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I SUPPOSE IF I SUGGESTED SUMMARY EXECUTION I would be called "harsh"?
OSINT.INTERNET HAGANAH.com ^ | June 7, 2010 | n/a

Posted on 06/07/2010 4:16:27 PM PDT by Cindy

June 07, 2010

I SUPPOSE IF I SUGGESTED SUMMARY EXECUTION I WOULD BE CALLED "HARSH"?

SNIPPET: "U.S. Intelligence Analyst Arrested in Wikileaks Video Probe

Note that he didn't just lift a video and send it to Wikileaks. He also stole and released 260,000 classified US State Department diplomatic cables."

(Excerpt) Read more at osint.internet-haganah.com ...


TOPICS:
KEYWORDS: antiamerican; antiwaractivists; appelbaum; binladen; bradleymanning; chelseamanning; classifedinfo; classified; classifiedinfo; computerhackers; computers; davidhouse; documents; dod; gayagenda; globaljihad; hacker; hackers; harsh; holland; homosexualagenda; homosexuals; homsexualagenda; house; internet; jacobappelbaum; jihadforums; lamo; manning; military; nobelpeaceprize; obl; operationpayback; peaceprize; perverts; seattle; shamikh1; solna; stockholm; sweden; thepiratebay; tor; transgender; ubl; wikileaks
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1 posted on 06/07/2010 4:16:28 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: All

ON THE INTERNET:

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/06/leak/


2 posted on 06/07/2010 4:17:00 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: All
SNIPPET from the link in post no. 2:

"Wired.com could not confirm whether Wikileaks received the supposed 260,000 classified embassy dispatches."

3 posted on 06/07/2010 4:18:50 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: Cindy; SandRat; cripplecreek; SJackson; neverdem

I’m not a veteran, so I’ll leave the answer to veterans- did this perp commit treason?


4 posted on 06/07/2010 4:20:06 PM PDT by Clintonfatigued (Obama's more worried about Israelis building houses than he is about Islamists building atomic bombs)
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To: Cindy

Definitely a Military Tribunal in Baghdad ... not something in a federal court in NYC.

I would think the firing squad would be on the table also.

The last soldier executed after military trial for desertion was Pvt Slovak during WWII for desertion ... I believe.


5 posted on 06/07/2010 4:21:01 PM PDT by K-oneTexas (I'm not a judge and there ain't enough of me to be a jury. (Zell Miller, A National Party No More))
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To: All

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Military/2010/0607/Soldier-arrested-in-WikiLeaks-classified-Iraq-video-case

“Soldier arrested in WikiLeaks classified Iraq video case”

By Peter Grier, Staff writer / June 7, 2010

SNIPPET: “The US Army has arrested Specialist Bradley Manning, a soldier deployed in Iraq with the 10th Mountain Division, on charges that he allegedly released classified information. The military is looking at a possible connection between Spc. Manning and WikiLeaks, an online whistleblower organization which in April published a graphic video of an Apache gunship mistakenly shooting civilians, according to Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman.”


6 posted on 06/07/2010 4:22:17 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: Cindy
From the Link:

Manning ... said that the networks contained “incredible things, awful things … that belonged in the public domain, and not on some server stored in a dark room in Washington DC.”

How long before the leftists proclaim this man to be a hero and a "political prisoner"?

7 posted on 06/07/2010 4:22:47 PM PDT by Michael.SF. (Even Hitler had Government run health care, but at least he got the Olympics for Germany)
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To: Cindy

The part that you are missing is that the liberals are only mad because the whistleblower leaked Hillary Clinton’s diplomatic cables to 3rd world leaders.

That’s why this whistleblower is being strung up.

Back when he leaked thousands of Bush documents, he was a hero.

Now, he’s a villain.


8 posted on 06/07/2010 4:24:29 PM PDT by Southack (Media Bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
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To: Michael.SF.

See post #8.


9 posted on 06/07/2010 4:25:58 PM PDT by Southack (Media Bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
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To: Cindy

If not execution, life in prison.

We have to stop letting people just get away with this stuff. When Jane Fonda went to Hanoi and was not charged with treason, we made it virtually impossible to charge anyone with treason.

Now, I know there are good and valid reasons to make the bar for treason very high, back in the 18th Century, the English Crown used treason as a catch-all offense.

But what this guy did was more than just wrong.

It was treason.


