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"Middle Class Americans" is a made-up-term
google books ^ | 2012 | google

Posted on 07/15/2012 10:11:01 AM PDT by bunkerhill7

Of the 300+ books on google books using the term, "middle class America", only one earliest is 1971, a few in 1980`s and 95% in 1990`s and 2000`s til now.

I never heard the term "middle class Americans" in my youth, not even in college sociology classes in 1960`s. It appears to be a made-up-term borrowed from English social class structure as defined by Webster.

These communist sociologists try to force an Englsh social model upon America which is impossible- to make a square peg fit a round hole in an fallacious attempt to define a fluid social dynamic of American society as a static factor, which it is not.

These revisionist precaricators attempt to falsely tell us that other 18th century and 19th century authors wrote about the "American Middle class" yet it appears that I couldn`t find one instance of a direct quote using that term in those eras.

They are repeating this lie so often for so many years and teaching it in schools and colleges that everyone actually believes there is a static frozen American middle class , which there just ain`t. You can browse these volumes and see the communist propaganda there disguised as "class" this and "class" that which is a lie.

viz: "Karen Halttunen draws a vivid picture of the social and cultural development of the UPWARDLY MOBILE MIDDLE CLASS" [my caps],...1986, ;Confidence men and painted women:...'

Sorry Obummer but "middle class" is a term origninated in England to denote people bewtween the nobility and the working people.

Webster`s Dictionary definition of "middle class". p.532:

"In England, people who have an intermediate position between the nobility and or leisured class and the working class. It includes professional men, bankers, merchants, and small landed proprietors."

Googlebooks search 300+ examples after 1980`s etc except for one in 1971:

"The Emergence of the Middle Class: Social Experience in the ...

books.google.com Stuart M. Blumin - 1989 - 434 pages - Preview

====

"This book traces the emergence of the recongnizable 'middle class' from the 1760-1900."

Middle-class Blacks in a white society: Prince Hall Freemasonry in ...

================

"Children and arson: America's middle class nightmare"

books.google.comWayne S. Wooden, Martha Lou Berkey - 1984 - 267 pages - Snippet view =======================================================

"The cult of youth in middle-class America: Volume 69"

books.google.comRichard L. Rapson - 1971 - 118 pages - Snippet view

=====================

"Confidence men and painted women: a study of middle-class culture ...'

books.google.comKaren Halttunen - 1986 - 262 pages - Preview

"Karen Halttunen draws a vivid picture of the social and cultural development of the upwardly mobile middle class, basing her study on a survey of the conduct manuals and fashion magazines of mid-nineteenth-century America."

============================

"The aristocracy of labor: the position of skilled craftsmen in the ..."

books.google.comGavin Mackenzie - 1973 - 208 pages - Preview

"Dr Mackenzie's study is designed to test the common assertion in the press and in recent American academic sociology that the line separating the working class from the middle class is becoming increasingly blurred, leading to the ..."

====================== >p? "Work in America: A - M".: Volume 1 - Page 628

books.google.com2003 - 369 pages - Google eBook - Preview

'In Babbitt (1922),Lewis examines the unimaginative aspirations of the American middle class, the role work plays in defining white-collar worth,and the unending quest for profit and status'

=========================

books.google.comWilliam A. Muraskin - 1975 - 318 pages - Full view

source: https://www.google.com/search?q=middle+class+America&btnG=Search+Books&tbm=bks&tbo=1#q=middle+class+America&hl=en&safe=off&tbo=1&tbm=bks&ei=o-kCUPC8L7Ky0QGN2PzUBw&start=40&sa=N&fp=1&biw=1366&bih=540&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&cad=b&sei=WeQCUMboBcbf0QHb9uTBBw


TOPICS: Society
KEYWORDS: americans; class; middle; middleclass

1 posted on 07/15/2012 10:11:09 AM PDT by bunkerhill7
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To: bunkerhill7

Google is a made up term.


2 posted on 07/15/2012 10:14:50 AM PDT by mountainlion (I am voting for Sarah after getting screwed again by the DC Thugs.)
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To: bunkerhill7

Every term or phrase is “made up”.


