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Should I buy this house? (vanity, but important to me!)
me

Posted on 05/13/2012 12:49:41 PM PDT by MacMattico

Hi, My Dad passed away a few years ago and my Mom, it has recently been determined, needs round the clock care so must go into a nursing home. My father's Grandmother, then single due to her husbands death, bought this home in 1902 (I have the original deed) after having to sell their farm and lived there, renting to boarders to make money. She later saved up to buy another home and rented out rooms there during the Depression, all on her own. When she passed away, each of her daughters were given a home, which they fixed up to be family homes for themselves and obviously their families. When my Grandmother passed, (my dads mom) the house went to my father and mother. I grew up here. The house the other sister got was sold in the early 70's when she passed away, and is now ugly apartments. I'm torn whether or not we should buy this house, or sell it to pay for my mother's nursing home care to any old buyer. The house needs A LOT of work, but ours is worth at least double to triple so if we sold the one we live in now we'd have cash (and our own sweat equity) for repairs. Her house is actually a bit bigger square footage wise, which is good. It's on a nice quiet street but not near the water like we are now, except when the creek in back floods! My kids are iffy on the subject, but I think because of it's present condition. My husband says he doesn't care where we live, he was moved around so many times he doesnt form attachments to houses. Maybe I shouldn't either. What do you guys think? We'd also have to get a new pool or the kids would kill me!


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; History
KEYWORDS: family; house; mortgage; nostalgia
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Am I just being to sentimental? Also, even if our home didn't sell for a while we'd be ok mortgage wise.
1 posted on 05/13/2012 12:49:49 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: MacMattico

Don’t do it.


2 posted on 05/13/2012 12:53:37 PM PDT by Rebelbase
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To: MacMattico

I would think it would be foolish to buy a house that needs lots of work when so many low priced homes are on the market. Sentimentality can be very expensive.


3 posted on 05/13/2012 12:53:56 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: MacMattico

Sell the old house. As much emotional attachment as you might have to it the logical decision is to let it go. The renovation and upkeep will close the gap on that price differential.


4 posted on 05/13/2012 12:56:21 PM PDT by saganite (What happens to taglines? Is there a termination date?)
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To: MacMattico

5 posted on 05/13/2012 12:58:07 PM PDT by Theoria (Rush Limbaugh: Ron Paul sounds like an Islamic terrorist)
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To: MacMattico

I’d enlist the help of a good contractor to determine what is needed and the cost. Condition of the framing, foundation/basement are big concerns. Also keep in mind any plumbing and electrical upgrades will cost and I heard the word flood in there. If money is not a concern who cares but I’d treat it like a business decision.


6 posted on 05/13/2012 12:59:44 PM PDT by enduserindy (Conservative Dead Head)
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To: MacMattico

I would start by talking to some brokers to try and get a handle on what the house would realisticly be worth on today’s market. Then, try and figure out the neighborhood’s short and long term market prospects seem like in case you were to hold onto it.


7 posted on 05/13/2012 1:00:55 PM PDT by Cementjungle
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To: MacMattico

Take a picture and let it go


8 posted on 05/13/2012 1:01:38 PM PDT by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: MacMattico
Friend, make your decision on whether you are really committed and have the resources to keep this home, then if you have doubts on being able to maintain it, discuss the matter with a financial consultant.

All the best hopes for your mother and this difficult situation.

Finally...pray...

Cheers..

9 posted on 05/13/2012 1:04:25 PM PDT by Caipirabob (I say we take off and Newt the site from orbit. It's the only way to be sure...)
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To: MacMattico

You had better check into whether or not the State can take the house to pay for your mother’s care.

If her money runs out before she dies Medicaid will foot the bills.In that case a Transfer penalty may apply to the assets.There is a 5 year span there that may come into being.

Better check with a lawyer.

I don’t know if this applies or not, but better check it out.

http://elderlawanswers.com/Elder_Info/medicaid-planning.asp


10 posted on 05/13/2012 1:06:09 PM PDT by Venturer
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To: MacMattico

Get a structural inspection. Find out what repairs will cost. don’t guess on that. Hold off on your final decision. Gather information, like the structural inspection.

If the house is sound, you will be able to put that issue aside or at least know what you will be looking at to make repairs.

A big part of your decision is subjective. That is why I say take some time. Time often provides the answer to a subjective decision that can’t be quantified.

