Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Right Wing vs Conservative: What's the Difference?
1/9/08 | FutureRocketMan

Posted on 01/09/2009 8:25:22 AM PST by FutureRocketMan

I just have a question: Is there a difference between "conservative" and "right wing"? I say there is none, but many people, including conservatives within y family, have said there is a big difference, yet I don't know exactly what that is? Please help...

PS. I just finished the book "the Last Jihad" by Joel C Rosenburg. It is a great, fast-paced novel, about a war with Iraq. It was written and published before the war in Iraq. I would recommend it to everyone.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Society
KEYWORDS: americanism; conservatism; leftandright; politicalscience

1 posted on 01/09/2009 8:25:22 AM PST by FutureRocketMan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan

No difference—they’re both “neocons”...;^)


2 posted on 01/09/2009 8:26:16 AM PST by randog (Hope is a bad business plan.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan

Conservative applies if a conservative is talking, right-wing applies when a liberal whack-job moonbat is talking.

I loved that book. I’m checked out his “The Last Days” at the library on Wednesday. Will start it later this weekend.


3 posted on 01/09/2009 8:29:40 AM PST by kimmie7 (***sigh***)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan
"right wing", like "left wing", is an identifying tag based on the concept of collectivist identity

"conservative" is a philosophical position based on the rights of the individual.

4 posted on 01/09/2009 8:34:04 AM PST by Oztrich Boy ("The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule." - H L Mencken.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kimmie7
I'm still learning about politics but I think that the difference between the two is this:

A right winger to me is someone that has conservative ideas, but still thinks that government is needed to help the people.

A conservative is someone who thinks that the constitution should be followed, government should allow the people freedom to earn and be successful, family values should return to how they used to be, abortion should be outlawed, the military should be respected, and every citizen should have the right to PURSUE happiness... NOT have the government hand it out.

That's just my opinion...

5 posted on 01/09/2009 8:36:36 AM PST by Mind Freed
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan

I don’t think there is much difference in right wing and conservative but there is a big difference in Republican and conservative.


6 posted on 01/09/2009 8:37:19 AM PST by ontap (Just another backstabbing conservative)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan

The word conservative is a noun, while “right-wing” is a pejorative adjective.
It is used almost always by leftist cockroaches—see `Main Stream Media’—in preceding the noun in order to achieve an abusive ad hominem effect, or to “poison the well” before the conservative even gets a word in edgewise.
Why do they do this? Because roaches hate sunlight.
(Other adjectives, see: “staunch”, “ultra”, “far-right”, “Frankensteinish”, “coulteresque”, “rabid”, “Nazi”, “eater-of-the-children”, et cetera.)


7 posted on 01/09/2009 8:41:26 AM PST by tumblindice
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan

The terms “conservative”, “liberal”, “right wing”, “left wing”, “moderate” and so forth seem to me to be used very loosely without precision and are of limited use.

In specific answer to your question, there appears to be a difference between “right wing” and “conservative”. “Conservative” is a subset of “right wing”. A conservative would be on the right wing but there could be a right wing radical also. There might also be a right of center moderate who is thereby on th right wing but is certainly not a conservative or radical.

Self proclaimed Conservatives can’t necessarily agree on what a conservative is.

All of the above is my opinion and observation of course.


8 posted on 01/09/2009 8:50:00 AM PST by KrisKrinkle
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan
I am to the right of center and proud of it! At the same time I am not saddled by blind faith that forbids free thought and expression. I guess that makes me "right (ish) wing with a brain!!
9 posted on 01/09/2009 8:56:24 AM PST by WellyP
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan

Right wing is just a term for a hard core conservative, someone that is againt just about every thing that liberals stand for including their morals.


10 posted on 01/09/2009 8:57:33 AM PST by garylmoore (Faith is the assurance of things unseen.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan
The conservative wing of a legislative body typically sat on the "right" side of said body. They were believers in moral law (as in: "it's the right thing to do") and they also championed traditional authority, opinion, and values.

This is why one can have a "right-wing" Democrat or a "left-wing" Republican.

I just want to know: Where did all the right-wing Democrats go?

