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David S. Goyer: ‘Man of Steel’ Being Approached ‘As If It Were Real’
Screen Rant ^ | January 29, 2013 | Andrew Dyce

Posted on 01/29/2013 10:38:05 AM PST by Bratch

Hanry Cavill Superman Man of Steel

Ever since Man of Steel was announced as being written by David S. Goyer and executive produced by Christopher Nolan, the claims of the film being a case of Superman getting ‘the Dark Knight influence’ have persisted. Even though the two men come from, literally, entirely different worlds.

But according to Goyer, this incarnation of Superman (Henry Cavill) isn’t going to be trading realism for fantasy, or hard questions for special effects. In fact, Man of Steel isn’t being approached as a comic book movie at all.

While Marvel may have found success developing comic books into movies without removing much of the humor and wonder seen in the source material, Goyer and Nolan did something different with their take on Batman. Removing or re-imagining elements in order to update an aging story or to help the material speak to modern audiences may be seen as blasphemy by some, but to Goyer, it’s all in the service of a stronger story.

In the latest issue of Empire Magazine (via CBM) Goyer outlines his approach to a story familiar to nearly everyone. While staying respectful of the films that preceded Man of Steel, fans should expect something very different this summer:

“We’re approaching ‘Superman’ as if it weren’t a comic book movie, as if it were real… I adore the Donner films. Absolutely adore them. It just struck me that there was an idealist quality to them that may or may not work with today’s audience. It just struck me that if Superman really existed in the world, first of all, this story would be a story about first contact.

“He’s an alien. You can easily imagine a scenario in which we’d be doing a film like ‘E.T.,’ as opposed to him running around in tights. If the world found out he existed, it would be the biggest thing that ever happened in human history… It falls into that idea of trying to humanise the inhuman. He’s made out of steel, he’s not made out of flesh, metaphorically speaking. We are portraying him as a man, yet he’s not a man.”

The scriptwriter pulls no punches in his characterization of Superman as an alien (his suit already makes that clear), and not the simple embodiment of “truth, justice and the American way” to which he is so often reduced. However, in the process, Man of Steel seems to be as much a story about societies and how they view outsiders. Specifically, how the entire human race would view something as ‘outside’ our own experiences as a full-blown alien entity.

Superman Man of Steel Not a Comic Book Movie

It’s not hard to see the themes of immigration, belonging, and communal identity that Goyer is driving at (claiming that this is a movie he feels “the world needs right now“), but conceiving of a Superman who is so markedly removed from mankind takes this reboot into entirely different realms. As Goyer alludes to, Richard Donner’s Superman (1978) never concerned itself with showing how the government or people on the street would react to an alien revealed to have been hiding among them.

Bryan Singer’s Superman Returns (2006) jumped even further into acceptance of Superman as a celebrity, not just a superhero. But Cavill’s closing lines of dialogue seen in the full Man of Steel trailer posed the question to all viewers quite plainly: “My father believed that if the world found out what I really was, they would reject me… what do you think?

That willingness to face prejudice, fear, paranoia, and even hatred without sugarcoating humanity’s, shall we say, less flattering tendencies, promises a film that is at least new, if not universally-pleasing. The themes at work have impressed executive producer Christopher Nolan, as has director Zack Snyder’s vision for the big screen. But how do you tell such a serious, grounded story about a superhero from another world?

Russell Crowe Talks Man of Steel

That’s a question that has yet to be asked by DC superhero movies, since Nolan and Goyer’s previous work on Batman was an extremely personal story of suffering and trauma. The task is a more difficult one, but at the end of the day, the story of Superman can be reduced to one core question of identity. A question hinted at in the pair of teaser trailers, but hinging on the ability to make it feel real:

“It is obviously a much longer process with a character like Superman. It is much easier to do a realistic take on Batman. You know nothing can hurt Superman, presumably other than Kryptonite. The challenge was simply: Can we figure out a way to make those elements work, quote unquote, in the real world? It’s very much a story of a man with two fathers.”

Nobody ever accused David S. Goyer or Zack Snyder of making things easy on themselves. And as if pairing such a personal struggle alongside massive” action and backdrops, the word out of Warner Bros. is that much of the direction and feasibility of any Justice League movie will rest on how Man of Steel is received by the public.

