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Letter Re: Synthetic Motor Oil as a Gun Lubricant in TEOTWAWKI
Survival Blog ^ | 9/5/12 | Sgt. K.A.

Posted on 09/05/2012 4:09:22 PM PDT by Kartographer

We discovered that the regular issue Cleaner, Lubricant, Protectant (CLP) [which is a Mil-Spec lubricant, sold commercially under the trade name "Break Free CLP".] CLP was contributing to the problem more than fixing it. It is true that we cleaned our weapons daily sometimes two or three times depending on conditions and enemy activity. Our M16/ M4s would function properly as long as they were cleaned routinely. Problems would occur when troops were engaged for prolonged times and couldn't risk breaking down their weapons to clean out all the dirt. We would simply pour in more CLP. An AR-15 type rifle will fire and function dirty as long as it is liberally lubricated. The problem is the more oil you pore down the bolt and into the chamber the more dirt it collects. What we discovered is that using Mobil1 synthetic motor oil usually in a 0w30 or 5w30 works much better than the CLP. At $10 per quart it is on the expensive side as motor oils go. But when compared to CLP or Rem Oil that are usually sold in 6 ounce containers at $5 to $6 it is much more cost effective. We also experimented with it on out crew served weapon systems. We found it to out perform the (Lubricant, Small Arms (LSA) used on the M2 (.50 Cal Browning machinegun) and MK-19 (40mm grenade launcher).

(Excerpt) Read more at survivalblog.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: banglist; preparedness; preppers; weapons
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Something I'll be adding to this weeks shopping list as though not as bad as the Middle-East the war with dust in the Desert South-West is just as never ending.
1 posted on 09/05/2012 4:09:27 PM PDT by Kartographer
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers’ PING!!

When it comes to keeping a weapon clean and ready I always listen to a Marine!


2 posted on 09/05/2012 4:11:28 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

Why not use a dry lube in a dusty/sandy environment?


3 posted on 09/05/2012 4:11:59 PM PDT by fso301
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To: Kartographer

Seems that I’ve read that the soviets discovered that mixing a bit of gasoline with the oil kept the oiled parts moving freely during the winter siege of Stalingrad.


4 posted on 09/05/2012 4:13:40 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Kartographer

I’ve heard of using automatic transmission fluid.


5 posted on 09/05/2012 4:15:08 PM PDT by MachIV
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To: fso301

I have no answer for you. Possible another FReeper does, but I repeat when it comes to maintaining and cleaning weapons when a Marine speaks I listen.


6 posted on 09/05/2012 4:17:16 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: fso301
MoS2
7 posted on 09/05/2012 4:17:52 PM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Kartographer
Good to know, re: synth. motor oil. Frankly, I've used CLP for both military and personal weapons, but have switched to this:

It's made here in Louisiana and there's a lot of petroleum industry/drilling technology in there. It outperforms any other lubricant/protectant I've ever used, but I still use Hoppes #9 to clean and break down fouling.

8 posted on 09/05/2012 4:18:41 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: Kartographer
When the Marine Corps was first issued the M-16 in Vietnam {1967} a product called “Dry Slide” was provided for lubrication. It looked like dissolved graphite but I think it was silicone based. It tended to cake up when exposed to heat and cause malfunctions. It was replaced by another product—gun oil.
9 posted on 09/05/2012 4:22:49 PM PDT by Brad from Tennessee (A politician can't give you anything he hasn't first stolen from you.)
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To: fso301

Caking? See post #9


10 posted on 09/05/2012 4:25:58 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Brad from Tennessee

Dri-Slide contains Molybdenum Disulphide which is a great lubricant especially in high heat, high pressure situations.

I use it on my guns and airguns. I remember my Daisy Powerline airguns say to use 30 weight non-detergent motor oil for both lubrication and protection.

I have often wondered how well synthetic motor oil would do for gun oil. It is really cheap compared to the name brands. I know it is expensive for motor oil but in motor oil quantities it is pretty cheap per ounce.


