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Truck drivers from India to take U.S. jobs? (I am just now zotting retread)
worldnetdaily.com ^ | July 21, 2006 | Jerome R. Corsi

Posted on 07/21/2006 3:32:06 PM PDT by cope85

THE NEW WORLD DISORDER Truck drivers from India to take U.S. jobs? Union protests plan as attempt to undercut 'hard-working Americans'

An American company is recruiting long-haul truck drivers from India with the goal of placing them with U.S. trucking firms.

The Teamsters Union strongly opposes the plan by Gagan Global LLC of Garnerville, N.Y.

Teamsters Union spokesman Galen Munroe told WND the plan "is yet another example of corporations exploiting a visa program to replace highly trained, hard-working Americans with cheap labor from overseas."

Gagan Global has contracted with the Indian state government of Andra Pradesh and its Overseas Manpower Consultancy to run a training school in the Asian country.

Gagan Global CEO Philip Gagan told WND a first batch of 200 Indian truck drivers has been recruited to attend the school in preparation for work in the U.S.

"We are recruiting Indian truck drivers," Gagan confirmed to WND. "We are very demanding on our requirements to get into the school. The requirements are that you have to have five years of heavy driving experience on tractor-trailer trucks, you have to be HIV-negative, have a clean police record, verifiable references that the government in India can verify."

What about the ability to speak English?

"The Indian truck drivers have to be able to read and understand English," Gagan explained. "We like them to speak English. They all speak pigeon-English, mostly what they learned in schools."

How does Gagan Global know that the Indian drivers will be able to read road signs or communicate with other drivers on the road?

"We know that if they can read English and understand what they are reading," Gagan told WND, "then we think they can learn enough English in the four-months training program to be able to be productive in the U.S."

Gagan argued that the reason he created the company was to address the growing shortage in the U.S. for long-haul drivers.

"There's a massive shortage of long-haul truck drivers in the U.S.," Gagan said. "Long-haul truck drivers get home four days a month. There just aren't enough Americans who want to do that kind of work."

A May 2005 study conducted for the American Trucking Association argues that there is "already a shortage of long-haul heavy-duty truck drivers equal to about 1.5 percent of the over-the-road workforce, or about 20,000 drivers."

The driver shortfall is projected to reach 114,000 by 2014. Another 219,000 new truck drivers "must be found to replace drivers currently of ages 55 and older who will retire over the next 10 years and to replace those in younger groups who will leave the occupation."

Teamster Union spokesman Munroe strongly objected. In an e-mail to WND, he wrote:

While there is currently a shortage of long-haul drivers, the problem lies with corporations like Gagan Global that are championing the race to the bottom for American workers. If corporations would treat their employees fairly and offer competitive wages with decent benefit packages, this shortage would disappear. Gagan Global is in the process of applying to the Department of Labor to get H-2B visas for the Indian drivers. H-2B visas are designed to be issued only when there are no qualified and willing U.S. workers available for the job. Gagan acknowledges that no H-2B visas have yet been issued to Indian truck drivers training in India with his company.

Regarding the issuance of H-2B visas, Munroe wrote WND:

Gagan Global has twisted the intent of the H-2B visa program to fit their desire for a fatter bottom line. The assertion that there are no American workers who are willing to take long-haul truck driving jobs is absurd. It would be more accurate to say they do not want to be exploited by taking poor-paying, long-haul jobs at nonunion companies. On the company website, Gagan Global explains why Indian drivers are suitable to help address the shortage in long-haul drivers:

We also found that while the average long-haul truck driver makes between $50,000 and $90,000 a year, these truck drivers make far less, and work a whole lot more. So what we have here are people who are never shy of work, extremely friendly and cooperative, and most of all, tough guys who are more than up to handling the American trucks. Why is Gagan Global so sure the Indian drivers will be able to be successful on U.S. highways? The company website explains the Indian drivers "on an average, have anywhere between 10 and 25 years of experience driving trucks for a living. These drivers have driven long-haul trucks in extreme conditions and terrain and on roads that are anything but like the freeways in the U.S."