On the subjective decision, all you really need to know at present is how much time do you have to make a decision. As you go about your daily routine in your present house you will get a feel for what it will be like to be in both houses.

Don’t rush this decision.


11 posted on 05/13/2012 1:07:44 PM PDT by gunsequalfreedom (Conservative is not a label of convenience. It is a guide to your actions.)
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To: MacMattico

I’d let it be sld to somebody else.

The creek floods?....FEMA is re-mapping communities all over the country; and, if this house grts put into a flood zone, look out - the insurance is so high (FEMA will require lenders to require this), the value of the home goes down.

Also, the entry of your relative into a nursing home complicates things, in my mind. If funds run out, and medicaid ends up paying for nursing care...the last minute sale of the house may raise eyebrows, and jam up the medicaid paperwork.


12 posted on 05/13/2012 1:08:07 PM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: MacMattico

Its more valuable as a rental than as a single family dwelling. If you wanted to buy it to rent it out as apartments, I would say go for it. If you want to buy it to convert it back into a single family home, I would say you are going to pay way too much in repairs and remodelling.

It all comes down to how important this building is to you. You should understand you will never get out of it what you put into it if you choose to convert it into a single family home...unless you do all the work yourself...and that is a lot of physical effort that could be used on some other more profitable project.

Its hard to make a determination on this. How do you put a price on sentimental value and your own labor?


13 posted on 05/13/2012 1:10:41 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: MacMattico

IF you can afford it and the nursing home care (see post #10)... do it! We grand kids let a family farm be sold...and regret it deeply.


14 posted on 05/13/2012 1:11:06 PM PDT by Bradís Gramma (PRAY for this country like your life depends on it......because it DOES!)
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To: MacMattico

Get some dollar figures:
Sale price of your home
Cost of old home
cost of repairs

If the plumbing and wiring of the 1902 house has been modernized and repairs are just painting, light carpentry and carpet type stuff, and your home will sell at a high price, the old house could be a bargain.

Get some numbers then see how you feel.


15 posted on 05/13/2012 1:14:48 PM PDT by mrsmith (Dumb sluts: Lifeblood of the Media, Backbone of the Democrat Party!)
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To: MacMattico
The house I grew up in was built in 1911. It was a wonderful place to grow up, and a fertile garden for a myriad of wonderful childhood memories. In the mid-90's my folks paid of the mortgage, and, with all the kids out of the house, built on an expanded family room with the anticipation of grandkids coming to visit, having more time to spend with friends, etc.

Within a couple years of doing so, a major drugstore chain decided they wanted to buy up the block and open a store there. I was in Korea at the time and realized that the last time I left that house would be the last time I had ever been there. My parents (and their neighbors) all got very reasonable offers for the properties and my folks found a wonderful place across town.

I'm a pretty sentimental guy, but as much as I thought I'd miss the old house, when I got back to the states, I realized that it had been just a building. It was the people who lived there and the things we'd done that mattered.

My advise? Let go of the house. Keep the memories.

16 posted on 05/13/2012 1:18:05 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: MacMattico

A house is just brick, mortar and wood. The people in it make it a home. Do the numbers and see what they say.


17 posted on 05/13/2012 1:21:54 PM PDT by jwalsh07 (.)
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To: MacMattico

Never, ever make an emotional decision on any major financial matter. Never ever let yourself be cowed into doing so, either, by some knowitall just to meet hisorher emotional needs.


18 posted on 05/13/2012 1:23:31 PM PDT by OKSooner (Never take a "known safety risk" shooting with you even if he is an ordained minister.)
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To: MacMattico
In the same boat family since 1919, grew up in it.... Sell it “as Is” and get out from under it. If and WHEN Medicaid comes for its cut you won't feel so bad. Dump it, dump it now!
19 posted on 05/13/2012 1:24:49 PM PDT by Wilum (Never loaded a nuke I didn't like)
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To: MacMattico

My In-laws are in assisted living and I am fixing up the house he built himself in 1946. Upgrading their house is a royal pain in the butt. I cannot imagine working on one built in 1902! Sell it and move on!


20 posted on 05/13/2012 1:26:43 PM PDT by laker_dad
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To: MacMattico

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House Part II


21 posted on 05/13/2012 1:27:12 PM PDT by trailhkr1 (All you need to know about Zimmerman, innocent = riots, manslaughter = riots, guilty = riots)
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To: MacMattico

In my opinion the answer lies in your priorities. If the house is important to you because of its history the simple “street value” of the property might not be the biggest concern.