11 posted on 09/05/2012 4:43:27 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: cripplecreek

I thought you used saliva and silt to lubricate Mosin’s, no?


12 posted on 09/05/2012 4:43:34 PM PDT by Axenolith (Government blows, and that which governs least, blows least...)
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To: Joe 6-pack

Hoppes #9 is also a fine mens cologne, it attracts conservative women, and it repels libtards AND mosquitos I believe... ;-)


13 posted on 09/05/2012 4:46:52 PM PDT by Axenolith (Government blows, and that which governs least, blows least...)
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To: fso301

Or you could buy an AK47, which can use sand and dust as a lubricant. (I’m joking, but just barely)


14 posted on 09/05/2012 4:46:54 PM PDT by Hugin ("Most times a man'll tell you his bad intentions, if you listen and let yourself hear."---Open Range)
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To: Brad from Tennessee

Not disagreeing with y’all, understand, but wasn’t the malfunction issue found to be carbonates from the caustic wash Winchester used to neutralize the acids used in manufacture of the propellent?


15 posted on 09/05/2012 4:49:26 PM PDT by WorkingClassFilth (I'm for Churchill in 1940!)
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To: Kartographer

Regular old 30/wt motor oil has long been known to be superior to most lubes and protectants. Any self-loading action will gunk up if it gets enough crap in it, including the AK.


16 posted on 09/05/2012 4:53:39 PM PDT by ozzymandus
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To: Hugin

“Or you could buy an AK47, which can use sand and dust as a lubricant. (I’m joking, but just barely)”

No joke. My buddy dug an AK out of a stream bed in Viet Nam, ran a cleaning round down the tube and ripped off a whole magazine.

On the other hand, my 16 not only needed daily cleaning, but the ammo had to be wiped off periodically as well.


17 posted on 09/05/2012 4:53:55 PM PDT by Makana
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To: Joe 6-pack

I use carburator cleaner in my Benelli shotgun and my AR-15.


18 posted on 09/05/2012 4:54:45 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (I will never vote for Romney. Ever.)
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To: Kartographer

Best lube in the world http://www.sniperworld.com/reviews/42267_TGSCOM_Cleaning_Supplies_SPEC357_IN_A_ONE_OUNCE_BO.aspx


19 posted on 09/05/2012 4:54:49 PM PDT by jaz.357 (Twas Ever Thus)
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To: WorkingClassFilth

Macnamara’s whiz kids changed the powder from the one Stoner specified for his gun to a cheaper type the army already had on hand. A lot of Americans died to save a few cents on gunpowder.


20 posted on 09/05/2012 4:57:16 PM PDT by ozzymandus
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To: ozzymandus

I have an American Rifleman article someplace that cites the acid neutralizing basic wash as responsible for mineralization troops experienced in VN. Perhaps Winchester used a different powder due to DOD pricing guidelines?


21 posted on 09/05/2012 5:02:40 PM PDT by WorkingClassFilth (I'm for Churchill in 1940!)
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To: jaz.357

For a while CDNN was giving away free tiny bottles of MiliTech-1 oil with each purchase. I have used it long enough to know it is good stuff.

I have no idea what is best but it is certainly good. I read somewhere that it’s magic ingredient is just plain old Zinc.


22 posted on 09/05/2012 5:04:18 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: ozzymandus
...changed the powder from the one Stoner specified ...

That is what I recall

23 posted on 09/05/2012 5:05:03 PM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: WorkingClassFilth

I couldn’t say, but I have read that the powder the Pentagon specified caused more fouling than the one Stoner specified. The hangover from this may explain the current craze for piston-driven ARs.


24 posted on 09/05/2012 5:05:08 PM PDT by ozzymandus
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To: cripplecreek

Soviet motor oil in the 1940s would have been much heavier yhan a modern 0W-30 or 5W-30. Check the oil now before TSHTF... It probably won’t need thinning.


25 posted on 09/05/2012 5:05:28 PM PDT by ArrogantBustard (Western Civilization is Aborting, Buggering, and Contracepting itself out of existence.)
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To: Squantos; archy

Whadya think?