The economic incentive for the Indian truck drivers is obvious. Gagan explains:

These [Indian truck drivers] want to work. They want to get into their trucks and work every hour that they are legally allowed to work. They only have a one-year period, plus a one-year extension under their visa to work here. Then they have to go home for six months and apply for a new visa. The Indian truck driver can earn in a day in the U.S. what it may take two months to earn in India. They don’t have families here and they don't care about time-off. If the Indian drivers come here work hard, they can go home with maybe $100,000, which is five lifetimes of money back home in India. Gagan explained to WND that his company’s goal was not to undercut U.S. truck drivers:

We’re not here to take jobs away from Americans. If they drive for a Teamster organization, they will join the Teamsters. Our Indian drivers have to come into a company and be paid exactly what the American drivers are being paid in that company. They have to receive every benefit and they have to be treated exactly the same. We want them to get the highest paid jobs they can get. We have rejected as clients a couple of companies that have approached us because they want to hire them as trainees and pay them about half as much per mile as they pay U.S. drivers. The Teamsters' Munroe objected to Gagan Global's program, concluding, "It is time for American companies to invest in the American workforce. Outsourcing will only quicken the demise of the middle class."


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1 posted on 07/21/2006 3:32:09 PM PDT by cope85
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To: cope85

After seeing how well indian tech support works for computers, I'm sure they'll work well for truck drivers.


2 posted on 07/21/2006 3:37:39 PM PDT by TypeZoNegative (".... We are a nation of Americans. We are DECENDED from legal immigrants"- johnandrhonda)
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To: 1_Inch_Group; 2sheep; 2Trievers; 3AngelaD; 3pools; 3rdcanyon; 4Freedom; 4ourprogeny; 7.62 x 51mm; ..

ping


3 posted on 07/21/2006 3:39:01 PM PDT by gubamyster
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To: gubamyster

I've been on hold with HP Tech Support in India for the last 45 minutes. Keep them there!!!!!!1


4 posted on 07/21/2006 3:41:10 PM PDT by Ax ("Burn the Village to the Ground, Doo-dah, Doo-dah....")
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To: cope85

What it will kill is the independent trucker.

My bro runs a few trucks and I know that the regulations, COT, the recordkeeping, taxes and insurance not to mention the fines levied by government from time to time for oversights, plus the repairs on the trucks and the cost of tires is high.


5 posted on 07/21/2006 3:41:41 PM PDT by OpusatFR ( ALEA IACTA EST. We have just crossed the Rubicon.)
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To: cope85

Outrageous! Of course once the word "Union" is mentioned the knee-jerk reaction on FR will be to fire everyone and hire foriegners. These people need to be kept out of the US.


6 posted on 07/21/2006 3:41:53 PM PDT by dljordan
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To: OpusatFR

You Are In: USINFO > Products > News From Washington
21 July 2006

G8 Nations Will Push Plans To Fund Medicines for Poor Countries
Experts say lack of consensus regrettable, but will not stop pilot programs



By Elizabeth Kelleher
Washington File Staff Writer



Washington – In reviewing what she called the Group of Eight (G8) nations’ recent “intense meeting on global health,” Josette Shiner, U.S. under secretary of state for economic, business and agricultural affairs, pointed out an omission in the official document resulting from the summit: endorsement of finance mechanisms to pay for vaccines and medicines needed by poor countries.

Shiner said that, even though there is support among donor countries for finding ways to get better results from their financial assistance to less developed nations, officials from the United States, Japan, Germany, Italy, France, the United Kingdom, Russia and the European Union could not reach consensus on proposals put forward in St. Petersburg, Russia. She spoke July 20 at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington.

The G8 communiqué, “Fight Against Infectious Diseases,” adopted July 16, encourages greater investment in research, development and production of drugs and vaccines to address global diseases impeding development and calls for innovation in strategies to promote those goals. “The limited capacity of health systems is a major barrier to coming as close as possible to universal access to treatment for those who need it by 2010,” the communiqué says. (See related article.)

Citing evidence in a July article in the medical journal The Lancet, another participant at the CSIS discussion, Jennifer Kates of the Kaiser Family Foundation, said global health funding is increasing, but not fast enough to meet the needs of the world’s poor. The journal reports that an additional $22 billion a year will be needed by 2007 and an additional $31 billion a year by 2015.