3 posted on 07/15/2012 10:18:52 AM PDT by wtc911 (Amigo - you've been had.)
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To: bunkerhill7

Funny, I grew up hearing the term middle-class Americans, that the middle-class is the backbone of America, the working middle-class, the lower middle-class and the upper middle-class. It wasn’t until later that I began to understand the concept of political elites and serfs, or the filthy rich. It isn’t a bad term, or a bad reality. It implies upward mobility, and reward for hard work. It has defined America, a place where anyone can start with nothing, and work their way into something. It is the middle area that we move through, live in, hate, enjoy, join and leave behind, and without it, we get stuck looking up. It’s demise is a tragedy.


4 posted on 07/15/2012 10:40:49 AM PDT by pallis
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To: bunkerhill7

Note to Google: Marx called the middle class the “petit bourgeois” and rails against it for the fact that it represents people who should be siding with the “workers”, but instead believe that they should side with the capitalists. Attempting to rewrite history so that “middle class” never existed doesn’t even follow the writings of their god, Karl Marx.


5 posted on 07/15/2012 10:54:44 AM PDT by Bryanw92 (Sic semper tyrannis)
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To: bunkerhill7
MIDDLE CLASS REMAINS THE ELECTION ARBITER; Roosevelt and... ‎ $3.95 - New York Times - Jul 28, 1940 It may be hackneyed, certainly' repetitious, to say that the goal of each is the all-important American middle class, but it is none the less true. ... There are more from before the 1970s: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&tbm=nws&q=middle+class&oq=middle+class&gs_l=news-cc.3..43j0j43i400.2469.4468.0.4670.12.5.0.7.7.0.65.296.5.5.0...0.0.Y-JdAo113ws#q=middle+class&hl=en&safe=off&gl=us&tbs=ar:1&tbm=nws&ei=ugMDUOjVF8Tn0QG3p8jqBw&start=90&sa=N&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=4e6164c1614b4875&biw=1246&bih=602
6 posted on 07/15/2012 10:56:57 AM PDT by PghBaldy (I eagerly await the next news about the struggles of Elizabeth Sacheen Littlefeather Warren.)
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To: bunkerhill7

Er... OK... so what does this all mean?


7 posted on 07/15/2012 11:01:21 AM PDT by Capn Freedom
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To: bunkerhill7

You’re going to get slammed with evidence to contrary, so I’m not even going to bother. I grew up hearing the term all the time. However, the use that I heard growing up was more synonymous with working class than the definition we use now.


8 posted on 07/15/2012 11:06:31 AM PDT by Melas (u)
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To: Capn Freedom
Er... OK... so what does this all mean?

It means that shares in Stupid.com have blasted through their 30- and 150-day resistance levels.

The expected correction is still off in the future somewhere.

9 posted on 07/15/2012 11:07:11 AM PDT by Steely Tom (If the Constitution can be a living document, I guess a corporation can be a person.)
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To: bunkerhill7

“Middle Class America” is union-speak for themselves.


10 posted on 07/15/2012 11:17:34 AM PDT by Madame Dufarge
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To: bunkerhill7

http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=”middle+class”&hl=en&lr=&prmd=imvnsub&source=lnms&tbm=nws&sa=X&ei=3wkDUJrTDMqE0QHctozsDw&ved=0CFMQ_AUoBA&biw=1064&bih=750&cad=cbv&sei=7QkDUOXVOcrq0gHzpcGhBw#q=%22middle+class%22&hl=en&lr=&prmd=imvnsu


11 posted on 07/15/2012 11:22:25 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Check my profile page for the FReeper Online Cookbook 2011)
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On above ‘advance google search’ link - go to news search and put in date parameters...1800’s to 1960, etc.