The report comes from Variety, with Warner Bros. President Jeff Robinov explaining that the studio is “awaiting the results” of Snyder’s Man of Steel before moving forward. That fact has been assumed to this point, but this certainly puts a damper on anyone expecting massive secret announcements at Comic-Con 2013.

What do you think of Goyer’s approach to grounding Superman, and facing the world’s reaction to his presence head on? Is this the story you’ve been waiting to see told (on film) or the wrong direction altogether?

Man of Steel hits theaters June 14th, 2013. Pick up Empire‘s March issue on newsstands this Thursday.



TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Society; TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: aliens; immigration; manofsteel; superman

1 posted on 01/29/2013 10:38:12 AM PST by Bratch
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To: Bratch

Emo-Supes is my impression from the trailer. Nolan’s batman trilogy had one great movie, one okay movie and one terrible movie. Thankfully Marvel knows how to do comic book movies.


2 posted on 01/29/2013 10:53:45 AM PST by Chipper (You can't kill an Obamazombie by destroying the brain...they didn't have one to begin with.)
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To: Chipper

Thanks for posting this. I’m a big Superman fan and despite my misgivings about the new direction taken by ‘Man of Steel’ I appreciate the insight provided by the article.


3 posted on 01/29/2013 11:05:40 AM PST by lbryce (BHO:"Now, I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds by way Oppenheiner at Trinity NM)
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To: Bratch

First, the comics at least touched on these questions from time to time, of Supes being Kryptonian and being a bit of an outsider. He was an infant when he left, and those stories never worked very well.

Second, a Superman with the full array of powers had from about 1950 on would be impossible to make “real”. He is a fantasy character. The 1938 incarnation jumped, ran, punched and “nothing less than a bursting shell could penetrate his skin”. (which doesn’t imply that he couldn’t be poisoned, starved or killed with two bursting shells.)

He didn’t fly. He didn’t have:

heat vision

freeze breath

microscopic vision

no need of food or drink

the ability to stop his heart

telescopic vision

super hearing

x-ray vision

ability to go through time

no need to breath (hence, could fly into outer space)

super ventriliquism

ability to hypnotize people to see Clark Kent diffenrently

ability to pass through walls or change features (one time
use on both from 40s, later ignored)

Super wind

ability to move around the speed of light (that’s so much
faster than a speeding bullet it constitutes a new power)

Super brains (can learn languages in few hours, comprehend things read at superspeed, make complex calculations in his head, except when hit with Fuzz-Brain [see TRS-80 comic books])

No one has gotten Superman right yet. One either must raise the powers of his enemies (or make them employ magic or Kryptonite to weaken Supes), making them fantastic as well, or go back to an early 40s version, perhaps with flight, preferably before WWII, because the war would have been over before it started with him around.


4 posted on 01/29/2013 11:05:40 AM PST by Dr. Sivana ("C'est la vie" say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell. -- Chuck Berry)
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To: Chipper

Nolan did pretty well with all three, particularly the last two and ESPECIALLY the last one.

I’m a Marvel guy, but the Marvel movies haven’t all been that great, either;

Spider-Man (great)
Spider-Man II (excellent)
Spider-Man III (trash)

X-Men didn’t nearly live up, especially the casting.
Wolverine was just OK.

Both HULK movies sucked donkey balls.

Iron Man really brought it out but Avengers just wasn’t that good, bordering on the sucky.


5 posted on 01/29/2013 11:13:46 AM PST by SJSAMPLE
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To: Bratch

I wondered where Charles Brandon got off to....


6 posted on 01/29/2013 11:14:18 AM PST by CatherineofAragon (Support Christian white males---the architects of the jewel known as Western Civilization)
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To: Dr. Sivana

Good list.
That’s why Superman doesn’t resonate with anybody over 12.

After twelve, everybody wants to be Batman (money, cars, women, mad phat ass-kicking skeelz).


7 posted on 01/29/2013 11:18:33 AM PST by SJSAMPLE
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To: Bratch

How does he shave? Wouldn’t Superman beard be impervious to a mach 3 razor?


8 posted on 01/29/2013 11:32:20 AM PST by Sirius Lee (All that is required for evil to advance is for government to do "something")
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To: Sirius Lee
How does he shave?

