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Agriculture (General/Chat)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Zika: update from Brazil: towering non-evidence

    02/06/2016 10:15:54 AM PST · by SubMareener · 6 replies
    Jon Rappaport's Blog ^ | February 4, 2016 | Jon Rappoport
    It is obvious that no significant connection between microcephaly and the Zika virus has been found. It's not even close. So far, therefore, there is absolutely no reason to trumpet an epidemic of Zika. Doing so is quite insane, by any reasonable standard. Here are the principal facts in the article (after which I'll comment): * As of January 30, 2016, 4,783 suspected cases of microcephaly were reported in Brazil. * Of those, 3,670 suspected cases of microcephaly, covering the entire country of Brazil, are being investigated. * Of those 3,670, 404 cases have been confirmed as microcephaly or "other...
  • St. Cloud [FL] homeowners find catfish in mailboxes

    02/03/2016 10:57:41 AM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    www.clickorlando.com ^ | Updated: 11:30 AM, February 03, 2016 | By Amanda Castro
    ST. CLOUD, Fla. - Several residents in Osceola County have found catfish in their mailboxes and yards, prompting questions whether it's a prank or something more serious. Maddison Fertic said she received an unusual delivery Monday morning when her postman discovered a large, dead catfish inside her mailbox. "I was honestly in shock because it doesn't make any sense," Fertic said. "It's just one of those things where it's, just, 'Why?'" Fertic said the fish was 12 inches long, and she had to use a stick to pull it out. "It looked like it could have been a live fish...
  • How Garden & Gun Magazine Defies Industry Slump

    02/03/2016 7:51:13 AM PST · by DUMBGRUNT · 19 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 1 feb 2016 | JEFFREY A. TRACHTENBERG
    Since it made its debut in April 2007, the publication has hewed to its own course, focusing on everything Southern from ham biscuits to bird-dog trainers... it remains tightly focused on food, drink, the land, travel, and the sporting life, including bird hunting and shotguns. Roughly 72% of subscribers live in the Southeast or Southwest... “Our audiences are very different,” said Sid Evans, the former editor-in-chief of Garden & Gun who now edits Southern Living. He noted that more than 90% of Southern Living’s subscribers are female. Women account for about 47% of Garden & Gun’s subscribers.... At a time...
  • Feral swine have Texas county at epicenter of hog wild battle

    01/05/2016 10:47:53 AM PST · by jazusamo · 35 replies
    Fox News ^ | January 5, 2016 | Perry Chiaramonte
    A county in Central Texas is winning the war on feral hogs one tail at a time. Caldwell County has become the Lone Star State's front line in the fight to curb the exploding population of the wild beasts, which cause millions of dollars in property and environmental damage every year. A volunteer task force has found success using a host of strategies including $5 tail bounties, helicopter hunts and smartphone-controlled corrals. "We're probably the most coordinated program in the state," Nick Dornak, founder of the county's Feral Hog Task Force, told FoxNews.com. In the two years since it was...
  • Exceptionally strong and lightweight new metal created [Reardon Metal?]

    12/23/2015 12:40:15 PM PST · by Red Badger · 62 replies
    phys.org ^ | December 23, 2015 | Provided by: University of California, Los Angeles
    At left, a deformed sample of pure metal; at right, the strong new metal made of magnesium with silicon carbide nanoparticles. Each central micropillar is about 4 micrometers across. Credit: UCLA Scifacturing Laboratory ============================================================================================================= A team led by researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has created a super-strong yet light structural metal with extremely high specific strength and modulus, or stiffness-to-weight ratio. The new metal is composed of magnesium infused with a dense and even dispersal of ceramic silicon carbide nanoparticles. It could be used to make lighter airplanes, spacecraft, and cars, helping to...
  • New way to make yeast hybrids may inspire new brews, biofuels

