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Nearly Half of U.S. Meat Tainted With Drug-Resistant Bacteria
FOX NEWS ^ | 04-15-11 | Fox News

Posted on 04/15/2011 9:06:22 AM PDT by hope_dies_last

"Here’s something to think about the next time you stop by the meat counter at your local grocery store – there may be drug-resistant strains of bacteria lurking in that steak or chicken...."

A study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute, found that Staphylococcus aureus – a bacteria that causes most staph infections including skin infections, pneumonia and blood poisoning – are present in meat and poultry from U.S. grocery stores at “unexpectedly high rates.”

(Excerpt) Read more at foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: Food
KEYWORDS: bacteria; health; meat; poultry
Makes going meatless more appealing?
1 posted on 04/15/2011 9:06:24 AM PDT by hope_dies_last
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To: hope_dies_last

Fear sells news.


2 posted on 04/15/2011 9:10:19 AM PDT by PetroniusMaximus
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To: hope_dies_last
Experts say although Staph can be killed with proper cooking, it still may pose a risk to people who handle food improperly, and cross-contamination in the kitchen.

Duh. If people would pay attention, there would be no risk to any of this. Sometimes when I go to dinner parties I am shocked at the recklessness of some cooks habits. When people are too stupid to properly and safely feed themselves, the society is finished.

3 posted on 04/15/2011 9:11:19 AM PDT by Lazlo in PA (Now living in a newly minted Red State.)
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To: hope_dies_last

Why would eating the improper diet for humans become more appealing?


4 posted on 04/15/2011 9:11:32 AM PDT by brytlea (A tick stole my tagline....)
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To: hope_dies_last

Wonder if it has anything to do with using illegal aliens in the low paying part of the meat industry.


5 posted on 04/15/2011 9:12:01 AM PDT by Beowulf9
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To: hope_dies_last

I think half the food we eat is really poison.


6 posted on 04/15/2011 9:12:13 AM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: PetroniusMaximus
No kidding. Buried at the end of the article:

Experts say although Staph can be killed with proper cooking, it still may pose a risk to people who handle food improperly, and cross-contamination in the kitchen.

7 posted on 04/15/2011 9:14:12 AM PDT by brytlea (A tick stole my tagline....)
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To: hope_dies_last
Especially avoid buying chicken from Tyson or Purdue where hiring illegal aliens with TB to work in their packing plants is the norm.

We pay a little more for Amish or Mennonite raised chicken. They take pride in their work and my father (who was contracted to inspect their plants by the State of Minnesota) told me their standards were far cleaner than what the law required.

8 posted on 04/15/2011 9:15:02 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: PetroniusMaximus

The produce industry agrees.


9 posted on 04/15/2011 9:16:34 AM PDT by Vaduz
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To: Beowulf9

Maybe, but mostly I think it has to do with routinely feeding antibiotics to the livestock. Of course the bacteria they are infested with are the resistant ones, it’s basic evolution. The non-resistant ones are killed off, the resistant ones thrive.


10 posted on 04/15/2011 9:18:46 AM PDT by brytlea (A tick stole my tagline....)
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To: Vaduz

There are a number of methods that can preclude this problem including irradiation of meat. A lot of processed chicken is irradiated although that is not well known. The usual scare tactics and ignorance about the process limit the industry in it’s ability to use what is a very effective method.


11 posted on 04/15/2011 9:20:58 AM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: hope_dies_last

Thank you Obama!


12 posted on 04/15/2011 9:24:53 AM PDT by A. Morgan
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To: Lazlo in PA

Yes, my list of pet peeves are long. I particularly admire handling raw chicken, putting on the platter to grill, then using the same platter for the cooked meat. Oh, and using the same tongs that flipped the raw chicken to serve. Never disinfecting the faucet handles when washing your contaminated hands. Not bleaching cutting boards, refrigerator door handles, bathroom door handles, flush handles. It’s endless.


13 posted on 04/15/2011 9:27:11 AM PDT by poobear (FACTS - the turd in the punch bowl of liberal thought!)
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To: hope_dies_last

Not particularly surprising. Most people have one or more antibiotic resistant bacteria already living inside them. Here is what people need to know:

1) A normal person has between 300-1000 different kinds of bacteria living in their gut. But just 30-40 different kinds occupy almost all the space as big populations. There are also a huge number of viruses that vastly outnumber the bacteria. Most of them are called “bacteriophages”, which means that they attack bacteria, not human cells. They help keep the bacteria in check.

2) When a person is sick, or exposed to radiation, or takes antibiotics, some poisonous chemicals, or other things, it can upset the balance of bacteria in the gut, with some populations reduced, and others increased.

3) When a bacteria, any bacteria, becomes resistant to antibiotics, it gives it a huge advantage when the person takes antibiotics. Vast numbers of its competitors are wiped out, so that bacteria can have a population explosion.

4) While other bacteria kept an antibiotic resistant bacteria down, it could not produce enough toxic waste to harm its human host. But with them out of the way, and its population exploding, it produces far more toxic waste than the human can deal with.

5) For many years it was thought that the way to fight infections like this was to use bacteriophages. But only recently, scientists have learned that bacteria can become resistant to bacteriophages even faster than they can to antibiotics. So though they will still use bacteriophages, they only do so under very controlled situations, and in combination with antibiotics.

6) So the bottom line is to not overuse antibiotics, with the idea of keeping a healthy and balanced intestinal flora. One alternative that is being proposed is to take a large sample of flora from a healthy person and transplant it to the gut of a person with a bad flora, to try and reestablish a balanced culture of bacteria.


