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Home schooled children outpacing public school students
Examiner ^ | September 11, 2013 | Martha

Posted on 09/11/2013 4:20:22 PM PDT by usalady

Home schooled children outpacing public school students

Do you know there are 10 and 12- year-old students already attending college classes in America? It is happening every day as parents flee the public schools and instead educate their children at home.

(Excerpt) Read more at examiner.com ...


TOPICS: Education; Government; Politics; Society
KEYWORDS: commoncore; homeschool; school; students
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All across the U.S. home schooled children continue to surpass children subjected to the dumbing-down process that is offered by public education. The results are by the time home schooled students are in the 8th grade, they are four years ahead of their public/private school counterparts.
1 posted on 09/11/2013 4:20:22 PM PDT by usalady
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To: usalady

Public schools are child abuse!


2 posted on 09/11/2013 4:21:02 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: usalady

Kids should be learning Calculus by age 12.


3 posted on 09/11/2013 4:26:41 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: OneWingedShark
Kids should be learning Calculus by age 12.

Why? How many people would ever use it?

4 posted on 09/11/2013 4:29:10 PM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Isaiah 22:22, Matthew 16:19, Revelation 3:7)
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To: gorush

> Public schools are child abuse!

I am ever more inclined to agree with that sentiment.


5 posted on 09/11/2013 4:29:34 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: usalady

To make the state of Washington look good they rolled the academic scores of home schooled kids into the total state score. If they hadn’t then WA scores would have put the state near the middle to lower standard.


6 posted on 09/11/2013 4:30:19 PM PDT by SkyDancer (A white woman would be accused of racism if she gave birth to a white baby.)
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To: OneWingedShark

Just saw a young lady the other day — she was 15. She could not SIGN HER NAME because they don’t teach cursive handwriting anymore.

Guess one day she will be unable to sign a contract to buy a home, a vehicle, or property ... or much of anything — sign her own checks, etc.

Guess they’ve probably planned it that way all along ...

Guess these kids will just make their “X.”

Pathetic.


7 posted on 09/11/2013 4:31:10 PM PDT by LibsRJerks
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To: usalady

Our 29 yo daughter was home schooled and attended (by scholarship) college at 16, traveled all of Asia by herself (on her nickel) at 17 & 18 and is currently leading a full filling and successful life as a responsible adult.

Public school is only slightly better than a felony offense committed by the government.


8 posted on 09/11/2013 4:32:26 PM PDT by ChildOfThe60s (If you can remember the 60s.....you weren't really there)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas
Why? How many people would ever use it?

Learning calculus helps improve your thinking skills. Most people I encounter on a daily basis could use some help in that department.

9 posted on 09/11/2013 4:34:23 PM PDT by twhitak
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To: LibsRJerks

I know my own daughter is well ahead of her peers. She was homeschooled on and off. She’s 26 now and doing extremely well for herself and is entirely independent.

Many neighbors and relatives used to mock me for homeschooling.

Thank God I stood firm.


10 posted on 09/11/2013 4:34:33 PM PDT by LibsRJerks
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To: usalady

Public schools, for the most part, train children to ignore their parents, and then they claim that parents can not possibly provide the “proper” socialization. Meanwhile, the kids who end up shooting their classmates are somehow “properly” socialized?


11 posted on 09/11/2013 4:34:41 PM PDT by Slyfox (Without the Right to Life, all other rights are meaningless.)
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To: usalady

This has not been “news” for a number of years but the observation does need to be put in front of the citizenry often.


12 posted on 09/11/2013 4:36:07 PM PDT by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's Economics In One Lesson ONLINE http://steshaw.org/econohttp://www.fee.org/library/det)
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To: ChildOfThe60s

Our 29 yo daughter was home schooled and attended (by scholarship) college at 16, traveled all of Asia by herself (on her nickel) at 17 & 18 and is currently leading a full filling and successful life as a responsible adult.

Public school is only slightly better than a felony offense committed by the government.

**
We homeschooled also. The public skool kids we knew (whose mothers mocked me regularly) , well, I’m just not sure. Not too many of them went to decent colleges, or even college at all. Lots are preggo early with lots of tattoos, as far as I know. That’s about it.