26 posted on 09/05/2012 5:07:51 PM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: MachIV

Look up “Ed’s Red” ... It’s a homebrew cleaner and lubricant. Works very well for me.


27 posted on 09/05/2012 5:07:55 PM PDT by ArrogantBustard (Western Civilization is Aborting, Buggering, and Contracepting itself out of existence.)
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To: ozzymandus

Honestly,,,i have never seen an AK gunk up to the point that it cannot fire,,,ever.


28 posted on 09/05/2012 5:08:58 PM PDT by DesertRhino (I was standing with a rifle, waiting for soviet paratroopers, but communists just ran for office.)
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To: Kartographer

The Navy Seals use Froglube, its the best lube it even prevents bore fouling, its so easy to clean the bore you don’t really need anything more than some patches. You don’t have to use a bore brush since deposits don’t stick.


29 posted on 09/05/2012 5:09:56 PM PDT by Zenjitsuman
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To: Kartographer

If you can’t break your weapon down you can still run cloth down your bore and wipe your chamber with rags. Then clean the rags best you but, in any case, you can reuses them to clean whatever junk off and out as best you can.

I recently started using synthetic micro fiber towels on my second or third pass. Cleaning is way faster and I might start using them for all my cleaning except my finish pass. I like to see the white pad come out clean and blanco.

Oh, and Break Free is best used on piston rifles. Spring rifles like a typical AR doesn’t have the power to stay as clean as piston operated rifles.

Not a knock on springers. I like them too. But, my “go to”is always going to be my piston operated rifles as they are indisputably more reliable over spring operated rifles if you are in the dirt for extended periods and can’t perform a proper and full clean.

My dos centavos....


30 posted on 09/05/2012 5:12:49 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: fso301

Dry lube is probably fine in a city environment or if you won’t pass very many rounds before cleaning again.

However, dry lube can cake up or turn into glue .....


31 posted on 09/05/2012 5:17:09 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: Kartographer

Humble advice to shooters is “Try It”! Don’t think you’ll be disappointed...

Tried Mobil 1 a few years back as a lube for my semi-auto pistols, and was so impressed switched all my firearms to Mobil 1...Plus a bit of white lithium grease here and there...

I run my vehicles on Mobil 1 exclusively, and do my own changes...So have begun inverting the “empty” bottles overnight to catch the dregs...More or less “free” gun lube, since it would normally just be discarded with the containers...

And a quart would probably last most guys a lifetime anyway...Using 5W30 on everything and very happy with the results...Regularly run my Rock River ARs for four-day training sessions, shooting 800-1000 rounds in often very dusty conditions (keep that dust cover closed, boys!), and have had zero lube related issues with any of them...

As for corrosion porotection, living in Colorado where it’s dry this is less of an issue, but have used it as a protective film coating and so far no corrosion issues...Again, try it on some other clean scrap metal and see how it performs in a corrosive atmosphere...

Ran across this information awhile back and saved it, but cannot attribute it to the source...Apologies to the author...

According to this data, Mobil 1 apparently exceeds the minimum standard for which gun oils are evaluated, and that includes Militec and Rem Oil:

“Since Mobil 1 is subjected to such extreme conditions (in terms of thermal stress, oxidation and pressure) inside of an internal combustion engine, it appears that it should possess both adequate film and barrier strength to serve as a small arms lubricant.”

The criteria that these lubricants were evaluated by are:

1. Pour Point (P/P): The lowest temperature (in degrees F) at which the lubricant will flow within a specified timeframe.
Minimum requirement: -50 F

2. Flash Point (F/P): The lowest temperature (in degrees F) at which the lubricant will produce vapors that, if subjected to an ignition source, will ignite and combust.
Minimum requirement: +450 F

3. Viscosity at 100 F (V/100): The viscosity (in centistokes) of the lubricant at 100 F.
Minimum requirement: 40.00 cSt

4. Viscosity at 212 F (V/212): The viscosity of the lubricant (in centistokes) at 212 F.
Minimum requirement: 8.00 cSt

As a point of reference, the kinematic viscosity of pure water at:
68 F (room temperature) is 1.004 cSt
100 F is 0.658 cSt
212 F is 0.294 cSt

