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FReeper advice needed (Vanity) Time to go?

Posted on 03/08/2009 12:28:19 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack

I've been here a while now, put a hundred into the kitty to keep the site up so I'm posting a vanity asking for some advice. My family are all liberals I don't dare ask them their opinion. So here goes.


My bride and I both see bad things coming. We are buying 5 acres in rural south central Tennessee on contract from a friend. No house, just partially wooded land. We've been saving our money and investing in heirloom seeds, long term food supply that we eat and rotate, and camping gear.

I weld and am a jack of all trades. My wife has only ever worked as a retail bookseller. We're healthy but a little overfed.

We are considering leaving our apartment in Indiana when our lease is up in May. It's in a college town of over 100K. and very liberal. The plan is to store what we don't need immediately ( we have storage available until July of next year.). Go down south, pitch a camp and dig a privy then go forth to find work. We will be planting a garden and trying to get a small cabin weathered in before winter. I want to build a home as we earn the cash money to buy materials and do this without a mortgage.


I would rather get out while I can and keep her safe than stay here and she feels the same way.


So here's the crux of the matter, I'm 48 former USAF and don't like to take rash jumps into the unknown. I have however been in the third world, started over with nothing twice and am with the love of my life. She is 30, brilliant, sews, weaves, throws pottery, and has the ability to build her own kiln.
She's a former LDS and fell right in line with my food storage quirks not to mention she's a dead shot with everything I've put in her hands.
She thinks that pioneering will be an adventure. I know it will be hard work. Her parents have told us they admire our courage and want to know when to expect grandchildren. ( Sorry gonna have to wait Mom )


FRiends I'm worried I'm missing something. I like the benefits of civilization like hot showers and flush toilets. But being out of the cities when they do go wonky holds more appeal.


I welcome your comments.


TOPICS: Agriculture; Miscellaneous; Outdoors; Society
KEYWORDS: bolthole; planb
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Except for the land at $250.00 a month we're debt free. We have enough food for about six months and a little bit of cash for more staples and two vehicles paid for and in excellent repair. Ok the plan is to:

Simplify and get rid of excess stuff. (maybe make a few bucks)

Head south and set up camp. (got tents and plenty of gear)

Get water and electric running. (now at edge of lot line.)

Find work. (I really don't think this will be a problem, we work hard and have skills)

Plant a garden

Build a small cabin. (with money we don't have yet before snow falls)

Build a house for ourselves, do metalwork, pottery and weaving for sale and trade with work on the side.

I think it can work but I might be missing something. I could use some advice. Thanks.

1 posted on 03/08/2009 12:28:19 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: LucyT

Any opinions?


2 posted on 03/08/2009 12:29:42 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Our summers down here in TN have been brutal lately... and the mosquitoes... D’oh !


3 posted on 03/08/2009 12:33:13 PM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (~"This is what happens when you find a stranger in the Alps !"~~)
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To: fieldmarshaldj

So we better get some deet for the mosquitoes then.


4 posted on 03/08/2009 12:35:29 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: WhirlwindAttack
If you're doing it because it's your dream (which I would understand, I am in Indiana also and would love to move out to the country), go for it. If you're doing it because you think society is going to collapse into chaos and you want to get off the grid, I think it's unlikely. Possible, but unlikely. And if everything collapses, do you really think you can get far enough out that two people can defend a cabin fortress? Not unless you're considering Alaska as the destination.

If you want to move and have the means, now is the time. but do it because you'd enjoy the simple country life, not because you think we're heading towards Mad Max. Remove the Mad Max scenario, and make your decision.
5 posted on 03/08/2009 12:35:31 PM PDT by mysterio
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To: WhirlwindAttack
My humble thought on this... I would get the money and material for building a proper house first. You don't want to live in a tent/camp for more than a few weeks.

Before moving out of your current home, I'd think you ought to have a proper roof over your head ready at your new destination.