    12/04/2015 1:18:16 PM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    phys.org ^ | December 4, 2015 | by Terry Devitt & Provided by: University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Orange-colored galls, such as these pictured in 2010, from the beech tree forests of Patagonia have been found to harbor the yeast that makes lager beer possible. Five hundred years ago, in the age of sail and when the trans-Atlantic trade was just beginning, the yeast somehow made its way from Patagonia to the caves and monastery cellars of Bavaria where the first lager beers were fermented. University of Wisconsin-Madison Genetics Professor Chris Todd Hittinger and colleagues have discovered a quick and efficient way to fuse different strains of yeast to make hybrids similar to the lager beer hybrid, an...
  • More efficient way of converting ethanol to a better alternative fuel [BUTANOL]

    12/04/2015 12:48:06 PM PST · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    phys.org ^ | December 3, 2015 | by Peter Iglinski & Provided by: University of Rochester
    Ethanol, which is produced from corn, is commonly-used as an additive in engine fuel as a way to reduce harmful emissions and scale back U.S. reliance on foreign oil. But since ethanol is an oxygenated fuel, its use results in a lower energy output, as well as increased damage to engines via corrosion. But now a research team, led by William Jones at the University of Rochester, has developed a series of reactions that results in the selective conversion of ethanol to butanol, without producing unwanted byproducts. "Butanol is much better than ethanol as an alternative to gasoline," said Jones,...
  • Cannabis increases the noise in your brain

    12/03/2015 2:19:25 PM PST · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | December 3, 2015 | Provided by: Elsevier
    Cannabis indica. Credit: Wikipedia ========================================================================================================================================= Several studies have demonstrated that the primary active constituent of cannabis, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC), induces transient psychosis-like effects in healthy subjects similar to those observed in schizophrenia. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not clear. A new study, published in the journal Biological Psychiatry, reports that ∆9-THC increases random neural activity, termed neural noise, in the brains of healthy human subjects. The findings suggest that increased neural noise may play a role in the psychosis-like effects of cannabis. "At doses roughly equivalent to half or a single joint, ∆9-THC produced psychosis-like effects and increased neural...
  • Oldest Peach Pits Found in China [ > 2 million yrs old ]

    12/02/2015 11:43:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Tuesday December 1, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    The oldest peach pits have been found near a bus station in China, according to a new study that sheds new light on the little-known evolutionary history of the fruit. The eight fossilized peach endocarps, or pits, date back more than two and a half million years. They were found by Tao Su, associate professor at Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, when road construction near his house in Kunming, capital of Yunnan in southwest China, exposed a rock outcrop from the late Pliocene. Preserved within the Pliocene layers, the fossils looked "strikingly modern," according to Su. With colleague Peter Wilf, a...
  • Demand for farm loans surges amid low crop, cattle prices

    12/01/2015 11:56:56 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Dec. 1, 2015 2:54 PM EST | Roxana Hegeman
    The nation's net farm income is the lowest since 2002, and with another year of low commodity prices, demand for agriculture loans is surging as farmers struggle to make ends meet. [...] Agricultural lenders say they are seeing people who had operating loans requesting larger ones, and some who had operated with cash are borrowing money. But it's unlikely the current run on loans will be anything like the farm credit crisis of the 1980s, when those who survived the significant year-to-year losses were without large debts to repay. ...
  • Amish.biz The Amish are online, onscreen, and multiplying fast

    11/28/2015 7:08:09 PM PST · by daniel1212 · 38 replies
    © Aeon Media Pty ^ | 20 November, 2015 | Kevin Williams
    The Amish are online, onscreen, and multiplying fast. In their battle with modernity, it’s tough to say who’s winning I’ve probably visited more Amish settlements than anyone. Who would venture out to the most remote corners of Montana, Maine and South Texas if they didn’t happen to be a student of Amish culture? Perhaps a peddler of pots and pans; many Amish cooks, I have noticed, gradually gave up their cast iron for stainless steel in the past 50 years... In my 25 years exploring Amish communities, I’ve witnessed changes that would be unnoticeable to the average outsider... To the...
  • The Miracle of Squanto’s Path to Plymouth

