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Itís Beer Thirty FReepers! Time For The Homebrewing/Wine Making Thread #9 July 27, 2012
7-27-2010 | Red_Devil 232

Posted on 07/27/2012 3:33:57 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232

Good afternoon/evening FReepers. Yep, it is Beer Thirty Time Once Again!

Happiness is a bubbling airlock!

 

BEER


Good evening/afternoon brewers and winemakers. I have a couple of different secondary 5 gallon Carboys - Glass, PET, and Buckets. I prefer to use the glass carboy but I do use the others from time to time and all have been used successfully. The glass carboy is heavy and difficult to move but the others are easier to use because they are lighter and have spigots for racking to the bottling bucket. I am beginning to wonder why I use the glass one. I know there are pros and cons on using these different types of secondary Carboys. I would like to hear your opinions.

I hope all of you and your Brews and Wines are doing well. Stop by and share what you are brewing or let us know what your favorite brew, wine or spirit is.


TOPICS: Hobbies
KEYWORDS: beer; homebrewing; weekly; wine
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1 posted on 07/27/2012 3:34:04 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232
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To: quantim; spinestein; 5Madman2; DTogo; Horatio Gates; Ribeye; decal; B Knotts; doodad; hemogoblin; ..

Ping


2 posted on 07/27/2012 3:38:05 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

In before the ping list!

We just popped the top on our store-bought Sam Adams “Noble Pils.”


3 posted on 07/27/2012 3:38:39 PM PDT by WXRGina (Further up and further in!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

I’m not a homebrewer yet, but my favorite beer is (at the moment) Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA. Fantastic.


4 posted on 07/27/2012 3:38:56 PM PDT by needmorePaine
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To: Red_Devil 232

any truth to rumor that all that construction on the WH some time back was to add-on a micro-brewery next to the mosque?

The production of Spirits run thru the veins of our nation’s very being.. some distilled, some .. well..


5 posted on 07/27/2012 3:39:04 PM PDT by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi)
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To: WXRGina

Is it good?


6 posted on 07/27/2012 3:39:50 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

I’m not a homebrewer yet, but my favorite beer is (at the moment) Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA. Fantastic.


7 posted on 07/27/2012 3:39:58 PM PDT by needmorePaine
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To: Red_Devil 232
I continue to make Geo. Washington molasses 'beer'. It's working well for the summer. I won't budge off of that until the weather cools off.

/johnny

8 posted on 07/27/2012 3:40:21 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: NormsRevenge

HAHAHAHA!!!


9 posted on 07/27/2012 3:41:37 PM PDT by WXRGina (Further up and further in!)
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To: needmorePaine

Have never had a Dogfish Head. Are you brewing it?


10 posted on 07/27/2012 3:42:28 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

No, I haven’t tried my hand at homebrewing yet. With three kids under 2, I can’t find the time to go to the bathroom.

Dogfish Head is a Delaware brewery that makes some excellent beers.


11 posted on 07/27/2012 3:49:55 PM PDT by needmorePaine
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To: Red_Devil 232

The Mrs. and I just got back from a vacation to Wiltshire, in southwest England...and as you might imagine, I made good use of the local pubs. Wiltshire is cider country, and I tried Thatcher’s, Aspall, Heck’s, Blackthorn, and a bunch of local farmhouse ciders and scrumpies. Man, that was good stuff. Better than the local beers, which on their own were quite good (Arkell’s, Wadworth, etc)....

I wish we could get good British cider here in the States.


12 posted on 07/27/2012 3:50:18 PM PDT by Renfield (Turning apples into venison since 1999!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

No, I haven’t tried my hand at homebrewing yet. With three kids under 2, I can’t find the time to go to the bathroom.

Dogfish Head is a Delaware brewery that makes some excellent beers.


13 posted on 07/27/2012 3:50:27 PM PDT by needmorePaine
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To: Red_Devil 232

I don’t drink but what is the easiest way to make wine at home?


14 posted on 07/27/2012 3:50:39 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Pursue Happiness)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Yes, it is. It’s fairly hoppy. Good flavor!


