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Should I buy this house? (vanity, but important to me!)
me

Posted on 05/13/2012 12:49:41 PM PDT by MacMattico

Hi, My Dad passed away a few years ago and my Mom, it has recently been determined, needs round the clock care so must go into a nursing home. My father's Grandmother, then single due to her husbands death, bought this home in 1902 (I have the original deed) after having to sell their farm and lived there, renting to boarders to make money. She later saved up to buy another home and rented out rooms there during the Depression, all on her own. When she passed away, each of her daughters were given a home, which they fixed up to be family homes for themselves and obviously their families. When my Grandmother passed, (my dads mom) the house went to my father and mother. I grew up here. The house the other sister got was sold in the early 70's when she passed away, and is now ugly apartments. I'm torn whether or not we should buy this house, or sell it to pay for my mother's nursing home care to any old buyer. The house needs A LOT of work, but ours is worth at least double to triple so if we sold the one we live in now we'd have cash (and our own sweat equity) for repairs. Her house is actually a bit bigger square footage wise, which is good. It's on a nice quiet street but not near the water like we are now, except when the creek in back floods! My kids are iffy on the subject, but I think because of it's present condition. My husband says he doesn't care where we live, he was moved around so many times he doesnt form attachments to houses. Maybe I shouldn't either. What do you guys think? We'd also have to get a new pool or the kids would kill me!


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; History
KEYWORDS: family; house; mortgage; nostalgia
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Am I just being to sentimental? Also, even if our home didn't sell for a while we'd be ok mortgage wise.
1 posted on 05/13/2012 12:49:49 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: MacMattico

Don’t do it.


2 posted on 05/13/2012 12:53:37 PM PDT by Rebelbase
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To: MacMattico

I would think it would be foolish to buy a house that needs lots of work when so many low priced homes are on the market. Sentimentality can be very expensive.


3 posted on 05/13/2012 12:53:56 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: MacMattico

Sell the old house. As much emotional attachment as you might have to it the logical decision is to let it go. The renovation and upkeep will close the gap on that price differential.


4 posted on 05/13/2012 12:56:21 PM PDT by saganite (What happens to taglines? Is there a termination date?)
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To: MacMattico

5 posted on 05/13/2012 12:58:07 PM PDT by Theoria (Rush Limbaugh: Ron Paul sounds like an Islamic terrorist)
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To: MacMattico

I’d enlist the help of a good contractor to determine what is needed and the cost. Condition of the framing, foundation/basement are big concerns. Also keep in mind any plumbing and electrical upgrades will cost and I heard the word flood in there. If money is not a concern who cares but I’d treat it like a business decision.


6 posted on 05/13/2012 12:59:44 PM PDT by enduserindy (Conservative Dead Head)
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To: MacMattico

I would start by talking to some brokers to try and get a handle on what the house would realisticly be worth on today’s market. Then, try and figure out the neighborhood’s short and long term market prospects seem like in case you were to hold onto it.


7 posted on 05/13/2012 1:00:55 PM PDT by Cementjungle
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To: MacMattico

Take a picture and let it go


8 posted on 05/13/2012 1:01:38 PM PDT by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: MacMattico
Friend, make your decision on whether you are really committed and have the resources to keep this home, then if you have doubts on being able to maintain it, discuss the matter with a financial consultant.

All the best hopes for your mother and this difficult situation.

Finally...pray...

Cheers..

9 posted on 05/13/2012 1:04:25 PM PDT by Caipirabob (I say we take off and Newt the site from orbit. It's the only way to be sure...)
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To: MacMattico

You had better check into whether or not the State can take the house to pay for your mother’s care.

If her money runs out before she dies Medicaid will foot the bills.In that case a Transfer penalty may apply to the assets.There is a 5 year span there that may come into being.

Better check with a lawyer.

I don’t know if this applies or not, but better check it out.

http://elderlawanswers.com/Elder_Info/medicaid-planning.asp


10 posted on 05/13/2012 1:06:09 PM PDT by Venturer
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To: MacMattico

Get a structural inspection. Find out what repairs will cost. don’t guess on that. Hold off on your final decision. Gather information, like the structural inspection.

If the house is sound, you will be able to put that issue aside or at least know what you will be looking at to make repairs.