    11/27/2015 4:42:05 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 39 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 11-24-15 | Eric Metaxas
    The Thanksgiving tale of the Pilgrims and the Indian has an astonishing, less well-known back story. The story of how the Pilgrims arrived at our shores on the Mayflower—and how a friendly Patuxet native named Squanto showed them how to plant corn, using fish as fertilizer—is well-known. But Squanto’s full story is not, as National Geographic’s new Thanksgiving miniseries, “Saints & Strangers,” shows. That might be because some details of Squanto’s life are in dispute. The important ones are not, however. His story is astonishing, even raising profound questions about God’s role in American history. Every Thanksgiving we remember that,...
  • The Cruel Secret Behind Tennessee's Walking Horses [Big Lick Only-17min video]

    11/26/2015 2:40:07 AM PST · by huldah1776 · 7 replies
    SPS Dateline [YouTube-Journeyman] ^ | September 2014 | Ashley Hamer (research)
    Walk of Shame: How Tennessee's famous high-stepping horse became the latest animal-cruelty scandal
  • Biologists induce flatworms to grow heads and brains of other species

    11/24/2015 12:49:31 PM PST · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 24, 2015 | Provided by: Tufts University
    Tufts biologists induced one species of flatworm -- G. dorotocephala, top left -- to grow heads and brains characteristic of other species of flatworm, top row, without altering genomic sequence. Examples of the outcomes can be seen in the bottom row of the image. Credit: Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology, School of Arts and Sciences, Tufts University. ============================================================================================================ Biologists at Tufts University have succeeded in inducing one species of flatworm to grow heads and brains characteristic of another species of flatworm without altering genomic sequence. The work reveals physiological circuits as a new kind of epigenetics - information existing...
  • The Greatest Giblet Gravy Recipe (Mine).....

    11/23/2015 11:20:20 AM PST · by Red Badger · 80 replies
    Myself | 11/23/2015 | Red Badger
    Red Badger's Great Giblet Gravy 1 pkg giblets from the turkey (Liver, Neck, Gizzard and Heart) 1 16oz pkg chicken livers 1 16oz pkg chicken gizzards 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper 2 cubes chicken bouillon 2 stalks celery, diced 2 medium yellow onions, diced 1 quart hot water (to begin) 2 cans chicken broth OR 1 can and 1 1/2 cups turkey drippings 6 hard-boiled eggs, diced 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1/2 cup COLD milk Directions: In a large pot, 4qt or similar, boil ALL the giblets, salt, pepper, bouillon, celery, onion and water for 1...
  • U.S. Cattle Futures Slide Limit-Down, Sending Hog Prices Sharply Lower

    11/21/2015 11:40:43 AM PST · by jjotto · 32 replies
    NASDAQ ^ | November 16, 2015 | Kelsey Gee
    [Excerpt and link] ...Live-cattle futures for December fell 3 cents, or 2.3%, to $1.27675 a pound, after declining 3.1% over the past week on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Cattle futures for February were also limit-down, dropping 2.3% to $1.2965 a pound. Feeder-cattle futures for November fell 2.775 cents to $1.7230 a pound. Other feeder-cattle futures were limit-down... ...December lean hogs fell 3 cents, or 5.5%, to 51.80 cents a pound, a fresh six-year low...
  • Experts Say Viral Cucumber Prank Can Be Harmful To Cats

    11/19/2015 4:08:58 AM PST · by Biggirl · 92 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | November 19, 2015 | Breitbart News
    LOS ANGELES, Nov. 18 (UPI) — A viral trend involving placing cucumbers behind cats has been deemed cruel and harmful behavior by some experts.
  • This Is Why We Can't Have Anything Nice