12 posted on 07/15/2012 11:27:00 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Check my profile page for the FReeper Online Cookbook 2011)
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To: PghBaldy

Sorry but “Middle Class” is an English term for society in England, not American society.
It was usurped by the sociologists to try to fit awkwardly’ on American society. I was raised with Webster`s dictionary in school, and the term “middle class” is a term originated evidently in England, not the USA. Ergo, it is false to ascribe it to American society, because there is no titled nobility aristocracy allowed in the USA by the U.S. Constitution. You may have heard the term “middle class” when growing up, but the term has nothing to do with American society. Next thing you know these sociologists pinkos will borrtow the term “caste” from India and apply also to American society... Gimme a break. Who gives the right to these idiots to rdefine Webster. Absurd morons!
If you want to argue the point, argue with Webster- I am just sourcing the FACTS, Jack.


13 posted on 07/15/2012 11:51:28 AM PDT by bunkerhill7 (. . what??? Who knew? .)
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To: PghBaldy

Sorry but “Middle Class” is an English term for society in England, not American society.
It was usurped by the sociologists to try to fit awkwardly’ on American society. I was raised with Webster`s dictionary in school, and the term “middle class” is a term originated evidently in England, not the USA. Ergo, it is false to ascribe it to American society, because there is no titled nobility aristocracy allowed in the USA by the U.S. Constitution. You may have heard the term “middle class” when growing up, but the term has nothing to do with American society. Next thing you know these sociologists pinkos will borrtow the term “caste” from India and apply also to American society... Gimme a break. Who gives the right to these idiots to rdefine Webster. Absurd morons!
If you want to argue the point, argue with Webster- I am just sourcing the FACTS, Jack.


14 posted on 07/15/2012 11:51:46 AM PDT by bunkerhill7 (. . what??? Who knew? .)
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To: pallis
Funny, I grew up hearing the term middle-class Americans, that the middle-class is the backbone of America, the working middle-class, the lower middle-class and the upper middle-class. It wasn’t until later that I began to understand the concept of political elites and serfs...

Therein lies the story, and it's a subtle but critical one.

I suspect I "grew up" a lot earlier, and although "middle class" was in common useage the entire time, Middle Class Americans" was not.
Middle class and "Middle Class Americans" are not synonymous.
Those who control language control everything.

Just "Middle Class" is a phrase that is totally subject to as many definitions, by inference, as there are people. It is inexact."
"Middle Class Americans" is a political phrase that is critically necessary for the class war; sort of like "The New Man." Among other things, it drills into the subconscious that everyone who is in America is an American.

Including Illegal Aliens.

Don't think so?
Listen carefully to Hussein and the Soros surrogates, and their flying monkeys.

Even Fox has succumbed.
I wince, every time I hear the inane phrase, "Americano, como tu."

In your dreams, Xotlil!

15 posted on 07/15/2012 2:02:29 PM PDT by publius911 (Formerly Publius 6961, formerly jennsdad)
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To: pallis
Funny, I grew up hearing the term middle-class Americans, that the middle-class is the backbone of America, the working middle-class, the lower middle-class and the upper middle-class. It wasn’t until later that I began to understand the concept of political elites and serfs...

Therein lies the story, and it's a subtle but critical one.

I suspect I "grew up" a lot earlier, and although "middle class" was in common useage the entire time, Middle Class Americans" was not.
Middle class and "Middle Class Americans" are not synonymous.
Those who control language control everything.

Just "Middle Class" is a phrase that is totally subject to as many definitions, by inference, as there are people. It is inexact."
"Middle Class Americans" is a political phrase that is critically necessary for the class war; sort of like "The New Man." Among other things, it drills into the subconscious that everyone who is in America is an American.

Including Illegal Aliens.

Don't think so?
Listen carefully to Hussein and the Soros surrogates, and their flying monkeys.

Even Fox has succumbed.
I wince, every time I hear the inane phrase, "Americano, como tu."

In your dreams, Xotlil!

16 posted on 07/15/2012 2:02:48 PM PDT by publius911 (Formerly Publius 6961, formerly jennsdad)
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To: bunkerhill7
Sorry to have to let you know this, but England used to keep some colonies here abouts AND they let their people emigrate in huge numbers to this part of the world.

They had this perverse tendency to bring their language with them, and the Scots, Irish, Welsh, Cornish and Manx did the same doggone thing.

Now America was vast, empty, wild and wonderful so for a long time the English class system was worn down by it all and quite frankly didn't manage to survive. But some of their concepts ~ dating back to ancient times ~ continued.

