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The Riflemanís Burden
zerogov.com ^ | 4 January, 2012 | Rifleslinger

Posted on 01/06/2012 5:46:29 PM PST by marktwain

I use the word “Rifleman” in the following text as a general term that could also be interpreted as “warrior”, “knight”, “patriot, “samurai”, “protector” or any number of other terms. At any rate, mere skill at rifle marksmanship is not what I’m talking about, and any number of other skill sets may fit the following description.

If you’re reading this for pleasure, you’re very likely a rifleman or an aspiring rifleman (I include women in the word “rifleman” because I remember what proper English is, even though I seldom speak it). If you’re a rifleman, you might have thought about what all your hard won skill might be useful for. So have I.

The rifleman in modern society is akin to a ham radio in a smart phone world. The smart phone is quick and chock full of capabilities that are a lot more interesting in terms of the phone’s screen than of the real, physical, and interactive world. It is new, and keeping up with the latest model is a sure way to engage in what sociologists would call “conspicuous consumption”, so you can let everyone in the checkout line at the supermarket know that you can afford the latest and greatest as you text away (or whatever you do with those damn things). Your smart phone can gather all the data you need to come up with a firing solution for your precision shot in just a minute or two. You can even buy a mount for your picatinny rail on which to plant the phone (never miss a call as you ‘send it’). You can use your phone to watch movies and listen to music. You always know that if there is an emergency, or your car breaks down you don’t have to worry. You can always be aware of what’s going on everywhere, except directly around you.

The ham radio is not new or sexy. The barista at Starbucks is not likely to be impressed by the skills of an amateur radio operator. It doesn’t do a plethora of cool things. It’s pretty much a communication tool.

In the extremely unlikely event that the thin veneer of our placid and peaceful society is somehow ripped away, the cell phone network is likely to be compromised. In the event the batteries cannot be charged, the phone’s life will be measured in hours. It will then be a useless piece of garbage. Millions of smart phone owners who are totally dependent will be left jonesing for their smart fix. They will be expecting that they can get bailed out with a quick call or text. The idea that they should have found some other way out would be unfathomable to them.

Ham radios are intended to be used as a backup to regular communication in the event of an emergency. Their users think ahead on how to keep power supplied and replenished. The technology is relatively simple and robust.So it is with the rifleman.

The rifleman, like the ham radio is not the flashiest. He is probably not perceived as especially useful by most people. A male model or newscaster would appear to the common modern American to be preferable to the rifleman. But in an emergency, when most people’s reality is turned upside down, the rifleman is who everyone else will look to for guidance and leadership.

So far I have conveyed that the rifleman is someone who we hope is never needed, is not well understood by the masses, and who has a skill that seems out of date and out of place in modern society unless the worst happens, and the thin veneer of stability is worn away. Let’s examine the rifleman as he was conceived in our country to better understand him in his proper context.

When America still existed as British colonies, communities had to band together to some degree to protect themselves from the wild, and from invaders. The able bodied men were mandated to answer this call of responsibility. It was understood that although you may be asked to give up everything- your home, the well-being of your family, your livelihood, and possibly your life, it was necessary for the survival of the community that you take up arms if it was necessary. In antiquity, they called the collective body of riflemen the “militia”. This is not currently a politically correct word, and is not a productive term to use anymore. The media has undermined the meaning of this word, and turned it upside down, as they have with a great many other things.

The riflemen of old functioned not so much out of rights, but out of responsibilities. These responsibilities were to their communities. Community in those days meant that you had an extended circle of family and friends that you had to answer to for your words and deeds. Note that communities have largely been left behind in favor of mobility and privacy.

When it came time to overthrow the ruler of the original American colonies, our own Founding Fathers recognized an important principle that they later found necessary to articulate in the nation’s primary governing document: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” Obviously at that time, the rifleman was still a necessity to the security of his community, and to his burgeoning nation.

In time the wealth of the nation flourished. Consider this quote by John Adams: “I must study politics and war, that our sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. Our sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry and porcelain.” He got his wish, but at what cost (a nation of pansies perhaps)?