    11/16/2015 12:02:20 PM PST · by blueunicorn6 · 35 replies
    A lecture | 11/16/2015 | blueunicorn6
    I had just walked through the front door when I heard those words that send chills up the spine of every man. "This is why we can't have anything nice!" It was my wife. I put the mail on the stairs while I tried to figure out if I could make it back out the front door without her hearing me. I knew I couldn't. The woman can hear what I think, for crying out loud. Now, I had to determine who did it while I was still unseen. There are always three likely culprits: 1. Me 2. The Boy...
  • Obit - Ruth Hartman, original member of All-American Girls Baseball League

    11/11/2015 6:21:40 AM PST · by pa_dweller
    Reading Eagle ^ | 11/11/15 | Dan Kelly
    Ruth A. Hartman, an accomplished local sheep breeder known locally and nationally as an original member of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, has died in Reading Hospital of injuries suffered over the weekend after her SUV struck a deer in Oley Township. - See more at: http://www.readingeagle.com/news/article/champion-sheep-breeder-from-limekiln-remains-critical-after-weekend-accident#sthash.ih8zyVSB.dpuf
  • Ancient British tree undergoing 'sex-change'

    11/02/2015 11:36:43 AM PST · by Red Badger · 87 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 2, 2015 | Staff
    A British tree thought to be up to 5,000 years old has started to change sex, a "rare and unusual" phenomenon not fully understood by scientists, a botanist said Monday. The Fortingall Yew, in Perthshire, central Scotland has for hundreds of years been recorded as male, but has recently begun sprouting berries, suggesting that at least part of the tree is changing gender. "It's a rare occurence ... rare and unusual and not fully understood," said Max Coleman of Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, who spotted the berries. "It's thought that there's a shift in the balance of hormone-like compounds that...
  • Massive 'crack in the Earth' opens up suddenly in Wyoming's Bighorn Mountains

    10/30/2015 8:21:11 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 80 replies
    www.mnn.com ^ | By: Bryan Nelson | October 30, 2015, 12:40 a.m
    The crack appears like a miniature Grand Canyon up close. (Photo: Randy Becker/Facebook) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A dramatic crack has suddenly formed in the foothills of Wyoming's Bighorn Mountains that measures an impressive 750 yards long and 50 yards wide. It was discovered recently by surprised backcountry hunters who travel frequently to the area in search of game. First reported by SNS Outfitter & Guides, a hunting company, on their Facebook page, the mammoth chasm appeared over the course of just a couple of weeks. It's an impressive example of just how quickly very large geological events can occur under the right...
  • Researchers compare 'natural' mosquito repellents to DEET

    10/28/2015 12:46:26 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 96 replies
    phys.org ^ | 10/28/2015 | by Josh Lancette &Provided by: Entomological Society of America
    Every summer while preparing for long weekends at our family cabin in the north woods of Minnesota, we'd face the same dilemmas. What food should we bring? Is SPF 50 sunscreen enough protection? And, most importantly, which mosquito repellent should we buy? If we picked the wrong kind, we'd be opening ourselves up to evenings of constant swatting by the campfire and nights of uncontrollable itching. Protection from the unofficial state bird, the mosquito, was not something to take lightly. However, while itchy limbs might be annoying, Minnesotans don't have much to worry about from mosquitoes, except for the occasional...
  • First Gene-Edited Dogs Reported in China

    10/20/2015 6:59:45 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | 10/19/2015 | By Antonio Regalado
    Beagles named Hercules, at left, and Tiangou are the worlds first gene-edited dogs. =============================================================================================================================== Mans best friend is now his newest genetic engineering project. Scientists in China say they are the first to use gene editing to produce customized dogs. They created a beagle with double the amount of muscle mass by deleting a gene called myostatin. The dogs have more muscles and are expected to have stronger running ability, which is good for hunting, police (military) applications, Liangxue Lai, a researcher with the Key Laboratory of Regenerative Biology at the Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, said in an...
  • Alaska to Resident Hunters: Go Shoot Musk Oxen Before They Drown