15 posted on 07/27/2012 3:51:58 PM PDT by WXRGina (Further up and further in!)
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To: needmorePaine
If you're interested, Mr. Beer makes a very simple kit to use with basically a two-step process you could squeeze in when the babies are napping or down for the night, and then it's just a lot of waiting until it's "done."
16 posted on 07/27/2012 4:05:52 PM PDT by WXRGina (Further up and further in!)
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To: GeronL

Wine making is easy & complex. It takes equipment & time. We started back in 1998 or so when we moved to a new home with lots of fruit trees. If you’re really interested (as a non-drinker), you might want to look at Jack Keller’s website:

http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/

But if you don’t drink, I’d recommend just going to the store & buying fruit juice! :-)


17 posted on 07/27/2012 5:27:02 PM PDT by Twotone (Marte Et Clypeo)
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To: Twotone

If I made it, I would probably try it.

I did use some Crown Royal on a tooth ache once. Pretty effective.


18 posted on 07/27/2012 5:42:56 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Pursue Happiness)
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To: needmorePaine

Oh man, you have excellent taste! That is my favorite as well.

I picked up a variety pack this evening and they did not have the 90 in stock so I settled for the 60. Still an excellent brew but the 90 is over the top IMO.

I did a homebrew of the 90 and it turned out pretty good but really hard to get it just right. With all of the multi-hopping it’s a process. But worth it!


19 posted on 07/27/2012 5:47:58 PM PDT by unixfox (Abolish Slavery, Repeal The 16th Amendment!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

My better half brought in some really nice large watermelons from the garden today. First ones she picked this season. Going to try making watermelon wine over the weekend....


20 posted on 07/27/2012 5:56:59 PM PDT by Mechanicos (When did we amend the Constitution for a 2nd Federal Prohibition?)
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To: Mechanicos

Hollis’s Watermelon Barbecue Sauce

1 each 6 lb seedless watermelon
8 oz tomato paste
1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon garlic powder
2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1/2 cup sherry
2 teaspoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon liquid smoke

Cut the melon into chunks and place in a saucepan. Cook it uncovered over medium heat until the melon is the consistency of applesauce (approximately 2-3 hours). Stir it occasionally. Add remaining ingredients. Simmer uncovered over low heat for 2 hours. Allow to cool to room temperature before using.

Options: White vinegar may be substituted for the lemon juice. Try mixing yellow tomatoes and watermelon for color variation From Hollis Harris of Porter’s Catering, Portland, Oregon

Let me know if this works out.


21 posted on 07/27/2012 6:20:33 PM PDT by american_ranger
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To: Red_Devil 232

I started a Belgian ale last Sunday; it’s still fermenting fairly lustily, with a starting gravity of 1.07. I’m going to add a handful of cherry wood chips soaked in cream sherry to give it a bit of a cask-conditioned flavor. I tried this last year with a smoke ale, and after about six months of aging in the bottle it’s outstanding. It should be even better with a Belgian.

People joke about Mr. Beer, but it’s a really great and simple way of getting your feet wet with brewing, and giving the novice a feel for the process. Once you’ve done a few Mr. Beer batches, if you’re really serious, you’ll want to delve a little deeper. It’s not that difficult, nor expensive to get started with extract brewing, and there are plenty of web resources for reference.


22 posted on 07/27/2012 6:24:06 PM PDT by Mr Ramsbotham (Laws against sodomy are honored in the breech.)
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To: GeronL

Well, a very quick run-down of the process is:

1) You crush your fruit & place it in a primary fermenter with appropriate chemicals & yeast.

2) You stir twice a day to provide the yeast with oxygen.

3) After 4-6 days you remove the fruit & rack into a carboy with an airlock, being careful to leave the lees behind.

4) After 3 weeks you rack again into another carboy, leaving the lees behind.

5) After 3 months you rack again to remove the lees.

6) After 6 months you rack again to remove the lees, & continue every 6 months until the wine is clear.

7) When clear & stable you bottle & cork.

8) Age for a period - 6 months maybe - and then try it. If you like it you start enjoying.