A big part of your decision is subjective. That is why I say take some time. Time often provides the answer to a subjective decision that can’t be quantified.

On the subjective decision, all you really need to know at present is how much time do you have to make a decision. As you go about your daily routine in your present house you will get a feel for what it will be like to be in both houses.

Don’t rush this decision.


11 posted on 05/13/2012 1:07:44 PM PDT by gunsequalfreedom (Conservative is not a label of convenience. It is a guide to your actions.)
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To: MacMattico

I’d let it be sld to somebody else.

The creek floods?....FEMA is re-mapping communities all over the country; and, if this house grts put into a flood zone, look out - the insurance is so high (FEMA will require lenders to require this), the value of the home goes down.

Also, the entry of your relative into a nursing home complicates things, in my mind. If funds run out, and medicaid ends up paying for nursing care...the last minute sale of the house may raise eyebrows, and jam up the medicaid paperwork.


12 posted on 05/13/2012 1:08:07 PM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: MacMattico

Its more valuable as a rental than as a single family dwelling. If you wanted to buy it to rent it out as apartments, I would say go for it. If you want to buy it to convert it back into a single family home, I would say you are going to pay way too much in repairs and remodelling.

It all comes down to how important this building is to you. You should understand you will never get out of it what you put into it if you choose to convert it into a single family home...unless you do all the work yourself...and that is a lot of physical effort that could be used on some other more profitable project.

Its hard to make a determination on this. How do you put a price on sentimental value and your own labor?


13 posted on 05/13/2012 1:10:41 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: MacMattico

IF you can afford it and the nursing home care (see post #10)... do it! We grand kids let a family farm be sold...and regret it deeply.


14 posted on 05/13/2012 1:11:06 PM PDT by Bradís Gramma (PRAY for this country like your life depends on it......because it DOES!)
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To: MacMattico

Get some dollar figures:
Sale price of your home
Cost of old home
cost of repairs

If the plumbing and wiring of the 1902 house has been modernized and repairs are just painting, light carpentry and carpet type stuff, and your home will sell at a high price, the old house could be a bargain.

Get some numbers then see how you feel.


15 posted on 05/13/2012 1:14:48 PM PDT by mrsmith (Dumb sluts: Lifeblood of the Media, Backbone of the Democrat Party!)
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To: MacMattico
The house I grew up in was built in 1911. It was a wonderful place to grow up, and a fertile garden for a myriad of wonderful childhood memories. In the mid-90's my folks paid of the mortgage, and, with all the kids out of the house, built on an expanded family room with the anticipation of grandkids coming to visit, having more time to spend with friends, etc.

Within a couple years of doing so, a major drugstore chain decided they wanted to buy up the block and open a store there. I was in Korea at the time and realized that the last time I left that house would be the last time I had ever been there. My parents (and their neighbors) all got very reasonable offers for the properties and my folks found a wonderful place across town.

I'm a pretty sentimental guy, but as much as I thought I'd miss the old house, when I got back to the states, I realized that it had been just a building. It was the people who lived there and the things we'd done that mattered.

My advise? Let go of the house. Keep the memories.

16 posted on 05/13/2012 1:18:05 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: MacMattico

A house is just brick, mortar and wood. The people in it make it a home. Do the numbers and see what they say.


17 posted on 05/13/2012 1:21:54 PM PDT by jwalsh07 (.)
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To: MacMattico

Never, ever make an emotional decision on any major financial matter. Never ever let yourself be cowed into doing so, either, by some knowitall just to meet hisorher emotional needs.


18 posted on 05/13/2012 1:23:31 PM PDT by OKSooner (Never take a "known safety risk" shooting with you even if he is an ordained minister.)
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To: MacMattico
In the same boat family since 1919, grew up in it.... Sell it “as Is” and get out from under it. If and WHEN Medicaid comes for its cut you won't feel so bad. Dump it, dump it now!
19 posted on 05/13/2012 1:24:49 PM PDT by Wilum (Never loaded a nuke I didn't like)
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To: MacMattico

My In-laws are in assisted living and I am fixing up the house he built himself in 1946. Upgrading their house is a royal pain in the butt. I cannot imagine working on one built in 1902! Sell it and move on!


20 posted on 05/13/2012 1:26:43 PM PDT by laker_dad
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