You rarely hear the term "men of property' in American history simply because "Owning PRoperty' meant an entirely different thing here where folks had slaves!

There are some other sociological terms the English had developed to refer to their condition that also disappeared.

The Middle Classes were always the non titled men of property who owned stores or farms, or ships, or small factories. A butcher would be a member of the Middle Classes. A tenant farmer wouldn't unless he owned his own team, plough boards, harness ~ and so on.

Merry Old England didn't have as frozen a social structure as the nobility imagined ~ still doesn't ~

17 posted on 07/15/2012 2:38:29 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: publius911

I’m not sure when I grew up had much to do with it. That was in the 50s and 60s, and the term came to me from conservative grandparents and a Goldwater Republican mother. One thing though, we didn’t have the illegal immigration problem we have now, and pride in America wasn’t looked upon as being vulgar. Middle class was regarded as a unique American development, a strength and creation of Capitalism and liberal Democracy. Poverty was something to get out of, and economic success was something to strive for. Between the two there was the vast middle class, land of three bedroom, two bath brick homes and jobs that paid the bills. On occasion there was a new car in the driveway, or a nice new used one. ...Those days are gone for a great many people. Somewhere all that turned into massive debt and more debt, and debt based wealth between the comfortably rich and the welfare poor. ...I stepped out of the game by paying as I went, sacrificing when I had to, and avoiding all debt. My wealth is my own, what little of it there is, and I don’t care what class I belong to.


18 posted on 07/15/2012 4:55:33 PM PDT by pallis
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To: muawiyah

Sorry but it appears etymological errors here. “Middle class” is a term of English society, not American, in origin. Are you telling me Webster`s dictionary is wrong? Who do you think one is - Webster?? Is one a revisionist etymologist? 1887 Webster`s dictionary defines “middle class” as an English social stratification separating the lords and nobility from the working class.
There was no “American middle class” existing in from 1787 to 1887 according to Webster`s dictionary because there is not and was not any nobility allowed in the U.S.
So where did the pseudo-term “American middle class” originate?
The so-called term “American middle class “ is an attempt by govt and leftist sociologists to define “classes’ of people by income stratification, whereas the true definition of the term “middle class” is based upon BIRTH [English society] and into what class the people were BORN, i.e,., nobility, bankers, merchants ‘[English middle class] or working people.
If this were true, then Obummer would by rules if grammar, logic and semantics, also have to define the “high classes [upper class]” and the “[low] lower classes”. You can`t have the goose without the gander. Obummer and pinko sociologists want to have “American middle class” sans “American high class” or “American upper class” and
“American lower class”- They want to have their cake and eat it too. You just cannot have middle class defined without upper and lower classes defined also.

Some of us have been down on our luck at some point in our lives, and we all know people who are down on their luck or poor but never in my life would I call them “lower class”.
Yet Obummer and leftist sociologoists open the door to this income class labeling and have to define the “American high class” and “the American lower class” since they insist on defining the middle class by wanting to have their cake and eat it too. You just can`t have a “middle class” without a “high class” and a
“lower class” or you are talking nonsense and are making double talk propaganda.
I dare Obummer to call his food stamp and welfare recipient followers and the unemployed as “lower class”. HAHA.

But England did have a high, middle and lower class in 1887 as defined by Webster.
“middle class”=
“In England, people who have an intermediate position between the nobility and or leisured class and the working class. It includes professional men, bankers,
merchants, and small landed proprietors.”
Webster`s Dictionary, p.532.

Just look at the problems the royal family has in England with members of their family marrying “commoners”
- HAHA
I can back up my hypotheses any day using the undisputed authority of Webster on the true meanings of words and terms and their ORIGINS to show the usurped origins of “American middle class” of leftist sociologists and their Obummer govt lackies any day. Webster is a better authority than any sociologist on meanings of words and terms, as I have stated previously. Go argue with Webster. I am only quoting the written authorized source my parents, grandparents and myself learned and used in school, not some fanciful unicorn term made up to fit a non-nobilty based country..

