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10 Best Survival Foods At Your Local Supermarket
Activist Post ^ | Oct 1, 2012

Posted on 10/01/2012 12:20:57 PM PDT by djf

As food prices continue to skyrocket, having a bulk supply of food is a great investment. But it also provides security and peace of mind against potential emergencies.

By now most people should be aware that grocery stores only have about 3 days of food in stock when crises strike. So if anything was to disrupt the food supply chain for an extended period of time, there would be untold chaos in most communities.

Any number of events could trigger mass disruption to a fragile food system, many of which are well documented and even predicted. Even NASA has warned its staff to prepare for potential disasters with survival foods and other precautions with their "Family Preparedness Program."

Prepping for disasters can seem overwhelming with so many aspects to be considered. However, for those just beginning to recognize how perilous these times are and are new to prepping, you can find many great survival foods at your local grocery store.

There are many fancy freeze-dried food companies offering light-weight storable meals. These are cost effective and great for new preppers. But if you don't have $1000 laying around to by a large supply, it may be better to pick up a few key items each week at the supermarket to build up your food bank gradually. And by buying base foods at the store, you'll ultimately save money.

It's best to keep your survival food list simple, and concentrate on storing foods with the highest amount of calories and the longest shelf life. This list is geared toward foods that will help you survive a crisis that lasts for extended periods of time.

Here are the ten best and cheapest survival rations available at any store:

Rice: Every time you go to the store you should buy one 10-lb bag of rice. You can find them for around $5 at most supermarkets. Rice will stay in good condition for 10 years or more if stored properly. It offers high carbohydrates which is especially important if you are exerting a lot of physical energy during a crisis.

Beans: Beans are known to be one of the best all-round survival foods. They're high in protein, and if sealed in food-grade buckets with a small amount of dried ice, they'll stay for up to ten years. Make sure to store them in a cool, dry, dark location. Buy a 4-5 lb bags of dried beans every time you go to the store. All dry beans are good to store; black beans, red beans, pinto beans, lentils, etc.

Cornmeal: All-purpose flours are good to store, but cornmeal may be the best overall. Cornmeal is packed with dense carbohydrates and contains oils that helps extend its shelf life. Additionally, if the power grid is down during a mega disaster, it is much easier to make good corn breads and tortillas with cornmeal in a simple skillet or solar oven, where refined flour will need yeast and oil to make decent bread or biscuits. Get a 5-lb bag of cornmeal ($10-$15) at each grocery visit. Seal and store the same way as beans (buckets, salt and dry ice), and it will safely keep 8 months to 2 years.

Lard: If you're a health-conscious reader, hydrogenated lard does not sound very appetizing, but in a survival situation you can't afford to be picky. Animal lard or vegetable shortening both offer much-needed calories during times of crisis, cooking oil for multiple uses, and it will keep longer than cooking oils because of the hydrogenation. Buy a 6-lb can ($12) and store in a cool, dry, and dark place and it will stay good for 2-3 years or longer.

Salt: Salt is one of the most useful survival food items. It's used for storing food, curing beef, and flavoring most meals. Salt will stay forever, so always buy extra when you're shopping.

Canned Fruit & Vegetables: These are another obvious survival food, but not as practical as many would think. They're heavy and somewhat costly for the calories they deliver. Additionally, acidic fruits and any cans with tomatoes will not keep as long as most people think. But most canned food is good for 5+ years. Buy green vegetables and fruits like peaches and pears for long-term storage, but more importantly, buy what you already eat in case you need to rotate them into your diet before they go bad.

Canned Meat: Canned meats like ham, tuna, and chicken are excellent to store. They typically will keep for 6-10 years and they're an excellent source of protein. However, if the grid is down for a long time (apocalyptic), hunting and fishing will likely provide most meats. Therefore, it may be sufficient to buy extra canned meats every other time you go shopping.

Sugar: Brown and white sugar will add much-needed flavor and calories to a survival diet and they'll keep for ten years or more if stored properly. Honey is also excellent as it will store forever. Make sure to buy extra every other time you go grocery shopping. You won't need too much, but they'll be well worth having if a crisis strikes.