Several proposed financing mechanisms, meant to better utilize money that developed countries donate to improve global health, were discussed at the G8 summit. But in the end, no endorsement of any of the mechanisms was made. “Everyone wanted their thing mentioned in the final document,” said Kates. In the end, countries stated their support for various proposals in an annex to the main document.

The United States favors a system whereby donor nations would make commitments to buy vaccines that pharmaceutical companies might develop in the future. These advance market commitments (AMCs) would encourage manufacturers to develop vaccines against diseases epidemic in poor countries. According to supporters – which include Italy, Canada and Russia – AMCs would assure manufacturers of profit at the end of development.

In current market conditions, the inability of poor countries to buy large amounts of vaccines and medicines for diseases that affect their populations is a disincentive for pharmaceutical companies to invest in the research and development of these drugs. The United States supports work toward a successful launch of an AMC pilot project for vaccines by the end of 2006, according to the U.S. annex to the G8 communiqué.

“Some of us wanted a good, strong looking-ahead at the AMCs,” Shiner said, “but there was no consensus.”

Another system, championed by the British, would issue bonds to pay for existing vaccines that could help developing countries now. The goal is to get donors to commit to 15 years’ worth of budget allocations to the bond program, allowing poor countries to ramp up large-scale health campaigns without worrying that funding would not be renewed year to year.

A third financing mechanism, favored by France, would tax airline tickets and use the money to pay for medicines for people with HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis or malaria. France implemented such a tax in its own country on July 1 and enjoys support for the idea from other countries.

Kates said that because the G8 countries did not agree on which mechanism to endorse in its main document, the press portrayed them as oppositional, when in fact each system can operate in complement to the others.

“It’s always nice to have G8 pronouncements to say these things are great,” said Owen Barder, of the Center for Global Development, a think-tank focused on poverty eradication. “But, in fact, the G8 has no budget, no bureaucracy, no process. So individual members can take things forward with or without the G8.”

The center expects several countries will launch a pilot AMC program by the end of 2006 to support the development of a vaccine to prevent pneumococcal infections. There is a version of a vaccine used in the United States, Barder said, that needs to be adapted to help children in African countries who often die or are left disabled after upper-respiratory infections.

Barder said that he expects such a pilot to be supported by Italy, Canada, the United Kingdom, the United States, Russia and “possibly France.” He said there will be outreach to donors not in the G8 – Australia, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Holland, Ireland and Switzerland – and to big foundations. His expectation was echoed by Lisa Carty of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, who also spoke at the CSIS panel.

Those expectations are based on a communiqué, resulting from an April meeting in Washington, in which the G7 finance ministers endorsed the concept of a pilot AMC for vaccines. The document calls for “the additional work necessary to make its launch possible in 2006.”

For additional information, see Health and G8 Summit 2006, St. Petersburg, Russia.


(The Washington File is a product of the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)


7 posted on 07/21/2006 3:42:11 PM PDT by cope85
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To: cope85
So why do I want a Union truck driver making $90 grand a year for driving a truck, so I have to subsidize over-inflated union wages, in every product I buy?
8 posted on 07/21/2006 3:42:12 PM PDT by AmericaUnited
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To: cope85

The Trinket Section in Truck Stops would have considerable growth in sales.

I think steering is on the right side in Indian vehicles. That could make for some fun on the highway.

9 posted on 07/21/2006 3:43:55 PM PDT by Cagey
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To: cope85

(After delivering a load of steel)

"Thank you! Come again!"


10 posted on 07/21/2006 3:45:25 PM PDT by Lazamataz (Islam is a perversion of faith, a lie against human spirit, an obscenity shouted in the face of G_d)
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To: cope85
Teamsters Union spokesman Galen Munroe told WND the plan "is yet another example of corporations exploiting a visa program to replace highly trained, hard-working Americans with cheap labor from overseas."

I'm not entirely sure that the term "highly trained" and "truck driver" belong in the same sentence.

But ignoring that, I'd rather have an English speaking Indian driving a US truck, duly inspected, than a Spanish speaking Mexican driving a Mexican truck on US roads.

11 posted on 07/21/2006 3:47:20 PM PDT by surely_you_jest
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To: Lazamataz

Mind-reader. LOL


12 posted on 07/21/2006 3:47:22 PM PDT by truthkeeper (It's the borders, stupid.)
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To: AmericaUnited
There is no way a truck driver is making $90,000 a year unless he's using two sets of log books.