    10/19/2015 6:12:46 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 36 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 18 Oct 2015 | Nicole Mormann
    Rather than let the herds drown or starve, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game opened the season on Thursday, giving hunters the go-ahead to start harvesting herds found on drifting ice floes in waters adjacent to Nunivak and Nelson islands.
  • Freeman Dyson's Remarkable View of the Future Is Worth Your Time To Examine

    10/16/2015 7:15:36 AM PDT · by Steely Tom · 12 replies
    Speech at Boston University ^ | 5 November 2005 | Freeman Dyson
    A couple of days ago, there was a quite successful thread here entitled Top Physicist Freeman Dyson: Obama 'Took the Wrong Side' on Climate Change. As an admirer and follower of Professor Dyson, I enjoyed it greatly, and posted several items on it. That thread got me interested in Dyson once again, and in looking for Dyson material I found this remarkable lecture on YouTube. I believe it is worth anyone's time to listen to in its entirety. At a little more than an hour in length, it is a bit long for one sitting, but I am sure most...
  • Oregon Farmer Wins Pumpkin Contest as Gourds Weigh Less in Drought

    10/14/2015 11:01:43 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | Oct 12, 2015 | Lisa Fernandez, Bob Redell and Josh Keppel
    An Oregon farmer won the annual 42nd Half Moon Bay pumpkin weigh-off on Monday, when his gourd clocked in at just shy of a ton. Steve Daletas' pumpkin weighed 1,969 pounds, which means he'll take home about $11,000 and his wife will get to remodel their kitchen in Pleasant Hill, Oregon, he joked, downplaying the role he had in his big win. "Maybe we were in the right spot," Daletas said, noting that Oregon isn't suffering from the severe drought that California has over the last four years. "I feel good." Ron and Karen Root from Citrus Heights, California who...
  • Report: U.S most obese in the world, fattest kids by a mile, tops for poor teen health

    10/13/2015 11:33:37 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 84 replies
    www.washingtonexaminer.com ^ | 10/13/15 2:16 PM | By Paul Bedard
    The United States is home to the most obese population in the Americas, Asia and Europe, has the fattest kids by a wide margin and is tops in poor health for teenagers, according to the latest measure of well-being from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In its "How's Life 2015?" report released Tuesday, the United States is also among the nations with underperforming students and second in murders and assaults. But the U.S. shines when it comes to personal wealth and even the number of rooms in our homes, said the organization that charts the personal and economic...
  • Everyone in China Is Wearing Plastic Plants on Their Heads and Nobody Knows Why

    10/08/2015 6:54:59 AM PDT · by bgill · 75 replies
    yahoo ^ | Oct. 7, 2015 | Jilhan Forbes
    Hip college students and grown folks alike are scratching their clover-laden heads wondering who got the idea to walk around with Frances Hodgson Burnetts Secret Garden sprouting from their tresses. I think this comes more from Western culture, one student told the Times. Its fun, but I guess its also about protecting the environment, to show that you care about nature, a peddler of the green headgear offered (which is interesting considering the country is one of the biggest polluters of out planet). But probably the best explanation came from a 24-year-old medical student, who best sums up how the...
  • Marina Man Arrested for Armed Robbery, Reveals His Own Identity (Used Medical Pot Card to Rob Pot)

    10/07/2015 10:19:29 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 15 replies
    KSBW ^ | Oct 06, 2015
    On Monday night, Ricardo Antonio Lopez-Campos, 27, of Marina, robbed a medical marijuana vendor and ordered some cannabis. Unfortunately for the robber, the vendor required that the purchaser show a copy of his identification and medical marijuana certification to them before agreeing to the transaction. Lopez-Campos then complied with the request and sent his own identification to the victim. Then, he proceeded with the armed robbery and took marijuana from the victim. Officers were able to quickly identify Lopez-Campos and were able to locate him within a very short time. He was booked into the Monterey County Jail. The stolen...
  • FLY GEYSER