I never heard the term “American middle class” in everyday language spoken here or in any university I attended, never until the 90`s when I started hearing on TV “middle class” from Democrats. I said to myself, “What the hell is the American middle class?”.


19 posted on 07/16/2012 6:53:57 AM PDT by bunkerhill7 (. . what??? Who knew? .)
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To: bunkerhill7

Very interesting! Thx for the post.


20 posted on 07/16/2012 7:10:56 AM PDT by workerbee (June 28, 2012 -- 9/11 From Within)
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To: workerbee

The correct term to use is “Middle Income Americans”.


21 posted on 07/16/2012 7:18:40 AM PDT by bunkerhill7 (. . what??? Who knew? .)
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To: bunkerhill7
You weren't around in the days when the British Empire was new and America was the crown jewel.

What you are doing is imagining there to be some sort of abrupt ending of England's influence and the beginning of America's influence on the English language ~ which we share with them.

We still have people who grovel at the sight of the Queen of England.

BTW, as best we try the English still have some influence on the shared tongue ~ probably always will have.

22 posted on 07/16/2012 11:36:41 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: bunkerhill7
Webster's dictionary doesn't have authority like the French or Spanish Acadame'. People create words and Webster's reports on the usage at that moment. They do not create words, nor do they circumscribe use.

Do you speak English as your second, third or fourth language?

23 posted on 07/16/2012 11:39:29 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah

I beg to differ- one cannot change the meanings of words nor their entymology in a dictionary by whim- one cannot change the definition of male and female, up or down, black or white- It appears one lives in a bizarro world-
-Sorry but America was never divided into Uppper class, Upper Middle class, Middle class, lower middle , lower class- it`s a bumch of economic strata borrowed from England after the 1960`s and placed in sociology books and called American classes- ridiculous... When I was going to school we were just all Americans created equal. If you were born into a rich family, you were a rich kid. If you lived on the other side of the tracks you were a poor kid etc., but I never ever heard the terms middle class , lower class etc. These are terms made up after the 1960`s when I was in school.
Whose dictionary did one use, Oxford Dictionary of the English Language? LaRousse?? Bhasa ??

Usage of words change upon slang or the gutteral, not the dictionary definitions. That`s the job of a thesaurus, not a dictionary.

These [mostly] words in Webster`s dictionary originate from Latin and Greek, and one cannot change the meaning and the etymology of these Latin and Greek roots on any whim.
Twisting English etymology and the usurping of words to ascribe to non-existent imaginary conditions which are borrowed from another language/culture is called cross- glossification, similar to Mexican slang words appearing in US culture in latter half of the 20th Century and gutteral Chicano beinmg spoken in California which does not have the exactness of the spoken crisp Mexico City spanish...

Class distinctions belong in Europe from whence they came, not in the USA.

Poeple can create words but they cannot change the original meanings of words and their etymology. That is called revisionism.

Your statement/question [Do you speak English as your second, third or fourth language?]-
viz- I will not stoop to conquer nor dignify the latter as evidently one has to stray from facts on a whim to leave the argument hanging like an apple on a non-objective tree.
I beg your pardon, Webster`s dictionary DOES have the authority in schools as to the learning and looking up of words and their meanings. I had to buy a Webster`s dictionary in high school as THE reference book for English classes, as with my french class, “dictionnaire francais larousse”.


24 posted on 07/16/2012 4:30:04 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (. . what??? Who knew? .)
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To: bunkerhill7
You are certifiably nuts.

This country consisted initially of several British colonies. The classes didn't change their stripes just because they moved here.

Then, there was slavery. Yup ~ call it what you want, but that was a LEGALLY ESTABLISHED CASTE.

Webster's is not an authority with permanent binding power ~ it's just a list of words and suggested definitions.

Users of words adjust working definitions to fit conditions. No dictionary can hold back the power of the marketplace.

25 posted on 07/16/2012 4:38:03 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: bunkerhill7
How to address this ~ oh, yes, 2 points. I was the final arbiter of correct definitions for all postal terms in the United States for a good 20 years. Just happened that way ~ every industry has its jargon.

Then, I actually assisted in the development of the dictionary for Bahasa Indonesia.