There might be an owner operator with a specialized rig making that every few years, but consistently?

Can't happen.
13 posted on 07/21/2006 3:47:54 PM PDT by investigateworld (Abortion stops a beating heart)
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To: gubamyster

http://csr-news.net/main/united-nations-global-compact-4th-international-learning-forum-meeting/2006/07/16/
Participants from all over the world will meet in Accra, Ghana to learn about challenges of implementing the Global Compact principles and partnerships for development. The meeting targets managers and other experts from business, civil society and labour that are working on corporate citizenship, sustainability and partnership issues. 200 america co have sign on to this


14 posted on 07/21/2006 3:49:45 PM PDT by cope85
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To: surely_you_jest

Well, truck driver and highly trained aren't in the same sentence here, are they? Okay, same paragraph, then. Or same article. I just don't think that truck drivers would qualify as "highly trained".


15 posted on 07/21/2006 3:49:54 PM PDT by surely_you_jest
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To: Lazamataz

we don,t make steel any more,name me 3 america co


16 posted on 07/21/2006 3:51:33 PM PDT by cope85
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To: cope85

I suspect that the Indian drivers (the ones that flunked the computer tech support class) will be driving on the new highway from Mexico to Canada courtesy of the New World Order.


17 posted on 07/21/2006 3:52:39 PM PDT by Jean S
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To: JeanS

THE NEW WORLD DISORDER Foreign ownership of U.S. airlines? Bush ready to defy Congress' ban despite pilots' fears of another Dubai ports deal

The Department of Transportation, acting under President Bush's orders, is preparing to issue an administrative ruling that would open U.S. airlines up to foreign ownership, despite specific prohibitions and warnings from Congress, as well as predictions by pilots that another Dubai ports controversy is in the offing.

The proposed ruling puts the Air Line Pilots Association, or ALPA – the largest airline pilot union in the world representing 61,000 pilots who fly for 40 U.S. and Canadian airlines – at odds with the Bush administration.

The administration is determined to comply with European Union demands presented in the November 2005 "open skies" negotiations. (So-called "open skies" agreements are bilateral or multilateral agreements that liberalize the rules for international aviation markets and minimize government intervention.)

The EU is threatening to delay the signing of an open skies treaty unless the U.S. changes restrictions on the percentage of a U.S. airline that can be foreign-owned. The U.S. currently has 74 bilateral open skies agreements, none of which require any rule changes on the foreign ownership of U.S. airlines.

The Bush administration continues to advocate the EU position, arguing that the Department of Transportation should issue new administrative rules, if necessary, even in direct defiance of Congress.

U.S. pilots have provided WND with copies of draft letters the Air Line Pilots Association has organized.

ALPA is encouraging pilots to write letters and e-mails of protest to Congress, newspapers and national television and radio outlets.

"Do not underestimate the seriousness of this issue!" ALPA has advised, "This is do-or-die, sink-or-swim time."

Some U.S. pilots who have spoken with WND on condition of anonymity expressed concern about job reprisals.

The pilots have argued another Dubai Ports World-type controversy is brewing in which the "Bush administration does not care about selling out key U.S. assets to foreigners." ALPA calls for action echo the alarm:

The writing is clearly on the wall! This Administration wants foreign investors, airlines or otherwise, to pay for the costs of our aviation infrastructure, while risking hundreds of thousands of aviation jobs, the Civil Reserve Air Fleet program (CRAF), and the safety and security of our national airspace. Forty percent of all Air Force Reserve and National Guard pilots are also airline pilots. ALPA believes the foreign-ownership issue is a fight for survival:

The time to act is now! Together, with every pilot across this country participating in this effort, we can stop this rogue attack on our profession and our industry. There is no issue more important than preventing this NPRM (Notice of Proposed Rulemaking) from moving forward. If the White House is successful in changing the foreign ownership rules through DOT affirmative action, within just a few short years our industry will mirror the maritime industry. Our jobs will no longer exist, our country's ability to militarily act abroad will be handicapped, and our families may no longer be safe in our own airspace! The ALPA concern concludes with this: "Our country already has a dependence upon foreign oil. Are we going to allow the DOT to make air travel dependent on foreign airlines, too?"

