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Keyword: science

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  • NASA Spacecraft Begins Final Approach to Big Asteroid Bennu

    08/21/2018 8:21:46 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    Space.com ^ | | August 20, 2018 06:40pm ET | Mike Wall,
    The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft began its final approach toward the big near-Earth asteroid Bennu on Friday (Aug. 17), NASA officials said. The milestone also marks the official start of OSIRIS-REx's "asteroid operations" mission phase, they added. OSIRIS-REx is still about 1.2 million miles (2 million kilometers) from Bennu and won't arrive in orbit around the 1,650-foot-wide (500 meters) space rock until Dec. 3. The $800 million OSIRIS-REx mission — whose name is short for Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer — launched on Sept. 8, 2016, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. If all goes according to...
  • YouTube Is Fighting against Scientific Inquiry and the Expansion of Human Knowledge

    08/20/2018 9:09:56 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 13 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | August 20, 2018 | William D. Balgord
    Editor's note: This column was co-authored by Calvin Beisner.Curiously, the mainstream media seem to have ignored the story, but it’s an important one. Buzzfeed reported August 7 that “YouTube Is Fighting Back Against Climate Misinformation.”As of July 9, “YouTube is now adding fact checks to videos that question climate change … as a part of its ongoing effort to combat the rampant misinformation and conspiratorial fodder on its platform.”But neither YouTube nor Wikipedia, the source of its “fact check,” is qualified to function as unassailable arbiter calling balls and strikes over what is or isn’t fact in any given field of...
  • The Universe Is Disappearing, And There's Nothing We Can Do To Stop It

    08/18/2018 8:10:32 PM PDT · by EdnaMode · 117 replies
    Forbes ^ | August 17, 2018 | Ethan Siegel
    It's been nearly a century since scientists first theorized that the Universe was expanding, and that the farther away a galaxy was from us, the faster it appears to recede. This isn't because galaxies are physically moving away from us, but rather because the Universe is full of gravitationally-bound objects, and the fabric of space that those objects reside in is expanding. But this picture, which held sway from the 1920s onward, has been recently revised. It's been only 20 years since we first realized that this expansion was speeding up, and that as time goes on, individual galaxies will...
  • Sprawling galaxy cluster found hiding in plain sight

    08/18/2018 5:42:48 PM PDT · by ETL · 31 replies
    MIT ^ | Aug 15, 2018 | Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office
    MIT scientists have uncovered a sprawling new galaxy cluster hiding in plain sight. The cluster, which sits a mere 2.4 billion light years from Earth, is made up of hundreds of individual galaxies and surrounds an extremely active supermassive black hole, or quasar. The central quasar goes by the name PKS1353-341 and is intensely bright — so bright that for decades astronomers observing it in the night sky have assumed that the quasar was quite alone in its corner of the universe, shining out as a solitary light source from the center of a single galaxy. But as the MIT...
  • Water-worlds are common: Exoplanets may contain vast amounts of water

    08/19/2018 12:03:41 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 31 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 8/17/18
    Scientists have shown that water is likely to be a major component of those exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) which are between two to four times the size of Earth. It will have implications for the search of life in our Galaxy. The work is presented at the Goldschmidt Conference in Boston. The 1992 discovery of exoplanets orbiting other stars has sparked interest in understanding the composition of these planets to determine, among other goals, whether they are suitable for the development of life. Now a new evaluation of data from the exoplanet-hunting Kepler Space Telescope and the Gaia mission...
  • Fireball caught on video in Alabama, Georgia

    08/18/2018 9:36:06 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 51 replies
    wvtm ^ | 08/18/2018
    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center says numerous people saw a very bright streak early Friday. A statement and video posted on Facebook says an analysis shows the meteor was first seen at an altitude of about 58 miles (93 kilometers) above rural Turkeytown, which is about 80 miles (129 kilometers) northeast of Birmingham. The office estimates a small asteroid about 6 feet (1.8 meters) in diameter then broke apart about 18 miles (29 kilometers) above the town of Oak Grove. It was at least 40 times as bright as the full moon at one point.
  • Everything Worth Knowing About ... Entanglement

    08/18/2018 9:28:36 PM PDT · by blam · 16 replies
    Discover Magazine ^ | 8-18-2018 | Devin Powell
    Up until last year, mathematician Peter Bierhorst had hoped the physicists he works with would fail. It was nothing personal. He just found their worldview a little disturbing. Like most physicists, his co-workers believe that our universe’s particles can influence each other using a sort of telepathy. Called “entanglement,” this connection allows two particles separated by vast distances to behave as a single entity. Both instantly react to something that happens to one of them. If you find this very weird and counterintuitive, you’re not alone. “I find this very weird and counterintuitive,” says Bierhorst, a postdoc at the National...
  • Supermassive black hole found in tiny galaxy, wowing researchers