    10/04/2015 3:25:54 AM PDT · by knarf · 57 replies
    e-mail. various | October 4, 2015 | knarf
    In the early twentieth century, a farmer decided that he needed to improve the agriculture on his ranch in Nevada. He figured that a well needed to be dug to bring water and nutrients to the soil above. He lived in a barren desert and the water stored deep beneath the Earths crust would have provided a more sustainable crop for this harsh and dry area. He knew that a well with ample water was needed to supply bountiful crops. What he didnt know was what was waiting for him deep below the soil. He began to dig a deep...
  • New diversity for lager beers

    09/25/2015 1:49:00 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    phys.org ^ | September 25, 2015 | Provided by: American Society for Microbiology
    Unlike ales, lager beers differ little in flavor. But now, by creating new crosses among the relevant yeasts, Kevin Verstrepen, PhD, Stijn Mertens, and their collaborators have opened up new horizons of taste. The research is published in the September 25 Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The relative uniformity of flavor among lagers turned out to result in significant part from a lack of genetic diversity among the yeasts. Genetic studies showed that lager yeasts had resulted from just two crosses between the parent yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and S. eubayanus. The problem was...
  • Remarkable Discovery Could Push Back Human Agriculture by 11,000 Years

    09/15/2015 12:38:16 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 17 replies
    io9 ^ | 7/24/15 12:40pm | George Dvorsky
    Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered evidence of early cereal cultivation at a 23,000-year-old site in Galilee, effectively doubling the timespan humans are believed to have practiced farming.
  • Your chances of hitting a deer are greater than ever

    09/14/2015 9:56:58 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 81 replies
    AJC ^ | 14 Sept 2015
    The odds drivers will file a claim from hitting a deer, elk or moose are 1 in 169, according to the latest numbers from State Farm.
  • Robots take root on smaller dairy farms, upping production

    09/12/2015 11:11:35 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 18 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Sep 12, 2015 12:30 PM EDT | Lisa Rathke
    Robots have taken up residence at some small- and medium-sized dairy farms across the country, providing reliable and more efficient labor and helping the businesses remain viable. Plus, farmers say, the milking technology makes for happier, more productive cows. Dairy operations here and abroad have used robotic milkers for more than a decade. But with more manufacturers and dealerships emerging the U.S., the number of smaller farms in Iowa with the technology has doubled over the last two years, from roughly 20 to more than 40, and family farms in the Northeast also are plugging in. The cost of not...
  • Man Crushed to Death by Hay Bales at W. Valley Farm

    09/09/2015 4:37:46 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 63 replies
    KPHO ^ | Sep 09, 2015 | Jennifer Thomas
    One man was killed and another was injured Wednesday morning after being buried under 1,300 pounds of hay at a farm in the West Valley, according to the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office. The accident happened around 9 a.m. at a farm located near Harquahala Valley and Courthouse roads. Officer Christopher Hegstrom said four men were independently contracted to remove a large tarp that was placed over a stack of hay bales measuring approximately eight bales high, eight bales deep and 15 bales long. While removing the cover, the front bales tumbled over and one man was crushed underneath the pile,...
  • Homeopathy conference ends in chaos after delegates take hallucinogenic drug

    09/08/2015 11:56:03 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 77 replies
    Social News Daily ^ | 8 Sept 2015
    An alternative medicine conference has ended in chaos in Germany after dozens of delegates took a LSD-like drug and started suffering from hallucinations. Broadcaster NDR described the 29 men and women staggering around, rolling in a meadow, talking gibberish and suffering severe cramps. Tests on their blood and urine revealed they had all taken hallucinogenic drug 2C-E, which is known as Aquarust in Germany and has been illegal there since the end of last year.
  • Surrender on weekly bin collections! Ministers axe pledge to bring back weekly rubbish rounds (UK)