6 posted on 03/08/2009 12:36:01 PM PDT by SolidWood (Palin: "In Alaska we eat therefore we hunt.")
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To: WhirlwindAttack; Gabz; gardengirl; Diana in Wisconsin; girlangler; SunkenCiv; nw_arizona_granny; ...

Garden - needs advice ping


7 posted on 03/08/2009 12:36:55 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Buy firearms and ammo.


8 posted on 03/08/2009 12:38:17 PM PDT by stockpirate (A people unwilling to use violent force to defend liberty deserves the tyrant that rules them SP)
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To: WhirlwindAttack

You can often find cheap used building supplies at Habitat for Humanity Restore locations.
http://www.habitat.org/cd/env/restore_detail.aspx?place=83


9 posted on 03/08/2009 12:38:59 PM PDT by posterchild (Endowed by my Creator with certain inalienable rights.)
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Sounds like you’re both OK with it, and actually might enjoy it, so no problems there.

Setting yourself up for WTSHTF but being dependent upon electricity is a weak spot.

You may want to investigate what the jurisdiction over this property might have to say about your plans and living arrangements, too. Digging a privvy isn’t going to fly in many places.

Other than that, it might be a good idea to have employment there before you make the leap.


10 posted on 03/08/2009 12:39:33 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: WhirlwindAttack

You are smart. I think you have a little time to build a house there before you move, though. Maybe a year. Don’t stress yourself out getting everything ready at once.


11 posted on 03/08/2009 12:39:42 PM PDT by lookout88 (.combat officer's dad, Socialism is slavery)
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To: mysterio
I do feel inspired by events, but not driven by them. Our dream is to be somewhere we can do things with our skills and simplify. And make a safe place to raise kids.

If it comes to Mad Max we're all stuffed. I'm looking at it like a phase that has to pass. Or until the big guy upstairs relieves me and has me quit my post.

12 posted on 03/08/2009 12:40:22 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Initial thoughts:

I think your ability to work and earn in your remote location could well be hampered by a lack of living quarters. I think you should be considering trailer or mfd home, lots of which are available used, cheap, etc;

I would investigate what it will REALLY cost to get power & sewer or septic to your homesite [eg; center of your lot] Power: Can be an astronomical number. Just investigate.

I would not shun taking on medium grade debt the way you seem to be talking about it. OTOH, you seem to be talking about moving to an area where there might be none, zero work.

I can understand your distaste for where you are now. I am not sure jumping into the reality you are contemplating will make life better for you and yours. Nobody’s forcing you to interact with hordes of liberals. In your rural paradise, starting with nothing, you’ll be forced to deal with all the things you’ll be forced to deal with.


13 posted on 03/08/2009 12:41:40 PM PDT by Attention Surplus Disorder (Mr. Bernanke, have you started working on your book about the second GREATER depression?")
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To: WhirlwindAttack

You are jumping the gun.

Why live in such third world conditions in the U.S. when you can move to a third world country and live in much better conditions compared to how you plan to live in the U.S.?


14 posted on 03/08/2009 12:42:04 PM PDT by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Did anyone mention to buy firearms?


15 posted on 03/08/2009 12:44:52 PM PDT by stockpirate (A people unwilling to use violent force to defend liberty deserves the tyrant that rules them SP)
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To: WhirlwindAttack

I don’t have any advice, just to wish you and your lovely lady the very best of the Lord’s blessings. Take care and stay blessed.


16 posted on 03/08/2009 12:45:51 PM PDT by spetznaz (Nuclear-tipped Ballistic Missiles: The Ultimate Phallic Symbol)
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Look into a windmill. They are expensive but you will no longer have to be on the grid and have to pay or depend on others for electricity.


17 posted on 03/08/2009 12:45:53 PM PDT by md2576 (Power Corrupts: Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely.)
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To: WhirlwindAttack; Calpernia; Fred Nerks; null and void; pissant; george76; PhilDragoo; Candor7; ...
Any opinions?