13 posted on 09/11/2013 4:37:29 PM PDT by LibsRJerks
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To: LibsRJerks

My own family mocked me initially. THEIR kids were popular.

Until the oldest daughter became an unwed mother at 17. We’ll try and avoid that ‘popular’. Thankssomuch.


14 posted on 09/11/2013 4:37:45 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: usalady
There are two reasons why home-schooling is NOT acceptable to government:

1) Indoctrination into becoming a "victim", and living ONLY at the benevolance of Government forcing others to pay you way

2) Inner-city tribal parasites have no one in the home intelligent enough to teach

15 posted on 09/11/2013 4:40:01 PM PDT by traditional1 (Amerika.....Providing public housing for the Mulatto Messiah)
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To: gorush
Public schools are child abuse!

I said that 10 years ago and all the FReepers who were keeping their children in public day prisons threw bricks at me. It is more severe child abuse now than it was last year and will be more so next year. Parents who care about their children will keep them out of public school. No exceptions. Except, of course, in the Homosexual State, Massachusetts.

16 posted on 09/11/2013 4:40:42 PM PDT by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's Economics In One Lesson ONLINE http://steshaw.org/econohttp://www.fee.org/library/det)
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To: OneWingedShark

My homeschooled 13yr is doing Algebra II. He is advanced by 1 yr. in math. I can’t imagine him doing Calculus at this age.


17 posted on 09/11/2013 4:41:20 PM PDT by stevio (God, guns, guts.)
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To: usalady

My home schooled son is attending USMA at West Point. He is a senior, with honors now.

When applying, I asked the supe (3 star general) how West Point liked home schooled kids. His response...we love them 10 percent of the student body was home schooled. Probably higher now.

For full disclosure, my daughter did one year at a community college, and is now starting as an academic scholarship at Drexel University for biomedical engineering and has been invited to join the Penoni (spelling?) honors program.

My final son swims for the local high school team but is home schooled too.

We yanked our kids out of elementary school when the district adopted Mathland — no fractions, no long division, etc. We have never looked back, and my wife and daughter are currently writing a book about our experiences...

We live in one of the top school districts in the state of PA. Our school taxes are obscene.


18 posted on 09/11/2013 4:42:20 PM PDT by Geoffrey
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To: Black Agnes

My own family mocked me initially. THEIR kids were popular.

Until the oldest daughter became an unwed mother at 17. We’ll try and avoid that ‘popular’. Thankssomuch.

**
LOl, yes, I do believe so.

I will admit — our daughter does EXTREMELY well ...she’s an analyst at a major, major, major US financial firm in NYC. She works in Manhattan. She went to a very decent college and did so well. She NEVER EVER suffered any problems with socialization .....in fact, she has a long term wonderful boyfriend and a nice group of solid close friendships from college — so that shoots THAT theory down.

And we were NOT Little House in the Prairie evangelical types ...we just wanted our kids to have a good, solid education where their abilities would be challenged .... of course, Faith was important to us, and we imparted our values as well .....but we really weren’t homeschooling insulated nut cases, like everyone paints you out to be.

It all started when I realize they were not going to teach the vowels ...AEIOU or phonics based reading. I knew nothing of homeschooling ...I just wanted the kid to be able to read!!


19 posted on 09/11/2013 4:44:45 PM PDT by LibsRJerks
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To: LibsRJerks
My daughter is fifteen and will be in college this winter because we home schooled her.
20 posted on 09/11/2013 4:46:36 PM PDT by jimpick
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas
I use it sometimes -- but you'd be surprised at the places calculus turns up.
You can use it to, say find the area under an overpass that needs paint.

From wikipedia's Calculus entry:

Calculus is used in every branch of the physical sciences, actuarial science, computer science, statistics, engineering, economics, business, medicine, demography, and in other fields wherever a problem can be mathematically modeled and an optimal solution is desired. It allows one to go from (non-constant) rates of change to the total change or vice versa, and many times in studying a problem we know one and are trying to find the other.