We add sulphites every other rack to prevent oxidization, & we like our wine sweet, so we add sugar which feeds the yeast & keeps it working. The batch that took the least amount of time was a Port we made which finished in 6 months. That was a record. Generally, the process takes about two years from start to completion.

It’s a fun hobby, but there is a financial & time component. We started taking our wines to the state fair to get the comments of judges & gradually improved the result. Now we are very satisfied with what we make. But we wouldn’t have bothered to begin with if we hadn’t already been imbibers.


23 posted on 07/27/2012 6:26:29 PM PDT by Twotone (Marte Et Clypeo)
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To: Twotone

I think it would be interesting to try, not that I am in that position right now. There is a plum tree in the front yard though... hhmmmm... heh.

Or that other process, throw fruit and kool-aid into a trash bag and let it sit in a corner of the cell for a while. lol. just kidding.


24 posted on 07/27/2012 6:35:08 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Pursue Happiness)
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To: GeronL

You could certainly try that as a quick & dirty method. Just add some sulphites to prevent mold. :-)


25 posted on 07/27/2012 6:44:11 PM PDT by Twotone (Marte Et Clypeo)
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To: Renfield

Are tget brits willing to share their recipes?


26 posted on 07/27/2012 7:04:00 PM PDT by tillacum
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To: Red_Devil 232

We ferment in glass almost exclusively. The only time we use buckets is if we are afraid that our fruit will be tough to remove from the carboy.

We currently have 42 gallons of wine in fermentors this week. Not sure how much we are going to get this year but so far we have cherry, plum, and white grape.


27 posted on 07/27/2012 8:55:55 PM PDT by pennyfarmer (Even a RINO will chew its foot off when caught in a trap.)
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To: needmorePaine
I have 8 kids and I just brew at a friends house. :)
28 posted on 07/27/2012 9:07:26 PM PDT by pennyfarmer (Even a RINO will chew its foot off when caught in a trap.)
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To: Red_Devil 232
21st wedding anniversary today. Celebrated the occasion with t-bones, a few Summit Pale ales and watching all 3 Lord Of The Rings.

My current batch of home brew refused to ferment.

Best I can figure is the honey I put in it was made in china sold at Costco. Apparently the Chinese super filter all the pollen out of it so it can't be traced to the country of origin and they load it up with antibiotics. I do believe the antibiotics is killing my yeast which I have added in massive amounts 3 times.

Not sure if that's what's going on but I am not happy.

29 posted on 07/27/2012 9:39:51 PM PDT by Manic_Episode (Tom Hoefling for President - 2012)
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To: Red_Devil 232

i have 3 gallon jugs of cider that look like they are done. i have 2 more gallons of apple juice to go in, and in the last one i am going to try ginger beer/ginger wine


30 posted on 07/28/2012 8:12:16 AM PDT by wafflehouse (RE-ELECT NO ONE !)
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To: Red_Devil 232
also have the stuff to mix up a 5 gal batch of Skeeter Pee (lemon wine), but havent had time to get it together yet

http://www.skeeterpee.com/
31 posted on 07/28/2012 8:13:57 AM PDT by wafflehouse (RE-ELECT NO ONE !)
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To: Red_Devil 232
I haven't done this yet, but it's crossed my mind a number of times. What is the initial investment? I am lacto-fermenting cabbage this year, other vegetables, and some fruits too. The stuff is out of this world, very easy and very cheap to make. Can you put me on your Beer Thirty list? It might inspire me to make some marigold wine sometime, some brew, etc.

United States of Budweiser?
32 posted on 07/28/2012 2:54:24 PM PDT by mlizzy (And if we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell others not to kill? --MT)
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To: mlizzy

You have been added to the ping list.

You can get started with basic “get started” equipment for $70 to $100. This site ships for free and is good to order equipment from.
http://morebeer.com/search/102142/beerwinecoffee/coffeewinebeer/Personal_Home_Brewery_Equipment_Kits

It is easy to brew up a good beer. Boiling water and adding ingredients at the proper time. It is probably best to start with Extract kits. The waiting for the beer to ferment and age is the hardest part.