Pasta: Pasta is a good light-weight storable food that is also a great source of carbohydrates. Pasta will not keep as long as rice, but it can stay for around 5 years in good conditions. Pasta is also very inexpensive and extra should be bought at each trip to the store. It will take up more space in your food bank that rice, beans and cornmeal, so plan your space the best you can.

Peanut Butter: Peanut butter is a terrific source of protein, fat, and calories. Plus, it's just a great treat to have on hand. Peanut butter can last up to five years in root cellar conditions. Stock up whenever there are good deals at your grocery store. You'll be happy you did if the SHTF.

If you consistently buy these items 3-4 times per month, you'll quickly acquire a year's supply of survival rations for your whole family.

How to store it?

A really basic way to store the rice, beans, cornmeal, sugar and pastas is to buy several 5-gallon seal-able paint buckets or food-grade buckets from your local hardware store. Put a cup or so of salt into a sandwich baggie (opened) at the bottom of the buckets. Then fill it with food stuffs and add a couple of ounces of dried ice (found at large grocery stores) which will remove the oxygen from the bucket after it's sealed. Finally, label each bucket with its contents and the date, and place it in your cellar.

Please let us know what other food items you think will be useful for new preppers....


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Food; Society
KEYWORDS: emergencyprep; foodbasics; preppers; survival
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Good list!

I might add those dried gravy packets. A cup of water and one of those packets, you can have some nice turkey or country gravy, does very well over ride or beans or egg noodles.

1 posted on 10/01/2012 12:21:01 PM PDT by djf
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To: djf

“ride” sb “rice”!


2 posted on 10/01/2012 12:22:34 PM PDT by djf (Political Science: Conservatives = govern-ment. Liberals = givin-me-it.)
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To: Kartographer

prepper stuff...


3 posted on 10/01/2012 12:23:20 PM PDT by djf (Political Science: Conservatives = govern-ment. Liberals = givin-me-it.)
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To: djf

Food prep...for later


4 posted on 10/01/2012 12:25:50 PM PDT by Codeflier (Bush, Clinton, Bush, Obama - 4 democrat presidents in a row and counting...)
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To: djf

I get frustrated reading these articles, because I’m no where near prepared for such a situation and for one big reason: I live in Florida.

A lot of preppers in my area lament the warm, moist conditions as not being conducive to adequate long-term storage. It’s often very humid, water gets into everything over time, and storage of things like rice, beans, and pasta is often measured in months and not years.


5 posted on 10/01/2012 12:31:42 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: djf
Cornmeal: All-purpose flours are good to store, but cornmeal may be the best overall. Cornmeal is packed with dense carbohydrates and contains oils that helps extend its shelf life.

Uhhh, I may be wrong, but I've always thought the oils in ground cornmeal would turn rancid after being stored for a long while (assuming the bugs didn't ruin it first), unless you oven can the cornmeal in jars with lids, or vacuum sealed it in #10 cans or mylar bags with oxygen absorbers.

I would think for really long term storage (i.e. years) it would be preferable to vacuum seal or mylar bag whole corn and then grind it as needed for cornmeal. Keeping it as whole corn until needed makes it less likely the oil in the kernel will turn rancid.

Someone with more experience with storing corn/cornmeal can maybe confirm this or explain it better.

6 posted on 10/01/2012 12:34:13 PM PDT by OB1kNOb (November 6th is the tipping point for freedom in America.)
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To: Codeflier

Where’s bookmark? Great list!


7 posted on 10/01/2012 12:35:31 PM PDT by Bubbette
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To: djf

I might add powered milk and complete pancake mix.


8 posted on 10/01/2012 12:36:27 PM PDT by bjorn14 (Woe to those who call good evil and evil good. Isaiah 5:20)
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To: djf

Ping!


9 posted on 10/01/2012 12:37:57 PM PDT by ChinaGotTheGoodsOnClinton (Go Egypt on 0bama)
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To: djf

What about the life of cured meats, like smoke, sugar or salt cured hams?