As the nation flourished, a couple important things happened. First, the notion of the community began to dissolve. We became more mobile and lost the geographic bonds forged among family, friends, and neighbors. Second, we became specialists. We decided that instead of maintaining a militia of the common man, we would develop an institution of professional militia. In the case of threats outside our borders, this took the shape of a professional military. In the case of civil unrest and crime, this became the police. This makes a lot of sense because people who do a lot of something and do it frequently tend to get very good at it.

The loss of communities and the rise of specialization must be considered together. The professional militia, the military and police, no longer served the face of their family and neighbors, or answered to their own conscious. Gone was the “town meeting” style of governance from the old colonies that left every man to consider his actions by his own compass. Instead they answered to superiors and followed orders, or more significantly, they followed the culture that began to develop inside their organizations. As this occurred, the average citizen began to disassociate himself increasingly from such matters.

In the present, the average man finds himself immersed in matters related to his specialization, and then to his entertainment. The plight of another in his “community” does not compel him to act. He leaves this to the “professional”.

Not only is the average man in modern society generally unwilling to come to the aid of his community in an emergency, it is very likely that he is unable to do so. He might be able to operate a cell phone to call the “professionals” but the odds of him conveying the important information quickly and efficiently are not good. Modern people function in a state that assumes nothing bad will happen. When bad things happen, the shock that something bad and unexpected is happening induces an immediate onset of “Code Black”.

The performance of the professional can vary from community to community, and will depend largely on the culture of his organization. In some cases it works quite well. In others well it is a miserable and corrupt failure. In most cases it will likely fall somewhere in between. This professional is the most obvious and outward symbol of the government erected by the people of that jurisdiction, although the professional may not even be a member of the community in which he works. In short, the community reaps what it sows.

The rifleman, on the other hand, still cares about his community. He has not given up on his neighbor, although his neighbor largely disregards him.The dominant culture is upside down and inside out, and therefore shuns the rifleman.

The rifleman understands his duty as a member of his community, although his community may no longer function as such. He understands that as an able bodied man, it is incumbent on him to maintain readiness to act, whether that action involves the use of arms or an extra set of hands. He understands that coincidence of timing and circumstance may place his abilities in a situation that demands them.He may be called on to protect someone in his community who cannot protect himself. He may be called on to stop someone from doing harm unto others.He may even be called to protect his community at large.

The rifleman may not fit in well. He doesn’t care. The rifleman does not live in deference to contemporary fashion or relativism. He lives according to principle. He may not seem like much upon superficial inspection, but if Providence should place him in a moment of need, he will not disappoint. The problem now is that we need more like him.

Rifleslinger’s blog: http://artoftherifle.blogspot.com/


TOPICS: Government; Hobbies; Military/Veterans; Politics
KEYWORDS: banglist; defense; militia; rifleman
Interesting reading.
1 posted on 01/06/2012 5:46:34 PM PST by marktwain
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To: marktwain

I couldn't resist.

2 posted on 01/06/2012 6:06:04 PM PST by Godebert
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To: marktwain

I read into that article because I have a crush on Lucas McCain.


3 posted on 01/06/2012 6:06:25 PM PST by Jemian
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To: Godebert

GMTA


4 posted on 01/06/2012 6:07:28 PM PST by Jemian
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To: marktwain

As both a rifleman and a ham radio operator I understand and stand ready.


5 posted on 01/06/2012 6:11:07 PM PST by Okieshooter
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To: Godebert
.30-.30 lever action...the Original Assault Rifle
6 posted on 01/06/2012 6:17:01 PM PST by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus sum)
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To: marktwain
Reminds me of the tribes and sheepdog article.

Tribes and Sheepdogs

7 posted on 01/06/2012 6:25:41 PM PST by TADSLOS (Gingrich-Santorum FTW!)
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To: Okieshooter
Di-dah-dit. Bang!

/johnny

8 posted on 01/06/2012 6:29:06 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Tainan
Didn't the Turks use lever repeaters against the Russians during the winter war?

/johnny

9 posted on 01/06/2012 6:35:30 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Tainan

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mj4phDCXCfg&feature=related

Lucas McCain with an assault rifle.