33 posted on 07/28/2012 3:20:49 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Manic_Episode; JustaDumbBlonde

That is disappointing. I am sure you can find local produced honey? We have a FReeper that is harvesting bee hives and she has something in the area of 40 gallons of honey she has harvested from her bees. You might get in touch with her. She Posts and Hosts the weekly gardening thread - JustaDumbBlonde.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2911641/posts?page=13#13


34 posted on 07/28/2012 3:32:16 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: mlizzy

Lacto fermenting of food can be very healthy and does not take a lot of time to do. Do you use whey?


35 posted on 07/28/2012 4:02:25 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232
I'm not using whey. I'm using Himalayan Salt crystals and filtered water to make brine. I'm using basic Ball jars to ferment in, and I've been very very pleased with the results. This was the initial recipe I followed: Link
36 posted on 07/28/2012 4:23:04 PM PDT by mlizzy (And if we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell others not to kill? --MT)
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To: mlizzy

Have you seen this site?

http://www.thefamilyhomestead.com/homemadekraut.htm


37 posted on 07/28/2012 4:35:29 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Mr Ramsbotham

I did a few Belgian brews when I first started out. They did not turn out well, at least to me. They may have needed more bottle aging than I gave them.


38 posted on 07/28/2012 4:52:58 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Thank you for the “homestead” link. I had seen it before and forgot to save it, so now I’ve got it on file. It makes me want to try ginger next! And thanks for the beer site too. What do you think of fermenting beer in the plastic containers they sell in their kits over glass containers? I like the picture on your thread of those huge glass bottles.


39 posted on 07/28/2012 5:59:05 PM PDT by mlizzy (And if we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell others not to kill? --MT)
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To: Red_Devil 232
I did a few Belgian brews when I first started out. They did not turn out well, at least to me. They may have needed more bottle aging than I gave them.

High gravity brews really do need a considerable aging time to get the flavors right. When first starting out I was following the old Mr. Beer formula of one week fermentation, one week aging, bottling and drinking after a week or two. I was so impatient to sample the final product that sometimes I could hardly wait that long. These days I generally let everything go at least a month in the bottle before attempting to drink it. Even at that, I've had ales and lagers that I wanted to throw out, but resisted the temptation and let them sit a few months, at the end of which time they were excellent. For the heavier Belgians you probably need at least three months, and six wouldn't hurt. I'm starting my Belgians now, and hope to have them ready for Christmas.

40 posted on 07/28/2012 6:09:53 PM PDT by Mr Ramsbotham (Laws against sodomy are honored in the breech.)
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To: Mr Ramsbotham

Yeah I rushed my Belgians and tried them way to early. It is hard for a newby to resist sampling a few which eventually eventually consumes the stash before their prime!


41 posted on 07/28/2012 9:15:59 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Twotone
"...we like our wine sweet, so we add sugar which feeds the yeast & keeps it working. The batch that took the least amount of time was a Port we made which finished in 6 months. That was a record. Generally, the process takes about two years from start to completion....."

It's your penchant for the sweetness, no doubt, that adds so much time to your process.

I ferment my wines to complete dryness...my whites are ready to bottle in less than 6 months. I prefer to leave my reds in the barrel for at least a year; 18 months is better...and then bottle.

But since you like sweet wines: There is another way to get a sweeter wine: rack it (or press if it's a red) at around 3 Brix. Sulphite it to at least 50ppm free SO2, and fine-filter it with a #3 filter pad, to remove the yeast. Also chill it...what you don't want is for the fermentation to start up again; which is taken care of by the SO2 and the filtering. The chilling will also help arrest the fermentation, but it's not as crucial as the SO2 and filtering.

42 posted on 07/28/2012 9:41:34 PM PDT by Victor (If an expert says it can't be done, get another expert." -David Ben-Gurion, the first Prime Minister)
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To: Red_Devil 232
I have a couple of different secondary 5 gallon Carboys - Glass, PET, and Buckets. I prefer to use the glass carboy but I do use the others from time to time and all have been used successfully. The glass carboy is heavy and difficult to move but the others are easier to use because they are lighter and have spigots for racking to the bottling bucket. I am beginning to wonder why I use the glass one. I know there are pros and cons on using these different types of secondary Carboys. I would like to hear your .