11 posted on 01/09/2009 8:57:48 AM PST by Flycatcher (Strong copy for a strong America)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Flycatcher

So what your saying is there is no difference between “conservative” and “Right Wing”?

That is what I thought...


12 posted on 01/09/2009 9:05:08 AM PST by FutureRocketMan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan
"Is there a difference between "conservative" and "right wing"? "

First, think about where that term "right wing" came from. It came from the left-wing, liberal, communist-leaning, main stream media.

I have always refuted the term "right wing" because if you stop to think about what it means to be conservative, you find that conservativsm automatically means nowhere near a wing of any type. Conservativsm is just plain old conservative, that's all, and nothing else even makes sense.

The reason the MSM invented the term is to try to convince the stupid people that there must be therefore a "middle" where people are "reasonable" and know how to compromise with communists.

Way too many people have bought into the idea that there is a left, right, and a middle.

Re-drawing the political landscape in graphical form, you see more of a horse-shoe shaped line. Graph political ideology against rule of law, and you will see that Constitutional conservatives are located at the top of the curve, right in the middle.

Not on a "wing".

13 posted on 01/09/2009 9:09:14 AM PST by Designer (We are SO scrood!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan
Conservative = 1 shot 1 kill
Right Wing = a lotta shots to make sure he's dead.
14 posted on 01/09/2009 9:09:32 AM PST by stylin19a ( Real Men don't declare unplayable lies)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: garylmoore
Since when do liberals have morals???

How does one stand against something that is nonexistent?

15 posted on 01/09/2009 9:11:46 AM PST by mountn man (The pleasure you get from life, is equal to the attitude you put into it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan

I would say that a conservative is a rightwinger. A libertarian would also be a rightwinger possibly even further to the right. Capitalism is rightwing. Classical liberalism is rightwing. The Founders were rightwing.

It is funny I had written something on this very subject last night and was going to post here on FreeRepublic to get input on it (it is on my computer at home) maybe I will post it tonight.


16 posted on 01/09/2009 9:12:06 AM PST by TheBigIf (Supre)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: garylmoore

That is what I thought. However, I got the impression from those who said that the two terms are different that it has to do with attitude?


17 posted on 01/09/2009 9:19:12 AM PST by FutureRocketMan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: ontap

Dually noted.


18 posted on 01/09/2009 9:20:54 AM PST by FutureRocketMan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan
Historically, that is correct. As I said in my previous post, those who held traditional values were seated on the "Right" side of the legislative body. It was always understood they were conservatives.

However, like any good word, it is being corrupted somewhat. As many posters on this thread have pointed out, it is now sometimes being used pejoratively by the MSM.

But that's fine. It's only the Left which fears labels.

19 posted on 01/09/2009 9:22:47 AM PST by Flycatcher (Strong copy for a strong America)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Designer

Very well said! I like it!


20 posted on 01/09/2009 9:26:36 AM PST by ontap (Just another backstabbing conservative)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: TheBigIf
>>The founders were right wing

Updated version of a long-running rightwingstuff.com T-shirt

21 posted on 01/09/2009 9:32:54 AM PST by raccoonradio
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: ontap
Re: post #13, above.

"Very well said! I like it!"

Thanks, ontap.

22 posted on 01/09/2009 10:09:28 AM PST by Designer (We are SO scrood!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan
Max Eastman's comments on this subject are worth noting:

"In Europe, especially, the connotations [of 'Left' and 'Right'] were extensive and very rich. The 'man of the Left' liked a plain suit of clothes, and the farther left the plainer and simpler until you reached the soft collar and cap and loose flowing tie of the Bohemian rebel. The man of the Right liked titles and ceremonies; he addressed people with careful regard for the distance between them. He revered personages and looked down on mere human beings. The man of the Left shook hands and said hello to everybody, and why not? The man of the Right was for law and order as good in themselves. The man of the Left was for law primarily as a defense of the rights of hthe citizen and his liberties. The man of the Right was conventional and inclined to respect accepted opinions. The man of hte Left was ready to kick over the conventions, and go in for independent inquiry on any subject. All these traits enriched the connotation of left and right, but most of all, and at the bottom of all, the attitude toward the constituted authorities, to the state: 'the individual on one side, the state on the other, that is the underlying substance of this contrast,' says J. Pera in an engaging essay on this subject [Etudes Materialistes, No. 14, September, 1947].