5. Transient Operating Range (TOR): The sum of the absolute values of the Pour Point (P/P) and the Flash Point (F/P).
Minimum requirement: 500 F

6. Viscosity Index (VI): An arbitrary numerical value assigned to a lubricant indicating its ability to retain its viscosity across a specified temperature range.
Minimum requirement: 110 (Very High)

Low VI: 35 or lower
Medium VI: 35-80
High VI: 80-110
Very High VI: 110 or higher

Data for Mobil 1 Synthetic Lubricants:

0W20
P/P: -70.6 F
F/P: +449.6 F
V/100: 43.0 cSt
V/212: 8.4 cSt
TOR: 520.2 F
VI: 176

0W30
P/P: -65.2 F
F/P: +456.8 F
V/100: 63.1 cSt
V/212: 11.0 cSt
TOR: 522.0 F
VI: 169

0W40
P/P: -65.2 F
F/P: +456.8 F
V/100: 80.0 cSt
V/212: 14.3 cSt
TOR: 522.0 F
VI:188

5W20
P/P: -52.6 F
F/P: +442.4 F
V/100: 48.3 cSt
V/212: 8.8 cSt
TOR: 495.0 F
VI: 164

5W30
P/P: -65.2 F
F/P: +446.0 F
V/100: 64.8 cSt
V/212: 11.3 cSt
TOR: 511.2 F
VI: 171

5W40
P/P: -49.0 F
F/P: +438.8 F
V/100: 102.0 cSt
V/212: 14.8 cSt
TOR: 487.8 F
VI: 152

5W50
P/P: -65.2 F
F/P: +456.8 F
V/100: 104.9 cSt
V/212: 17.5 cSt
TOR: 522.0 F
VI: 184

10W30
P/P: -49.0 F
F/P: +453.2 F
V/100: 62.0 cSt
V/212: 10.0 cSt
TOR: 484.2 F
VI: 148

10W40 (MX4T)
P/P: -65.2 F
F/P: +487.4 F
V/100: 86.0 cSt
V/212: 13.8 cSt
TOR: 552.6 F
VI: 166

15W50
P/P: -49.0 F
F/P: +446.0 F
V/100: 125.0 cSt
V/212: 17.4 cSt
TOR: 495.0 F
VI: 153

20W50 (VTWIN)
P/P: -59.8 F
F/P: +518.0 F
V/100: 130.0 cSt
V/212: 17.7 cSt
TOR: 577.8 F
VI: 151

75W90
P/P: -50.8 F
F/P: +347.0 F
V/100: 106.0 cSt
V/212: 15.2 cSt
TOR: 397.8 F
VI: 151

75W140
P/P: -59.8 F
F/P: +429.8 F
V/100: 179.0 cSt
V/212: 25.3 cSt
TOR: 489.6 F
VI: 175

SYNTHETIC ATF
P/P: -65.2 F
F/P: +456.8 F
V/100: 34.0 cSt
V/212: 7.6 cSt
TOR: 522.0 F
VI: 203

JET OIL II
P/P: -74.2 F
F/P: +518.0 F
V/100: 27.6 cSt
V/212: 5.1 cSt
TOR: 592.2 F
VI: 113

JET OIL 254
P/P: -79.6 F
F/P: +489.0 F
V/100: 26.4 cSt
V/212: 5.3 cSt
TOR: 568.6 F
VI: 137

JET OIL 284
P/P: -70.6 F
F/P: +442.4 F
V/100: 17.6 cSt
V/212: 4.0 cSt
TOR: 513.0 F
VI: 128

MILITEC-1 (for comparison purposes only)
P/P: -45.0 F
F/P: +455.0 F
V/100: 43.41 cSt
V/212: 5.63 cSt
TOR: 500.0 F
VI: 63

Top 5 Criteria Compliant Grades:

1. 20W50 (VTWIN)
2. 10W40 (MX4T)
3. 5W50
4. 0W40
5. 0w30


32 posted on 09/05/2012 5:17:09 PM PDT by elteemike (Light travels faster than sound...That's why so many people appear bright until you hear them speak!)
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To: Kartographer

Personally I would think Tufoil “tough oil” would do well. Good for your engine and I’d think good for the gun too.