But if protecing your “nest egg” and it’s important to you to buy only something you can reasonably assume will increase in value over the next five years, I’d suggest you not buy it.

2012 was supposed to be the worst year in US history for home foreclosures. But we haven’t yet seen that wave of real estate inventory be put up for auction/sale. I suggest that the reason for this is government pressure being brought to bear to hold that inventory off the market until after the election, so the massive downturn in home values that would result from 1.2 to 2 Million homes popping up in foreclosure auctions doesn’t impact Obama’s chances for reelection.

I believe current real estate values are being held up artificially by the federal government, and that after the election is over all hell is going to break lose in that market.


22 posted on 05/13/2012 1:29:39 PM PDT by RavenATB ("Destroy the family and you destroy the country!" ~Vladimir Lenin)
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To: Venturer

You are exactly right. Plus, the “profit” you make in selling your house may need to be reinvested in the new house within two years of the sale. This may no longer be a valid tax law, but you need to check into the tax consequences, as well as if the state can take the house to pay for nursing care. In MN, your mother would have needed to give all assets away over a regulated period of time (5 years) to prevent forced sale of the assets for care (medical assistance).


23 posted on 05/13/2012 1:54:24 PM PDT by SgtHooper (The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list.)
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To: MacMattico

Buy my house. It needs a lot of work and I need the money. And I’m a nice guy.


24 posted on 05/13/2012 1:59:20 PM PDT by Krankor
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To: MacMattico

I just sold my house on the lake for a “fire sale” price. The kids were kind of upset, but I couldn’t take care of it anymore, so I moved in with my batchelor son. Good move, I said to myself when I got the real estate tax bill for my commercial property! Now I can’t take any money out of there without raising the rents, but I won’t do that because I have to have it fully rented just to pay the bills, so I made a deal with my son, who is a tenant in my building, He doesn’t pay rent and I live at his house.

So my advice to you is to look at this in a strictly business perspective, and forget about sentimental things.


25 posted on 05/13/2012 2:04:43 PM PDT by MondoQueen
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To: MacMattico

Sorry, sentimentality has no place in real estate. Run away from that deal.


26 posted on 05/13/2012 2:22:25 PM PDT by LouAvul
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To: MacMattico; Venturer
Venturer is giving you very sage advice. The five year look back provision is very encompassing from multiple federal and state agencies. As far as if the decision can clear that hurdle, you must (or you and siblings must)determine what is the best decision for your mom's best long term needs, not necessarily the sentimental issues related to the house. If you get past those hurdles, the suggestion for the counsel for a good valuation on the property and cost estimates are excellent. If the value at completion is more than what it would sell for today plus the cost of improvements, any dollars of the fix-up costs above a fair market value just assign to your sentimental value for the house. Are the dollars better there than your retirement needs? Any money you need for kids education? Or maybe you just have more money than need?
27 posted on 05/13/2012 2:29:50 PM PDT by jwsea55
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To: MacMattico

If the house is structurally sound, is in a good area where home prices are stable, and you like the community, why not go for it if it won’t be a financial burden?

However, remodeling a home can be a rather stressful experience. I think it’s important that the whole family be on board with the idea.


28 posted on 05/13/2012 2:31:46 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: MacMattico

The best way to acquire an old house is to buy one after some other idiot has poured money into it and has to sell way below what he/she has in it.


29 posted on 05/13/2012 2:34:31 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Do I really need a sarcasm tag? Seriously? You're that dense?)
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To: MondoQueen

“He doesn’t pay rent and I live at his house.”
Sounds like he got the bad deal. just kidding.


30 posted on 05/13/2012 2:39:27 PM PDT by Orange1998
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To: MacMattico

I think you are very lucky. My dad died when I was 15 and we lost our home and everything else.


31 posted on 05/13/2012 2:43:03 PM PDT by pabianice
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To: MacMattico

location, location, location.........


32 posted on 05/13/2012 2:49:19 PM PDT by Ditter
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To: MacMattico

I’d sell the old house. I’m in a situation now where my parents have been gone for 8 years, but my supposedly well educated brother refuses to sell their house The house is about 50 years old and has been broken into at least once that I know of. The neighborhood is deteriorating, and most likely, when or if my brother decides to sell the house, it will be practically worthless.

