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STUPID FIREARMS QUESTIONS

Posted on 08/04/2006 9:29:09 AM PDT by 7thson

Alright, I am going to set myself up here for flaming and such - especially by certain @$$wipes who enjoy making themselves feel superior - by I have a couple questions concerning firearms.

Basic question one - what is the difference between a pistol and a revolver?

Basic question two - what is the difference between single action and double action?

Basic question three - which should a beginner go with - revolver, pistol, SA, or DA?


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: banglist; colt; doubleaction; firearms; magnum; pistol; revolver; singleaction; sw; wipes
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1 posted on 08/04/2006 9:29:11 AM PDT by 7thson
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To: 7thson

What is best? Whatever the owner is comfortable with that will do the job.


2 posted on 08/04/2006 9:31:42 AM PDT by RightWhale (Repeal the law of the excluded middle)
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To: 7thson
A pistol is any handgun, while a revolver is a hand gun in which rounds are fired from a revolving chamber.

Single-action is when the trigger only releases the hammer.

Double-action is when the trigger cocks and releases the hammer so you don't have to cock the hammer manually.

3 posted on 08/04/2006 9:32:31 AM PDT by wideawake ("The nation which forgets its defenders will itself be forgotten." - Calvin Coolidge)
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To: 7thson

All revolvers are pistols but not all pistols are revolvers. A .45 colt magazine-fed pistol is not a revolver, as you probably know. A single-action is cocked by the thumb on the hammer. A double action can be fired repeatedly by squeezing the trigger. I think a four-inch double action .357 would be best and shoot .38's in it until you're ready for the heavier kick.


4 posted on 08/04/2006 9:32:36 AM PDT by elhombrelibre (Knowledge is power, so the MSM makes sure the terrorists have our classified info.)
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To: 7thson

If you're looking for a gun for a child, get them a rifle first. Raise a kid on a handgun and he'll become a thug. The handgun can even come a month after the rifle, but get the rifle first.

Revolvers (the ones with cylinders) are probably better to start with ... easier to maintain, easier to shoot, simple all the way around.


5 posted on 08/04/2006 9:32:39 AM PDT by SittinYonder (Ic t gehate, t ic heonon nelle fleon fotes trym, ac wille furor gan,)
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To: 7thson

A revolver has the drum loaded with rounds (like in the old west movies). A pistol has a magazine (like a 9mm). As for which to start with, I'd say go to a gun range and rent their weapons and see which one suits you best.

Be sure you can hit your target. That's what gun control is all about.


6 posted on 08/04/2006 9:32:44 AM PDT by rfreedom4u (Native Texan)
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To: 7thson
Anyone giving you gun advise will have superior knowledge on the subject and run the risk of being called names by you?

That's a great way to seek advise and make friends.

7 posted on 08/04/2006 9:33:49 AM PDT by TexasCajun
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To: 7thson

You're going to get at least 134 different opinions here.

Check this out and it will answer many of your questions.


http://www.all-about-handguns.com/Pistol/BUYING%20A%20HANDGUN%20FOR%20THE%20FIRST%20TIME.html


8 posted on 08/04/2006 9:34:03 AM PDT by Cagey
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To: 7thson

1. Revolvers are pistols. Pistols generally include revolvers and automatic pistols

2. With a single action pistol you have to manually pull the hammer back to be able to pull the trigger and fire the pistol. With a double action you can maunnaully pull the hammer back like a singel action but you can also pull the trigger to draw back the hammer and fire the weapon.

3. Get a revolver and an auto. You can never have too many guns.


9 posted on 08/04/2006 9:34:24 AM PDT by SeanOGuano
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To: 7thson

Can't flame someone with an honest question IMO, and FR is a great place to ask them.

Pistol: Any handgun.
Revolver: A hadgun that uses a revolving cylinder to hold the ammo.
Single action: The shooter has to cock the hammer (pull it back) before pulling the trigger.
Double action: Just point and shoot.

If your questions are this basic, take a training course before you even think of buying a gun. It will give you the info you need for your purchasing decision.


10 posted on 08/04/2006 9:35:03 AM PDT by Squawk 8888 (Yay! It's Riding Season!)
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To: 7thson
get started
11 posted on 08/04/2006 9:35:21 AM PDT by n230099 ("If the creator had a purpose in equipping us with a neck, he surely meant us to stick it out.")
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To: 7thson

A revolver is a revolver, a pistol is a usually a semi-automatic (not quite sure where single shots, etc fall in this defiintion)

Single action (revolver) hammer must be maually cocked before firing.