10 posted on 06/07/2010 4:26:56 PM PDT by rlmorel (We are traveling "The Road to Serfdom".)
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To: K-oneTexas

Slovik


11 posted on 06/07/2010 4:27:28 PM PDT by arthurus ("If you don't believe in shooting abortionists, don't shoot an abortionist." -Ann C.)
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To: Cindy

"He's a good kid...just a little sloppy and disorganized."

12 posted on 06/07/2010 4:29:07 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: rlmorel

The US should still execute that bitch for treason, then move ontop the present problem that plagues us all.

As for this dipshxt he should tortured and then executed.. sloooooooooooooooowly.


13 posted on 06/07/2010 4:30:53 PM PDT by maddog55 (OBAMA, Why stupid people shouldn't vote.)
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To: Clintonfatigued
I’m not a veteran, so I’ll leave the answer to veterans- did this perp commit treason?

From the article - bolding is mine: Federal officials have arrested an Army intelligence analyst who boasted of giving classified U.S. combat video and hundreds of thousands of classified State Department records to whistleblower site Wikileaks...

Why leave it to veterans? The guy endangers everyone, and provides aid to the enemy, when he unilaterally makes the decision to release classified. I don't even need to look up the definition of treason, or look at USC to figure that out.

14 posted on 06/07/2010 4:35:43 PM PDT by Felis_irritable (Fool me once, I'll punch you in the...er, something or other...)
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To: maddog55
I must say, it warmed my heart when I went to the Gathering of Eagles in 2007, to see how the Vietnam Veterans absolute disdain and loathing for Jane Fonda has not cooled one iota in all these years...


15 posted on 06/07/2010 4:43:26 PM PDT by rlmorel (We are traveling "The Road to Serfdom".)
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To: K-oneTexas

Since he did not desert, that would not apply, however the last to die was in 1961.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_A._Bennett


16 posted on 06/07/2010 4:47:45 PM PDT by packrat35 (Planned Parenthood - Keeping healthcare costs down, one fetus at a time)
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To: packrat35

As this says, he was convicted of desertion on November 11, 1944. Every where I have read this story that was the fact as it was presented, the conviction for desertion. we can’t write it any other way today if we wanted too. He may have claimed otherwise but the conviction stands.

I didn’t know about Bennett in 1961, thanks for adding that.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Sad Story of Private Eddie Slovik

(http://www.28-110-k.org/sad_story_of_private_eddie_slovi.html)

Of all the U.S. soldiers charged with desertion during World War II, only one was executed—Private Edward “Eddie” Donald Slovik. It happened just after the Battle of the Bulge.

Only in a technical sense was Eddie Slovik a member of the 28th Infantry Division, and that was for just one day. It would seem then that his story should not really be regarded as part of the history of a proud division that suffered a total of 26,286 battle casualties—2,146 of whom were killed in action or died of battle wounds. Unfortunately, however, Private Slovik and the 28th Infantry Division figure together in the overall picture of the war in Europe.

Eddie Slovik was born in 1920 in a poor neighborhood of Detroit. He quit school in the ninth grade at age 15. He had several brushes with the law, the first in 1932, when 12-year-old Eddie and some friends broke into a foundry to steal some brass. Between 1932 and 1937, he was arrested several more times for crimes such as petty theft, breaking and entering and disturbing the peace. He was never a leader, but he was apparently a willing accomplice. Slovik first went to jail in October 1937, for stealing candy, chewing gum, cigarettes and change from a drugstore where he was working. He was paroled in September 1938, but in January 1939 he and two buddies got drunk, stole a car and accidentally wrecked it. Slovik was sentenced to 2 1/2 to seven years in prison but was paroled again, this time in April 1942. His prison record led him to be classified 4-F in the draft.

Two good things happened to Slovik when he was released from prison. First, he got a job in Dearborn, and second, he met and married Antoinette Wisniewski. Slovik was a personable, good-looking young man, but he needed a strong person to help and guide him. To those who knew the couple, it seemed that person was Antoinette.

The meat grinder of war eventually forced American draft officials to lower their standards in order to meet demands for replacement troops. As a result, Slovik’s draft classification was changed to 1-A in November 1943. He was drafted into the infantry in January 1944.

During training, Slovik earned the reputation of being a good-natured buddy and learned to fire a rifle (which he hated) and other weapons. He arrived in France on August 20, 1944. Five days later he was assigned to Company G, 109th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division.