FReeper advice needed.

18 posted on 03/08/2009 12:45:55 PM PDT by LucyT (Boycott the economy. Buy nothing but food, shelter, and fuel.)
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To: stockpirate

got it covered.


19 posted on 03/08/2009 12:46:31 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Better to stay where you are, arm yourselves, and WTSHTF take what you need from all those liberal college types, who’ll be running around waving their little spaghetti arms begging you for protection.


20 posted on 03/08/2009 12:46:33 PM PDT by Capn Nickerson
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To: WhirlwindAttack

“o down south, pitch a camp and dig a privy then go forth to find work. We will be planting a garden and trying to get a small cabin weathered in before winter. I want to build a home as we earn the cash money to buy materials and do this without a mortgage.”

Check your state and county codes....be sure you can build on your land, or at least camp on it. Here, we can only camp for less than 6mos of the year and a septic tank runs about 20 grand, if you can get it.


21 posted on 03/08/2009 12:49:09 PM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: md2576
Look into a windmill. They are expensive but you will no longer have to be on the grid and have to pay or depend on others for electricity.

The land is a great solar site we wanted to set some PV panels and a windmill as we could afford to.

22 posted on 03/08/2009 12:50:31 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: mysterio; WhirlwindAttack
...you think society is going to collapse into chaos and you want to get off the grid, I think it's unlikely. Possible, but unlikely. And if everything collapses, do you really think you can get far enough out that two people can defend a cabin fortress? Not unless you're considering Alaska as the destination.

There's wisdom in mysterio's words... One of the historical reasons for towns and villages was people banding together to protect each other. Finding like minded people might be a challenge - but a worthwhile one.

23 posted on 03/08/2009 12:50:33 PM PDT by GOPJ (Obama needs adoration to prop up his empty suit. He's open to manipulation by professional thugs.)
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To: WhirlwindAttack
Even a small one room shack is better than a tent after about a week.

Just you and your wife I imagine you could put together a 200 sq foot shack/home fairly easy. 10X10 bedroom/living area. The rest broken up into bathroom and kitchen.

For example:


24 posted on 03/08/2009 12:50:59 PM PDT by Domandred (Hope is the first step on the road to disappointment.)
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To: WhirlwindAttack
Build a small cabin. (with money we don't have yet before snow falls)

What is the plan B if you can't build a cabin before snow falls? I've seen cabins built within a week, but with 10-15 people working. You two may not have enough manpower to work with heavy materials, and not enough experience to organize the work optimally. I also read that you plan to work for someone else during this time...

Could it be that a trailer instead of a cabin is a better solution, especially if you rent it? You'd need a good deal of money, and a year, to build a permanent house. I don't know what prices in TN might be, but in CA you probably need $200,000 to have just bare necessities - foundation, walls, roof, water, septic, and likely some driveway.

This is a standard problem with land - it costs so little exactly because you need to pour plenty of cash into it before it becomes usable. I know people who, instead of ordering the house built, decided to build one themselves. It took them at least 20 years to get to some semblance of completeness, and by then pieces of it started falling off. To find out what costs you will be facing you need to talk to a local architect (since you can't build anything anyway without plans prepared and signed by a licensed architect.) Also you'll need to research the soil at the lot because the foundation has to be built accordingly, and in some places you can't get a permit without such a research. You also need to have water investigated, because a well is probably your only source of water. Test the water sample in a lab for chemical and biological contaminants.

Another option, of course, is to just buy land with some house on it, already built. This will cost you more, but you take no risk on construction. This depends on getting a mortgage, which might be tough these days, considering that you will need a new job when 10% are unemployed...

25 posted on 03/08/2009 12:51:47 PM PDT by Greysard
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To: WhirlwindAttack
Only you can answer the question, so go with your gut.

If you need affirmation from someone else, you may find it very lonely when the reality sets in.