14 posted on 04/15/2011 9:31:19 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: hope_dies_last

keep


15 posted on 04/15/2011 9:31:21 AM PDT by vanilla swirl (We are the Patrick Henry we have been waiting for!)
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To: hope_dies_last
RE: Going meatless-Not a chance! The salad is worse! I avoid eating out, but when I make exceptions and eat a salad or raw vegetables from a restaurant, about 75% chance I'm going to have digestive issues. At least the meat has to be cooked, killing most of the bad stuff.
16 posted on 04/15/2011 9:33:28 AM PDT by Missouri gal
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To: RJS1950

Including irradiation of meat works,Isn’t the meat the military receves irradiated?.


17 posted on 04/15/2011 9:38:04 AM PDT by Vaduz
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To: hope_dies_last

Nope, makes me want either raise my own beef or go hunting.

Squirrel and rabbit are good this time of year.

Freshly killed free range chicken is better than anything in the store.

If you ask around, it’s pretty easy to go in halves with a hand raised pig.

Plenty of options, no reason to do anything drastic like giving up the omnivore diet we were created to eat.


18 posted on 04/15/2011 9:42:42 AM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: PetroniusMaximus

Humans already learned this 10,000 years ago - cook your meat.


19 posted on 04/15/2011 9:49:54 AM PDT by PGR88 (I'm so open-minded my brains fell out)
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To: Lazlo in PA

Back in my line-cooking days, chicken was treated like hazardous material—seperate cutting boards, utensils, cleaning all that stuff with bleach. I still treat chicken (and eggs) very carefully, wash my hands constantly, try not to touch anything with chicken-fouled (har har) hands.


20 posted on 04/15/2011 9:57:36 AM PDT by Huck (This running things, kid. It ain't all gravy.)
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To: hope_dies_last
Makes going meatless more appealing?

That's probably the intended outcome of the study. These studies are NEVER funded without some kind of political agenda attached. I consider ALL such studies to be worthless BS. In two months there will be another telling us how healthy 2-3 portions of meat a day are. BS. I'll eat what I want, when i want because I like it.

21 posted on 04/15/2011 9:58:45 AM PDT by pgkdan ( "Wherever the Catholic sun doth shine / There's always laughter and good red wine / ...Belloc)
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To: hope_dies_last

Does our tax money go to the “Translational Genomics Research Institute” loonies?

It sounds like it. To keep our money rolling in to them, they have to invent such crap.


22 posted on 04/15/2011 10:04:09 AM PDT by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: Vigilanteman
Especially avoid buying chicken from Tyson or Purdue where hiring illegal aliens with TB to work in their packing plants is the norm.

I will never buy a Tyson product. They tied themselves to the Klintoons.

23 posted on 04/15/2011 11:06:34 AM PDT by Digger ((If RINO is your selection, then failure is your election))
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To: hope_dies_last

So they tested a grand total of 26 stores in 5 cities and declared we now know how much of US meat has bacteria?

Anybody have a link to the actual study? If I’m doing my math right, picking 26 items out of a population of 230,000(# grocery stores in the US) gives an error of +/- 19% at a 95% confidence level.

I think my stats professor would have a fit.

As for testing 136 samples of meat it’s a little better, +/- 8.4% using a really large number for the population... but then there are other issues I have questions about, did they adjust their sample sizes based on what products are most available? I.E. take more samples of beef than pork(I’m assuming there is more beef in the US than pork)? I’m also concerned with there being only 5 cities. And how many different producers of meat are represented here?

Way too many questions about this study to believe it from a news article.

Anyways, I cook properly and wash my hands so I guess I shouldn’t really be this concerned. ;)


24 posted on 04/15/2011 11:32:32 AM PDT by Mike3689
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To: hope_dies_last

Sounds like the new scare-fad of the day.


25 posted on 04/15/2011 11:45:33 AM PDT by beaversmom
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To: Vaduz

I believe that it might be. I was a research assistant for one of the university research grants from the Army Natick Labs in 1975-76 and our small part of the research looked at the effects of irradiation on various strains of E-Coli and several other organisms that could be present in raw meat. A very effective process when done correctly; I saw one study that irradiated a slab of freshly cut beef, vacumn sealed it and put it on a shelf at room temp. After a number of months it was opened and evaluated and was as fresh as the day it was cut and was bacteria free. The same process could be used on veggies. I don’t know if the military adopted this on a larger scale. If they did it would have been for deployable rations and food since I believe that most meat, like other commodities for garrison use are purchased locally or through local distributors. After finishing my degree and reentering the military I purchased meat from the commissary and ate meat in field types of situations where the meat would spoil if not used within a reasonable time so I don’t know if it was ever mandated for whatever use.


26 posted on 04/15/2011 2:35:27 PM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: Huck

I can identify with that. About 18 years ago I was cutting some chicken at home for dinner and did not realize that I had a slight paper cut on one finger. That was all that it took. My finger swelled up to three times its normal size and turned black within two days. The flight surgeon actually told me that I might lose the finger. I took the antibiotics and after several days accidently lanced the wound by smacking it against a hard object. I drained it and scrubbed it with a surgical brush, hot water and alcohol and reported directly back to the flight surgeon who looked at it and said I had done a good job and it should heal within three days. It did, but that was an extremely unpleasant lesson.


27 posted on 04/15/2011 2:43:20 PM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: hope_dies_last

http://www.infowars.com/meat-glue/

Meat Glue.. How Restaurants fabricate Fillet Mignons and Chicken Nuggets.


28 posted on 04/18/2011 8:06:23 AM PDT by Broker (Mabuhay!)
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To: Lazlo in PA

The bacteria can be killed by cooking but the toxins are heat resistant.


29 posted on 04/18/2011 8:23:13 AM PDT by CholeraJoe (To conserve energy, the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off permanently.)
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