10 posted on 01/06/2012 6:48:54 PM PST by ClearCase_guy (Nothing will change until after the war. It's coming.)
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To: Tainan

The weapon that made the Rifleman a television legend was an 1892 .44-40 Winchester carbine.


11 posted on 01/06/2012 6:55:07 PM PST by Chuckster (The longer I live the less I care about what you think.)
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To: Chuckster

I don’t doubt that that is true — but I believe the series was supposed to take place in the 1880’s. Television has a long history being a little casual about facts and timelines.


12 posted on 01/06/2012 7:01:18 PM PST by ClearCase_guy (Nothing will change until after the war. It's coming.)
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To: marktwain

Well said. Nobody loves the soldier or the gun owner until the enemy is at the gate.

We should lobby for a new TV show on the Spike TV network called the Assault Rifleman. It would be a great opening scene....a bit longer with a 30 rounder, but still great.

The show was a morality play every week. It spoke to being a sheepdog before such a term was applied to those among us who protect the widow and orphan, the weak and old....those who do not avert their eyes or worse yet, become the exploiter.

Still I was amazed how every drifter and bad guy would invariable pick on the only 6 foot 5 inch 270 pound guy who could freeze water with his gaze AND had the reputation for being a crack rifle shot.....Yep. That is the guy I want to screw with.


13 posted on 01/06/2012 7:22:28 PM PST by Lowell1775
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To: Chuckster

OK, first of all, great post. The individual rifleman and ham radio operator are uniquely American characters and worth emulating by those who love liberty.

Now... if you listen to the original “The Rifleman” intro, I counted at least fourteen shots fired during Lucas McCain’s walking fusillade. There’s a film splice if you look closely.

Of course, I loved the show as a kid, back when there were several TV westerns where a specialized weapon was part of the plot (Steve McQueen’s `mare’s laig’, for example). And MAD Magazine did a classic parody:

“How come you carries a rifle instead of a pistol, Pa?”

“’Cause there’s more room for notches, son.”


14 posted on 01/06/2012 7:50:17 PM PST by elcid1970 ("Deport all Muslims. Nuke Mecca now. Death to Islam means freedom for all mankind.")
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To: marktwain

What Good Can a Handgun Do Against An Army?
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-backroom/2312894/posts


15 posted on 01/06/2012 7:53:49 PM PST by 2ndDivisionVet (You can't invade the US. There'd be a rifle behind every blade of grass.~Admiral Yamamoto)
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To: Tainan

“.30-.30 lever action...the Original Assault Rifle”
____________________________________________________

My pre-64 Winchester is STILL the one I’m likely to reach for first if the SHTF.

My Bells and Whistles .308? Not a long-term option if an armorer or quality gunsmith is unavailable.

My wife’s AR-15? Don’t make me laugh!

M-39 Finnish Mosin Nagant? A solid second, but not as practical here in the Northwest rainforest.

Probably much better trained with handguns and a 12 gauge, but I’ve always thought of myself as a rifleman first. Funny.

I like this article - thanks for posting.


16 posted on 01/06/2012 8:14:27 PM PST by dagogo redux (A whiff of primitive spirits in the air, harbingers of an impending descent into the feral.)
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To: Jemian

“I read into that article because I have a crush on Lucas McCain.”

###

So do I....and I’m a heterosexual male.

Maybe its the gun.....


17 posted on 01/06/2012 8:17:06 PM PST by EyeGuy (2012: When the Levee Breaks)
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To: dagogo redux
My Bells and Whistles .308

Odd though it may sound, I've been considering a Remington 7600 in .308 as a "go to" rifle of late.

18 posted on 01/06/2012 8:24:47 PM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh, bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: marktwain

Take the first step towards becoming a rifleman. Come to an Appleseed. http://www.appleseedusa.org


19 posted on 01/06/2012 8:30:23 PM PST by ebshumidors ( Marksmanship and YOUR heritage http://www.appleseedinfo.org)
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To: Okieshooter

Another one here. Made lots of good Ham friends in OK. Lived in Piedmont for 7 years. Loved it.

Bump!

and I actually hate cell phones.