33 posted on 09/05/2012 5:18:23 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I can neither confirm or deny that; even if I could, I couldn't - it's classified.)
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To: Kartographer
I use WD40 or 3 in 1 oil on my personal weapons.

On the machine guns (M249, 240G, and M2), I would put 10W30 or 10W40 in a bottle labeled "CLP" (at least give the appearance you're following the regs) and use that.

34 posted on 09/05/2012 5:21:39 PM PDT by Repeat Offender (Official Romney/GOP-E Platform - We suck less)
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To: Kartographer

In WWII, when the Germans invaded the Soviet Union, they encountered many miles of mature sunflowers in bloom. However, then they encountered fine dust five foot deep that was a mechanical nightmare.

They resolved the situation in the short term by inventing the first dry lube, made from ground sunflower seeds. This worked on the way in. However, on the way out, that five foot deep dust had turned to near impassable mud.


35 posted on 09/05/2012 5:24:51 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: Kartographer

Ive switched to FrogLube. My weapons work well and my hands dont smell. It reminds me of wintergreen Lifesavers.


36 posted on 09/05/2012 5:24:58 PM PDT by Azeem (There are four boxes to be used in the defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury and ammo.)
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To: Kartographer

Marvel Mystery oil.


37 posted on 09/05/2012 5:25:40 PM PDT by Venturer
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To: Kartographer

Amsoil MP (metal protector) which is the synthetic version of WD-40 is one of the best things to clean a gun with. My hubby has been a dealer for 30 + years and is a gun nut also.


38 posted on 09/05/2012 5:26:48 PM PDT by notpoliticallycorewrecked (Our military does not kill babies, those that commit abortion kill babies.)
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To: Kartographer

The smallest can of hi temp bearing grease is better than motor oil. Wipe a bit on, then wipe the excess off. For gas impingement systems, like the M4/M16 varieties, having some oil to spuirt into the bolt carrier means cutting motor oil with a dab of something to endure hi temps, and a dab of olive oil does the trick nicely.


39 posted on 09/05/2012 5:34:26 PM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: yarddog
I remember my Daisy Powerline airguns say to use 30 weight non-detergent motor oil for both lubrication and protection.

You need a USFT :-)


40 posted on 09/05/2012 5:34:49 PM PDT by Axenolith (Government blows, and that which governs least, blows least...)
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To: Repeat Offender
"On the machine guns (M249, 240G, and M2), I would put 10W30 or 10W40 in a bottle labeled "CLP" (at least give the appearance you're following the regs) and use that."

I wish I could find the pic of guys on an M-88 somewhere in Vietnam dumping a quart of "issue" motor oil into the guts of a smokin' hot .50 cal to keep it going.

41 posted on 09/05/2012 5:38:06 PM PDT by SnuffaBolshevik (In a tornado, even turkeys can fly.)
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To: MachIV
I’ve heard of using automatic transmission fluid.

ATF is part of the formula for the homemade gun cleaner/lubricant "Ed's Red". Hence the "red" part. It's been years since I mixed any up, because I made enough to last a loooooooong time. I'm thinking Kerosene, ATF, and maybe Acetone? I'll have to look it up again to be sure.
42 posted on 09/05/2012 5:39:10 PM PDT by rickomatic
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To: rickomatic

I’d watch using anything with acetone in it on any component of synthetic/plastics.


43 posted on 09/05/2012 5:44:20 PM PDT by Axenolith (Government blows, and that which governs least, blows least...)
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To: MachIV

It was pretty common to use 5606 (hydraulic fluid) on the air 60s, mostly for cleaning. Very similar to xmission fluid, or at least it’s red.

