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FR Weekly Cooking Thread *Recipes* Oct 1, 2011
FreeRepublic Cooks | Oct 1, 2011 | libertarian27

Posted on 10/01/2011 6:42:45 AM PDT by libertarian27

Welcome to the 43rd installment of the FR Weekly Cooking (Recipes) Thread.

Looking for something new to make or made something new that came out great? Please share a 'tried-and-true' recipe or three- for fellow FReepers to add to their 'go-to' Recipe Stack of Family Favorites!

Here's the place to share and explore your latest and greatest favorite recipe.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Food; Hobbies; Reference
KEYWORDS: cooking; food; recipes; weeklycookingthread
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To: Flamenco Lady

Bookmarked that one! Thanks again.


51 posted on 10/01/2011 3:29:38 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

You are welcome!


52 posted on 10/01/2011 3:37:47 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: NautiNurse

I use House of Tsing low sodium.


53 posted on 10/02/2011 1:08:13 AM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: Flamenco Lady
Well I did cook up that Red Wine and Chicken last night. I used the suggestions posted by the second commenter. I had two skinless breasts that I butterflied and created 4 pieces. I salted peppered and used smoked paprika about an 1/2 before starting the cooking process. I chopped up 1/2 of a small onion and two cloves of garlic and slightly browned them in 1 tsp of clarified butter removed from the pan and added another tsp of clarified butter heated in the pan then browned both sides of the chicken. The chicken browned up beautifully I added the onions back to the pan and added 1/4 cup brown sugar and 3/4 cup of red wine and a 1/2 cup of chicken broth. Brought that to a boil and then simmered with a cover on the pan for about half an hour. Removed the chicken to a plate and made a slurry of cold red wine and corn starch and added it a tsp at a time to the now boiling sauce to slightly thicken the reducing sauce. Served with white rice.

My wife liked it but I thought it was a little to sweet. But I like my chicken herby.

54 posted on 10/02/2011 8:17:08 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Thank you for letting me know how you liked it. My husband nixed the idea of me cooking it for the family because he did not like the idea of chicken and red wine together in the same dish, so it looks like I will have to wait and try this recipe on a night he isn’t going to be home for dinner, which is usually only about twice a year at most.

Since you like chicken with herb flavor, you might try the following recipe:

Herbed Roasted Chicken with Vegetables

1 whole chicken

1 stick of softened butter

a combination of your favorite dried or fresh herbs
(I like to use herbs like parsley, rosemary, sage with chicken, but pick the ones you like.)

1-2 Lemons, quartered

3 onions quartered

salt and pepper to taste

1 box of chicken stock or broth or use your own home made stock

A combination of your favorite vegetables cut in larger size chunks (I always use potatoes and carrots, and throw in whatever else I have around the house that we like roasted with chicken). I sometimes add additional vegetables during the cooking process, since not all vegetables can withstand an hour of cooking time such as asparagus or a handful of frozen green beans or peas.

Directions:
Pour a box of chicken stock or broth into a saucepan. Throw in the chicken parts if any that came with the chicken, one onion, and a bundle of herbs. If using dry herbs you can tie them up in cheesecloth to hold the dry herbs, so the broth stays clear, or just throw them in the pot. Bring this to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer. Leave this simmering on the stove to use to baste the chicken as it cooks.

Slip your fingers between the skin and the meat over the chicken breast and make as large a pocket as possible on either side of the chicken breast. Season the chicken inside and out with salt and pepper.

Combine the herbs and the softened butter to make a wonderful herb butter. Put some of the herb butter inside the pocket you made between the breast and the skin, and slather the rest on the outside of the chicken. Stuff the chicken with a bundle of fresh herbs (or sprinkle a few inside if using dried herbs, one onion and the lemon(If I can’t fit all the lemon inside the chicken I throw the rest in with the broth on the stove tip, so it doesn’t get wasted).