10 posted on 10/01/2012 12:38:04 PM PDT by Ratman83
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To: djf
Canned Meat: Canned meats like ham, tuna, and chicken are excellent to store.

Why is there no canned pork? I can get chicken, beef and tuna, but I can never fond pork. (besides ham)

11 posted on 10/01/2012 12:38:32 PM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: Bubbette

Never mind! Swear it wasn’t there a minute ago!


12 posted on 10/01/2012 12:38:33 PM PDT by Bubbette
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To: djf
I'm getting there, slowly:


13 posted on 10/01/2012 12:38:47 PM PDT by carriage_hill (Libs, dems, unions, leftist scum & murderous muzzies - are like bacteria: attack, attack, attack!)
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To: djf

I’m also interested in learning how best to store salt, sugar, and spices, for long term storage. For large quantities of salt and sugar is vaccum packed in large mylar bags in plastic buckets with oxygen absorbers and dessicant packs adequate to keep it good/useable for 2 years or more?


14 posted on 10/01/2012 12:39:16 PM PDT by OB1kNOb (November 6th is the tipping point for freedom in America.)
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To: djf

My favorite recommendation: 50 pounds of rice or bread flour costs under $20 at Costco. One sack for one “yuppie food stamp” and you can feed an adult enough calories (maybe not nutrients, but at least energy) for over a month.


15 posted on 10/01/2012 12:39:48 PM PDT by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com)
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To: carriage_hill

Wow. Impressive and inspiring!


16 posted on 10/01/2012 12:39:55 PM PDT by Bubbette
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To: rarestia
It’s often very humid, water gets into everything over time,...

Even if it is vacuum packed?

17 posted on 10/01/2012 12:40:46 PM PDT by Excellence (9/11 was an act of faith.)
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To: MileHi
Why is there no canned pork?

SPAM! the regular stuff lasts for many years. Mostly pork in that stuff.

18 posted on 10/01/2012 12:40:59 PM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.)
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To: MileHi
You can order canned Yoder Meats from MreDepot.
19 posted on 10/01/2012 12:41:52 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: Codeflier

Mark


20 posted on 10/01/2012 12:42:02 PM PDT by Former Proud Canadian (Obamanomics-We don't need your stinking tar sands oil, we'll just grow algae.)
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To: carriage_hill

Nice.


21 posted on 10/01/2012 12:43:07 PM PDT by Ratman83
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To: Bubbette

Thanks. That was last mid-month’s pic; it’s expanded considerably since, and I have to re-shoot some recent pics.


22 posted on 10/01/2012 12:44:17 PM PDT by carriage_hill (Libs, dems, unions, leftist scum & murderous muzzies - are like bacteria: attack, attack, attack!)
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To: djf

Chocolate. Lots of it.


23 posted on 10/01/2012 12:44:40 PM PDT by 43north (BHO: 50% black, 50% white, 100% RED)
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To: Bloody Sam Roberts

Got Spam.


24 posted on 10/01/2012 12:46:01 PM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: djf

Doesn’t honey last forever?


25 posted on 10/01/2012 12:46:08 PM PDT by STJPII
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To: bjorn14
I might add powdered milk and complete pancake mix.

We bought both at Sam's Club a few weeks ago to repackage and seal in gallon mylar bags with oxygen absorbers.

One night we repackaged 2 mylar bags of powdered milk and several bags of beans. We put oxygen absorbers from the same pack in all the bags. Everyone of the bags of beans vacuum sealed down very tight, but both bags of powdered milk never shrunk down a bit. I know it should not be a problem with the oxygen absorbers or the seal, so I'm stumped why the mylar bags full of powdered milk didn't create a vacuum like the bags of beans.

26 posted on 10/01/2012 12:46:45 PM PDT by OB1kNOb (November 6th is the tipping point for freedom in America.)
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To: OB1kNOb
I’m also interested in learning how best to store salt, sugar, and spices, for long term storage. For large quantities of salt and sugar is vaccum packed in large mylar bags in plastic buckets with oxygen absorbers and dessicant packs adequate to keep it good/useable for 2 years or more?

Sugar and Salt will store forever as long as you keep them very dry in a well sealed container. There is very little else you need to do. I just use Gamma Seal lids with my buckets. Have been doing it for years.
27 posted on 10/01/2012 12:46:50 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: 43north
Chocolate. Lots of it.

How to you store yours for long term keeping?

28 posted on 10/01/2012 12:47:12 PM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.)
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To: djf

Bookmark


29 posted on 10/01/2012 12:47:25 PM PDT by sfimom
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To: djf

Honey, Bisquick, and cheap weight gain powders also come to mind. Provided you have water, you could cook biscuits on a stick over an open fire, slather them in hooney and wash it down with a weight gain drink of your choice. Could be worse.


30 posted on 10/01/2012 12:48:25 PM PDT by MattinNJ (Romney? Really? Seriously?)
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To: PA Engineer

Thanks. I never see canned pork in stores. I want something to replace ham hocks in hocks and beans.


31 posted on 10/01/2012 12:48:25 PM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: Excellence

I suppose that’s something to consider. Would I be correct to assume that I’d have to vacuum seal individual bags of rice, beans, for instance, as opposed to keeping it in a container unsealed?


32 posted on 10/01/2012 12:49:22 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: bjorn14

bjorn14~: “ I might add powered milk and complete pancake mix.”

powered milk : Yup !

complete pancake mix : with reservation !
Check the ingredients ~ Long term storage of pancake WITH EGG , may lead to samonella .
Pancake with egg ingredients ~ store for no longer than 6 - 8 months (in zip-lock baggie for moisture protection )


33 posted on 10/01/2012 12:49:41 PM PDT by Tilted Irish Kilt (Disclaimer - the opinions above merely reflect the writers restricted ability to observe reality)
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To: STJPII
Doesn’t honey last forever?

Yes and some info.
34 posted on 10/01/2012 12:50:39 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: OB1kNOb

I may be wrong, but I think both salt and sugar have what amounts to an infinite shelf life if kept cool and dry. (and away from any bugs or critters)


35 posted on 10/01/2012 12:51:23 PM PDT by djf (Political Science: Conservatives = govern-ment. Liberals = givin-me-it.)
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To: Bloody Sam Roberts

[How to you store yours for long term keeping?]

Around my waistline...

Seriously though, I would think that an airtight container - say 200 or so .50 cal. ammo cans - stored in a cool place would keep chocolate fresh for a long time. If it got a little stale, so what? If SHTF time comes, I’d eat it stale or not.


36 posted on 10/01/2012 12:55:56 PM PDT by 43north (BHO: 50% black, 50% white, 100% RED)
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To: PA Engineer

Thanks for the insight. Do you use mylar bags, OA’s or dessicant packs for your salt and sugar stored in the buckets?


37 posted on 10/01/2012 12:56:33 PM PDT by OB1kNOb (November 6th is the tipping point for freedom in America.)
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To: Bloody Sam Roberts

Never forget to add Hostess Twinkies. For a good example, watch the movie ZombieLand.


38 posted on 10/01/2012 12:57:47 PM PDT by glorgau
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To: All

Another one of my faves is something I don’t hear people mention often.

Canned sweet potatoes.

Hey! Good with any kind of breakfast, also good with dinner. You can eat them cold or warmed up. High in sugar, so a good energy source. Packed in water, another very useful commodity.

And in the big picture, they are pretty cheap, bulk-wise.


39 posted on 10/01/2012 12:58:50 PM PDT by djf (Political Science: Conservatives = govern-ment. Liberals = givin-me-it.)
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To: MattinNJ

The weight gain stuff, I’ve been thinking about scarfing a couple buckets of it.

Lot of that stuff is almost pure whey protein. One cup of it a day is probably more than the average persons protein requirements.

Might not be super palatable, but it WILL keep you alive!