Physics makes particular use of calculus; all concepts in classical mechanics and electromagnetism are interrelated through calculus. The mass of an object of known density, the moment of inertia of objects, as well as the total energy of an object within a conservative field can be found by the use of calculus. An example of the use of calculus in mechanics is Newton's second law of motion: historically stated it expressly uses the term "rate of change" which refers to the derivative saying The rate of change of momentum of a body is equal to the resultant force acting on the body and is in the same direction. Commonly expressed today as Force = Mass × acceleration, it involves differential calculus because acceleration is the time derivative of velocity or second time derivative of trajectory or spatial position. Starting from knowing how an object is accelerating, we use calculus to derive its path.

Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism and Einstein's theory of general relativity are also expressed in the language of differential calculus. Chemistry also uses calculus in determining reaction rates and radioactive decay. In biology, population dynamics starts with reproduction and death rates to model population changes.

Calculus can be used in conjunction with other mathematical disciplines. For example, it can be used with linear algebra to find the "best fit" linear approximation for a set of points in a domain. Or it can be used in probability theory to determine the probability of a continuous random variable from an assumed density function. In analytic geometry, the study of graphs of functions, calculus is used to find high points and low points (maxima and minima), slope, concavity and inflection points.

Green's Theorem, which gives the relationship between a line integral around a simple closed curve C and a double integral over the plane region D bounded by C, is applied in an instrument known as a planimeter, which is used to calculate the area of a flat surface on a drawing. For example, it can be used to calculate the amount of area taken up by an irregularly shaped flower bed or swimming pool when designing the layout of a piece of property.

Discrete Green's Theorem, which gives the relationship between a double integral of a function around a simple closed rectangular curve C and a linear combination of the antiderivative's values at corner points along the edge of the curve, allows fast calculation of sums of values in rectangular domains. For example, it can be used to efficiently calculate sums of rectangular domains in images, in order to rapidly extract features and detect object - see also the summed area table algorithm.

In the realm of medicine, calculus can be used to find the optimal branching angle of a blood vessel so as to maximize flow. From the decay laws for a particular drug's elimination from the body, it's used to derive dosing laws. In nuclear medicine, it's used to build models of radiation transport in targeted tumor therapies.

In economics, calculus allows for the determination of maximal profit by providing a way to easily calculate both marginal cost and marginal revenue.

Calculus is also used to find approximate solutions to equations; in practice it's the standard way to solve differential equations and do root finding in most applications. Examples are methods such as Newton's method, fixed point iteration, and linear approximation. For instance, spacecraft use a variation of the Euler method to approximate curved courses within zero gravity environments.
Seriously, it's likely you're using it (or something based on it) in everyday life.
21 posted on 09/11/2013 4:46:44 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: twhitak

I occasionally pull out a calculus book for mental exercise myself (you can only do so much sudoko).

But calculus isn’t the only way to improve a child’s thinking skills. Most people I know who studied calculus way back when couldn’t even tell you what a derivative is anymore. So unless the kid is definitely bound for engineering or some physical science, the time spent learning calculus might be better spent learning something more applicable to his future avocation.


22 posted on 09/11/2013 4:46:54 PM PDT by kevao (Biblical Jesus: Give your money to the poor. Socialist Jesus: Give your neighbor's money to the poor)
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To: Geoffrey

We pulled two of ours out of a parochial school when it dumped Saxon Math in favor of a system that was opaque and required the teacher to explain every step. The teachers didn’t like Saxon because a child with moderate intelligence could teach himself from the book without intervention from a “teacher.” I don’t know about Saxon now since the family had to sell it away to a mainstream publisher due to inheritance taxes.


23 posted on 09/11/2013 4:48:01 PM PDT by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's Economics In One Lesson ONLINE http://steshaw.org/econohttp://www.fee.org/library/det)
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To: LibsRJerks

Perhaps someone should compile a book with profiles of homeschooled kids ....A “where they are now” book, to feature how successful many of them have turned out.

I’ll never forget a public school teacher neighbor of mine who was SO arrogant and dismissive of us. Her kids were maniacs, of course.

Another neighbor would repeatedly ask me ..”you’re not going to do that again next year, are you?