Twist the chicken wings underneath the chicken so they don’t cook faster than the rest of the chicken and tie the two drumsticks together to keep the stuffing inside the bird while it cooks.

At this point you have three options. You can either place a bed of vegetables including the last of the onion in the bottom of your roasting pan and set the chicken on top of the vegetables, use a rack to hold the chicken in the roasting pan and surround it with the vegetables, or place the vegetables in a separate baking dish to cook along side the chicken and just drizzle them with a little olive oil along with the herbs. I prefer the second method, so I can easily pull out the vegetables if they cook faster than the chicken, but they still get the added flavor of the chicken drippings as they cook. My husband prefers the last method because he doesn’t like his vegetables absorbing the flavor of the chicken, and if you don’t have a rack to hold your chicken the first method is a good option to help keep your chicken centered in the pan so both sides of the breast cook evenly.

If I am cooking the vegetables with the chicken I pour 1-2 ladlefuls of broth in the roasting pan over the vegetables and sprinkle them with some of the herbs (just enough broth to cover the bottom of the pan so the vegetables can get the benefit of a little steam to help keep them from drying out during the cooking process. Don’t smother the vegetables in broth.)

I cook the chicken and the vegetables in a 350 degree oven for about 1 hour, basting the chicken about every 10 minutes or so during about the last thirty minutes of roasting. (I take care not to smother the vegetables in broth and maintain just enough broth in the bottom of the roasting pan to cover the bottom of the pan, so I baste the chicken either with the broth already in the roasting pan or from the saucepan on the stove top in order to maintain that level throughout the cooking process. Sometimes I don’t have to use the broth on the stovetop at all because the chicken produces so much of its own drippings.) If the vegetables cook faster than the chicken I pull them and set them aside in a covered casserole dish to keep warm until the chicken finishes cooking.

This will be the moistest, most flavorful herbed chicken you have ever tasted. If you are having a dinner party or want to make a particularly nice display of your cooked masterpiece, you can place the cooked chicken in the center of a serving platter and surround it with the roasted vegetables and carve the chicken at the table just like you would a turkey at Thanksgiving (Don’t forget to remove the string tying the drumsticks together! Also make sure to let the chicken rest before carving so most of the remaining juices stay with the chicken).

The pan drippings can be reduced to make a wonderful thin gravy, or they can be thickened with a butter roux or cornstarch for a thicker gravy. (Make sure to scrape up all the flavorful bits on the bottom of the roasting pan too.) The leftover broth in the saucepan can also be used if there are not enough pan drippings.

Any leftover stock I save for use in other dishes. I simply strain out the chicken pieces, vegetables and herbs, since they have served their purpose. I do put any leftover broth in the refrigerator over night and skim off any of the excess fat that rises to the top of the container the next day, and then either freeze the leftover broth or use it in other meals during the rest of the week. My grandmother would also save the chicken pieces and onion that had been simmering in the broth and chop them up finely and add them to her own version of dirty rice for another meal that same week, so they didn’t get wasted either. My family would clearly disown me if I did this, so dispose of them after they have finished flavoring the broth.


55 posted on 10/02/2011 10:25:26 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Red_Devil 232; All

I failed to mention that the chicken fat I skim off the top of the reserved chicken stock can also be used in other cooking instead of using cooking oil, butter, etc. It adds extra flavor to a dish when using it to saute onions or other vegetables you are going to serve, especially when you are serving them with chicken or in a chicken dish. It is also great to use if you are browning up some boneless skinless chicken breasts, instead of using cooking oil.

During tough economic times it can also help with the grocery budget. You can use all the rendered fats from cooking your meats such as bacon, sausage, turkey and chicken as a substitute for cooking oil or butter in many recipes. I like to use them mainly for sauteeing onions and other vegetables, but my grandmother often used rendered fats for other things as well. She sometimes used some rendered chicken fat to make her crusts for her chicken pot pies, so the flavor of the chicken would also be in the crust of the pie and not just the filling. Her pot pies were the best you have ever tasted!