    08/14/2018 6:31:50 PM PDT · by ETL · 36 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Aug 14, 2018 | Chris Ciaccia
    A supermassive black hole has been found at the center of a tiny galaxy, a rare find. What makes the discovery even more unique is that it has been located in an ultracompact dwarf galaxy, stunning researchers. The findings, published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, note that the galaxy Fornax UCD3 is part of a set called ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs), a very rare set of galaxies. "We have discovered a supermassive black hole in the center of Fornax UCD3," said the study's lead author, Anton Afanasiev, in a statement. "The black hole mass is 3.5 million...
  • Perseid Meteor Shower 2018 Peaks Tonight! How to Watch Online

    08/12/2018 12:12:54 PM PDT · by ETL · 30 replies
    Space.com ^ | August 12, 2018 | Elizabeth Howell, Space.com Contributor
    The peak of the summer's best meteor shower – the Perseids– peaks overnight tonight (Aug. 12), but you'll need good weather to see it. Just in case your night sky cloudy or hazy, you can check out the annual meteor shower on webcasts online by Slooh, NASA and the Virtual Telescope Project. You can watch the Perseid meteor shower webcast here, courtesy of the astronomy broadcast service Slooh. The 6-hour webcast begins at 5 p.m. EDT (2100 GMT) and you can watch it directly on Slooh.com. During the broadcast, viewers can use the hashtag #Slooh on social media to share...
  • Alien Life, Seth Shostak and SETI

    08/09/2018 11:10:20 AM PDT · by jcpryor · 16 replies
    The Chris Pryor Show ^ | 08/09/2018 | Chris Pryor
    Seth Shostak from SETI.org joined the Chris Pryor Show. Seth discussed current scientific attempts to discover intelligent life and the mechanisms involved in this search. Seth has a fantastic radio show of his own, Big Picture Science and it can be found here https://seti.org/education-outreach/big-picture-science-overview
  • Look Up! You Might Be Able to See a Green Comet Tonight

    08/07/2018 12:09:27 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | Aug 7, 2018 | By Temi Adebowale
    Viewing the Incredible Hulk with the naked eye may be a little tricky. Because the comet got so close to the sun and broke up from solar heat, it's rapidly fading from view. Also, thunderstorms and clouds in various parts of the country may impede vision of the comet. However, experts don't rule out another eruption in the coming days, which could make the comet brighter in the night sky. Additionally, Paul Chodas, the manager for the Center for Near-Earth Object Studies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, told Live Science the comet may be visible later in August ― around...
  • True Colors of Pluto and Its Largest Moon Charon

    08/07/2018 8:49:37 AM PDT · by ETL · 36 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Aug 2, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Marking the anniversary of New Horizons’ historic flight through the Pluto system on July 14, 2015, NASA released high-resolution natural-color images of Pluto and Charon. These color images result from refined calibration of data gathered by New Horizons’ Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC).The processing creates images that would approximate the colors that the human eye would perceive, bringing them closer to ‘true color’ than the images released near the encounter.The image of Pluto was taken as New Horizons zipped toward the dwarf planet and its moons on July 14, 2015, from a range of 22,025 miles (35,445 km).The striking features...
  • The Reengineering of the Common Tomato

    08/04/2018 4:25:08 PM PDT · by vannrox · 58 replies
    metallicman ^ | June 2018 | editorial staff
    Did you know that the tomato is a fruit? It actually is, you know. It certainly does not taste like one today. Though, it really used to. Tomatoes used to be sweet and delicious. That is, until the 1920’s in the United States. What in the world was going on then? All that damned “Progressivism” and trying to change America into a utopia ruled by a benevolent wealthy class. Nonsense. Oh, yes. They implemented the Federal income tax, and they banned alcohol and did all kinds of things (like giving the right to vote to woman) to turn the world...
  • HD 26965b: Super-Earth Found Just 16 Light-Years Away