24 posted on 09/11/2013 4:48:22 PM PDT by LibsRJerks
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas; OneWingedShark
Kids should be learning Calculus by age 12.

Why? How many people would ever use it?


I had calculus in 12th grade about 30 years ago.

Teachers simply made sure that learning was by rote and boring for all but a chosen few students.

Nowadays I find myself touching on higher math subjects in my work.

And it becomes painfully clear that the whole point of public school is to allow most student's educational process to turn off.

Indoctrination is pursued instead. Unless a student proves too stubborn and streetwise to it. In that case the student is simply ignored as much as possible.

In holding young students back, it's not so much what the teacher does, it's what they don't do. They simply stick to the textbook, page by page, without ever stepping back and getting the student mentally organized about the big picture of mathematics. A conservative student shows promise - actually exhibits signs of being very bright ? Don't dare ever take that kid aside and turn him on to all the various fields of higher math.

If you take a really good education and compare it to public school, public school is just the opposite.

Learn by rote, learn facts only, learn the left-wing version of the facts, add in some indoctrination to new world order myths, etc.

Don't dare ever teach logic. Do not ever give an overview of the Bible, then proceed on to philosophy, so the student can see where the "philosophers" are going wrong in so many ways. The student instead must only be exposed to the mythical version of American history according to new world order, so these myths can be used to create the student's own mental foundation for morality.

Stay clear of any situation where the student might start exploring and learning on their own. Keep them going from quiz to quiz, test to test. Make sure to babble in a monotone and have "teacher's favorites", so any bright kids will basically fall into a holding pattern, waiting to graduate.

Also, don't ever discuss accounting, i.e., a profit and loss statement and a balance sheet. Students might start understanding debt and equity.

Never teach anything about the law. Almost all of the population will be completely ignorant of legal principles, and thus be easy to control and mess with, legally and financially.
25 posted on 09/11/2013 4:49:41 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves)
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To: kevao

Calculus is a tool of thinking most effective when young minds are learning stuff. Calculus and a foreign language or two, preferably a very different foreign Language like Mandarin or Korean. All of these things give a young mind different pathways, different approaches to perception and aid in thinking about, and problem solving in, all subjects.


26 posted on 09/11/2013 4:52:32 PM PDT by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's Economics In One Lesson ONLINE http://steshaw.org/econohttp://www.fee.org/library/det)
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To: gorush
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

27 posted on 09/11/2013 4:52:52 PM PDT by TurboZamboni (Marx smelled bad & lived with his parents most his life.)
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To: LibsRJerks
Just saw a young lady the other day — she was 15. She could not SIGN HER NAME because they don’t teach cursive handwriting anymore.

To be fair, cursive now belongs in the history curriculum. It is no longer an everyday use skill and it has zero place in business outside of signatures.

They don't teach calligraphy anymore either, outside of some art electives. Exactly the same thing.

28 posted on 09/11/2013 4:54:03 PM PDT by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: stevio
My homeschooled 13yr is doing Algebra II. He is advanced by 1 yr. in math. I can’t imagine him doing Calculus at this age.

You are slacking; algebra is easy and should be no trouble for a normal 10 year-old: as it is merely the extension of the basics of arithmetic with unknowns. Any marginally thoughtful individual could 'discover' algebra if they were trapped on a desert island and needed to manage supplies.

Calculus is a bit more of a mind-bender and ought to be taught young. Many of its rules are non-intuitive — like why should the area under the curve be related to the slope of the curve at that point? (Granted trig is a bear; but elsewise using calculus [after getting those non-intuitive rules down] is mostly just algebra.)

29 posted on 09/11/2013 4:55:24 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: usalady

All is going as planned by the adherents of The Frankfurt School (including public schools and teaching schools, teacher unions. government, media and churches).


30 posted on 09/11/2013 4:55:52 PM PDT by polymuser ("We have a right to debate and disagree with any administration!" (HRC))
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To: gorush

You beat me.


31 posted on 09/11/2013 4:57:49 PM PDT by Navy Patriot (Join the Democrats, it's not Fascism when WE do it, and the Constitution and law mean what WE say.)
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To: usalady

Yay for my team!