I wish you the best of luck, whatever your decision.

26 posted on 03/08/2009 12:52:00 PM PDT by Madame Dufarge
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Before you go, make sure you have enough stockpiles. You will need a source of water that is reliable and sanitary. I cannot over stress sanitation issues. If it is a well, how will it be operated, electric, propane, or diesel? Hand pump? How will you dispose of your refuse? Septic system? These are facts of modern life that get taken for granted, but without them, you will quickly learn why life expectancy was low in previous eras.

Next your will need to know what is allowed by the local ordinances. Will livestock be allowed? Have you considered picking up a cheap RV in fairly good condition while you are building your permanent dwelling? Are there places of employment nearby? Do you know anyone nearby?

All of that aside, there is a wealth of knowledge out there. Try “Country wisdom and know how” and “The encyclopedia of country living”. Both of these resources offer good advice, insights, and potential pitfalls of primitive living. I wish you luck.


27 posted on 03/08/2009 12:53:54 PM PDT by gracie1
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To: WhirlwindAttack
We are considering leaving our apartment in Indiana when our lease is up in May... Find work. (I really don't think this will be a problem, we work hard and have skills)...

Find the work FIRST.

Rural life is "neat" because there aren't any people around to bother you.

But, at the same time, because there aren't any people around, there is much less opportunity for economic activity - in really rural places, there aren't any other people at all with whom you can engage in commerce.


She is 30... Her parents have told us they admire our courage and want to know when to expect grandchildren. ( Sorry gonna have to wait Mom )

Start making the babies NOW.

In just a few short years [like as early as when she turns 35], her womb will start going barren, and the window of opportunity will be lost forever.

At this point, EVERYTHING has to be subservient to the making of babies.

28 posted on 03/08/2009 12:53:56 PM PDT by KayEyeDoubleDee
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Does it hail there? I hear hail will damage solar panels. Just a thought. Also, If you decide, you can sell back power you don’t use to the local power company.


29 posted on 03/08/2009 12:56:39 PM PDT by md2576 (Power Corrupts: Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely.)
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To: AuntB

Thanks Aunt B, Septic will cost about 3K. I can dig a privy and camp as long as I want there. A travel trailer is an option also.


30 posted on 03/08/2009 12:57:01 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: mysterio

I would echo the sentiment about the Mad Max scenario. If society *did* descend into chaos, you would probably be better off in your little town in Indiana than out in the wilderness in TN.

Save your money until you can afford to build a small cabin/house/whatever, build it, line up jobs, and *then* move. Moving beforehand is just asking for an awful lot of grief (and way more stress on your marriage than you probably want - especially since it sounds like you just got married).


31 posted on 03/08/2009 12:59:19 PM PDT by OH4life
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To: LucyT

Drill for water and bring in electric power.


32 posted on 03/08/2009 1:02:51 PM PDT by frog in a pot (Is there a definition of "domestic enemies" as used in federal oaths, or is that just lip service?)
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Looks like you’ve checked into the necessities. A travel trailer is a good option. I lived in a 5th wheel for a year, in between locating. It was great...get one with a rear bath, more privacy...you can pick up good used ones cheap. And if you don’t like it there...leave!


33 posted on 03/08/2009 1:03:06 PM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Parts of Tennessee experience tornadoes. Be sure to check out the area where you plan on settling so you don’t wind up in Kansas.


34 posted on 03/08/2009 1:03:58 PM PDT by Carley (President Obama ~ Leaving No Tax Cheat Behind)
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To: WhirlwindAttack; LucyT
Do it.

Just make sure you have a way to get along for a while if you both lose your jobs.

Put up LOTS of firewood and get a good stove that will hold a load for 12 hours ( we used a barrel stove kit, no other stove will hold such a load.)