"Now it is clear that not only in their underlying substance, but in all their essential implications, these words left and right have exactly changed places. In America, and I think in all Western countries, a 'leftist' is a man unhorrified by the Soviet tyranny and acquiescent in the gigantic overgrowth of hte state at home. The restauration in Russia of epaulettes, salutes, emblems, and attitudes of rank, the transformation of 'comrade Stalin' first into 'Marshal' and then 'Generalissimo'--even the adoption of the goosestep in the Red Army--did not disturb his feelings. The reverence for a personage passing almost into obeisance before a god was not revolting to him. He accepted, of found excuses for, a system of law which, instead of defending men's liberties, was focused upon suppressing them, and where it failed of that could be replaced by administrative decrees, or mere decisions of the state police. Conventions made rigid, opinions handed down by infallible authorities, value judgments made obligatory in every field of endeavor, a fixed hierarchy of caste and imposed status in civil and industial as well as military and political life--all these things were meekly swallowed down. In short, every judgment and choice, every trait and mode of behavior, that once had given meaning tot he word 'right' is now supported or condoned by those whom all agree in calling 'left' or 'leftist."

--Max Eastman, Reflections on the Failure of Socialism, (New York: Devin Adair, 1955), pp. 70-71.

23 posted on 01/09/2009 10:14:16 AM PST by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan
Oh, one more thing:

Re: my earlier post "Graph political ideology against rule of law.."

It is interesting to note also that socialism and anarchy begin to converge at the bottom of the horse-shoe curve, occupying nearly the same position, near the the two lower ends of the curve.

24 posted on 01/09/2009 10:17:12 AM PST by Designer (We are SO scrood!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan

In Europe the Nazi Party and other fascist parties like Benito Mussolini’s party were considered on the “right” even though they were advocates of big government socialism. The acronym Nazi, after all, has the word Socialist in it.

Here is a little Poli Sci 101:

1) Nationalist Socialists are Nazis.

2) Internationalist Socialists are Communists.

3) American Socialists are Democrats.


25 posted on 01/09/2009 10:22:20 AM PST by Welcome2thejungle
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Flycatcher
I just want to know: Where did all the right-wing Democrats go?

I just want to know: Where did all the right-wing Republicans go?

26 posted on 01/09/2009 10:27:22 AM PST by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Just another Joe
I just want to know: Where did all the right-wing Republicans go?

Good one.

27 posted on 01/09/2009 10:32:47 AM PST by Flycatcher (Strong copy for a strong America)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan

Right wing or “extreme” right-wing is what the leftists in the media and acedemia call anyone who disgrees with them.


28 posted on 01/09/2009 1:25:02 PM PST by vpintheak (Like a muddied spring or a polluted well is a righteous man who gives way to the wicked. Prov. 25:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill

Right-wing as an expression goes back to the States General of the French Revolution of 1789. The traditionalists, upholders of King and Church, sat on the right. This ideology was essentially a development from the absolutist monarchs of the early modern period. The rebels, the worshippers of Voltaire and (especially) Rousseau, sat on the left. These were the only two ideologies at play on the European continent at the time.

The problem is that these two ideologies just weren’t involved in the American Revolution or the early American experience. The American Revolution was fought and won by believers in the British Whig ideology, which was quite different from either of the two contending European ideologies. To over-simplify, it was descended from the aristocratic opponents of an absolutist King, Magna Carta, the Roundheads and all that. The ideology died on the Continent because the constant foreign warfare indulged in by Europeans required a single decision maker, as warfare always does. Poland, for example, tried to hold onto the ideal of “aristocratic freedom,” and was absorbed by its neighbors as a result. Britain, alone on an island, didn’t face this dilemma, and the ideology was able to survive and thrive.

Originally, the “free men” it stood up for were basically the nobles. Over time, this category expanded. By the time of the American Revolution, or shortly thereafter, it meant all white men. It later expanded further to include all adults.

