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S. Korea: U.S. Food Guru Hails Korean Cooking (lecturer at CIA)
Chosun Ilbo ^ | 07/12/07

Posted on 07/13/2007 8:09:30 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster

U.S. Food Guru Hails Korean Cooking

“The future of Korean food is bright; it’s healthy and the flavors are unique,” says Assoc. Prof. John Nihoff of one of the top culinary schools in the U.S. He was speaking at the 2007 New York Food Fair.

Prof. Nihoff, who has been lecturing in French cuisine and cultural history of food at the CIA - that’s the Culinary Institute of America -- for 20 years, has a special affection for Korean food thanks to his Korean wife. He is a judge on the popular TV show “America Iron Chef.”


“Korean dishes have unique taste and look good. And they’re good for our health,” he explains. “Japanese dishes are too focused on artistic packaging and Chinese food is so various that it is difficult to find a single identity. But Korean food is simple and has a unique identity.” Nihoff eats Korean food for breakfast and dinner. “I’ve lost 4 kg of weight over the last two or three years. I think Korean food helps me.”

He is particularly keen on sesame oil, which gives much of Korean food its distinct flavor. “American students splash sesame oil over dishes as if it was mayonnaise. But I tell them to smell the oil first, just like we enjoy scent of wine, and carefully put just two or three drops on the dishes.”

Korean Beef barbeque, kimchi and dishes made from fresh song-i mushrooms have a competitive edge on the world stage, he believes. Nihoff urges Koreans not to Westernize traditional recipes and serving styles. There is no need, he says, to change Korean serving style to produce several courses rather than an all-at-once feast: many Americans love the Korean custom of putting rice, soup and all the various side dishes on the same table.

But asked to choose the best Korean product, he answers with a smile, “My 10-month-old daughter Min-joo.”



TOPICS: Food
KEYWORDS: cia; food; foodie; korea; korean; koreanfood; nihoff; tlr
CIA - that’s the Culinary Institute of America

I learn something new everyday.:-)

By the way, I suspect that he is responsible for increased feature articles on NYT regarding Korean food. At first I found it curious that NYT's coverage on Korean food suddenly picked up recently. Now I have a plausible explanation: It has all started when a food-guru married a Korean woman.

1 posted on 07/13/2007 8:09:33 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
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To: TigerLikesRooster; AmericanInTokyo; Steel Wolf; nuconvert; MizSterious; nw_arizona_granny; ...

Ping!


2 posted on 07/13/2007 8:10:12 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster (kim jong-il, chia head, ppogri, In Grim Reaper we trust)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

What does Bobby Flay say?

I don’t cook it unless I Iron Chef it!


3 posted on 07/13/2007 8:12:02 AM PDT by edcoil (Reality doesn't say much - doesn't need too)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Yum...kimchi.


4 posted on 07/13/2007 8:13:42 AM PDT by The Great RJ ("Mir we bleiwen wat mir sin" or "We want to remain what we are." ..Luxembourg motto)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

My favorite restaurant is a Korean-Japanese restaurant about 1 1/2 blocks from work. I eat there at least weekly. If I want sushi or Korean food, I have the best of both right there.


5 posted on 07/13/2007 8:13:56 AM PDT by CholeraJoe ("Who are you and what have you done with Hermione Granger?")
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Man, I love toasted sesame oil.

Think I’ll have bun thit nuong for lunch


6 posted on 07/13/2007 8:14:16 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

The excess/abandoned dog problem can be solved overnight.......


7 posted on 07/13/2007 8:16:08 AM PDT by Red Badger (No wonder Mexico is so filthy. Everybody who does cleaning jobs is HERE!.......)
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To: mylife
Think I’ll have bun thit nuong for lunch

Who's she?.........

8 posted on 07/13/2007 8:17:45 AM PDT by Red Badger (No wonder Mexico is so filthy. Everybody who does cleaning jobs is HERE!.......)
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To: Andy'smom; bradactor; politicalwit; Spunky; mplsconservative; don-o; boadecelia; freeangel; ...

**Freeper Kitchen Ping**


9 posted on 07/13/2007 8:18:12 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Woof!


10 posted on 07/13/2007 8:18:36 AM PDT by golas1964 (www.imwithfred.com)
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To: Red Badger

;0)


11 posted on 07/13/2007 8:18:51 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: TigerLikesRooster
CIA - that’s the Culinary Institute of America

Without doubt the most over rated culinary school in the world.

My wifes former employer routinely tossed CIA interns out for lack of competence.

If you want a first rate culinary education, try Kendall.

L

12 posted on 07/13/2007 8:20:46 AM PDT by Lurker (Comparing moderate islam to extremist islam is like comparing small pox to ebola.)
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To: Tamar1973

ping!