I strain any rendered fat and pour it into small jars that I label with the date and they type of rendered fat (chicken, bacon, sausage, etc.) I keep them in my refrigerator and use the oldest jars first, so it never has a chance to go bad. If the fat has solidified before you had the time to strain it and pour it into jars, you can warm it gently on the stove so you can strain it and then pour it into the jars to use at a later date.

I especially like to use the small jars I have saved from store bought pimentos for my fat renderings, since they are small and don’t take up much room in the refrigerator.

I also save the carcas from the roasted chicken to use the next time I make chicken stock, and save any leftover chicken to use for another dish as well. I usually throw the carcas in a zip lick freezer bag and throw it in my freezer until the next time I make stock. Any leftover chicken or even the chicken that falls off the carcas when I am making stock, I add to my chicken soups, stews, Chicken and Dumplings, or Chicken pot pies, so very little gets wasted.

You can also puree any leftover roasted vegetables thinned with a little chicken stock if needed for a roasted vegetable soup the next day. Just heat it up and serve with some nice croutons, crusty french bread, or even a grilled cheese sandwich and you have a wonderful lunch.


56 posted on 10/02/2011 11:42:40 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: NautiNurse

I went to make the spicy sesame pork and realized the only amount given for any ingredient, was for the corn starch! lol

Needless to say, we had something else for dinner.


57 posted on 10/02/2011 12:35:28 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: Flamenco Lady

Thank you very much.


58 posted on 10/02/2011 1:01:13 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Netizen

LOL—I didn’t include amounts because only the corn starch can screw up the end product. Use as much as you want for everything else.


59 posted on 10/02/2011 4:22:33 PM PDT by NautiNurse ("This Is Hermain Cain!" has moved up to #70 in Amazon books. Release date: Oct 4)
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To: Trillian
Ok, I don’t know why putting a pic in my post screwed up everything else.

This forum allows optional use of most HTML tags. If your post does not contain HTML, it will be converted to HTML when posted, retaining paragraphs as typed. This conversion is not performed if you have anything resembling an HTML tag in your text.

Posting a picture would use a HTML tag.

60 posted on 10/02/2011 5:40:42 PM PDT by magslinger (To properly protect your family you need a Bible, a twelve gauge and a pig.)
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To: Trillian

Pumpkin cheese cake is even better with a crust made from ginger snaps instead of graham crackers.


61 posted on 10/02/2011 5:45:15 PM PDT by pops88 (Geek chick over 40)
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To: libertarian27

This is good and a nice change from regular meat loaf:

Reuben Meatloaf

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds ground beef, crumbled
1 cup soft bread crumbs
1/2 cup Thousand Island dressing
1 large egg
1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
filling: Ingredients:
1 can sauerkraut, 8 oz, rinsed and drained
1/4 cup chopped corned beef
1/2 cup shredded Swiss cheese

Instructions:

Spray a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray or line with nonstick foil.

Combine all meat mixture ingredients in medium bowl. Press 1/2 of mixture in bottom of loaf pan. Make slight indentation down the center of the meatloaf. Combine all filling mixture and put in indentation. Top with remaining meat mixture, pressing to enclose filling and sealing edges.

Bake at 350° for about 1 hour, or until done. Let stand for 5 minutes before slicing.
Serves 4 to 6.

Note- I serve with extra Thousand Island on the side. You can also use 1/2 beef, half pork.


62 posted on 10/02/2011 5:56:50 PM PDT by pops88 (Geek chick over 40)
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To: NautiNurse

The corn starch will determine the thickness, so amounts for the liquids are needed.


63 posted on 10/02/2011 9:03:30 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: Netizen

The rule of thumb I use is 1 tablespoon of cornstarch to 1/4 c cold water. Combine the two until there are no lumps. Add to your sauce to thicken, however, the sauce has to reach a boiling point to thicken. If your sauce is not as thick as you like it then you can repeat the process. Cornstarch has twice the thickening power of flour.