Double action (revolver) pulling trigger will fire firearm.

Single action (pistol/semi-auto) Hammer is cocked by manual manipulation of slide for first shot. Cycling of action cocks each shot thereafter.

Double action (pistol/semi-auto) pulling trigger fires firearm for first shot, each shot thereafter can either be double action, or single action depending on design. (There's a lot of grey area in some definitions with the newer striker fired guns such as Glock, Springfield XD...)

FWIW I'm a big fan of Smith & Wesson (DA) revolvers, followed by 1911 type (SA) autos. Slim don't do plastic guns.


12 posted on 08/04/2006 9:35:22 AM PDT by Tijeras_Slim (Crazier than a rattlesnake at a Thai wedding)
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To: 7thson
Basic question three - which should a beginner go with - revolver, pistol, SA, or DA?

For the beginner, most likely take the Double Action (DA) revolver versus the semi-automatic handgun. It's easier...

13 posted on 08/04/2006 9:37:29 AM PDT by demlosers
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To: 7thson

You are an 18-year retired vet of the Navy and you don't know the answer to these questions?

I'm very dissappointed in the US Navy training.


14 posted on 08/04/2006 9:37:37 AM PDT by Integrityrocks
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To: 7thson
http://www.horstheld.com/default.htm

Great antique gun porn at above URL.
15 posted on 08/04/2006 9:40:27 AM PDT by HuntsvilleTxVeteran ("Remember the Alamo, Goliad and WACO, It is Time for a new San Jacinto")
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To: 7thson

Here goes what I think:

A pistol is a hand held short barrel weapon.
A revolver is a type of pistol.
A semi-automatic would be another type.
(fully automatic another type, but I'll leave that one out of this)
A revolver has a cylindrical 'magazine' which houses the ammunition to be fired. The cartridge to be fired is the one lined up to the barrel. A single action revolver would require you to physically cock the hammer back by hand which would rotate the cylinder at the same time, then pull the trigger to discharge the weapon.
A double action revolver would function as above, but also, you can just keep pulling the trigger and the mechanism inside will do the hammer cocking and cylinder rotating all at once.
A semi-auto would be similar, but no cylinder.
It would have a magazine loaded with cartridges. A single action (such as Colt 1911 style) would recuire you to rack the slide to load cartride and cock the hammer. Once thats done, you can keep pulling the trigger until the ammo's gone. The blowback will automatically chamber another round and cock the hammer. But, if the hammer isn't cocked, and you pull the trigger nothing will happen. Even if there is a round in the chamber. If the hammer isn't cocked, a trigger pull won't cock it.
A double action semi-auto would do that. A trigger pull would cause the hammer to cock and discharge the weapon. But, a trigger pull alone won't rack the slide and load the weapon. A round would already have to be in the chamber.


16 posted on 08/04/2006 9:40:37 AM PDT by Center Line Theory
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To: 7thson

In my opinion a revolver is not the best choice for a beginner, as most don't have a safety and also when loaded there is always a round under the firing pin as every round has it's own firing chamber.
With a semi auto pistol you can choose to not cock it (not put one in the pipe) so there is no round in the chamber this makes it safer to carry.


17 posted on 08/04/2006 9:41:15 AM PDT by READINABLUESTATE ((Newt is great in 2008))
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To: 7thson; Tijeras_Slim
This should be the gun you start with. Its one of the best and will last you a lifetime.
Single action semi-automatic .45. Im drooling just looking at it!!!

Click the pic and find out more.

18 posted on 08/04/2006 9:41:22 AM PDT by Delta 21 ( MKC USCG - ret)
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To: 7thson
There are no dumb questions when it comes to gun safety.
1. A semiautomatic is usually called a pistol but some people refer to revolvers as pistols.
2. Single action is where the hammer must be cocked. On semi's after the first round is fired the rest will be double action which means the slide will cock the hammer. On double actions semi's you can either cock hammer manually with your thumb or pull the trigger to cock and shoot. On single actions revolvers you must cock with thumb after each shot but on double actions revolvers again you can cock manually with thumb are pull the trigger.
3. Probably for a beginner a good double action revolver would be easier to adjust to. Such as a good snub nose .38 caliber.
19 posted on 08/04/2006 9:41:38 AM PDT by longhorn too
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To: wideawake

So, with a SA, you have to pull the hammer back first, and then fire?