Speaking of red, “Ed’s Red” is great stuff. It’s a homebrew cleaner preservative, a modern variant on a recipe from one of the old arsenals.
The “red” part comes from Dexron - tranny fluid - along with Acetone, Kerosene, etc.


44 posted on 09/05/2012 5:46:01 PM PDT by Freedom4US
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To: Kartographer

I’m a big fan of Ballistol. It can be found here: http://www.ballistol.com


45 posted on 09/05/2012 5:49:40 PM PDT by gunsmithkat (There is no such thing as Too Many Guns)
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To: Axenolith

I wish I could afford one of those. I do have an RWS Diana model 48 which is a side lever springer. It is both accurate and powerful and not that hard to cock.


46 posted on 09/05/2012 5:55:16 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: Kartographer

Well what do you know, I’ve been using Mobil 1 on my guns for at least 10 years now and synthetic ATF on my fishing reel bearings. It’s good to accidentally be ahead of the curve.


47 posted on 09/05/2012 6:11:51 PM PDT by 762X51
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To: gunsmithkat

It’s good for leather, too. Supposed to be excellent for muzzle-loaders, with the black powder residue.

However,

Still have most of the can left that I bought, - that stuff really stinks, enough to make me hurl. It ain’t Hoppes #9 lemme tell ya. Hm.


48 posted on 09/05/2012 6:48:24 PM PDT by Freedom4US
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To: Kartographer

Most of the stuff sold or used as “gun lube” is at best, more expensive than it ever needs to be and is no better than motor oil, some things are at worst detrimental to firearms.

On the “worst” end of the spectrum we have WD-40 and CLP. WD-40 is NOT a lubricant by design - it is a water-based machining coolant dispersing fluid. It’s designed to get under water-soluble oils used in machining and get it off the metal, which used to be an important function in a machine shop before non-corroding water-based oil emulsions became more common.

CLP is OK for cleaning, but is a poor lube.

In my work on guns, the only thing I used WD-40 for is lubricating a cut on aluminum. When I’m milling or flycutting aluminum, spraying a little WD-40 into the cut produces a mirror finish. Other than that... I don’t even have it in my toolbox.

On the fairly expensive but only-slightly-better-than-useless end of the spectrum are things like RemOil.

But let’s get back to your point: The idea of using synthetic motor oil has real merit.

Let’s back up a moment: What is or has been the best gun lube in the past? Because gun makers used to have a strong preference in the past... and it was sperm whale oil. It was the perfect lube - didn’t dry out, didn’t turn rancid or gummy, resisted breaking down at higher temps, stayed where you put it, lubed even in sub-zero conditions, etc.

As a kid, I remember how well sperm whale oil (which is actually more like a gel than a pourable oil at room temp) lubed my model cars, guns, you name it. Then the damn bunny-snugglers banned importation, sale, etc. People have been fined thousands of dollars recently for putting “found” inventories of sperm whale oil up for sale on the ‘net.

Everything since then has been an effort to duplicate sperm whale oil. Synthetic motor oils and (especially) synthetic ATF’s are getting closer to sperm whale oil characteristics all the time.

ATF and hydraulic fluids have important attributes of being pretty good at low temperature performance, but they tend to run off too easily. Synthetic motor oils share many of these attributes, and stick a bit better where you put them. Motor oils have lots of detergents in them, which is used to carry away combustion byproducts to the filtration system. ATF’s and hydraulic oils (or spindle oils) avoid these additives.

So we need a tackifier added to the oil, much as some types of machining oils (in particular, “way oils” used on machine ways) have in them. Using “way oil” on guns is probably better than most of the things you can get out of a bottle, but most people can’t find way oil without going through an full oil line dealer or a machinery supply shop. What people need is something they can brew up from local supplies - like the local NAPA parts shop.

One homebrew formula I’ve been taught is ‘Bug juice’ from some USA armorers:

2 quarts Mobile 1 synthetic 10W30
1 quart ATF (doesn’t much matter which ATF - Mercon/Dextron III is probably easiest to find)
1 pint STP oil treatment (which adds tackiness to the oils)
1 9 oz bottle of Hoppes #9. I think you could sub a little bit of mineral spirits here.