I have not purchased my brewing equipment yet, still in the setting aside funds mode. However, I did do a lot of research so far and I will be going the ported Better Bottle route. They are lighter and shatter resistant. There are way too many stories about glass carboys breaking and sending the brewer to the ER. Also I like the ported valve assembly that allows closed loop racking, less chance of contamination.

I wish I could find a brewing starter kit that was all Better Bottle. 6 gal. primary & 5 gal. secondary. Or, a kit of all the incidentals only.( Hydrometer, bottle capper, tubing, airlock, bottle filler, etc.) Then I could just add the Better Bottles that I want.

The closest I have found is the Midwest Intermediate kit w/ optional ported bottles. Then buy a 6 gal. ported BB for a primary. I guess I could use the buckets for sanitation. (Starsan) I know, I know . . . the bucket is supposed to be the primary. Well, some folks like to watch tropical fish swim in circles. I rather watch yeast blow bubbles. [grin] (yeah, I lead a boring life . . . )

43 posted on 07/29/2012 5:21:42 PM PDT by Petruchio (I Think . . . Therefor I FReep.)
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To: Petruchio

I understand about watching the fermentation take place it is a wonderful sight! I also like the ported BB’s.


44 posted on 07/29/2012 5:48:09 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: mlizzy

I like the ported clear Better Bottles (clear plastic) especially for a beginning brewer, They are much lighter than glass and you can see the miracle that the yeast preforms on the sugars on your brew as the initial fermentation process progresses, it is an amazing sight. Being able to see the process work is quite beneficial to a beginning brewer. I really enjoy watching the yeast do their work. The white buckets don’t let you see what is going on.


45 posted on 07/29/2012 6:10:59 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232
Please add me to your ping list. Just ordered all of the supplies that I will need for my first batch of mead.

HomeBrewStuff.com has a flat rate shipping option of only $7.95, which is great and allowed me to get a glass carboy instead of PET. Every other supplier I looked at wanted $20-$30 for shipping on a carboy alone!

Now, if my book on meadmaking would just arrive, I could have this figured out before the supply order arrives. Hoping to do a muscadine infused batch.

How is your cranberry batch doing?

46 posted on 07/30/2012 12:20:16 PM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

You have been added. My Cranberry Mead is sitting in bottles and is expected to be ready by November. Yum a Muscadine mead! That should be good. Just a little advice - freeze your Muscadines and lightly crush them before using. The freezing helps to break down the grape’s cell structure Releasing their flavor and juices. Good luck! Did you order a good wine yeast and the nutriments to feed the yeast during fermentation? Your book should give you some good info.

Thanks for stopping by.


47 posted on 07/30/2012 2:55:23 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232
Yes, I ordered Lalvin ICV D-47 and Lalvin EC-1118 yeasts, and I ordered Fermax nutrient.

Thanks for the tip on freezing the muscadines. I had been wondering about that and was waiting anxiously on the meadmaking book to answer the question. Now that you've said so, I will freeze some tomorrow.

48 posted on 07/30/2012 5:12:56 PM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: Red_Devil 232

I’m going to do my first batch with the D-47 yeast and use the 1118 for a non-infused dry mead. 1118 is a champagne yeast recommended by the supplier, and I came up with the 47 on my own research.


49 posted on 07/30/2012 5:16:29 PM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
Freezing is the way to go. You will need anywhere from 5 to 10 lbs or more of Mucaines. I don't know how many lbs you can pick fresh each day so yes freezing is the way to go untill you get enough. When you get you book look up making a "pyment" this is what a Mead is called when you use grapes to infuse the mead. You will need to let your Muscadines thaw and then mash lightly.

Here is a youtube video on making Muscadine wine. The procedures will be the same but you will using 12 to 13 lbs honey. I crushed my cranberries the same way this guy does in the video - Zip Lock bags and a rolling pin. Also note he used 30 lbs of Muscadines for a 5 gallon batch.

Muscadine Wine

50 posted on 07/31/2012 10:42:35 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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