Sell now and save yourself the grief.


33 posted on 05/13/2012 2:51:59 PM PDT by fatnotlazy
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To: MacMattico
You don't say who actually has the deed to the house. Is it you or your mother? Is she mentally able to make the decision to sell the house? Has she given you power of attorney?

If she transfers ownership to you the state may take it to pay for her medical care if she's under Medicaid. They can reach back five years to do this in most states. Even if you sell it and you take the profit they can claim the money.

If you sell your home and move into your mother's home after taking ownership I don't know what they can do.

You MUST consult an attorney versed in this crap. The state will try to get its money even if they have to throw you out of the house.

34 posted on 05/13/2012 3:11:05 PM PDT by raybbr (People who still support Obama are either a Marxist or a moron.)
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To: enduserindy

Good advice....


35 posted on 05/13/2012 3:15:51 PM PDT by richardtavor
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To: pabianice

Yes, she is very lucky. My mother is leaving everything to my wonderful brother who has gone behind her back to tell us other siblings that he is not going to be burdened with her when she is too old or sick to care for herself.

So, being a high school dropout, extortionist, bullying, lying, deceitful son who refused to marry the mother of his out of wedlock kid until he could afford a wedding so he could cash in on wedding gifts does pay off.

Course, I wasn’t told of the decision to give him everything until hubby and I sunk $8k into her home for hurricane repairs and old appliances- brother refused to help- physically or financially- even while knowing all would go to him.

Sorry to vent. I just hate being related to a dirtbag.


36 posted on 05/13/2012 3:17:39 PM PDT by Cowgirl of Justice
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To: MacMattico

My grandparents both went into a nursing home, thinking they would always come back to their house. We paid someone to mow the lawn and look in on it. We kept it up.

They passed away without ever moving back, but knowing it was always just a couple miles away was a great comfort to them.

What does your mom think?


37 posted on 05/13/2012 3:37:56 PM PDT by Blue Ink
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To: MacMattico

It should be sold for your mother’s care. Do you even have power of attorney?


38 posted on 05/13/2012 4:11:14 PM PDT by Kirkwood (It's not a lie. It's a composite.)
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To: MacMattico

yes, you are being sentimental and the rest of your family sounds like they arte trying to be nice about it

Old houses are MONEY PITS.
Is this where you want to be investing your family’s financial future?

Sell the house to a buyer you think will love and restore it, someone who is interested in the family history and determination of the woman who started your family real estate dynasty


39 posted on 05/13/2012 4:12:22 PM PDT by silverleaf (Funny how all the people who are for abortion are already born)
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To: mamelukesabre
Its only a viable rental property if you live in a state an county where they don't require landlords to abate lead paint, asbestos, lead pipes, old wiring, radon, nonstandard railings and stair treads, require owners to put in sprinkler systems and fire escapes, reline or rebuild to standard chimneys, remove buried oil tanks, replace septic systems, yada yada yada

and whole host of other old house issues

Not to mention jack up the property taxes on landlord-owned property to double what homeowners pay

Buying pre-1979 property (or worse, pre-1950 property) for rental is extremely risky in many localities

check it out

40 posted on 05/13/2012 4:19:44 PM PDT by silverleaf (Funny how all the people who are for abortion are already born)
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To: silverleaf

that’s scary

People are going to find a shortage of housing and will be forced into government subsidized housing. Maybe that is the whole point of those bullshit regs.


41 posted on 05/13/2012 4:27:19 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: MacMattico

Buy it.


42 posted on 05/13/2012 5:01:06 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand
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To: MacMattico

You are going to build a pool in a back yard that has a creek that floods?Really? Do you have ANY idea what a night mare you are creating? It is far more likely that house will go up in flames during a renovation accident than anything else. Sell it and get a turn key house. Which would you rather have, time to experience life with your kids, or fixing up a old house lying to yourself thinking your kids will value the time money and effort you poured into it?


43 posted on 05/13/2012 5:19:04 PM PDT by Walkingfeather
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To: MacMattico
Know I'm being a stick-in-the-mud, but:

You're asking a bunch of people who you don't know, and never will, to tell you how to run your life/finances. If you take someones advice here, and you wind up 'going south', don't ever say :"I didn't want to do it, but one of my Freeper friends named 'boogaloo-betty-from-boston' said I would make a killing by selling that house and living in this one, (or, whatever) and now I've lost the house, my IRA, my bank account and I have to pay the EPA a $76,000 fine because the creek rose 4 inches when it flooded after a freak storm in South Dakota."