20 posted on 08/04/2006 9:43:08 AM PDT by 7thson (I've got a seat at the big conference table! I'm gonna paint my logo on it!)
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To: 7thson
Basic question one - what is the difference between a pistol and a revolver? Basic question two - what is the difference between single action and double action? Basic question three - which should a beginner go with - revolver, pistol, SA, or DA?

1. A pistol has a magazine for the rounds. A revolver has the revolving wheel you see in the Westerns.

2. Single action is for a semi-automatic. The gas from the last round chambers the next round. Double action, the trigger pull both fires the round and chambers the next round. Effect. It's usually harder to pull the trigger on a double action because you are doing more. Double action only means that's all you get. That would be a pistol or revolver with no hammer. But many revolvers have a hammer. When you cock the hammer, it is single action. When you just pull the trigger, it is double action.

3. I recommend a double action only revolver. Simple. Doesn't jam. For carry, Keltec makes really little and lightweight double action only pistols.

21 posted on 08/04/2006 9:44:39 AM PDT by ModelBreaker
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To: TexasCajun

Maybe, but some people on this post - like Cobra64 - come off insulting and arrogant for no reason at all in threads that do not concern them. I should have been more specific and for that I apologize.


22 posted on 08/04/2006 9:45:50 AM PDT by 7thson (I've got a seat at the big conference table! I'm gonna paint my logo on it!)
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To: Center Line Theory

I'll just follow up that testing my single action comment; 'nothing will happen if the hammer isn't cocked even with a round in the chamber'; by pointing it at yourselve or others would be unwise. A gun should always be considered loaded and never pointed at yourself or others unless you mean to kill them or yourself.


23 posted on 08/04/2006 9:46:16 AM PDT by Center Line Theory
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To: 7thson
Correct. On a common revolver, say a .38 revolver, you use your thumb or preferably your other hand to cock the hammer and then you squeeze the trigger.

With a .45 semiautomatic you can pull the trigger slightly, hear the click of the hammer cocking, and then squeeze the trigger completely and fire.

24 posted on 08/04/2006 9:46:49 AM PDT by wideawake ("The nation which forgets its defenders will itself be forgotten." - Calvin Coolidge)
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To: Integrityrocks

Dunno if it's different today, but I went through USN reserve boot camp and never handled a pistol. Once on active duty, I stood many a watch with loaded .45, never having recieved a bit of training in it's use. On one boring midwatch, I disassembled the .45 and it took almost the entire rest of the watch to get it back together ;-}

Hope things have improved since those days


25 posted on 08/04/2006 9:46:57 AM PDT by Vermonter
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To: 7thson

I've taught my son and most of his friends how to use firearms safely. Most of them had a much easier time learning to use a revolver than they did learning to use a semi-automatic. (Rifles, of course, are easier than any kind of pistol.)

One of the advantages for revolvers was a significant reduction in the number of misfires. From what I have seen, people who have never shot a handgun tend to hold a semi-automatic too loosely, leading to problems feeding the next round. (I've seen this with 9mm as well as with 22's, so it is not because the rounds are not powerful enough.)

Regardless of what you buy, be SURE to spend a lot of time at the range learning to shoot safely and accurately.

Take some classes! If you don't know what "A gun is always loaded" means, then you haven't been trained well enough and should not even handle a gun.


26 posted on 08/04/2006 9:47:17 AM PDT by EternalHope (Boycott everything French forever. Including their vassal nations.)
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To: Tijeras_Slim
Slim don't do plastic guns.

LOL

Since we're talking basics here...

What's good to use for a target?

Just joined a fish and game club up here in Lake George.

Went to the local sporting goods shop and all they had was a small cardboard stand with some stick-on sheets.

Looking forward to FReeper input on do it yourself targets.

27 posted on 08/04/2006 9:47:56 AM PDT by andyandval
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To: READINABLUESTATE
In my opinion a revolver is not the best choice for a beginner, as most don't have a safety and also when loaded there is always a round under the firing pin as every round has it's own firing chamber.

With a semi auto pistol you can choose to not cock it (not put one in the pipe) so there is no round in the chamber this makes it safer to carry.