13 posted on 07/13/2007 8:21:43 AM PDT by fishtank ("Amnesty" and "amnesia" are from the same root word !!!)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

While kimchi turns my stomach, there is something called beef bul goki or something like that a local Korean restaurant serves.

Man that is good.


14 posted on 07/13/2007 8:22:02 AM PDT by rwfromkansas ("Dick Cheney should have gone hunting with Hillary." -- Yakov Smirnoff)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

I like kimchi and Korean BBQ but for me the best Asian dishes are Thai and Vietnamese.


15 posted on 07/13/2007 8:24:18 AM PDT by aft_lizard (born conservative...I chose to be a republican)
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To: rwfromkansas

You dont like kimchee? I’ll have yours.
I Love it!


16 posted on 07/13/2007 8:24:33 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: CholeraJoe

There are a few Korean restaurants here in the Twin Cities.

Believe it or not, the best one is out in the ‘burbs in s strip maill. It’s called Hoban.

Their beef bulgogi is pretty damned good. The kimchi is great too.

The service is at times slow and impersonal - but it’s almost worth it just for the food.


17 posted on 07/13/2007 8:25:01 AM PDT by MplsSteve
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To: aft_lizard

I agree with you 100%


18 posted on 07/13/2007 8:25:08 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: The Great RJ
Yum...kimchi.

Not sure whether or not that is sarcastic. It's certainly an aquired taste, one I have not acquired.

Of course, there's no shortage of, um, odd Western cuisine -- I'm not about to line up for chitlins, haggis, souse or lutefisk, either.I do like Brunswick stew, though -- I choose not to think about where it comes from.

19 posted on 07/13/2007 8:28:05 AM PDT by ReignOfError (`)
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To: TigerLikesRooster
>>CIA - that’s the Culinary Institute of America

I learn something new everyday.:-)

I used to see CIA recipes as a weekly wire feature. There's no way you don't do a double-take at the phrase "CIA recipe." But I find they turn out pretty well if you substitute a pinch of cayenne in place of the sodium pentothal.

Depending on your guests, of course.

20 posted on 07/13/2007 8:33:07 AM PDT by ReignOfError (`)
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To: MplsSteve

Last time I was in St. Paul, I stopped by Sawatdee across from the Farmers Market and found it had CLOSED. I made an emergency run down 94 to the other Sawatdee in dt Mpls.


21 posted on 07/13/2007 8:34:27 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (BTUs are my Beat.)
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To: ReignOfError

Why? Brunswick Stew has regular palatable ingredients, certainly nothing out of the ordinary or disgusting to the average American palette. Unless you get the rare version that contains Squirrel.


22 posted on 07/13/2007 8:34:33 AM PDT by aft_lizard (born conservative...I chose to be a republican)
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To: TigerLikesRooster
Yukkaejang "spicey beef soup"

No one can tell me what that green weed is in there L0L

23 posted on 07/13/2007 8:36:28 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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Mmmmmm..... Kimbap


24 posted on 07/13/2007 8:40:10 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: mylife
Are you from CIM (Culinary Institute of Mylife)? :-)
25 posted on 07/13/2007 8:41:59 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster (kim jong-il, chia head, ppogri, In Grim Reaper we trust)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Yup! Yup! That about sums it up


26 posted on 07/13/2007 8:42:58 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: aft_lizard
I like kimchi and Korean BBQ but for me the best Asian dishes are Thai and Vietnamese.

I've dabbled in a little Thai cooking, and cooked everything too long until a friend of mine explained everything in a way that made clear and perfect sense.

Southeast Asia is a hot place. I was sweating on New Year's Eve, and I grew in in Atlanta without AC. Lot of heat, lot of people, not much wood/fuel. They don't, as many European cuisines do, keep a stew/soup opt bubbling on the stove for hours on end.

There might be hours of prep time, but the cooking is fast, hot, done and out. Like stir-fry.

27 posted on 07/13/2007 8:44:20 AM PDT by ReignOfError (`)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

I made some bun thit nuong sunday from scratch with no recipe and it was my first try.
I took some to a viet coworker monday.
He say, not bad for a whiteboy. ;0)


28 posted on 07/13/2007 8:44:54 AM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: aft_lizard
Why? Brunswick Stew has regular palatable ingredients, certainly nothing out of the ordinary or disgusting to the average American palette. Unless you get the rare version that contains Squirrel.

In a traditional Southern hog-killin' barbecue, no part of the hog goes to waste. The, erm, back end becomes chitlins. Brunswick stew starts with boiling the head.

That's tradition. in any modern BBQ joint, there is almost certainly no head-boiling involved. Less-than-prime meat boiled off the bone, sure. That's what the word "stew" means.