AFAIK, He is only shown with a beard in one comic book where he is dosed with Red Kryptonite (ransom, temporary effects). Supergirl and Krypto combine heat vision to smooth him out. I suppose he could use a piece of mirror from his Kryptonian craft and his own heat vision to groom himself. Supergirl might have more problems with her hair styling.


9 posted on 01/29/2013 11:42:22 AM PST by Dr. Sivana ("C'est la vie" say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell. -- Chuck Berry)
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To: Sirius Lee
How does he shave? Wouldn’t Superman beard be impervious to a mach 3 razor?

10 posted on 01/29/2013 11:43:31 AM PST by Bratch
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To: Dr. Sivana
Supergirl might have more problems with her hair styling.

11 posted on 01/29/2013 11:49:29 AM PST by Bratch
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To: Dr. Sivana

They would have to make him fly, because that is the one power that everyone associates with Superman, so the audience would reject any non-flying Supes out of hand nowadays. I do think getting rid of the heat rays/x-rays/superlungs/invincibility is a good idea though. Otherwise, you know that every criminal will be walking around with a pocket full o’ kryptonite, and that is just lame.


12 posted on 01/29/2013 12:03:58 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: Dr. Sivana
A good fantasy doesn't need to have foes of equal power, the good guy doesn't have to struggle and barely beat the bad guy, evil doesn't need to be portrayed as omniscient and Omnipotent while good is portrayed as weak but manages to win through incredibly unlikely good fortune.

It's far too simplistic to make it about power levels. Do you think it would be hard to kill superman? His power levels are off the chart but his weakness is also. How about shooting him with a kryptonite bullet? Bang! Dead alien superhero. Has no one ever thought of this? Superman doesn't even bother to dodge bullets. A 12 year old with a zip gun could kill him. Too afraid to shoot superman? (and I can understand that) How about a kryptonite frag grenade? Krypton gas? Let's face it for all his daunting powers he is a soft target.

Wolverine can't fly, he doesn't have heat vision, x-ray vision etc. etc. but he is way harder to kill than superman. He is way meaner too. You try to kill wolverine you are in for a world of hurt, superman will just take you to jail, but wolverine would make you scream before he killed you.

13 posted on 01/29/2013 12:24:01 PM PST by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
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To: Durus
Do you think it would be hard to kill superman? His power levels are off the chart but his weakness is also. How about shooting him with a kryptonite bullet? Bang! Dead alien superhero. Has no one ever thought of this? Superman doesn't even bother to dodge bullets. A 12 year old with a zip gun could kill him. Too afraid to shoot superman? (and I can understand that) How about a kryptonite frag grenade? Krypton gas? Let's face it for all his daunting powers he is a soft target.

Bullets make noise. Between insanely fast relexes and supervision Superman could easily determine that this was no ordinary bullet, and (assuming heat vision couldn't melt it), fly out of harms way, or use super breath to change its path. That's why the preferred method has also been to entice Superman and distract him with a lead lined box. (K-rays don't penetrate lead. Heck, there was one comic where Superman tricked Luthor into thinking he won (with help of a man-made Hebrew mythology Golem) by vibrating the entire civilization into another dimension or something (with Len Wein, anything is possible). Maybe the zip gun in the hands of an innocent looking 10 year old at skin contact (or Mr. Mxyzptlk, who should be able to kill Superman at will, if it wouldn't rob him of fun,but Mxyxptlk is arbitrarily powerful). The Kryptonite gas thing has been done. Do note that Kryptonite acts pretty slowly, and apparently doesn't take away all of Superman's invulnerability, otherwise, someone would have done the Kryptonite box followed by a regular lead bullet. As it is, Lois Lane, a Superman robot, a member of the Justice League, a one-time regular human character, or even another arch-foe shows up in time to save the day. I think the grenade idea has merit if you use human bait to disguise the hidden payload.

Do note that earth-bound Kryptonite was turn to regular rock in Superman #233 (1971), and was out of the picture for years before it had to be returned.

A well-trained sorcerer could do him in if these types could avoid drawing attentionto themselves (simply attend one of the numerous charity events where Superman bends steel girders or something).