20 posted on 01/06/2012 8:38:54 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
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To: marktwain
Charlton Heston; “From My Cold Dead Hands”. Long Version

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ju4Gla2odw

Every time out country stands in the path of Danger an instinct seems to summons her finest first. Those who truly understand it.

When freedom shivers in the path of true peril it is always the patriots who first hear the call. When loss of liberty is looming as it is now the siren sounds first in the hearts of freedoms vanguard the smoke in the air of our Concord Bridges and Pearl Harbors is always smelled first by the farmers. Who come from their simple homes to find the fire and fight, because they know that sacred stuff resides in that wooden stock and blued steel.

Something that gives the most common man the most uncommon of freedoms. When ordinary hands can possess such and extraordinary instrument that symbolizes the full measure of human dignity and liberty.

That is why those 5 words issue an irresistible call with all and we must. So as we set out this year to defeat the divisive forces that would take freedom away, I want to say those fighting words, for everyone within the sound of my voice, to hear and to head, and especially for you Mr. Gore “From my Cold Dead Hands”.

Charlton Heston (addressing the 2000 NRA Convention)

21 posted on 01/06/2012 8:51:20 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
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To: marktwain
Riflemen


22 posted on 01/06/2012 8:59:43 PM PST by stylin19a (obama - "FREDO" smart)
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To: tacticalogic

Doesn’t sound odd at all. Sounds like a good idea.


23 posted on 01/06/2012 9:25:07 PM PST by dagogo redux (A whiff of primitive spirits in the air, harbingers of an impending descent into the feral.)
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To: dagogo redux

I don’t hunt, but I do like to bust clays. I do most of my shooting with a BPS, so I think I’d be comforatble with that.


24 posted on 01/06/2012 10:13:16 PM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh, bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: Texas Fossil

QRZ de W5HJ


25 posted on 01/07/2012 1:00:45 AM PST by Okieshooter
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To: ClearCase_guy

I found a web site dedicated to the rifle used in the show that stated that the show takes place twenty years earlier than the rifle used was actually introduced. Would have made it 1870s. OK by me. I was just a kid at the time and that “Official Rifleman Rifle” cap shooter under the Christmas tree was just perfect! Killed a lot of redskins and rustlers with that rifle and my “Fanner Fifty” d;^)


26 posted on 01/07/2012 2:17:24 AM PST by Chuckster (The longer I live the less I care about what you think.)
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To: dagogo redux

The Winchester feels good. The sights come up easy and is handles great.
Its 30-30 round isnt a world beater,but it stops a lot of both four and two legged game.
I like it..and I too have a pre 64....


27 posted on 01/07/2012 2:37:48 AM PST by Yorlik803 (better to die on your feet than live on your knees.)
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To: EyeGuy
Maybe its the gun.....

What gun?

28 posted on 01/07/2012 4:34:57 AM PST by Jemian
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To: marktwain
The rifleman may not fit in well. He doesn’t care. The rifleman does not live in deference to contemporary fashion or relativism. He lives according to principle. He may not seem like much upon superficial inspection, but if Providence should place him in a moment of need, he will not disappoint. The problem now is that we need more like him.

Kind of makes you feel like a member of the Priesthood.

29 posted on 01/07/2012 5:52:09 AM PST by Pontiac (The welfare state must fail because it is contrary to human nature and diminishes the human spirit.)
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To: ClearCase_guy

Spewed coffee on the keyboard. Thanks.....


30 posted on 01/07/2012 6:11:11 AM PST by Godebert
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To: leapfrog0202

31 posted on 01/07/2012 12:19:24 PM PST by leapfrog0202 ("the American presidency is not supposed to be a journey of personal discovery" Sarah Palin)
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To: Chuckster

That .44-40 round is a mighty good one. Right balance of accuracy, controlability and take-down power.


32 posted on 01/07/2012 6:21:11 PM PST by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus sum)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

What Good Can a Handgun Do Against An Army?
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-backroom/2312894/posts

STILL a great read after nearly 10 years on FR. And although one pistol won’t defeat an army, 40 million will make one hell of a dent!


33 posted on 01/08/2012 9:48:57 AM PST by Oldpuppymax
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