On June 14, in an official statement of administration policy, the Office of Management and Budget in the executive office of the president put out a notice that the Department of Transportation intended to change the foreign ownership rule by issuing a new administrative rule:

The Administration understands that an amendment may be offered to prohibit the use of funds to implement a final rule regarding foreign investment in U.S. airlines. The proposed rule would facilitate a landmark agreement with the European Union that would provide significant benefit to consumers as well as the domestic passenger and cargo airline industry. The Administration has worked with Congress to address concerns with the final rule and recently extended the final comment period by an additional 60 days. The Administration strongly opposes any amendment that would prevent the Department of Transportation from finalizing its rule. To counter the Bush administration, five congressmen wrote a letter eight days later, June 22, to DOT Secretary Norman Mineta on U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure stationary.

In citing specific congressional prohibitions, the letter noted Congress had taken two specific actions to put the White House on notice that "a major change to the current law regarding foreign ownership of U.S. airlines should be accomplished only by congressional action, not unilaterally imposed by the executive branch."

The letter cited the following congressional prohibitions:

First, the Conference Report on H.R. 4939, Making Emergency Supplementary Appropriations for the Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2006, includes 'language preventing the Secretary from issuing a final rule regarding foreign control of U.S. airlines for 120 days.' Second, during consideration of H.R. 5576 – the Transportation, Treasury, Housing and Urban Development, the Judiciary, the District of Columbia, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2007 (TTHUD appropriations), the House adopted, by an overwhelming vote of 291 to 137, an amendment prohibiting the department from finalizing or implementing the policy proposed in the rulemaking during the next fiscal year. The letter concluded by reminding Mineta, "the courts have ruled that an executive branch agency does not have authority to interpret a law in a manner inconsistent with the plain meaning of the words of the law."

Signing the letter were Reps. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif.; chairman of the Armed Services Committee; Frank A. LoBiondo, R-N.J.; chairman on the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee; Ted Poe, R-Texas; James L. Oberstar. D-Minn., ranking Democratic member on the Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee; and Jerry F. Costello, D-Ill., ranking Democratic member of the Subcommittee on Aviation.

A major proponent of the rule change has been Under Secretary of Transportation Jeffery Shane, who was quoted on a government Web site in April suggesting Mineta remains "committed to completing this important rulemaking procedure."


18 posted on 07/21/2006 3:53:04 PM PDT by cope85
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To: cope85
we don,t make steel any more,name me 3 america co

Is that a demonstration of the Indian Pigeon English mentioned in the article?

19 posted on 07/21/2006 3:53:23 PM PDT by AmericaUnited
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To: AmericaUnited

that the point you make LOL


20 posted on 07/21/2006 3:54:24 PM PDT by cope85
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To: AmericaUnited

Foreign Companies Are Buying Up American Highways and Bridges Built by U.S. Taxpayers
Associated Press ^ | Saturday July 15 | Leslie Miller


Posted on 07/16/2006 10:30:40 AM PDT by cope85


Foreign Companies Are Buying Up American Highways and Bridges Built by U.S. Taxpayers

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Roads and bridges built by U.S. taxpayers are starting to be sold off, and so far foreign-owned companies are doing the buying. On a single day in June, an Australian-Spanish partnership paid $3.8 billion to lease the Indiana Toll Road. An Australian company bought a 99-year lease on Virginia's Pocahontas Parkway, and Texas officials decided to let a Spanish-American partnership build and run a toll road from Austin to Seguin for 50 years.

Few people know that the tolls from the U.S. side of the tunnel between Detroit and Windsor, Canada, go to a subsidiary of an Australian company -- which also owns a bridge in Alabama.

Some experts welcome the trend. Robert Poole, transportation director for the conservative think tank Reason Foundation, said private investors can raise more money than politicians to build new roads because these kind of owners are willing to raise tolls.

"They depoliticize the tolling decision," Poole said. Besides, he said, foreign companies have purchased infrastructure in Europe for years; only now are U.S. companies beginning to get into the business of buying roads and bridges.

Gas taxes and user fees have fueled the expansion of the nation's highway system. Thousands of miles of roads built since the 1950s changed the landscape, accelerating the growth of suburbia and creating a reliance on motor vehicles to move freight, get to work and take vacations.