After the American Revolution, the American political spectrum ran from conservative Whig (Burke/Hamilton/Washington/Federalist) to liberal Whig (Charles James Fox/Jefferson/Madison/Republican). There were no upholders of an absolutist King and state Church, or of the “general will” promoted by Rousseau. This split continued down to the rise of the Progressive Movement in the late 19th century, which was an import of European socialist left-wing ideas foreign to the American experience to that point.

The ideals of the American Revolution, which is what American conservatives want to conserve, thus had essentially nothing to do with either the right wing or the left wing of the French Revolution. So the term is inappropriate.

However, American “liberals” have abandoned even a facade of upholding American revolutionary ideals and have become European socialists and thus are in direct line of descent from the left wing of the French Revolution.


29 posted on 01/09/2009 2:04:59 PM PST by Sherman Logan (Everyone has a right to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: FutureRocketMan
You're conservative if you want to conserve or preserve something.

You're right-wing if you're against the left-wing or liberals.

"Right-wing" and "left-wing" talk is pretty passe.

Essentially the media calls extremist groups "right-wing" and then applies the same label to conservatives in order to demonize them.

I'd keep "liberal" and "conservative" for what's more or less the mainstream, and "extremist" -- no "right-wing" or "left-wing" just "extremist" -- for the radical fringe groups which have more in common with each other than with those closer to the middle.

Then if you really, really want to call yourself "right-wing" you may eventually be able to do so without people thinking you're a Nazi.

30 posted on 01/09/2009 2:21:40 PM PST by x
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sherman Logan
The ideology died on the Continent because the constant foreign warfare indulged in by Europeans required a single decision maker, as warfare always does. Poland, for example, tried to hold onto the ideal of “aristocratic freedom,” and was absorbed by its neighbors as a result. Britain, alone on an island, didn’t face this dilemma, and the ideology was able to survive and thrive

From 1154 to 1558 England was a continental European nation, and still managed to produce Magna Carta, the Provisions of Oxford, and the Model Parliament.

31 posted on 01/09/2009 7:12:26 PM PST by Oztrich Boy ("The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule." - H L Mencken.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Oztrich Boy
From 1154 to 1558 England was a continental European nation

Not exactly. During the period in question England was a (part of an )island nation with colonies and conquests on the continent. France and Spain, as it turned out, were unable to really get at England, while the English were always able to attack them and then retreat to their invulnerable stronghold.

Also, during most of the period you mention "aristocratic freedom" was a fully competitive ideology in most of Europe. It wasn't until the early modern period, when gunpowder and particularly artillery became critical to war-making capability that kings throughout Europe were able to crush their fractious nobles. When making war mostly consisted of men and horses, an ad hoc noble coalition could go toe to toe with the king fairly well.

Once an artillery train, financially beyond the capability of nobles, became a necessity, the nobles couldn't compete. Particularly because the artillery allowed the king to demolish their castles in hours or days. Before this, capturing a castle required weeks or months of siege work, which meant a noble coalition could drag resistance out for years and wear the king down.

The great English documents you mention had counterparts in most European nations. Almost every European nation had an analogue to the English Parliament. The difference is that kings gained power in Europe after 1400 and lost power in England. The promising beginnings of free institutions were crushed in one European country after another, but survived in England. I believe we sometimes don't fully realize how amazing this is.

32 posted on 01/09/2009 8:55:38 PM PST by Sherman Logan (Everyone has a right to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: garylmoore
Right wing is just a term for a hard core conservative...

Ding, ding. We have a winner.

Besides, it's much more entertaining to see a liberal's head figuratively explode when you tell them you're a fringe right-winger.

Makes the whole conversation worth while. Almost...

33 posted on 01/09/2009 9:20:17 PM PST by WrightWings (Remember, Remember, the Fifth of November...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: x

My history teacher has called Nazis the right wing, which they are not. He also has called Sean Hannity “just like the Nazis”. Yes, I know, it is despicable.


34 posted on 01/10/2009 2:41:25 PM PST by FutureRocketMan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Sherman Logan
You're darn tootin'!

Clarence E. Manion also explained this in his authritative and readable book, The Key to Peace: A Fromula for the Perpetuation of Real Americanism (Chicago: The Heritage Foundation, 1950).

35 posted on 01/10/2009 6:03:22 PM PST by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson