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Possible Suicide Mission Mosin Nagant! Coated In "Orange Cyanide" Very Rare!
gunbroker.com ^ | 9-22-12 | Gun Broker

Posted on 09/27/2012 3:01:36 PM PDT by dynachrome

***Extremely Rare*** "Orange Cyanide" Mosin Nagant Many gun collectors have already discovered the "Mosin Nagant" rifle platform that took the market by storm just a few years ago. For those who are not familiar with Mosin Nagants they were the basic battle/sniper rifle in the WWI and WWII era. Because of the stress created in the countries armories during that time, too many Mosin's were made and armories were forced to put all guns into storage. Being that they were just recently recovered you can pick up an average Mosin for only around $150, but this is no such firearm! This excellent condition Mosin features the number "25" located inside a triangle on the receiver and is covered in the same orange paste that coats the sights markings. What boosts the value of this gun so much is the orange paste. The orange paste is believed by some to be "Orange Cyanide" that is thought to avoid POW-MIA's by creating an option of immediate death to soldiers, in which licking the "cyanide" would theoretically kill the soon to be captured soldiers. The production of these firearms were definitely limited , but an exact number isn't exactly known. Also to add to the rarity of this firearm all serial numbers match which signifies that it is not a "rebuild".

***DISCLAIMER*** Though we cannot prove that the Orange substance on the gun is lethal, we do not promote nor are we responsible for any consuming of the chemical. By bidding you are signifying that you have read and understand this.

(Excerpt) Read more at gunbroker.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Humor; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: gunbroker; mosin; nagant; suicideorange
And someone bought it.
1 posted on 09/27/2012 3:01:44 PM PDT by dynachrome
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To: dynachrome

Its paint

http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?113260-triangle-25-red-orange-paint-survey

Have one like it.


2 posted on 09/27/2012 3:04:26 PM PDT by Bidimus1
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To: dynachrome
"And someone bought it."

Yeah I wonder if they licked it yet? ;-)

3 posted on 09/27/2012 3:04:34 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Bidimus1

Yup. I’ve seen several. I had a “12” in a triangle one for awhile, no orange color, though.


4 posted on 09/27/2012 3:06:45 PM PDT by dynachrome ("Our forefathers didn't bury their guns. They buried those that tried to take them.")
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To: dynachrome

Comments on the rifle itself? Reliable? Accurate, etc??


5 posted on 09/27/2012 3:07:18 PM PDT by Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America
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To: Kartographer

Some guy out there trying to get his wife to “taste” it no Doubt!


6 posted on 09/27/2012 3:08:29 PM PDT by dynachrome ("Our forefathers didn't bury their guns. They buried those that tried to take them.")
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America

There are whole groups of Mosin enthusiasts on FR including myself. For the price, they are great guns. Also, because of the availability and low price, they are fun to tinker with. I find them very accurate but of course, due to the age and the many different factories, it is hit and miss. Still, I would bet 8 of 10 are out of storage accurate.


7 posted on 09/27/2012 3:14:26 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: dynachrome

Can I offer that I used to work industrially with hydrogen cyanide and it is water soluable. I don’t know how long an effective dose would last in battlefield conditions.


8 posted on 09/27/2012 3:14:37 PM PDT by muir_redwoods (Hopey changey Low emission unicorns and a crap sandwich)
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To: dynachrome

Cyanide breaks down over the course of several days and virtually inert after about a week.

I’ve owned and refurbished dozens of MNs and have never seen nor heard of such a thing. This was likely a gimmick, IMO.

FWIW, when I’ve been asked to strip the stock red shellack off of a Nagant, I’ve always used a white stain or paint to enhance engravings on the receivers and butt plates. This looks more like an orange paint to me.


9 posted on 09/27/2012 3:16:39 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America

As for reliable, there is a reason why they have been in continuous service from 1890 until recently (and probably still use in deep Afghanistan and Africa).


10 posted on 09/27/2012 3:19:03 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America

I like Mosins. They are accurate for what they are, main battle rifle for Ivan in WW2. The Finns acquired a lot of them before and when they fought Stalin, beefed up the stocks and accurized them. Their M39 model is very accurate for it’s time.

http://www.mosinnagant.net/finland/simohayha.asp

“Many remember Simo Häyhä only as using the Mosin Nagant M28 or M28/30 rifle with open sights and only credit his high kill total to his role as a sniper; however, this is not entirely correct as Häyhä was also an expert with the Suomi K31 SMG and a large number of the Soviets that he felled were from his K31. Above are examples of the tools of Simo Häyhä in his hunts in Kollaa.

Mr. Häyhä was credited with over 500 kills in his service during the Winter War with his service cut short as he was wounded on 3-6-40 by a Soviet sniper. Simo was shot in the face with what turned out to be an exploding bullet and he was taken out of action due to these wounds. The total time that Simo Häyhä served in the Winter War was 100 days with about 500 kills credited to him. His record is truly remarkable and is long since remembered in the nation of Finland.”


11 posted on 09/27/2012 3:19:55 PM PDT by dynachrome ("Our forefathers didn't bury their guns. They buried those that tried to take them.")
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To: rarestia
I’ve always used a white stain or paint to enhance engravings on the receivers and butt plates.

I've been doing the same thing.

What is interesting is the yellow 37 you see on there appears red in normal light but comes up yellow under a camera flash. Have you ever seen that? The Yellow (red) was there when I got it from factory storage. The red-red was what I added so the markings stand out.

12 posted on 09/27/2012 3:23:27 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: dynachrome

I think there is a much simpler way to kill yourself with a rifle.

As Kipling put it “Just roll to your rifle and blow out your brains, and go to your Gawd like a soldier.”


13 posted on 09/27/2012 3:29:08 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America

Russian version of the 30-06. If you want a highly accurate rifle for hunting, get the 30-06. If you want a cheap rifle with cheap ammunition that has halfway decent accuracy, Mosin aint bad.

On the down side, a lot of the surplus ammunition is corrosive, the gun is heavy and long, and it does have quite a report when fired.


14 posted on 09/27/2012 3:29:21 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: dynachrome

It’s likely suicidal to be carrying a bright orange rifle in combat. Perhaps these were issued to “problem” recruits?


15 posted on 09/27/2012 3:29:49 PM PDT by bitterohiogunclinger (Proudly casting a heavy carbon footprint as I clean my guns ---)
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To: mnehring

Red dye number 2?


16 posted on 09/27/2012 3:29:49 PM PDT by paint_your_wagon
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To: dynachrome

Speaking of K31s, you can get demilled ones for about $80 if you are feeling skilled and adventurous.


17 posted on 09/27/2012 3:37:30 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: dynachrome

I had a Mosin Nagant. Quite a butt kicker.


18 posted on 09/27/2012 3:37:30 PM PDT by Past Your Eyes (You knew the job was dangerous when you took it.)
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To: mnehring; humblegunner; Viking2002

Some mosin humor via gunbroker


19 posted on 09/27/2012 3:38:38 PM PDT by dynachrome ("Our forefathers didn't bury their guns. They buried those that tried to take them.")
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To: mnehring

Semi-auto rebuild, but pretty cool:

http://www.jgsales.com/finnish-m31-suomi-9mm-submachine-gun-style,-16.25in.-p-3889.html


20 posted on 09/27/2012 3:43:04 PM PDT by dynachrome ("Our forefathers didn't bury their guns. They buried those that tried to take them.")
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America

Comments on the rifle itself? Reliable? Accurate, etc??

You can reliably hit the broad side of a barn with one, regardless of condition or how vodka-soaked you are.

Perfect for human wave attacks.


21 posted on 09/27/2012 3:45:16 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (I will never vote for Romney. Ever.)
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To: Past Your Eyes

“Quite a butt kicker.”

From being knocked back and landing on your butt?

Only fit for 200lb fat peasants.


22 posted on 09/27/2012 3:47:04 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (I will never vote for Romney. Ever.)
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To: dynachrome

That’s pretty cool. I wonder if it could fall under the C&R designation for possibly owning a full auto with just that license?


23 posted on 09/27/2012 3:50:26 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: dynachrome

We used to use the blood of Mohammedan Jihadists to dye the butt-stocks of our Lee Enfield 1 mk IIIs. Where indeed are the erythrocytes of yesteryear?


24 posted on 09/27/2012 3:54:33 PM PDT by golux
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To: TheThirdRuffian
They also double as flame throwers.


25 posted on 09/27/2012 3:54:36 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: Kartographer

Wavy Gravy!


26 posted on 09/27/2012 3:55:53 PM PDT by Yehuda (http://jewpoint.blogspot.com)
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To: mnehring

“Pavel! How many times have I told you not to eat Cheetos before sighting in your rifle!”


27 posted on 09/27/2012 4:00:21 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: muir_redwoods
Can I offer that I used to work industrially with hydrogen cyanide...

Heat treating? Not too many other uses for cyanide and the EPA and OSHA have driven "salt bath" heat treating into near oblivion. I suppose a few "basement" gunsmiths still tinker with it as it is an easy process to master if you are careful not to inhale fumes from the "pot" and to keep water away from the molten salt. The major problem being safe disposal of the used cyanide salts.

Heat treating generally used sodium or potasium cyanide as a carburizing agent. The solid forms of cyanide react with strong acids to produce hydrogen cyanide, the gas that makes the "gas chamber" lethal. I've never heard of using hydrogen cyanide for gas carburizing, the usual carbon rich gas used is carbon monoxide (CO)

Regards,
GtG

28 posted on 09/27/2012 4:01:32 PM PDT by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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To: TheThirdRuffian; Past Your Eyes

“#9: Mosin-Nagant M44
Speaking of guns without safeties, here’s the Mosin-Nagant M44 Carbine from Russia. The Mosin was used by the Russians against the Finns, the Finns against the Russians, the Estonians against the Russians, the Russians against the Russians, and the Russians against the Germans. It does, in fact, have a safety, but it’s quite hard to engage. But this is not a complaint one would ever voice in the Red Army. Your officer would reply, “Safety? Safety? Is gun! Meant to kill! No warrior should know he has safety on gun, because he should be killing enemies of homeland! Safety make loud click to aid enemy in locating warriors! No safety!” while pounding his fist on the table.

And the Mosin can kill enemies of homeland. The muzzle blast will vaporize green growth within a few feet of the muzzle, and even if you miss, the enemy will be reduced to shouting “WHAT?” to communicate. You’ll need a recoil pad or shooting jacket. Ordinarily, this might be considered unmanly, but this rifle has a short stock for using while wearing several layers of wool for a Russian winter. It is acceptable to wear padding to fire a Mosin.

Of course, there are also M38, 91/30 and other variations of Mosin-Nagant and all are cool. All, also (except the M38), come with a bayonet. Russian doctrine held that the bayonet was mounted except while traveling in a vehicle, because the Russians understood that an empty rifle could still be a pointy stick—a Viking spear. The Russians loved to spear Turks. So, coincidentally, did the Vikings. This rifle sounds better all the time, doesn’t it? The Finns used the Mosin as a sniper rifle during the Winter War, and their greatest Sniper was Simo Häyhä, who had 500 confirmed kills in 100 days. This is a man the Finns describe as “modest” and “self-effacing.” It’s a good thing the Russians didn’t run into a Finn who was proud and arrogant. They’d have been wiped out.

It fires a 7.62X54R (for “Rimmed”) cartridge, about as powerful as .30-06, and holds the distinction of being in service from 1891 to the present, longer than any other military cartridge. It is still used in Dragunovs, PKMs and other Russian weapons. It’s cheap in quantity. So are the rifles, because they were built for (all variations) over 70 years, by Russia, Finland, Poland, Romania, even the US. As I write this, arsenal-new M44s are $55 to $200. At that price, you should have several, so any guests you have during the Collapse can be outfitted as they receive Enlightenment. Then they can rape, kill, sack and loot with the rest of the men who secure a new Dark Ages to hasten the new renaissance. It will be a manly duty.”


29 posted on 09/27/2012 4:07:43 PM PDT by dynachrome ("Our forefathers didn't bury their guns. They buried those that tried to take them.")
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America

If the bullet doesn’t kill ‘em the muzzle blast will.


30 posted on 09/27/2012 4:14:14 PM PDT by OKSooner
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To: Gandalf_The_Gray

None of those, I was an offset cameraman in an old printshop. The job doesn’t exist anymore. We used cyanide to try to rescue overdeveloped film. Cyanide used with a warm water stream would removed fixed emulsion from the back of the film and lighten it a bit.

Of course this was the bad old days pre-OSHA where I was given about five minutes of instruction and expected to understand that it was cyanide and I had best be careful. Oh, and the cyanide and water solution went right town the drain into the city sewer system


31 posted on 09/27/2012 4:21:33 PM PDT by muir_redwoods (Hopey changey Low emission unicorns and a crap sandwich)
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To: TheThirdRuffian

Naw, I was ready for it.


32 posted on 09/27/2012 4:36:03 PM PDT by Past Your Eyes (You knew the job was dangerous when you took it.)
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To: dynachrome

Also please do not lick the brownish grease and sand particles on the butt.


33 posted on 09/27/2012 4:41:59 PM PDT by golux
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To: Gandalf_The_Gray

I used to use the cyanide salt bath method when I worked in a machine shop back in the day. Any factory that tried it now would be shut down in an instant.


34 posted on 09/27/2012 4:48:44 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: taxcontrol

“Russian version of the 30-06.”

And kangaroo tastes like chicken.???? No it has nothing to do with the -03 or -06. It predates both by over a decade. It is a robust 7.62x54 rimmed cartridge and the MN action is also robust. Not a thing wrong with it. The single stack mag was all the rage in 1891.


35 posted on 09/27/2012 4:54:49 PM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: taxcontrol

And by the way MNs come in many flavors. The 38s are not at all heavy, and to my estimation neither are the 91-30s. Enfolds, 98 Mausers, and Sprinfields are all heavier. A sporterized MN is quite light.


36 posted on 09/27/2012 4:58:22 PM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America
Comments on the rifle itself?

Buy one. You'll find that it's a tool, and a very robust tool at that. You get the feeling that you could stab a tank with that bayonet, and it's fun to fire a round at the local range to announce your arrival.

37 posted on 09/27/2012 5:11:16 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Don't think for a minute that this excuse for a President has America's best interest in mind.)
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To: mnehring

It’s likely the angle.

Some dyes use different minerals and metals to get the colors you see. Red mineral or metallic dyes often use gold, which, under the right light conditions, could appear yellow. Likewise, green dyes often use copper. If I recall correctly, cobalt used in blue dyes can appear silver or even black, but I would avoid blues just because it would clash with a blued receiver.

What fiber/nylon stocks do you use on your Mosins? I’ve always been a wood guy myself, but I want to convert a carbine to a fiber stock.


38 posted on 09/27/2012 5:12:54 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America

The MN is by far the most popular and often the first rifle owned by C&R holders. At one point I owned 9 of them. They come in many different flavors and from many different armories and from many different years.

Ammo is dirt cheap.

Reliable? I’ve never seen one NOT fire. You often get fireballs from the muzzle from some of the cheaper milsurp ammo, and you WILL turn heads at any range, esp. indoor.

Accurate? My best shooting ever from a bench rest came with a hexagonal-receiver Mosin I refurbished. I shot five rounds in a 2” group at 300 yds. on iron sights. Couldn’t do it again if you paid me (mostly cuz I sold it), but with proper care, maintenance, and ammo, it’s a tack driver and a damn proper long-range rifle. Most, however, will need some work.

Def. worth it if you’re still in your “shooter” stage, and with some selling for less than $100, you’d be a fool not to pick one up.


39 posted on 09/27/2012 5:21:17 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia
That particular one is just an ATI. Beautiful fit though. Dropped right in and was easy to float. The next one (probably a Christmas project) will be a little more ambitious and creative. Going with a stock like this.


40 posted on 09/27/2012 5:34:29 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: SampleMan

30-06 is a long case .30 caliber as compared to the M1 carbine or the .308 which is short action. 7.62 x 54R is a long case is also .30 caliber. While obviously not the same there are enough similarities. When educating others, it is best to start with something that they know (30-06) and make a comparison.

Thus to frame the conversation to someone who knows the American / British weapons, letting someone know that it is the Russian version of the 30-06 is a valid description. No one ever said that the 30-06 predated the 7.62 x 54R.


41 posted on 09/27/2012 6:09:10 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: SampleMan

Most MN are not too heavy for men, can be heavy for women. Yes you can do a lot to trick out the MN. There is even an outfit that sells a bullpup replacement stock.


42 posted on 09/27/2012 6:27:24 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: taxcontrol
I guess it takes us back to the “tastes like chicken” issue.

The 7.62x54R is similar to the .30-06, but perhaps not any more so than to any other .30-.32 cartridge of the day.

30-06 = 150 @2,700, or 172 @ 2,640.
7.9x57 Mauser = 154 @ 2,835.
7.62x54R = 147 @ 2,886
.303 British = 175 @ 2,440.
7.7x58 Ariska = 175 @ 2,400.

I get your purpose and point taken, its just a pet peeve of mine to see MNs listed on Gunbroker as “The Russian .30-06”. They probably just mean “similar too” as well, so perhaps I should stop being such a purist and get over myself on the issue.

43 posted on 09/27/2012 6:45:38 PM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: taxcontrol

The Finn stocked 1891s are very beefy and heavy guns. Even the Finn 91/38 is much heavier than the Russian 91/30s. The Finns were probably much beefier too though.


44 posted on 09/27/2012 6:52:06 PM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: SampleMan
They probably just mean “similar too” as well, so perhaps I should stop being such a purist and get over myself on the issue.

Well, like the 7.62 x 54R, the 30.06 shoots a 7.62 round. The 30.06 shoots essentially the same weight bullet at essentially the same velocity as the 7.62 x 54R. It does so from a case about 54 mm in length. But it is not a rimmed case. So you find it sloppy to call it the "Russian 30.06"?

45 posted on 09/27/2012 7:10:33 PM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: IncPen

oing


46 posted on 09/28/2012 12:31:07 AM PDT by Nailbiter
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To: MileHi
So you find it sloppy to call it the "Russian 30.06"?

Well I do yes. Probably because I take a historical connotation in the description, and the historical link is not there. As I pointed out earlier, one can compare the ballistics of almost all .30-.32 cal medium to long case cartridges and declare them "the same" if a difference of a few hundred fps doesn't bug you. To say they are similar can be useful as a frame of reference. Getting back to the Russians, the Soviets flat out copied many things, like the B-29. Thus, that is what I'm thinking when I hear "Russian .30-06". To a neophyte, I might describe it as a .30 cal rimmed case, with a length between that of an -06 and a .308. But that's just me. Depending on their level of knowledge, I might also say its a shiny thing that goes bang. :-)

47 posted on 09/28/2012 3:46:12 AM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: SampleMan
This is probably the best explanation of why the .30-06 isn't the first thing that pops into my mind when I think 7.62x54R comparisons:
But if a person only knows U.S. hunting cartridges, then using the .308 (closer in size) and .30-06 as references would be a logical comparison for them, for size and performance.



48 posted on 09/28/2012 6:09:12 AM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: SampleMan
OK For me, when I hear .06 or 300 mag or .223 I think in terms of performance more so than lineage.
49 posted on 09/28/2012 7:54:59 AM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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