In 1956, President Eisenhower pushed to create the interstate highway system for a different: to move troops and tanks and evacuate civilians.

The Bush administration's plan to let a foreign company manage U.S. ports met a storm of protest in February. But plans to sell or lease highways to companies outside the United States have not met such resistance.

John Foote, senior fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, said the government can take over a highway in an emergency. But he objects to selling roads to raise cash.

But that is just what Chicago has done.

Last year, the city sold a 99-year lease on the eight-mile Chicago Skyway for $1.83 billion. The buyer was the same consortium that leased the Indiana Toll Road -- Macquarie Infrastructure Group of Sydney, Australia, and Cintra Concesiones de Infraestructuras de Transporte of Madrid, Spain.

Chicago used the money to pay off debt and fund road projects. Skyway tolls rose 50 cents, to $2.50; By 2017, they will reach $5.

The Indiana Toll Road lease is a better deal, Foote thinks, because the proceeds will pay for urgent projects such as road and bridge improvements.

That need is precisely why cities and states have begun to look to foreign investors.

Between 1980 and 2004, people drove 94 percent more highway miles, according to Federal Highway Administration statistics. But the number of new highway lane miles rose by only 6 percent.

Washington is not likely to produce more money to build roads. The federal highway fund -- which will have a balance of about $16 billion by the end of 2006 -- will run out in 2009 or 2010, according to White House and congressional estimates.

About half the states now let companies build and operate roads. Many changed their laws recently to do so.

So Illinois lawmakers are examining privatizing the Illinois Tollway, New Jersey lawmakers are considering selling 49 percent of the state's two big toll roads and a gubernatorial candidate in Ohio wants to sell the turnpike.

Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels, who championed his state's toll road deal, now wants investors to build and operate a toll road from Indianapolis to Evansville.

Patrick Bauer, the Indiana House's Democratic leader, says such deals are taxpayer rip-offs.

Bauer believes Macquarie-Cintra could make $133 billion over the 75-year life of the Indiana Toll Road lease -- for which Indiana got $3.8 billion.

"In five, maybe 10 years, all that money is gone, and the tolls keep rising and the money keeps flowing into the foreign coffers," Bauer said.

Orange County, Calif., got burned by a toll-road lease for a different reason.

The road, part of state Route 91, was built and run for $130 million by California Private Transportation Company, partly owned by France-based Compagnie Financiere et Industrielle des Autoroutes. The toll road opened in 1995.

Seven years later, Orange County was looking at gridlock. But it could not build more roads because of a provision in the lease. So it bought back the lease -- for $207.5 million.

To encourage more domestic investment in highways, former Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta made a pitch to Wall Street on May 23.

"The time is now for United States investors -- including our financial, construction and engineering institutions -- to get involved in transportation investments," said Mineta, who left office July 7.

U.S. companies are getting the message.

San Antonio-based Zachry Construction Co., along with Cintra, received approval on June 29 for a 50-year lease to build and run a toll road from Austin to Seguin for $1.3 billion.

That is part of Texas Gov. Rick Perry's vision to attract more than $80 billion in private funds for roads by 2030. He wants a new tollway from Oklahoma to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, and one from Shreveport, La., and Texarkana to Mexico. Cintra-Zachry reached a $7.2 billion deal last year to develop the project's first phase. The announcement of a $1.3 billion deal in June was part of that $7.2 billion agreement, said Perry's spokesman, Robert Black.

"In Texas, our population is going to double in the next 40 years and our current infrastructure can't handle that growth," Black said.

Not everyone in Texas buys the idea. Harris County officials recently voted against selling three toll roads. Also, independent gubernatorial candidate Carole Keeton Strayhorn opposes Perry's toll road plan.

"Texas freeways belong to Texans, not foreign companies," she said


21 posted on 07/21/2006 3:54:43 PM PDT by cope85
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To: JeanS

New World Order Rising? - Thoughts on the UN World Summit on Sustainable Development http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/743512/posts


22 posted on 07/21/2006 3:57:02 PM PDT by cope85
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To: cope85

Feds stonewalling on 'super-state' plan?
Agency fails to respond to FOIA request on 'North American union'

World Net Daily | July 19 2006

The U.S. Department of Commerce appears to be stonewalling a Freedom of Information Act request to obtain complete disclosure of a congressionally unauthorized plan to implement a trilateral agreement with Mexico and Canada that apparently could lead to a North American union.