    09/06/2015 6:33:19 PM PDT · by dennisw · 8 replies
    DailyMail ^ | 6 September 2015 | By JASON GROVES, DEPUTY POLITICAL EDITOR FOR THE DAILY MAIL
    Surrender on weekly bin collections! Ministers axe pledge to bring back seven-day rubbish rounds because they are 'very expensive' Despite years of promises and 250million investment, plan was scrapped Scheme was supposed to encourage town halls to reinstate weekly rounds But sources confirmed there would be 'no new bin initiatives' last night Critics have slammed ministers for breaking a 'clear promise' to voters Despite years of promises and a 250million investment, ministers have concluded their bin promise cannot be met Despite years of promises and a 250million investment, ministers have concluded their bin promise cannot be met A Tory pledge...
  • Three trillion trees: Study finds there are 7.5 times more trees than previously believed

    09/02/2015 10:56:17 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 115 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | September 2, 2015 | Provided by: Yale University
    The global map of tree density at the square-kilometer pixel scale. Credit: Crowther, et al A new Yale-led study estimates that there are more than 3 trillion trees on Earth, about seven and a half times more than some previous estimates. But the total number of trees has plummeted by roughly 46 percent since the start of human civilization, the study estimates. Using a combination of satellite imagery, forest inventories, and supercomputer technologies, the international team of researchers was able to map tree populations worldwide at the square-kilometer level. Their results, published in the journal Nature, provide the most comprehensive...
  • Corpse Flower 'Lacks Energy to Bloom,' Says Chicago Botanic Garden

    08/30/2015 2:52:29 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 30 replies
    WTTW ^ | 29 Aug 2015 | rebecca Palmore
    After much anticipation, the Chicago Botanic Garden on Saturday night announced that Spike is not expected to bloom.
  • The True Story of Kudzu, the Vine That Never Truly Ate the South

    08/28/2015 4:42:45 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 61 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | September 2015 | Bill Finch
    As s a young naturalist growing up in the Deep South, I feared kudzu. Id walk an extra mile to avoid patches of it and the writhing knots of snakes that everyone said were breeding within. Though fascinated by the grape-scented flowers and the purple honey produced by visiting bees, I trembled at the monstrous green forms climbing telephone poles and trees on the edges of our roads and towns. Introduced from Asia in the late 19th century as a garden novelty, but not widely planted until the 1930s, kudzu is now Americas most infamous weed. In a few decades,...
  • Harvest time for the Tree of Life

    08/24/2015 9:51:32 AM PDT · by SandRat · 1 replies
    Some people love them, some people could live without them. There are differing views on their benefit, but almost everyone is fond of the taste. From the honey and the smoke of the wood, to the highly nutritional flour made from the ground pods, they are a signature flavor here in the desert. The early start to monsoon this year affected the first mesquite harvest, with many finding unacceptable mold, which renders them inedible. However, the second harvest is looking better, and is in progress in parts of the county, although some altitudes have already peaked. I heard rumor about...
  • First Wolf Pack in 91 Years Photographed in Northern California

    08/20/2015 2:10:39 PM PDT · by Lurkina.n.Learnin · 21 replies
    Lostcoasr Outpost ^ | 8/20/2015 | Ryan Burns
    Scientists are calling it an ecological breakthrough: Two adult wolves and five cubs were recently photographed in Siskiyou County, the first known wolves in California since 1924 (with the exception of the famous wandering OR7, who wound up settling in Southern Oregon).
  • Idaho replaces mile marker 420 with 419.9 to thwart stoners

    08/18/2015 2:28:22 PM PDT · by Responsibility2nd · 107 replies
    BOISE, Idaho If you're looking for milepost 420, you won't find it in Idaho. Idaho transportation officials say the mile marker has been replaced with 419.9 signs to curb thieves eager to own a number associated with marijuana enthusiasts. Turns out, Idaho isn't alone in this problem. States like Washington and Colorado have also replaced 420 signs with 419.9 after consistently having to replace them after thefts by supposed sticky-fingered stoners. Adam Rush of the Idaho Transportation Department says officials have replaced the old sign along U.S. Highway 95 with "MILE 419.9," just south of Coeur d'Alene. ~snip~ The...
  • BlueBell in 2 weeks! (vanity)