I did it in 1984, with wifey and two kids aged 5 and 6. Rented homes in the winter worked three consecutive summers to build our home, and the family camped on site with a Swift Family Robinson tent platform, and a tow in Pop Up Camper for the kids bedroom.

we had nightoly campfire, daily swims in a lake 1/4 mile away. We toughed it out.

It will test your relationship, but you will thrive if you have genuine love for each other.If not, one of you will feel slighted and leave.

My kids still speak of those days as the favorites of their childhood.

We moved into our new home in November of 1987.

When yo buld, make sure you have a full concrete foundation, either basement or slab. That way you will have good equity inn the future.

Have your power and well working before you move on to the site.

If you set up a pioneer style tent, do so on a raised wooden platform, and and make sure you have a fly canvas set up to cobver the whole tent, that makes it workable, anything elese is too tiring in the long run because you can't rest at night well when the weather turns rainy or too hot. we had running water,propane heater,propane stove with oven electricty and telephone right into our "prospector" tent which was 12 by 14 feet with 4 foot side walls, 12 oz white canvas with a 20 by 20 foot fly, it all cost us 600 dollars at the time. Weran the stove and the water onto an 4 x 8 porch covered by the fly.

Go for it, make sure you have a good base to work from though, and the time goes fast until the first snow flies.

35 posted on 03/08/2009 1:05:23 PM PDT by Candor7 (I love Lucy : http://www.fiftiesweb.com/lucy.htm ( Those were better days))
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To: WhirlwindAttack

You can probably get set up in a used trailer pretty cheap.


36 posted on 03/08/2009 1:06:01 PM PDT by ebshumidors
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To: WhirlwindAttack
We are buying 5 acres in rural south central Tennessee on contract from a friend

Never buy on contract, especially from "a friend". Good way to part on not so friendly terms. Save for cash only purchase. Why go into debt when you are practically out of debt. You always have to include the worst case scenario..the unknown-health etc.

Build a house for ourselves, do metalwork, pottery and weaving for sale and trade with work on the side.

I don't mean to be a "downer" but there are tens of thousands (maybe many more no figures) of people with the same skills in my rural (vacationland) state. There are too many "artisans" who just got by before these poor economic times. What level does it really become a business and not just a hobby. Building supplies are up, go figure; even though builders (many of of work) of all skill levels are in heavy competition in their "contracted" prices. Logs have to season as well before a building is elevated, so that takes time with your own harvest. Not a "before winter" picture of reality.

Perhaps rent with option to buy, caretaker with quarters provided. Believe it or not, people do take care of light houses. Might need references. Flea markets bring income with little down. Popular as well. Are you anywhere near the World's Longest Yard Sale? The US 127 Corridor Sale? But "fun" buying will be less abundant with cash being held tight to the chest. No matter what income level.

South central Tennessee would not be my choice, but you go where you feel most comfortable. A support base.

Just my opinion. I am sure all the above have been under on your list made up of Positives and Negatives. If it "feels" right with no reservations..like asking others for their opinions ;), then go for it.

Good luck.

37 posted on 03/08/2009 1:06:51 PM PDT by fight_truth_decay
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To: Madame Dufarge
Only you can answer the question, so go with your gut. If you need affirmation from someone else, you may find it very lonely when the reality sets in. I wish you the best of luck, whatever your decision.

I'm weighing my options and know the decision rests firmly on my shoulders. I would like more time and money first. Move forward in stages. I'm just want what is best for my family.

38 posted on 03/08/2009 1:08:33 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: Greysard; WhirlwindAttack

Echoes my thinking exactly.

There are LOTS of foreclosures in TN, and many are owned by the USDA.

http://www.resales.usda.gov/

You could spend $30K getting power to a patch of land, performing perc tests, soil test for a foundation...... before you pour your first bucket of concrete. Easily. VERY easily.

I’d have to say....in the current environment, you can buy a home so darn close to what it would cost to build...that unless you had serious resources on the ground, in place, and experience building; it would be foolish to build.