Now, I'm going to give you my (like I know what the hell I'm talking about...DUH) advice, for what it's worth: "Go see several real estate persons and your banker to ask them. {{When you go see them, NEVER go right after they open or right before closing time.... first thing in the morning they're still sleepy and trying to eat their McMuffin and you're interfering. Right before knockoff, you may get the brush off because they are thinking of trying to get away to beat the traffic and make it across town to the day care to get the kid before it rains.} Also, sit down at your computer and surf the net for financial advice.".

Just another dummy talking here. GOOD LUCK.

One last thing: don't ask advice from someone who is apt to make a profit/commission off of your decision. That's kinda hard to do, but try......

44 posted on 05/13/2012 5:48:04 PM PDT by jmax (Ahhhh...life is so frigging good in the obama nation.)
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To: Venturer

Her house is being sold because she has to go on Medicaid to pay for the Nursing home. They (NY Social Services) will take the profit from it and put it towards her care. Medicaid kicks in when the house money runs dry, her only real asset. Social Services claims that if we purchased it, they would have us get an appraisal and they would get an appraisal and we’d negotiate from there, it keeps them from having to do a lot of work if we just say “Here, take her house.” It seems they get stuck with a lot of houses that are sitting empty. Essentially we’d be buying my mother’s house from them!


45 posted on 05/13/2012 7:52:36 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: Caipirabob

Thank you. I’ve prayed and cried but now the real work of cleaning out the house, deciding what to do, etc starts. I saw my mother today and she seemed well. Looked better then she has in years. She wants nothing from the house, because she says is just to hard to think about not going home. It’s tough for her because many of her needs are physical, she’s still mentally very sharp so she is well aware of what’s going on. I offered to have her live with us but no one is here 24/7 to deal with bathroom needs and I can’t lift her to bathe her or do so many other things for her. It really tears at my heart.


46 posted on 05/13/2012 7:59:23 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: lacrew
The creek is far enough away and down hill so that she is not listed in a flood zone. We would essentially be buying the house from the state of NY because they are already involved and going to take it as her largest asset. They claim they would be willing to negotiate with us because they have a back load of empty homes taken from nursing home Medicaid patients and don't want to deal with it if they don't have to. I would never pay full appraised value for it.
47 posted on 05/13/2012 8:08:16 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: mamelukesabre
Maybe I worded it wrong but it is a single family home now. I'm not in love with the house we live in now, but also don't want to go back to memories that aren't there. But one night when my mother was in the hospital and we thought she may come home, and the sleep schedule was all off from being with her night and day the previous week, I went over there and all by myself cleaned the downstairs from top to bottom because she wasn't able to keep up with this and wouldn't let people help out much. It felt like home, even being there alone. This will creep people out, and I wasn't alive at the time, but my Great Grandfather's funeral was in that house and my father was born there! But it doesn't bother me, I just feel a connection. Just going through the attic will be going through 110 years
worth of stored family memories! I've asked myself would I be interested in it if it were an empty house that needed work with no family attachments would I want it? Probably. Maybe. I can't detach my feelings! One good thing is I know every flaw and in negotiating with Medicaid to in essence buy it from them fir my mothers long term care, I'll point out every single issue to get the best price.
48 posted on 05/13/2012 8:28:33 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: Brad's Gramma
That's what I'm afraid will happen if I let it go. It's less then a mile from where we live now and it would be so strange to see other people there. The kids would still have the same school district and friends. We bought this house and gutted it so we are capable of fixing things up. I swear, though, my mother had horrible taste in flooring so besides the new bathroom tile, every floor would have to be recovered, but I know there's decent hardwoods under the carpet in the living room, dining room and upstairs bedrooms. It's the upstairs electrical, plumbing and and a small hole in the foundation that greatly concerns me.
49 posted on 05/13/2012 8:41:01 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: laker_dad
Oh no, the family bought it in 1902, it was built in 1847!

But the home I live in now was built in 1867, so what's another 20 years?!

Of course it took forever to get the one we live in now into the 21st century! Husband said never again, but now says it's up to me. My parents did have some work done about 10 years ago, but still...

50 posted on 05/13/2012 8:49:56 PM PDT by MacMattico
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