29 posted on 07/13/2007 9:03:22 AM PDT by ReignOfError (`)
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To: ReignOfError
Eating kimchi turns on the waterworks for me. Its like stepping into a shower.
30 posted on 07/13/2007 9:10:05 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (BTUs are my Beat.)
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To: edcoil
The chef is here. Good eats for everyone.

Iron Chef, New Jersey checking in.

'La bonne cuisine est la base du véritable bonheur.' - Auguste Escoffier
(Good food is the foundation of genuine happiness.)

LonePalm, le Républicain du verre cassé (The Broken Glass Republican)

31 posted on 07/13/2007 9:38:54 AM PDT by LonePalm (Commander and Chef)
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To: aft_lizard

I like pretty much all Asian cuisines but Korean is #1 to me because it is easy to make it low carb and remain authentic.


32 posted on 07/13/2007 12:19:10 PM PDT by Tamar1973 (Riding the Korean Wave, one BYJ movie at a time! (http://www.byj.co.kr))
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To: mylife

Looks like some kind of kelp to me.


33 posted on 07/13/2007 12:21:14 PM PDT by Tamar1973 (Riding the Korean Wave, one BYJ movie at a time! (http://www.byj.co.kr))
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To: Eric in the Ozarks; mylife

If you try Duk Bo Ki (spicy rice noodles), you’ll be eating the kimchee to cool your mouth off. LOL!


34 posted on 07/13/2007 12:22:57 PM PDT by Tamar1973 (Riding the Korean Wave, one BYJ movie at a time! (http://www.byj.co.kr))
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To: Tamar1973

I confess to being a fan of all things Thai (food). My favorites are the Pla Rard Prig (spicy/crispy fish) and Kang Puk curry. My old Thai restaurant pal, Pak always liked to say, “After you have Kang Puk, you have Kang Puk Gut !”


35 posted on 07/13/2007 1:30:19 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (BTUs are my Beat.)
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To: TigerLikesRooster; Rushmore Rocks

Interesting thread.


36 posted on 07/13/2007 1:34:58 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( Today is a good day for working on some heavy praying. The world needs God to hear them.)
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To: nw_arizona_granny

Thanks, Ruth. I’ve been reading it.

When my brother-in-law first brought his new bride from So. Korea to meet us, I asked her if she would prepare a meal for us (we knew that she was a great cook and that her family had a restaurant in Seoul) She was honored to be asked and I took Song Sun to our local Safeway to shop for the meal. She was totally amazed to see so many products in one place and had a fun time selecting items. After filling her cart, she went up and down the aisles again and again looking for something. She spoke almost no English and was getting quite frustrated. I called my b-i-l (who spoke Korean), and put Song Sun on the phone. She explained to him what she needed. I got back on the phone and he told me she wanted “taste powder”. He didn’t know what it was, and after some thought, I finally figured out she wanted “Accent” (monosodium glutamate). Problem solved and we had a wonderful Korean meal that night.

Now, 25 years later, whe is still a great cook and looks as beautiful as she did when I first met her.


37 posted on 07/13/2007 1:55:26 PM PDT by Rushmore Rocks
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
After you have Kang Puk, you have Kang Puk Gut !

That's why Korean food is better. You can eat Korean BBQ with lettuce instead of rice. THe traditional way to eat most Korean BBQ is to wrap the meat in lettuce leaves and eat it like a fajita or burrito. That's what I meant by my comment about Korean food being low carb friendly.

38 posted on 07/13/2007 2:13:07 PM PDT by Tamar1973 (Riding the Korean Wave, one BYJ movie at a time! (http://www.byj.co.kr))
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To: Tamar1973

There is a Thai specialty that uses lettuce roll ups. Can’t think of the name but it has chopped up little pieces of this and that.


39 posted on 07/13/2007 3:25:47 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (BTUs are my Beat.)
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To: Tamar1973

I will have to try that.
It sounds right up my alley


40 posted on 07/13/2007 3:46:38 PM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: Tamar1973

Vietnamese BBQ is eaten in a similar fashion.
Delicious!


41 posted on 07/13/2007 3:47:47 PM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Bimibibop(sp?) Bebimbop(sp?)...fun to say and great to eat.


42 posted on 07/13/2007 7:37:31 PM PDT by Tainan (Talk is cheap. Silence is golden. All I got is brass...lotsa brass.)
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To: Rushmore Rocks

Song Sun is a beautiful name and it sounds as tho she is a person worthy of the name.

How lucky you are to have Song Sun in your family.

Good food is good food, never mind the names that folks put on it.


43 posted on 07/13/2007 10:13:41 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( Today is a good day for working on some heavy praying. The world needs God to hear them.)
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