    08/17/2015 3:09:17 PM PDT · by waterhill · 38 replies
    8/17/2015 | me
    Life altering true ice cream..... Homemade Vanilla.
  • Genetically engineered pigs: Advance looks promising [For Transplants]

    08/14/2015 9:17:26 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | August 14, 2015 | by Nancy Owano
    A domestic pig on an organic farm in Solothurn, Switzerland. Image: Wikimedia Commons --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Stories of people waiting for organ transplants that could save their lives are well known. The numbers, though, are not encouraging. The US Department of Health and Human Services has some data: 122,407 people need a lifesaving organ transplant (total waiting list of candidates). The agency said that the gap between supply and demand continues to widen. The total number of donors from January through May this year was 5,975. On average, 22 people die each day while waiting for a transplant. Here is another statistic:...
  • This Renaissance Painting of Fruit Holds a Modern-Day Science Lesson

    08/09/2015 8:31:31 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 31 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | 8-8-15 | Helen Thompson
    Paintings can be a window to more than the outmoded dress and strange customs of the past sometimes, they have modern-day science lessons to impart, too. That's the case with Giovanni Stanchis 17th century still life of fruit, as Phil Edwards points out for Vox just look for the watermelons. Stanchis work, painted between 1645 and 1672 (and now up for auction at Christies), includes strange watermelons that look so foreign they could be from outer space in the bottom right corner. If watermelons looked like that in the Renaissance, then why do they look so different today?...
  • The plane that can fly backwards

    08/06/2015 2:40:06 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 28 replies
    The verge ^ | 1 Aug 2015 | BBC Future
    "The reason the An-2 still flies is that there is really no other aircraft like it," says aviation writer Bernie Leighton, who has flown in an An-2 in Belarus. "If you need an aircraft that can carry 10 soldiers, people or goats, that can take off from anywhere and land anywhere it is either that or a helicopter.
  • Coroner issues warning over dangers of ingesting poppies after death of Danish tourist...

    08/06/2015 10:13:47 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.abc.net.au ^ | 08-05-2015 | Staff
    The death of a Danish backpacker who drank a brew of tea made from poppies has prompted a warning from a Tasmanian coroner about the dangers. Jonas Havskov Pedersen died on his 26th birthday in February 2014 as a result of morphine intoxication after drinking poppy tea. He was on a working holiday at the time he climbed a poppy field fence somewhere between Jericho and Oatlands and took some poppy heads. Mr Pedersen began to vomit several hours after drinking the tea and his travelling companion said he looked "scared" and did not "look right". Both men eventually went...
  • Former carnival worker charged under Alabama's new bestiality law (He buttdialed while...)

    08/06/2015 9:17:29 AM PDT · by Responsibility2nd · 68 replies
    AL.com ^ | 08/05/2015 | Jonathan Grass
    A man living in Phil Campbell has become Franklin County's first suspect under the state's bestiality law enacted last year. Franklin County deputies arrested Russell Joseph Meyers, 54, on four counts of bestiality, plus one count of second-degree possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Franklin County Sheriff Shannon Oliver said Meyers admitted he had sexual relations with his female German shepherd on four occasions. Meyers got caught when he accidentally called someone while engaging in one of these acts, Oliver said. He said no one answered the phone, and the act was caught on the recipient's voicemail. This...
  • The astonishing 390-year old bonsai tree that survived the Hiroshima atomic blast

    08/04/2015 2:29:25 PM PDT · by dware · 36 replies
    Fox News ^ | 08.04.2015 | Fox News
    The history of a 390-year old bonsai tree at the National Arboretum that survived the Hiroshima atomic blast is being honored this week. Thursday marks the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing. The Japanese White Pine is in the Arboretums National Bonsai and Penjing Museum. The tree was donated in 1976 by bonsai master Masaru Yamaki as part of Japans Bicentennial gift to the American people.