32 posted on 09/11/2013 4:59:20 PM PDT by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: usalady
Home schooled children outpacing public school students

Surprise, surprise,....Yawn....

33 posted on 09/11/2013 4:59:28 PM PDT by Navy Patriot (Join the Democrats, it's not Fascism when WE do it, and the Constitution and law mean what WE say.)
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To: PieterCasparzen
Your post is very good and deserves a good answer on each of these points.
The logic and legal points are, to me, the most troubling of all.
In my search for how to combat illegitimate statutes (that is contraconstitutional) I have discovered that the legal-system is tuned to force you to fight from the position of the accused, and therefore a position of weakness, instead of allowing a citizen to directly accuse the "law" itself.
34 posted on 09/11/2013 5:00:30 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: ChildOfThe60s

Well done, Pop.


35 posted on 09/11/2013 5:00:36 PM PDT by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: arthurus

We used/use saxon math.

Initially we were looked down on by friends, family, co-workers. Initially. Now they make excuses for not home schooling or go to great lengths to explain how their school district is different.

No socialization problems, can communicate with all ages, no teen rebellion years...

All of our kids went to college (community) while still in high school.


36 posted on 09/11/2013 5:03:43 PM PDT by Geoffrey
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To: arthurus
"Public schools are child abuse!"

I said that 10 years ago and all the FReepers who were keeping their children in public day prisons threw bricks at me.

Before I was a Freeper, I used to belong to a hard core conservative biker forum. You wouldn't believe the head-in-the-sand responses I used to get from others when I'd make the same point.

"Well, our public schools are different!"

Yeah right......

37 posted on 09/11/2013 5:05:03 PM PDT by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: usalady

Sorry, but the public school system is a wasteland. I urge anyone with kids to put them in either a good private school, or parochial school, or home school.

hslda.org is a good homeschool site. they provide legal help, too.


38 posted on 09/11/2013 5:05:31 PM PDT by SoFloFreeper
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To: usalady

Why is this excerpted?


39 posted on 09/11/2013 5:08:54 PM PDT by coop71 (Being a redhead means never having to say you're sorry...)
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To: usalady

No doubt, home schooling is also good for the parents’ brains as well.


40 posted on 09/11/2013 5:11:15 PM PDT by grumpygresh (Democrats delenda est. New US economy: Fascism on top, Socialism on the bottom.)
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To: Windflier

Thank you!

Along with marrying my wife, the two smartest things I have ever done.

When she went to college, her guidance counselor was delighted, said he really liked home schooled students.

She has told us a number of times, especially while in college, that she was very grateful we home schooled her.


41 posted on 09/11/2013 5:12:34 PM PDT by ChildOfThe60s (If you can remember the 60s.....you weren't really there)
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To: arthurus
Calculus is a tool of thinking most effective when young minds are learning stuff. Calculus and a foreign language or two, preferably a very different foreign Language like Mandarin or Korean. All of these things give a young mind different pathways, different approaches to perception and aid in thinking about, and problem solving in, all subjects.

I'd go w/ Japanese and [Irish] Gaelic if I were to put forward a syllabus-schedule.
(English => SVO; Japanese => SOV, Gaelic => VSO)

As I said calculus by age 12; formal logic would likely fit nicely here though that might be a bit heavy in the math-stuffs.

Programming would probably start about a year after Logic; ideally I'd use Ada: it provides an excellent packaging system (thus teaching encapsulation and data-hiding w/o having to dig into OOP) as well as an excellent generic system. (Also interesting/useful are the language-level parallelism via the task construct and the separation of specification and body.)

In fact, I'd have them using Ada to build their own LISP interpreter, which would in-turn be used in their own Algorithms class; then we'd rewrite/repurpose it to be a FORTH interpreter and go down into assembly. (FORTH's words are [a] a list of words, or [b] an executable segment of code; so this would be a natural progression down into the machine proper.)

Anyway, that's what I'd shoot for if I were in charge of an educational institution.

42 posted on 09/11/2013 5:15:41 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: gorush

A third grade boy threatened to rape a girl in his class on Monday. No big deal.