26 posted on 07/16/2012 4:41:43 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah

Sir, just get a copy of the 1887 Webster`s dictionary and go to page 532 -you will read the definition of middle class=

“middle class -In England,
people who have an intermediate position bewtween the nobility and or
leisured class and the working class. It includes professional men, bankers,
merchants, and small landed proprietors.”

No such similar “middle class” exists in the United States which does not a have nobility.
My family was around-
BTW my family has been here since 1648 and my great grandparents, my grandparents, my parents, all never uttered those words to to me in their lives. They would say “down and out”, “in the poorhouse”, etc. but never say a worded phrase such as lower class or middle class- It was foreign to them because, indeed, it is a FOREIGN PHRASE OR TERM, does not apply to the USA, only England, from whence it came.


27 posted on 07/16/2012 4:45:05 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (. . what??? Who knew? .)
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To: muawiyah

Sorry- one does not have to stoop- If am nuts then in 1887 Webster was also nuts coz he wrote the definition of “middle class” on p.532 as a social term used in ENGLAND, not the USA..


28 posted on 07/16/2012 4:48:13 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (. . what??? Who knew? .)
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To: muawiyah

Terima Khasi no Gelak Saya mau boolong hahah.


29 posted on 07/16/2012 4:52:45 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (. . what??? Who knew? .)
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To: bunkerhill7
My earliest ancestor in the New World got here in 1502. If he bent over to fasten his buckle and broke wind, you'd been required to salute!

As it is the word "middle" and the word "class" have been around for a very, very, very, very long time!

30 posted on 07/16/2012 5:02:41 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: bunkerhill7
"Middle class" means different things in the US and the UK (and its equivalents in other languages mean something different in Europe as well).

The British middle class was the educated, professional, well-to-do bourgeoisie: the class of wealthy, non-titled achievers that was always "rising" in British history.

In the US, "middle class" meant people who were neither very rich nor very poor, in other words almost everybody. As far back as the 18th century it was common to speak of the "middling sort" or the yeoman farmers.

The British middle class contrasted itself with the nobility on the one hand and the working classes on the other. America's middle class excluded the very rich and the very poor.

What the "working class" was over here and whether you could work with your hands and be "middle class" were things we didn't much get into. If you had a job you qualified as "middle class," at least by many accounts.

You are actually right in a way. Most 19th century American references to the "middle class" or "middle classes" have to do with England (or Europe), rather than America. But those Americans weren't looking at their own society and possible divisions.

When they did start to look around at their own country with the same eyes they looked at Britain or Europe with, it was inevitable that they'd apply similar categories to US society, but they were aware of the differences as well.

You or I don't have to be "social scientists" or use words as they do. But if somebody sets himself or herself up as a "social scientist" they aren't going to say that "class" and "caste" are something other countries have, while everything is hunky-dory with us, and we don't have to categorize or label anything about us or distinguish differences between us. Applying those terms where they might fit and drawing possible distinctions goes with the job, like it or not.

Usage always changes a bit with time. You find a few more people here using the word in the British sense, but I'm not aware of any major revolution in usage over the course of the 20th century. "Middle class" has meant, not starving, not on welfare, but not independently wealthy for as long as I can remember.

All words are "made up" in some sense, and any attempt to categorize people by class is going to be disputed. You can categorize them as you wish and use or avoid terminology as you please. But I doubt throwing around the communist label is going to make anything clearer or more precise.

31 posted on 07/16/2012 5:30:08 PM PDT by x
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To: bunkerhill7

Bob Segar was singing about the U.M.C. (Upper Middle Class) on 1974’s Seven album, which was recorded in ‘73.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_%28Bob_Seger_album%29

If a working class rocker from the Midwest was obviously very familiar with the concept of the middle class in that time frame, why wouldn’t everyone else be?


32 posted on 07/16/2012 7:40:58 PM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: bunkerhill7

Live version.

http://youtu.be/2CFibAP5IBQ


33 posted on 07/16/2012 7:42:37 PM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: bunkerhill7

My name is not Jack.


34 posted on 07/16/2012 8:17:55 PM PDT by PghBaldy
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