I would have to disagree with this on all counts. A semi-auto is only "safer" if you remember its state. This is a bad assumption.

A double action revolver requires a stiff pull on the trigger. It doesn't go off by "accident."

28 posted on 08/04/2006 9:48:47 AM PDT by Dracian
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To: 7thson

I'm sure you'll get lot's of good advise and suggestions for your needs.


29 posted on 08/04/2006 9:49:07 AM PDT by TexasCajun
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To: 7thson

I'm not going to answer questions 1 & 2 because you're going to get a lot of responses answering this one for you and they're all going to be correct.

However, for question 3, I would personally go with a Ruger GP-100 .357. It's both a SA & a DA. It has plenty of stopping power plus you can fire .38's out of a .357 to save you a couple $. And it's a very versatile, over-built gun. Great for personal protection and for plinking. Small enough to carry and big enough to be accurate with.

This was actually my first gun that I purchased from a little gun store in Baltimore County years ago. I'm a big fan of revolvers, you only have to point and shoot. No worrying about whether there's one in the chamber, is the safety on, etc.

Get one gun, PRACTICE with it, learn it, and then go get a bunch more!


30 posted on 08/04/2006 9:50:19 AM PDT by drjack
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To: andyandval

I find that using a target that has good contrast with the sights is helpful. If you have black sights, a light colored target will help you focus on the sights and get good alignment. The FBI Q target is good. Trying to get everything lined up on a black bullseye (particularly if you're at an indoor range with low light) isn't as easy.


31 posted on 08/04/2006 9:55:29 AM PDT by Tijeras_Slim (Crazier than a rattlesnake at a Thai wedding)
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To: 7thson

George Bemis . . . wore in his belt an old original "Allen" revolver, such as irreverent people called a "pepper-box." Simply drawing the trigger back, cocked and fired the pistol. As the trigger came back, the hammer would begin to rise and the barrel to turn over, and presently down would drop the hammer, and away would speed the ball. To aim along the turning barrel and hit the thing aimed at was a feat which was probably never done with an "Allen" in the world. But George's was a reliable weapon, nevertheless, because, as one of the stage-drivers afterward said, "If she didn't get what she went after, she would fetch something else." And so she did. She went after a deuce of spades nailed against a tree, once, and fetched a mule standing about thirty yards to the left of it. Bemis did not want the mule; but the owner came out with a double-barreled shotgun and persuaded him to buy it, anyhow. It was a cheerful weapon--the "Allen." Sometimes all its six barrels would go off at once, and then there was no safe place in all the region round about, but behind it.
- Roughing It

MARK TWAIN


32 posted on 08/04/2006 10:02:49 AM PDT by HuntsvilleTxVeteran ("Remember the Alamo, Goliad and WACO, It is Time for a new San Jacinto")
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To: 7thson
I think a beginner should go with borrowing lots of different handguns at the range. If I could do it all over again, I'd start with a .22 revolver to learn good habits. Then I'd go handle and shoot as many different pistols as I could until I found the one for me.

As I type I have an S&W 686P 4" hanging off my belt. Golly I like this gun! But my usual concealed carry is a SIG P239 in 357 Sig. I weigh 190 and am 5'10" and I don't find this gun too large or heavy I really like the way it shoots.

I started out with DA/SA but a job I had required Glocks which are sort of kind of DA only and I got a SIG with their DAK trigger - a true double action. And I hate to admit it but with my DA/SA sigs, if my dander is up, my first (DA) shot will tend to go down and towards my weak side, so I 'm coming to appreciate the consistent trigger pull of a DA only.

I think handguns are kind of like a lot of personal purchases. It's good to put off deciding as long as you can, because what feels good now may not feel so good after you've had it for a while, and then what are you going to do with it? I still have but almost never carry or practice with a little titanium, 14 oz., 5-shot 38 special. Gee I hate that gun.

33 posted on 08/04/2006 10:11:50 AM PDT by Mad Dawg (If the gates of Hell prevail against it, it probably never was a church anyway.)
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To: 7thson
I'll skip answering your questions since they've already been answered by other FReepers. However you may be interested in the following:

NRA Basic Firearm Training Courses

NRA Courses in Maryland

34 posted on 08/04/2006 10:13:06 AM PDT by EdReform (Protect our 2nd Amendment Rights - Join the NRA today - www.nra.org)
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To: Integrityrocks

"You are an 18-year retired vet of the Navy and you don't know the answer to these questions"?