I was always taught that generally speaking 1 tablespoon of cornstarch mixed with 1/4 c of water will thicken 1 cup of liquid and 2 tablespoons of flour mixed with and equal amount of butter or water will thicken 1 cup of liquid.

Temperature, humidity, the type of flour used and how long the roux has stood before it is added to the liquid can all effect how much the sauce or gravy will thicken, so you may have to adjust from there, by adding more roux if you want it thicker, or a little more liquid if it becomes too thick.


64 posted on 10/03/2011 6:57:04 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

Thanks for that. That will give a good starting place. :) I like the flour gravies but always get lumps, so I usually use the corn starch. But, since I found out that that swiss steak recipe I use makes its own gravy, when I get a craving for the flour type gravy I just make that! lol Sometimes I add quartered potatoes to the pot.


65 posted on 10/03/2011 7:59:15 AM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: Netizen

I almost always thicken my gravies with a flour and butter roux in equal parts. The trick is to get the butter melted first and then get all the flour completely mixed with the melted butter before adding the liquid to it, whisking as you do so. No white specks of flour should be left anywhere. As the butter mixture melts into the liquid you are assured a lump free gravy every time. As it was explained to me the butter essentially adheres to every speck of flour so they can’t stick together and form lumps in your gravy.

You must use butter, however, as many margarines or butter substitutes won’t work the same way as butter when combined with the flour.

This same method also works well if you are using the bacon or sausage grease in a pan instead of butter when making biscuits and gravy or something similar. Just make sure the grease and the flour are completely combined before adding the liquid as you stir the mixture with a whisk. The animal fat essentially works just like the butter and melts right into the gravy making it lump free every time.


66 posted on 10/03/2011 8:44:58 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Netizen

I have been the designated gravy maker for all our family gatherings ever since my great aunt taught me how to make perfect gravy every time one year at Thanksgiving when I was still in grade school (over 30 years ago).

She was getting older and told me it was time to pass the baton (her whisk) of “official family gravy maker” on to someone in the younger generation. She told me she picked me because she remembered as a small child I loved her gravy so much I would sometimes just pour a ladlefull of her gravy on a piece of white bread, just so I could enjoy her gravy!

For over 30 years now I have never had lumpy gravy as long as I stuck to her method. (We won’t talk about the times when I tried a different method. LOL! Thankfully, I only tried the other methods when I was just cooking something for myself, so it was a small enough batch I could just throw it out.) I knew better than to mess with her perfection when serving others gravy!

Another trick she taught me was to add a bit of coffee to the stock or drippings before thickening it. She said it made the gravy have a richer taste and didn’t change the over all flavor of the gravy. I agree with her that it does give the gravy even better flavor and it doesn’t take much coffee to do so. Just a splash of coffee left over from the morning’s pot of coffee is perfect for the normal pot of gravy. Even when I make huge batch of gravy for a crowd in my large stock pot I add less than a cup of coffee to the drippings and stock.

The only change I have made to her method over the years is that I sometimes use spelt flour instead of white flour to thicken a gravy. (I tried it the first time about 15 years ago when I had to make gravy for someone that was allergic to most types of flour but could use spelt flour.) The spelt flour adds a bit more depth to the flavor and a slightly nutty or meaty flavor to the gravy. It is especially good to use for biscuits and gravy. My family doesn’t like it made with regular flour any more, since it is so much better with the spelt flour.

Spelt flour does not thicken quite as well as regular flour so I use 2 heaping tablespoons of the spelt flour instead of the 2 tablespoons of regular flour for a cup of gravy.


67 posted on 10/03/2011 9:36:05 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady
I loved her gravy so much I would sometimes just pour a ladlefull of her gravy on a piece of white bread, just so I could enjoy her gravy!