En route to the front, when his group of replacements was fired on, they stopped and dug in. Somehow Slovik and a friend became separated from the others, who moved on in the night. The two men soon came upon the encampment of the Canadian 13th Provost Corps and “joined” it, staying until October 5. Slovik finally joined Company G on October 8, but he deserted about an hour later, ignoring the pleas of a friend not to leave.

A day later, Slovik voluntarily surrendered to an officer of the 28th Infantry Division, handing him a signed confession of desertion. He went on to state in that document that he would run away again if he had “to go out their [sic].” The officer warned the private that his written confession was damaging evidence and advised him to take it back and destroy it. When Slovik refused to do so, he was confined in the division stockade.

On October 26, the division judge advocate, Lt. Col. Henry P. Sommer, offered Slovik a deal under which the court-martial action would be dropped if he would go back to his unit. Slovik refused. As a result, on November 11, 1944, he was tried and convicted of desertion, although he pleaded not guilty at the trial.

Because of the seriousness of the charge, the court voted by secret ballot three different times. The sentence of death was voted unanimously each time. It is important to note that Slovik’s police record could not have influenced the court, which did not have that information.

Slovik wrote a letter to General Dwight D. Eisenhower on December 9 pleading for clemency, but no basis for clemency was found. On December 23, in the midst of the Battle of the Bulge, Eisenhower confirmed the death sentence. One month later, he ordered Slovik to be executed by a firing squad from the 109th Infantry Regiment.

A few officers were concerned that some members of the firing squad might be repulsed by this onerous duty. They need not have been concerned. The sentence was carried out at 10:04 a.m. on January 31, 1945. Not one member of the firing squad flinched. At the end, Eddie Slovik was braver in facing the rifles of the firing squad than he had been in facing the Germans.

No doubt influenced by “guardhouse lawyers” (other military prison inmates), Slovik had apparently believed that he would not be executed but rather imprisoned until some time after the war ended—when he would be able to return to his beloved Antoinette. Three key factors influenced the decision to execute him. One was that his police record was included in the clemency deliberations, and it counted against him. Another was that desertion had become a problem for the U.S. Army in the European theater. General Eisenhower and other commanders felt something had to be done about it. Finally, Slovik’s case reached the point when it had to be reviewed and acted on by Eisenhower’s headquarters just as the U.S. Army was heavily engaged in its bitterest and bloodiest campaign of the war in Europe—the Battle of the Bulge.

Two members of the firing squad later summarized what many front-line soldiers thought about the execution of Eddie Slovik. One reportedly declared: “I got no sympathy for the sonofabitch! He deserted us, didn’t he? He didn’t give a damn how many of us got the hell shot out of us, why should we care for him?” The other soldier said, “I personally figured that Slovik was a no-good, and that what he had done was as bad as murder.”

Slovik’s widow spent the rest of her life pleading with the U.S. Army and the federal government to pardon her husband. She died a few years ago, having failed in her lifelong struggle to erase the shame from her husband’s memory.

It was, and is, a very sad tale.

Uzal W. Ent


17 posted on 06/07/2010 5:00:11 PM PDT by K-oneTexas (I'm not a judge and there ain't enough of me to be a jury. (Zell Miller, A National Party No More))
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To: Clintonfatigued
A Cell bunk with James Walker and his sons with a Natural Life +5 days sentence.
18 posted on 06/07/2010 5:00:52 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country! What else needs said?)
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To: rlmorel

Hanoi Jane Fonda ... there’s a conviction I’d like to see.


19 posted on 06/07/2010 5:00:53 PM PDT by K-oneTexas (I'm not a judge and there ain't enough of me to be a jury. (Zell Miller, A National Party No More))
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To: rlmorel

I gotta say rlmorel.. I was just about to the right of the guy in the bottom pic along with my wife, daughter and several veteran friends who rode our bikes up from Southern Maryland that morning in what I beleieve was about 26 degree weather.

We parked in a no parking zone out front of the State Department and a couple armed gueards walked over towards us. I humbly asked if they knew a place we could park and the response was; “You vets are fine right where you’re at, well watch your bikes.” and that was the start of a great day.


20 posted on 06/07/2010 5:32:59 PM PDT by maddog55 (OBAMA, Why stupid people shouldn't vote.)
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