    08/02/2018 1:53:13 PM PDT · by ETL · 75 replies
    Sci News ^ | July 30, 2018 | Natali Anderson
    Designated HD 26965b, the newly-detected alien world has a mass of 8.47 Earth masses and is located a mere 16 light-years away.This planet revolves around the bright K-class dwarf star HD 26965 once every 42.4 days.The host star is approximately 6.9 billion years old, has a mass about 78% of the Sun’s and a radius 87% as large.“HD 26965 is the primary of a very widely separated triple system. The other two companions are an M4 dwarf and a white dwarf,” said University of Florida astronomer Bo Ma and co-authors.“This star is a very bright metal poor star with an...
  • New radio telescope picks up mysterious signal from space

    08/02/2018 8:05:24 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 75 replies
    CNET ^ | July 31, 2018 9:57 PM PDT | Eric Mack
    A new radio telescope in Canada is doing its job picking up mysterious signals from deep space known as "fast radio bursts" (FRBs). The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) in British Columbia detected the first-ever FRB at frequencies below 700 MHz on July 25, a signal named FRB 180725A. As you might guess, FRBs are milliseconds-long bursts of radio emissions that come from some unknown source across the universe. They're one of the newer cosmic mysteries around, having been first detected only about a decade ago. Possible explanations include bursts from magnetars, exploding black holes, and yes, highly advanced...
  • Who discovered Mars, anyway? A look back at the history of the Red Planet

    07/31/2018 2:41:41 PM PDT · by ETL · 30 replies
    Space.com ^ | July 27, 2018 | Meghan Bartels, Space.com Senior Writer
    Who discovered Mars? That's a trick question: Because the planet is visible to the naked eye, humans have been watching our rusty neighbor for thousands of years, and there's no way to track down the name of the long-dead observer who first noticed its reddish glow. But just because we'll never be able to give that sharp-eyed human a name doesn't mean there's nothing interesting to learn about the history of observing Mars. That said, they didn't know what Mars was — it was just a bright light that didn't behave in quite the same way as the other bright...
  • CRISPR creates new species with single giant chromosome

    08/01/2018 5:09:32 PM PDT · by aimhigh · 32 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | 08/01/2018 | Antonio Regalado
    For at least the last 10 million years every yeast cell of the sort used to make beer or bread has had 16 chromosomes. But now—thanks to CRISPR technology and some DNA tinkerers in China—there are living yeast with just one. Genome organizer: We humans have our genes arranged on 46 chromosomes, yeast use 16, and there’s even a fern plant with 1260 of them. That’s just the way it is. And no one is quite sure why. The big one: Do we really need so many chromosomes? That’s what Zhogjun Qin and colleagues at the Key Laboratory of Synthetic...
  • I will convince you of a fact-based God in less than 1,500 words

    08/01/2018 10:24:15 AM PDT · by John Conlin · 73 replies
    personal blog and YouTube video ^ | 8/1/2018 | John Conlin
    Of Course God exists The Conlin Challenge - I will convince you of a fact-based, as opposed to a faith-based God in less than 1,500 words So you believe in science, eh? Excellent, so do I. One aspect of this scientific thinking is a laissez-faire attitude towards results. A person who truly follows a scientific-way of thinking shouldn’t care one way or the other about a certain experiment; they simply attempt to map reality and by definition must follow the facts wherever they lead. True followers of science are therefore immune to allowing personal biases to infect their professional thinking....
  • An Important Question for the Secular World: Why?

    08/01/2018 9:41:23 AM PDT · by Salvation · 9 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 07-31-18 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    An Important Question for the Secular World: Why? Msgr. Charles Pope • July 31, 2018 • One of the more common misunderstandings of the modern age—we might even call it a delusion— is confusing explanation with meaning. Using the scientific method and other empirical techniques, we have been able to explain many of the processes and mechanics of the natural world.To give explanation, however, is not the same as to ascribe meaning. To answer how things work is not the same as to answer why they do. Showing, for example, the wonderful symbiotic relationships involved in photosynthesis and describing...
  • Mars Terraforming Not Possible Using Present-Day Technology

    07/30/2018 3:44:07 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 90 replies
    NASA ^ | 7/30/18 | Bill Steigerwald / Nancy Jones
    July 30, 2018 RELEASE 18-13 Mars Terraforming Not Possible Using Present-Day Technology Science fiction writers have long featured terraforming, the process of creating an Earth-like or habitable environment on another planet, in their stories. Scientists themselves have proposed terraforming to enable the long-term colonization of Mars. A solution common to both groups is to release carbon dioxide gas trapped in the Martian surface to thicken the atmosphere and act as a blanket to warm the planet. However, Mars does not retain enough carbon dioxide that could practically be put back into the atmosphere to warm Mars, according to a new...