Hey, slack off on the guy, I met a 22 year, retired veteran of the NYPD who came to me for advice on choosing a home defense weapon. Nice guy, but his lack of knowledge was downright scary. That has been taken care of, but he still talks and walks funny! I don't think I can cure that, LOL


35 posted on 08/04/2006 10:13:32 AM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (LET ME DIE ON MY FEET, IN MY SWAMP)
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To: 7thson

The answers above are correct but just to confuse the issue, in Britain a 'pistol' is what we call an automatic and a revolver is always called a revolver.


36 posted on 08/04/2006 10:21:10 AM PDT by Grut
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To: Mad Dawg; 7thson

I think a beginner should go with borrowing lots of different handguns at the range. If I could do it all over again, I'd start with a .22 revolver to learn good habits. Then I'd go handle and shoot as many different pistols as I could until I found the one for me.


Very good advice. Some ranges, like the range I belong to, also rent guns.

37 posted on 08/04/2006 10:23:57 AM PDT by EdReform (Protect our 2nd Amendment Rights - Join the NRA today - www.nra.org)
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To: 7thson

Since the rest of your questions have been answered, I'll echo some others here and recommend you look at a revolver as your first pistol. Not to take anything away from autos, but revolvers are a lot simpler to maintain. It won't be long before you go back to your favorite gun shop for an auto.


38 posted on 08/04/2006 10:27:54 AM PDT by Doohickey (I am not unappeasable. YOU are just too easily appeased.)
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To: Integrityrocks; 7thson
You are an 18-year retired vet of the Navy and you don't know the answer to these questions?

I'm very dissappointed in the US Navy training.


Ditto...you owe everyone an explanation.
39 posted on 08/04/2006 10:30:28 AM PDT by Vision (I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me" Philippians 3:14)
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To: Tijeras_Slim
Aha. Never considered the color of the target.

Thanks.

40 posted on 08/04/2006 11:02:04 AM PDT by andyandval
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To: Integrityrocks

The Navy doesn't give much in the way of firearms training beyond bootcamp anymore. That is, unless your rate includes firearms handling (such as Gunner's Mate or if you are in SeaBees). If you're lucky enough to get into the SEALs, you get advanced weapons training. I know that this was the case as recently as the early 80's, and probably still is.


41 posted on 08/04/2006 11:15:36 AM PDT by P8riot ("You can get more with a kind word and a gun than you can with a kind word alone." - Al Capone)
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To: andyandval

You're welcome.


42 posted on 08/04/2006 11:16:45 AM PDT by Tijeras_Slim (Crazier than a rattlesnake at a Thai wedding)
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To: 7thson
I have a couple questions concerning firearms.

They're only stupid questions if you've repeatedly been told the answers and refuse to learn. And in particular, if you're looking to compare answers to find particular gems of accuracy or profundity, you're well on your way to erasing any residual ignorance left over from before you asked.

Basic question one - what is the difference between a pistol and a revolver?

Sometimes it's derivitive from legalistic or linguistic definitions [the term is pretty generally accepted to have originated from the gunmaking town of Pistoia in Italy] but modern technical usages defines a pistol as a handgun with a single firing chamber, such as a single-shot or semiauto handgun, while a revolver utilizes multiple chambers, usually arranged axially. Note that there are also double and miltiple-barrel handguns that are neither revolvers nor pistols, and also multi-revolving barrel weapons that if handheld, do qualify as revolvers. Multi-barrel weapons such as the Gatling Gun are asls revolver or revolving-barrel weapons, but are not handguns.

Basic question two - what is the difference between single action and double action?

The terms are generally meant to describe handgun, a single-actionbeing one in which an exposed or mechanically accessable hammer must be manually cocked for firing, and a double action [sometimes also seen as *double-acting* or *trigger cocking*] mechanism as one in which a pull on the trigger also cams the trigger or striker to the rear. There have also been *hammerless* trigger-cocking mechanisms in which the external hammer is eliminated, usually replacved by an internal mechanical striker or concealed hammer, thereby requiring a long and hard but consistant trigger pull for each shot. There are also intermediate variations and mechanical exceptions, though the descriptions served well enough to describe the simple revolver action designs of the 1880s. Things have changed since then, however.

Basic question three - which should a beginner go with - revolver, pistol, SA, or DA?