40 posted on 10/01/2012 1:02:58 PM PDT by djf (Political Science: Conservatives = govern-ment. Liberals = givin-me-it.)
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To: carriage_hill

Dadgum! You’re serious aren’t you?! - Oh, those crackers in those boxes will pick up moisture pretty quick; they need to be vacuum sealed with some moisture packs. - Oh, and some cans of survival garden seeds; you may have ‘em, I just couldn’t see ‘em. oh, and canned salmon is good. alaska wild.


41 posted on 10/01/2012 1:03:37 PM PDT by Twinkie (IT'S THE OBAMA ECONOMY, ZIPPY!!)
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To: OB1kNOb
Thanks for the insight. Do you use mylar bags, OA’s or dessicant packs for your salt and sugar stored in the buckets?

I have a very dry basement and don't use either. If the humidity is high and you are in and out of the bucket regularly, then I would recommend desiccants. The sugar and salt will still be good, but you will need an ice pick to break it up.
42 posted on 10/01/2012 1:04:34 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: carriage_hill

Dadgum! You’re serious aren’t you?! - Oh, those crackers in those boxes will pick up moisture pretty quick; they need to be vacuum sealed with some moisture packs. - Oh, and some cans of survival garden seeds; you may have ‘em, I just couldn’t see ‘em. oh, and canned salmon is good. alaska wild.


43 posted on 10/01/2012 1:04:41 PM PDT by Twinkie (IT'S THE OBAMA ECONOMY, ZIPPY!!)
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To: 43north

How ‘bout Twinkies? 127 year shelf life...


44 posted on 10/01/2012 1:06:34 PM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: djf

I would add two:

Coconut oil — lasts for a very long time, in all kinds of conditions. It is very healthy, and packs a lot of calories.

Small canned fish (with bones and skin) — nutrient dense, palatable, and inexpensive. Inexpensive, and being smaller fish, less contaminated with toxins than tuna.

Those two, coupled with multivitamins, and the obvious (salt, the more nutrient dense canned vegetables, etc.), are all that you need.


45 posted on 10/01/2012 1:09:02 PM PDT by jjsheridan5
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To: MattinNJ

About 30 years ago my hubby and I used to do a lot of camping. We had an old large skillet with a lid and a steam vent in the lid. I measured Bisquick into ziplocs with the right amount of powdered milk. Easy to mix up with water and I did drop biscuits in the skillet with the steam vent open. On low heat they “baked” really nice, one flip needed.


46 posted on 10/01/2012 1:13:35 PM PDT by MomwithHope (Buy and read Ameritopia by Mark Levin!)
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To: jjsheridan5

I have about 50 cans of sardines (Chicken of the Sea, in oil, lightly smoked).

Plus probably still have some Y2K tuna...


47 posted on 10/01/2012 1:15:54 PM PDT by djf (Political Science: Conservatives = govern-ment. Liberals = givin-me-it.)
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To: djf
Live like you're Amish or die trying. My survival foods:


48 posted on 10/01/2012 1:17:59 PM PDT by library user
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To: Twinkie

I’ve got 3 Survival Seed Bank Kits/Cannisters:
http://www.survivalseedbank.com/

The crackers all have silica gel packs surrounding them, and the basement’s heavily-dehumidified, but dry-sealing them, as you suggested, would be a very good idea. I also rotate-out the crackers and saltines every 6mos. (I make and eat a lot chili, soups and PB. I’ll look around for some canned wild Alaska salmon; love it. Maybe Yoder’s has it. I also have some other sources for canned meats.


49 posted on 10/01/2012 1:18:11 PM PDT by carriage_hill (Libs, dems, unions, leftist scum & murderous muzzies - are like bacteria: attack, attack, attack!)
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To: MattinNJ

About 30 years ago my hubby and I used to do a lot of camping. We had an old large skillet with a lid and a steam vent in the lid. I measured Bisquick into ziplocs with the right amount of powdered milk. Easy to mix up with water and I did drop biscuits in the skillet with the steam vent open. On low heat they “baked” really nice, one flip needed.


50 posted on 10/01/2012 1:18:33 PM PDT by MomwithHope (Buy and read Ameritopia by Mark Levin!)
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