One of the best ways to eat gravy! lol I like gravy on rice, potatoes, biscuits, bread, even had it on saltines, stuffing...

I'll have to remember that about the coffee. I have some leftover burrito meat that I thought could use a little moisture and some diluted coffee just might be a nice addition.

68 posted on 10/03/2011 3:46:52 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: Netizen; libertarian27; All

I have been experimenting with all different kinds of breakfast casseroles, since my family (the men too) seems to love them and they are a great way to feed a larger family on a tight budget, since it can stretch a half pound of meat into serving about 6 people.

My daughters and I also love Fritatas and quiche, but the men in our family aren’t big on Fritatas, and I have heard “Real men don’t eat quiche” way too many times to even try making a quiche when they are around. The following recipe is my latest attempt to make everyone happy and it was a huge sucess, so I am sharing it with all of you!

Anytime Potato, Sausage, and Egg Pie

This recipe is sort of a cross between a breakfast casserole and a frittata and can really be served any time of the day. I like to serve it with some fresh or canned fruit and some kind of home made muffin on the side.

The topping is totally optional and the dish is still very delicious without it. I actually came up with the idea of the spinach topping because in my family two people won’t eat spinach at all, two people love cooked spinach with eggs, and 1 person only likes creamed spinach. Having an optional creamy spinach topping was my way of making everyone in the family happy.

This pie can serve 6-12 people depending on what time of day you serve it and what else you are serving with it. Those of us that like spinach spoon the spinach mixture right on top of our pie, so we end up with a wonderful spinach pie, and those that don’t like spinach have a pie without any spinach that they can enjoy too!

The Crust:
About 4 Russet potatoes grated (enough to cover the bottom of a 9X13 baking dish)
Drizzle of Olive Oil
Salt and Pepper to taste

The Filling:
½ pound Italian Sausage
1 shallot, finely chopped (or ¼ cup onion finely chopped)
1 small can of mushrooms, drained
1 small can of sliced black olives, drained
any additional chopped or sliced vegetable you want to add(optional)
2 oz. cream cheese, cut into small chunks
1 dozen eggs
½ cup milk or water
1 cup (or more)of mozzarella, swiss, fontina, or other good melting white cheese
black pepper to taste
Crushed red pepper (optional)
Paprika
Chopped chives

The topping: (optional, since many people don’t like cooked spinach)
1-2 pieces of bacon cut into small pieces
1 shallot, finely chopped (or ¼ cup finely chopped onion)
1 8-10 oz package of frozen spinach, thawed, and with all excess water removed
4 oz. cream cheese, cut into cubes
2 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan or pecorino cheese

Directions for Crust:
Grease the bottom of a 9X13 inch pan with Olive oil. I like to dry off the grated potatoes a bit with a paper towel so they are not overly wet first. Then I toss them with olive oil and salt and pepper. Place the potatoes in the bottom of the baking dish to form a crust, pushing them up against the sides of the baking dish a bit. Bake in a 425 degree oven for about 20 minutes until the potatoes are browned and crispy. (In some ovens you might need to turn on your broiler and watch it for a few minutes until the crust finishes browning on top.)

Directions for the Filling:
While the crust is baking brown the sausage in a skillet, and then remove from the pan with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel. Pour off excess grease from the pan leaving just enough fat to cook the shallots or onion until it they are just beginning to brown. I like to add the mushrooms to the skillet about half way through so they absorb some of the flavor from the sausage and shallot or onions too. When the mixture is cooked, remove them from the pan with a slotted spoon, and set aside. Remove the pan from the heat, but set it aside to use for the topping later.

When the crust is done it is time to assemble the pie. Reduce the oven temperature to about 325 degrees. Sprinkle the cooked sausage on top of the potato crust, followed by the mushroom mixture, and then the black olives. If you want to add any additional vegetables now is the time to add them. (zucchini, peppers, or even blanched asparagus would be great add ins. Most veggies can be added in raw or blanched to keep their color.) Dot the top with the cream cheese.