39 posted on 03/08/2009 1:08:38 PM PDT by Attention Surplus Disorder (Mr. Bernanke, have you started working on your book about the second GREATER depression?")
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To: WhirlwindAttack

I would strongly advise spend the cash and get a septic system put in. A housing option would be a small pre-manufactured log home. All materials are delivered to your site. You can choose to put it all together yourself, or contract out the parts that are over your ability.


40 posted on 03/08/2009 1:08:51 PM PDT by gracie1
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To: WhirlwindAttack

She was a level-headed dancer on the road to alcohol
And I was just a soldier on my way to Montreal
Well she pressed her chest against me
About the time the juke box broke
Yeah, she gave me a peck on the back of the neck
And these are the words she spoke

[Chorus:]
Blow up your TV throw away your paper
Go to the country, build you a home
Plant a little garden, eat a lot of peaches
Try an find Jesus on your own

Well, I sat there at the table and I acted real naive
For I knew that topless lady had something up her sleeve
Well, she danced around the bar room and she did the hoochy-coo
Yeah she sang her song all night long, tellin’ me what to do

[Chorus]

Well, I was young and hungry and about to leave that place
When just as I was leavin’, well she looked me in the face
I said “You must know the answer.”
“She said, “No but I’ll give it a try.”
And to this very day we’ve been livin’ our way
And here is the reason why

We blew up our TV threw away our paper
Went to the country, built us a home
Had a lot of children, fed ‘em on peaches
They all found Jesus on their own!

John Prine


41 posted on 03/08/2009 1:09:53 PM PDT by outofsalt ("If History teaches us anything it's that history rarely teaches us anything")
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Stay at work another month or so and buy whatever junker trailer or motor home that you can get away with parking on your lot for a year or two.

There are plenty of old beat up motor homes (even if you have to tow it to your lot) and trailers that would go for next to nothing (and are worth about that much), the advantage is that they already are set up as a glorified shack with a propane stove and sleeping quarters and such.

That and one or two of those tent like temporary carports will give you working and storage space out of the rain.

If you do use a tent, put it under one of those $160.00 carports and it will make the living much easier, you will have a dry tent and plenty of spillover room for cooking, sitting and working, and keeping your stuff dry.


42 posted on 03/08/2009 1:12:12 PM PDT by ansel12 (Romney (guns)"instruments of destruction with the sole purpose of hunting down and killing people")
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To: outofsalt
John Prine

LOL I was listening to that just the other day.

43 posted on 03/08/2009 1:16:19 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: WhirlwindAttack
As quick as possible build at least a one room cabin. Forget log etc and use regular material. A local saw mill operator might save you some money though. You want a good solid shelter built fast. A 12X16 would get you by till more money comes in. Don't skimp on insulation. Several warnings. If you plan to use a wood stove keep the chimney clean and burn only hard wood or coal in it. No soft wood like pine etc. That builds up tar in the chimney. If you plan to use kerosene be very careful you have plenty of ventilation. Carbon Monoxide is deadly but so is lack of oxygen. K-heaters require a lot of it. Get a good water source. If it is from a spring build a holding tank for the spring to feed into and use a shallow well pump.

Next is snakes. Depending on what part of Middle Tennessee you can expect to see Copperheads, Rattlesnakes, and in some places west of Nashville Cottonmouths. Learn what they look like and under the conditions you will be living {camping} be watchful. Something a person told me about snakes. To keep them away get a few cats. The cats remove their food source. Before you get the cabin built have a bug out plan ready for possible overnight or longer shelter. Our weather can get pretty darn rough with little warning especially in the summer months and tents go sailing off into the next county.

Have you thought about this instead? Buy a used travel trailer already set up with beds, stove, sink, etc? This would give you adequate shelter while building your permanent home.

I know a few people in East Tennessee where I live who live in cabins in remote areas. One of them uses solar panels for what little electricity he uses for creature comforts.