It depends much on what you're trying to accoplish; the question is as broad as asking *what kind of car should I drive?*

For self-defence/ home defence purposes, a revolver is generally quite effective, easy to learn, reasonably cost-effective to feed, simple to maintain, and can be left loaded in a constant state of readiness with all springs at rest. Examples of the breed served most of America's police agencies through most of the XX Century, and now that those agencies have chosen to militarize their equipment, the leftovers can be found as real bargtains...or the manufacturing experience of firms that built the things for the last ten or twelve decades can be taken advgantage of if a new-built one is preferred. If needed, most versions can be simply picked up and fired, day or night, without concern as to the positioning of various safety devices or other mechanical function switches, though prudence demands checking the condition of the handgun EVERY time it's picked up after leaving your hand, whether revolver or otherwise.

The most usual alternative to the revolver is the semiautomatic or semiauto handgun [though I've been happily equipped with exceptions a couple of times such is really for those either very experienced or very desperate] The most proven version of which is the M1911 design, having been widely used by the US military from 1911 to 1984, and which remains in military use here and there. It's simple enough for even a relatively untrained Private to learn to safely use, and maintainance is similarly basic soldier-friendly. Though the first half of the XX Century found that design offered in only three primary calibers [.22, .45, and the .38 Super commercial version] there is now an almost bewildering array of calibers, variants and manufacturers from which to choose for those who favour Browning's 1911 design. More recent alternatives from Beretta, Glock, SIG-Sauer and others are certainly worthy and better suited to modern manufacturing methods. But the M1911 .45 handgun has withstood a test of time that most of them still require five decades of use to equal.


43 posted on 08/04/2006 11:24:21 AM PDT by archy (I am General Tso. This is my Chief of Staff, Colonel Sanders....)
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To: 7thson

I did not receive much arms training in the Navy either when I went in 1968. During boot camp we all got to shoot was two magazines thru an M-1 and that was it, I guess the Navy didn't think you needed much training if you were going to be on a ship.

I also went to RM "A" school in San Diego in 1969. They don't have the RM rating anymore.


44 posted on 08/04/2006 11:28:52 AM PDT by longhorn too
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To: 7thson
First the jab, a revolver is a pistol. ;) 1) Ok, now then, when people generally talk about "pistols" they are refering to semi-autos (autos) and revolvers 2) A single action (SA) will only fire if you cock the hammer and pull the trigger; a dual action (DA) will fire if you pull the trigger without cocking the hammer because it will move the hammer backwards as you pull the trigger. 3) Best thing to do is find a range that will let you rent the different ones and see which you are most comfortable with. Then you can start all over again with determining the caliber you feel most comfortable with. Then practice, practice, practice.
45 posted on 08/04/2006 11:36:44 AM PDT by looscnnn ("Olestra (Olean) applications causes memory leaks" PC Confusious)
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To: andyandval
Looking forward to FReeper input on do it yourself targets

I prefer using live targets, such as the neighbors cat. It's best to get good at shooting a moving target then the still targets are a snap--*sarc off*

46 posted on 08/04/2006 12:54:37 PM PDT by DeepInTheHeartOfTexas (Mamma's got a gun.........)
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To: wideawake

Your first answer would be correct if you were discussing a revolver made before 1890. Today's revolvers are either double action or double action only.

The second answer doesn't describe the most common .45 Auto which is John Browning's 1911. It's a single action and the hammer has to be back for the round to fire. Some of today's 1911's such as ParaOrdances are double action.


47 posted on 08/04/2006 3:25:59 PM PDT by Shooter 2.5 (Vote a Straight Republican Ballot. Rid the country of dems. NRA)
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To: 7thson

Congratulations you have taken the first step toward improved understanding of guns. Beware, however, as you cannot now ever become a journalist.


48 posted on 08/04/2006 4:24:29 PM PDT by kcar (The UN Sucks)
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To: 7thson

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa50-plo48&NR


49 posted on 08/04/2006 7:44:25 PM PDT by Shooter 2.5 (Vote a Straight Republican Ballot. Rid the country of dems. NRA)
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To: 7thson

http://www.thearmedcitizen.com/gunladys/


50 posted on 08/04/2006 7:45:25 PM PDT by Shooter 2.5 (Vote a Straight Republican Ballot. Rid the country of dems. NRA)
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