Beat the eggs and milk or water in a large bowl with the pepper and crushed red pepper and then pour them over everything in the casserole dish. Spread the grated cheese over the top of the eggs. Sprinkle the top of the pie with little paprika and chives for a little color on top of the pie to make it pretty! Bake in a 325 degree oven for about 20 minutes until the top is slightly browned and the eggs are fully cooked.

Directions for Topping:

In the skillet I used earlier, I start browning the bacon and then add shallot or onion and cook until the onions are slightly browned and the bacon has reached the desired doneness while the pie is cooking. If there is too much grease in the pan I spoon off the excess and then add the spinach, cream cheese and parmesan cheese. As soon as the cream cheese has melted to make a creamy sauce and the spinach is heated through this is done. I put a lid on it and remove it from the heat to keep it warm until the casserole is done. If you make this ahead, you can easily warm it up in a small covered casserole dish as you cook the casserole. This topping can also be made as a separate side dish to just about any meal.


69 posted on 10/04/2011 9:38:49 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

WOW! That sounds great!


70 posted on 10/04/2011 2:27:11 PM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27

It was so good! I fixed it last night for dinner and served it with some canned peaches and some Cinnamon Swirl muffins (made from a cake mix). This was enough to feed two adult males myself and my two high school age daughters for diner last night and the girls and I had the leftover pie and spinach this morning for our breakfasts. There are still three muffins left for after school snacks.

Tonight we are going to have an old classic recipe that my daughters have never tried before, but the guys and I remember this one well from our own childhood.

I am making creamed chip beef on toast and serving it with the last of the can of peaches and some canned pears, and a choice of peas or green beans (I have to fix both because one person in the family won’t eat peas, and one person won’t eat green beans).


71 posted on 10/04/2011 2:54:42 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: libertarian27

Chicken Paprikash

Traditionally this dish is made with sweet Hungarian paprika (or sometimes a mix of sweet and hot paprika). Using smoked paprika adds a smoky element of flavor — be sure to look for the highest quality paprika you can find.

8 chicken leg quarters
1½ tsp. Kosher salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 tbsp. olive oil
2 large or 3 medium onions, sliced (about 4 cups)
2 large garlic cloves, minced
1 large red bell pepper, seeded and diced
2 tbsp. smoked paprika
1 tbsp. flour
½ cup white wine

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Season chicken with ¾ tsp. salt and a good sprinkling of freshly ground black pepper. Heat oil in a Dutch Oven or large oven-proof pot over medium-high heat. Brown chicken quarters, about 2-3 minutes per side, turning once. Transfer chicken to a plate and set aside.

Add onions, garlic, and bell pepper to the pot. Sauté until onions are translucent and softened, about 6-8 minutes. Season with remaining salt, more black pepper and paprika. Stir to blend and cook for another 1-2 minutes. Sprinkle in flour. Stir and cook for another 1-2 minutes. Add wine and stir to blend. Return chicken to the pot. Spoon liquid over chicken quarters, cover and transfer to preheated oven.

Bake covered, for 1¼ -1½ hours. Serve hot over egg noodles or mashed potatoes.

Wishing you and easy and meaningful fast, Naomi Ross and the Park East Kosher family


72 posted on 10/04/2011 4:58:45 PM PDT by CJinVA
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To: libertarian27; Flamenco Lady

Please add me to your ping list? Thanks, FL, for the heads up!


73 posted on 10/05/2011 11:19:17 AM PDT by agrace
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To: agrace

You are very welcome. This is a great thread each week. Our wonderful hostess has all the links to prior threads on her home page, so you can easily find recipes. She also posts a recap at the end of each thread and provides a recap of the previous week’s recipes at the beginning of each new thread.

Since you also do gardening, there is also a weekly gardening thread that is posted every Friday. Let me know if you would like that link as well and I would be happy to look it up for you.