44 posted on 03/08/2009 1:21:21 PM PDT by cva66snipe ($.01 The current difference between the DEM's and GOP as well as their combined worth to this nation)
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To: WhirlwindAttack
www.avianflutalk.com is a Forum dedicated to surviving in troubled times. Yes, they do discuss when and where the Bird Flu is headed, although it isn't devoted to just the bird flu...They also have good tips on storing food, what to have on hand, and steps to take to survive in most any critical situation.

I think you'd get the best advice from that group.

sw

45 posted on 03/08/2009 1:21:33 PM PDT by spectre (Spectre's wife)
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Just a suggestion on housing:

Think ‘underground’ for many reasons, first of which is the advantage of concealment. Second, the insulation factor, warmer in the winter, cooler in the summer. Third, maintenance, no shingles to replace, no gutters to clean, none of that.

An interim method of acquiring underground housing on the cheap is to find yourself a used mobile home dealership, and look for one of the cheaper (i.e., older and visually less appealing) models, preferably a single wide with three bedrooms. After getting it moved on to your lot, keep the wheels on it while you find someone with a backhoe to dig yourself a nice deep hole that you can roll that rascal down into, leaving enough room on the side for a staircase from the front door to the surface.

Don’t just start dumping earth on top of your cheapo underground shelter, plan on building a framework of beams (4 x 4” thickness) that will rest on TOP of the mobile home to more evenly distribute the load of the earth that will eventually be used to fill in and cover up your humble abode.

You’ll need to think about the whole electric and plumbing issues, which may be a challenge, but are not insurmountable.

Basically what you’re doing is building a basement without a house, and your single wide mobile home is what you’re going to fill up the basement with.

I think what you’re doing is basically what I’m in the process of doing, although I am in what I like to call an ‘undisclosed secure location’, and I plan to be finished by the end of this year.

You’re making the right move. Ignore the naysayers. Go with your gut, that’s what the USAF taught you, I’m sure of that.

Good luck!

MKJ


46 posted on 03/08/2009 1:21:40 PM PDT by mkjessup (You're either with our Constitution, or you are with TKU ("The Kenyan Usurper"). CHOOSE!!!)
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To: WhirlwindAttack
The most sound advice you will ever receive was stated by mysterio. We came to exactly the same conclusion many years ago after following another doomsday scenario.
47 posted on 03/08/2009 1:22:01 PM PDT by Leonard210 (Tagline? We don't need no stinkin' tagliine.)
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To: WhirlwindAttack
Build yourself a steel home when you can.

I'm partial to these: Kodiak Steel Homes.

I wish I were at a point to build my own. Someday...

48 posted on 03/08/2009 1:25:56 PM PDT by IYAS9YAS (Obama - what you get when you mix Affirmative Action with the Peter Principle.)
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To: fight_truth_decay
I can weld and blacksmith. I make custom knives. I've worked as a general contractor. My friend I'm buying land from is a trusted saved my butt cover my back guy who's family treats us better than mine ever did, and her parents and sisters live in Memphis 2 hours away.
Support is there and I'm sure I could round up some free manpower from the LDS missionaries as long as I feed them.
City power and water and cable are to the lot line. I got the price of $800 for electric drop with a pole. Water will be trenched to the meter for another $500. Septic is around 4K with perk test included.
buildings under 200sq ft don't need a permit and we have house plans drawn up already. I still feel like I'm forgetting something. Thanks
49 posted on 03/08/2009 1:27:14 PM PDT by WhirlwindAttack
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To: WhirlwindAttack

Get a used travel trailer to use as temp housing and for storage!

Find a good church with some good peoplw down there and get to know them. No man )(or woman) is an island and you can find (and give) a lot of support and companionship in small churches..


50 posted on 03/08/2009 1:27:25 PM PDT by silverleaf (Freedom's just another word for "nothing left to lose")
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