The plan is being implemented through an office within the Department of Commerce as the "Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America," under the direction of Geri Word, who is listed as working in the department's North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, office.

As WorldNetDaily previously reported, the White House has established executive branch working groups documented on the Commerce website SPP.gov. The Security and Prosperity Partnership, or SPP, was issued as a joint press statement by President Bush, Mexican President Vincente Fox and then-Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin in Waco, Texas, on March 23, 2005.

Commerce has missed a statutory requirement to respond to the FOIA request, filed by author Jerome R. Corsi, within 20 businesses days.

In an e-mail from Bobbie Parsons on behalf of Robert Dolan, the department acknowledged receipt of the FOIA request on June 19. WorldNetDaily first reported Corsi’s FOIA request June 20.

Robert McQuire, attorney for Corsi, emailed Commerce Monday, notifying the agency of the statutory violation in their failure to respond.

Yesterday, McGuire received an e-mail response from Brenda Dolan, the departmental Freedom of Information and Privacy Act officer.

Dolan wrote:


The International Trade Administration, which is a bureau of the U.S. Department of Commerce, was assigned lead action on your Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request number CRRIF 06-376, for information concerning the Prosperity Working Groups. I have contacted Linda Bell, FOIA officer, ITA regarding the status of your pending FOIA request. I will provide the status of your pending request as soon as I receive word from Ms. Bell.
McQuire told WND that this response was unacceptable.

"The Department of Commerce skipped a deadline required by law," he explained. "The act's 20-day requirement relates to the department as a whole, not its sub-units."

McQuire also told WND he had copied Bell on his original e-mail copy of the FOIA request.

"I used Linda Bell's e-mail address as listed on the DOC website and her email bounced back," he said. "DOC has especially poor grounds for the delay, especially since DOC sent the request to Ms. Bell internally as well."

Corsi believes the department is stonewalling the FOIA request.

"The Bush administration does not want the American public to know how far along the creation of a new regional government, the North American union, is proceeding behind closed doors," Corsi said. "President Bush is acting as if he believes the U.S. Constitution is nothing more than a meaningless piece of paper. The American public have a right to know what the executive branch is doing with SPP and the FOIA request was designed to get that information released."

Attorney McQuire was equally firm.

"We thought we might encounter some recalcitrance," he explained to WND, "but I am frankly shocked that we had received no response at all. The department acknowledged its receipt of our request on June 19. The requirements of the Freedom of Information Act are quite clear: The government is allowed to respond to a FOIA request in many ways, but the complete failure to respond within 20 business days is simply not an option."



23 posted on 07/21/2006 3:59:42 PM PDT by cope85
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To: cope85
we don,t make steel any more,name me 3 america co

Wendys. Kodak. Harley Davidson.

24 posted on 07/21/2006 4:00:12 PM PDT by Lazamataz (Islam is a perversion of faith, a lie against human spirit, an obscenity shouted in the face of G_d)
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To: cope85

I need to work on my sarcasm skills because you misunderstood my post. You're a nut.


25 posted on 07/21/2006 4:03:10 PM PDT by Jean S
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To: blackie

Ping


26 posted on 07/21/2006 4:04:17 PM PDT by investigateworld (Abortion stops a beating heart)
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To: Lazamataz

LOL. Well-played.


27 posted on 07/21/2006 4:04:50 PM PDT by A Balrog of Morgoth (With fire, sword, and stinging whip I drive the RINOs in terror before me.)
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To: A Balrog of Morgoth

Hey, he didn't specify..... :^)


28 posted on 07/21/2006 4:05:43 PM PDT by Lazamataz (Islam is a perversion of faith, a lie against human spirit, an obscenity shouted in the face of G_d)
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To: cope85

Corsi has become quite the reactionary lately. Oh well.


29 posted on 07/21/2006 4:07:48 PM PDT by pissant
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To: JeanS
You're a nut.

Personal Attack!! ;-)

30 posted on 07/21/2006 4:08:34 PM PDT by TomServo ("Uh, Donner, party of three please.")
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To: JeanS

Our new masters will force us to eat Canadian bacon tortillas with mango chutney.