43 posted on 09/11/2013 5:16:03 PM PDT by Uncle Miltie (Why haven't we heard from the 30 Benghazi survivors?)
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To: usalady

Thank you to everyone who have shared their experiences in response to the article. As you can see, I am very enthusiastic about the benefits of home schooling.


44 posted on 09/11/2013 5:16:25 PM PDT by usalady
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To: All

When you can’t homeschool, what do you do?

When your spouse says ‘no’, are you going to divorce your spouse? Or are you going to work full time, then school your child/children also?

When your child is in a private school which is forced to abide by Common Core, what are you going to do when your spouse says ‘no’?

Which conservative value are you going to choose? Marriage or homeschooling? You can’t have both when you’re working full time and your spouse won’t cooperate.


45 posted on 09/11/2013 5:23:03 PM PDT by AlmaKing
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To: ChildOfThe60s
When she went to college, her guidance counselor was delighted, said he really liked home schooled students.

Not sure if any of ours are college-bound, but my fifteen year old daughter is expressing interest.

We've also run our own business for the last sixteen years. Now that the kids are getting old enough to work in it, it looks fairly certain that they're going to step in and take it over one day.

Perhaps a couple of them will take a few years off to pursue higher education before coming back to take the reins. They've got maybe ten years to get 'er dun.

46 posted on 09/11/2013 5:28:18 PM PDT by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas

I am not agreeing that all kids at 12 should be learning calculus, but there is more to learning than being able to use the content... learning calculus or geometry, Latin, music, logic all teach you to think a certain way... almost like learning a new language... it is valuable... unfortunately, so much of modern education is utilitarian...


47 posted on 09/11/2013 5:29:16 PM PDT by latina4dubya (when i have money i buy books... if i have anything left, i buy 6-inch heels and a bottle of wine...)
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To: Geoffrey
Socialization:
A major difference is that homeschooled kids have adults as role models and learn to be adults. Public school kids mostly have older kids as role models and grow up to be older children. Look around you and you know it is true.

In poor countries there is no "adolescence" and no "let the children be children." Kids are pulling their own wieight in the family well before they are 10 years old. They are learning to be adults from age 0.

48 posted on 09/11/2013 5:36:34 PM PDT by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's Economics In One Lesson ONLINE http://steshaw.org/econohttp://www.fee.org/library/det)
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To: LibsRJerks
She could not SIGN HER NAME because they don’t teach cursive handwriting anymore

Thank you for posting this. I am dismayed by the number of people on this site who think that not teaching children how to write in cursive is just fine --- we don't need cursive anymore.

I personally find it really sad to think of an entire nation of so-called adults who cannot write, but can only print -- as if they never got past the second grade.

Wise up. The reason kids are no longer being taught cursive is because the teacher's union doesn't want to make their teachers do that. The teachers think it is too hard to teach. So, they come up with a lame excuse about why they can't do their jobs. My late brother was a teacher/guidance counselor for his entire career. When I was speaking to him about my eldest daughter, who had just entered the second grade in a Catholic elementary school, I told him that they were beginning to teach cursive writing. He told me that Mrs. Rhodes (my daughter's teacher) was going to be "disappointed". At the end of the school year, I had my cursive writing daughter send a note to my brother. He never responded, as it was clear that a 2nd grader could learn cursive.

I also think that training in cursive writing is probably helpful for small motor skills.

49 posted on 09/11/2013 5:42:00 PM PDT by LibertarianLiz
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To: Geoffrey
I kind of pioneered Saxon long ago around here. I was interested by the description of Algebra 1/2 in a Conservative Book Club brochure and ordered it. I was fascinated that one could teach oneself easily from that book without any teacher. I found and ordered the other high school books as they came out. My wife, a public school teacher, and I hustled Saxon to the local parochial schools and even a couple of the public schools adopted it. The teachers raved for a year then other teachers started to complain and the union set its face against Saxon because it denigrated by implication the necessity of a teacher. Now the local parochial and public schools all teach from more "modern" texts and math performance is way down.
50 posted on 09/11/2013 5:43:32 PM PDT by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's Economics In One Lesson ONLINE http://steshaw.org/econohttp://www.fee.org/library/det)
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