This is not the same as “Ed’s Red” cleaning mixture, which is a whole ‘nuther issue.

On my AR-type objects, which have now tragically been lost due to a boating accident (in which my boat collided with another former gun owner’s boat on the Purgatory River in Colorado, and both craft exploded, burned and subsequently sank beneath the rocks on the bottom of the river bed...) this mixture is needed only in small quantities. Put a drop (as in ONE) on the bolt and wipe it around the rings before you insert it into the carrier, put another drop on the outside of the carrier and smear it around before you put the carrier into the upper, etc. On a bolt gun, you need only put a drop into the bolt raceways. On shotguns, you need only lube the breech block, action bar(s) and possibly a gas piston (depending on the shotgun in question). On something like a A5, you might want to lube the barrel/receiver interface.

As for cleaning: Look into a product called “M-Pro 7” for cleaning carbon and plastic deposits:

http://www.mpro7.com/mpro7-gun-cleaner.html

This is the first thing I use when cleaning guns - especially shotguns suffering from plastic wad fouling. To remove plastic fouling from a shotgun, push a sopping wet bore mop or shop towel down the bore and then leave the barrel sit for, oh, 30 minutes. Go down the bore with a bronze brush, then follow with a dry cleaning mop or cotton rag pushed with a small dowel. Plastic is gone.

Sometimes, people are alarmed to see pitting “suddenly show up” in their barrels after using M-Pro 7. Here’s the reality - the pitting was there (on older guns) or developed from non-cleaning by the owner(s) - and the pits used to be filled with plastic and carbon. MPro 7 didn’t cause the pits - it only cleaned them out.

On rifles and pistols, M-Pro 7 removes the carbon fouling better than any other product I’ve used. NB, I’m saying ONLY the carbon and plastic fouling is removed with this product - but those are often the most difficult to really strip out of a bore. I’ve seen people saw patches through a bore for 20 minutes after soaking with Hoppes, then using a brush, and they still can’t get a clean patch. With MPro, you can get clean patches pretty quickly if you let it soak for a little while.

For removing copper fouling, there’s several active bore cleaners which I’m sure people know about - but people should NB that these won’t attack all copper fouling. Not all copper used for jacket material is the same. The copper solvents that remove the jacket copper from your run-of-the-mill or premium jacketed hunting bullets might not remove copper fouling from Berger or Barnes 100% copper bullets. USP Bore Paste is a very fine garnet non-embedding abrasive which can remove copper fouling from a barrel pretty quickly.

Lead fouling can be removed with penetrating oil type products, of which Hoppes #9 is one. Another good one is Kroil penetrating oil (available only directly from Kano Laboratories). These all need time to penetrate under the lead to allow it to be removed with a brush.

Some firearms which can lead up very fast might need a more aggressive tool to remove lead. eg, revolvers have notorious leading issues in the forcing cone. A Lewis Lead Remover does the trick well:

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=21587/Product/LEWIS-LEAD-REMOVER

When I was in Nevada, I found that most any oil or grease on guns attracted the powder-fine alkaline dust that blew in off the playa, seemingly from every direction at once. I ditched most all liquid or grease lubes and ran with a mixture of powdered graphite and moly disulphide, with a little mineral spirits as a carrier that would dry off. Fortunately, most gun owners will never need to deal with the alkaline dust blowing in off the playas. It’s both gritty and corrosive and is the very work of Satan himself, as far as firearms are concerned.


49 posted on 09/05/2012 7:12:07 PM PDT by NVDave
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To: WorkingClassFilth
Not disagreeing with y’all, understand, but wasn’t the malfunction issue found to be carbonates from the caustic wash Winchester used to neutralize the acids used in manufacture of the propellent?

My personal experiences were with the UN-chrome barrels was the problem not he oil we where using. ,,, back in the 60's,,, 40 plus years take it toll on the memory,,

50 posted on 09/05/2012 7:15:56 PM PDT by piroque ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act")
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