31 posted on 07/21/2006 4:23:02 PM PDT by dighton
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To: All
Strike 1: Posted on Worldnutdaily
Strike 2: Article by Jerome Corsi
Strike 3: Only a quote from side of the issue..
32 posted on 07/21/2006 4:34:54 PM PDT by KevinDavis (http://www.cafepress.com/spacefuture)
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To: cope85; B4Ranch

BUMPping


33 posted on 07/21/2006 4:59:52 PM PDT by Brian Allen ("In war there is no substitute for victory." General Douglas MacArthur)
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To: cope85; darkwing104

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

34 posted on 07/21/2006 5:17:37 PM PDT by vigilante2 (Thank You Veterans)
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To: Lobbyist

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1670135/posts?page=21#21


35 posted on 07/21/2006 5:19:23 PM PDT by B4Ranch (Illegal immigration Control and US Border Security - The jobs George W. Bush refuses to do.)
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To: cope85; timpad; TBarnett34; MeekOneGOP; PetroniDE; Lady Jag; mhking; glock rocks; Darksheare; ...
Aw Gee...I was just relaxing...

Please let me know if you want ON or OFF my Viking Kitty/ZOT ping list!. . . don't be shy.

36 posted on 07/21/2006 5:20:15 PM PDT by darkwing104 (Let's get dangerous)
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To: darkwing104
WOw, good catch! A stealthzot!

I guess this means zotoids have stolen our stealth technology!

37 posted on 07/21/2006 5:23:49 PM PDT by Darkwolf377 (http://www.savethesoldiers.com/)
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To: darkwing104

Neat pic.


38 posted on 07/21/2006 5:25:30 PM PDT by dighton
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To: darkwing104; cope85
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
39 posted on 07/21/2006 5:25:46 PM PDT by dynachrome ("Where am I? Where am I going? Why am I in a handbasket?")
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To: AmericaUnited
So why do I want a Union truck driver making $90 grand a year for driving a truck, so I have to subsidize over-inflated union wages, in every product I buy?

I suspect there may be numerous American workers that feel the same about you and your job...If they are worth less, why are you not???

In fact, I don't drive a truck and likely don't do the same job you do...I'd like to see all of you take a 50-75% cut in wages...I could save even 'more' money when I shop at China-Mart...

40 posted on 07/21/2006 5:31:34 PM PDT by Iscool
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To: darkwing104
"Aw Gee...I was just relaxing..."


41 posted on 07/21/2006 5:36:04 PM PDT by DocRock
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To: darkwing104

42 posted on 07/21/2006 5:37:47 PM PDT by DocRock
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To: Iscool

So give me one reason why I and millions of other consumers should want to pay higher prices so a few can benefit?


43 posted on 07/21/2006 5:40:22 PM PDT by AmericaUnited
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To: TomServo

44 posted on 07/21/2006 5:40:34 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: cope85

US Steel, Mac Steel, North Star Steel


45 posted on 07/21/2006 5:43:15 PM PDT by proud_yank (If you think healthcare is expensive now, wait until its free.)
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To: pissant
"Reactionary"? Nope, he's become a full blown, tip to toe tinfoil wearing nutjob, who has been glommed onto by FR's nutjobs. It's becoming quite clear that some here need to go post this junk someplace else, the black helicopters are beginning to make FR look like an Art Bell site.
46 posted on 07/21/2006 5:43:19 PM PDT by nopardons
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To: Dog Gone

We've never had kitties there before..


47 posted on 07/21/2006 5:43:53 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (The Internet is the samizdat of liberty..)
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To: darkwing104

What a great picture! Ooooooooooooooooooooooooo..... such nice kitties. :-)


48 posted on 07/21/2006 5:45:29 PM PDT by nopardons
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To: TASMANIANRED

JimRob may have hired some guy kittens. Maybe we should ask. ;-)


49 posted on 07/21/2006 5:47:15 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: AmericaUnited
So give me one reason why I and millions of other consumers should want to pay higher prices so a few can benefit?

Because this is America where everyone can prosper, not just you...You may like the two class system they currently have in Mexico and you may get it here...Apparently you figure you're going to be in the upper class...

50 posted on 07/21/2006 5:48:07 PM PDT by Iscool
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