74 posted on 10/05/2011 12:00:56 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

Thanks, I’m on the gardening list. And now I’m going to go read through this thread, slowly. :) I see some herb roasted chicken that sounds pretty good...


75 posted on 10/05/2011 4:25:14 PM PDT by agrace
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To: Flamenco Lady
Our wonderful hostess has all the links to prior threads on her home page, so you can easily find recipes

Oh, you are so kind but my profile links haven't been updated since June, oops, but just got them all updated now!

76 posted on 10/07/2011 10:02:23 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27
Past weekly threads - updated list (also on my profile page)

December 12, 2010  December 18, 2010  December 25, 2010

January 1, 2011  January 8, 2011  January 15, 2011  January 22, 2011  January 29, 2011
February 5, 2011  February 12, 2011  February 19, 2011  February 26, 2011
March 5, 2011  March 12, 2011  March 19, 2011  March 26, 2011
April 2, 2011  April 9, 2011  April 16, 2011  April 23, 2011  April 30, 2011
May 7, 2011  May 14, 2011  May 21, 2011  May 28, 2011
June 4, 2011  June 11, 2011  June 18, 2011  June 25, 2011
July 2, 2011  July 9, 2011  July 16, 2011  July 23, 2011   July 30, 2011
August 6, 2011   August 13, 2011   August 20, 2011   August 27, 2011
September 3, 2011   September 10, 2011   September 17, 2011   September 24, 2011

77 posted on 10/07/2011 11:04:22 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: All; agrace

Recap of this week’s recipes *Oct 1, 2011*

Breakfast* 21 * Breakfast muffins (various recipes)
Dessert* 7 * Louisiana Yam Cake 
Dessert* 29 * Pumpkin Cheesecake
Meal* 8 * Braised Beef Short Ribs
Meal* 13 * spicy sesame pork stir fry 
Meal* 25 * Easy Football Party Chili
Meal* 31 * Bacon wrapped meatloaf
Meal* 32 * RIVERBEND CHICKEN
Meal* 33 * Marsala Chicken Breast
Meal* 35 * Cheese Chicken
Meal* 37 * White Bean and Chicken Chili
Meal* 38 * Chicken braised in a red wine sauce
Meal* 42 * Marinated Chicken Shish Kabobs
Meal* 48 * Chicken with figs in a port wine sauce
Meal* 50 * Chicken in Pastry
Meal* 54 * Red Wine and Chicken
Meal* 55 * Herbed Roasted Chicken with Vegetables
Meal* 62 * Reuben Meatloaf
Meal* 69 * Anytime Potato, Sausage, and Egg Pie
Meal* 72 * Chicken Paprikash
Side* 16 * Brown and Wild Rice Pilaf with Bulgar Wheat

(Please don’t post any new recipes here - this week’s thread coming up)

(agrace: you are added to the ping list!)


78 posted on 10/08/2011 7:04:18 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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October 8th Weekly Cooking Thread link:
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2789791/posts


79 posted on 10/08/2011 7:25:29 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: Red_Devil 232

That is a work of art.


80 posted on 10/08/2011 9:17:44 AM PDT by I still care (I miss my friends, bagels, and the NYC skyline - but not the taxes. I love the South.)
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To: Trillian

I’m making that.


81 posted on 10/08/2011 9:20:22 AM PDT by I still care (I miss my friends, bagels, and the NYC skyline - but not the taxes. I love the South.)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife

*


82 posted on 10/08/2011 9:23:41 AM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife ("Real solidarity means coming together for the common good."-Sarah Palin)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Wow. You are awesome. :)


83 posted on 10/08/2011 9:29:37 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: trisham

Those short ribs were awesome! The meat literately fell of the bones and it was so tender.


84 posted on 10/08/2011 11:22:04 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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Comment #85 Removed by Moderator

Comment #86 Removed by Moderator


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