As far as Wolverine is concerned, Supes can just dust off his Phantom Zone Ray, and send ol' Wolverine into a netherworld with the likes of Jax-Ur, kru-El and General Zod, who are so vicious, they vaporized a female cohort from the zone at the first opportunity even though she was a knockout (and perfectly resembled BOTH Supergirl AND Lena Thorul). he's been known to put folks in prisons that would make them WISH they were dead. Luthor is grandfathered in to avoid such treatment.

A good fantasy doesn't need to have foes of equal power, the good guy doesn't have to struggle and barely beat the bad guy, evil doesn't need to be portrayed as omniscient and Omnipotent while good is portrayed as weak but manages to win through incredibly unlikely good fortune.

Besides good fortune (which usually saves the day for the likes of Barney Fife types), with the DC heroes, planning ahead and making what should be a simple workaround is replaced with a ridiculously complex formula, often pretending a good guy goes bad, or that someone close to the hero has died. This stems from the DC approach of making the covers first and and the story after. Or the timely arrival of a third party (Snapper Carr, Jimmy Olsen, etc.), but that could fall under incredibly good fortune.

I would say that Captain Marvel should give Superman a good fight (despite having mainly the base powers), because his power comes from magic/mysticism. Jonn Jonnz could also do well if he is in an oxygen free environment (no fire), loaded with Kryptonite, and can throw the first punch.
14 posted on 01/29/2013 1:21:45 PM PST by Dr. Sivana ("C'est la vie" say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell. -- Chuck Berry)
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To: Boogieman
They would have to make him fly, because that is the one power that everyone associates with Superman,

Agreed. Besides the changes in powers, another reason why I'd like to keep Superman in the pre-War 40s is because his excuse for becomeing a reporter was to know what was happening first, in order to fight crime more effectively. Also, he wasn't expected to be in the office all of the time. Today, the reporters are the LAST to know. Even as far back as the 70s the idea of being a newspaper reporter was stale enough that he was promoted to network anchorman (?! What do you expect from a male boss who uses a cigarette holder?) However, in the early 40s, teh Daily Star/Planet was a reasonable place to be.
15 posted on 01/29/2013 1:26:45 PM PST by Dr. Sivana ("C'est la vie" say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell. -- Chuck Berry)
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To: Bratch

I’m really torn on this one. On one hand I’ve always found Superman (and most of the DC not-Batman pantheon) to be painfully boring as a character. On the other hand, Nolan and Snyder.


16 posted on 01/29/2013 1:27:08 PM PST by discostu (I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac)
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To: Dr. Sivana
Bullets make noise. Between insanely fast relexes and supervision Superman could easily determine that this was no ordinary bullet, and (assuming heat vision couldn't melt it), fly out of harms way, or use super breath to change its path.

Sure bullets make noise but a piece of kryptonite encased in a normal lead bullet doesn't make a strange noise or act in anyway like an abnormal bullet. How many time has superman let bullets bounce off of him? He seems to take great pleasure in it for some odd reason. As an aside could you even be charged for shooting superman with a normal bullet?

I was never suggesting a Superman vs. Wolverine fight but but if I had to choose a Nemesis I would choose Superman. Sure if he ever got me alone without Kryptonite he could kill me easily, but he wouldn't. He would probably give me a patronizing look and a stern talking too while either waiting for the police to show up or flying me to them. Wolverine...not so much.

17 posted on 01/29/2013 1:54:52 PM PST by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
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To: SJSAMPLE
Marvel didn't do the Spider-Man, X-Men or Wolverine movies. They have only produced Ironman 1&2, Thor, Incredible Hulk (Ed Norton version) Captain America and the Avengers movies. I thought they were also responsible for First Class, which is excellent, but they were not. I think The Avengers was the best of the lot, right up there with Dark Knight. Then again I am a Hulk fan and that movie was owned by the Hulk.

I thought this last Batman movie was the worst of the lot. I doubt I will even buy it. I own the first two, but Dark Knight is the only one I would watch multiple times, and that is not because of Batman.

18 posted on 01/29/2013 4:07:05 PM PST by Chipper (You can't kill an Obamazombie by destroying the brain...they didn't have one to begin with.)
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To: Bratch; Revolting cat!; Slings and Arrows
Removing or re-imagining elements in order to update an aging story or to help the material speak to modern audiences may be seen as blasphemy by some, but to Goyer, it’s all in the service of a stronger story.

Considering the nuSuperman no longer stands for Truth, Justice, and the "American" way, who give a crap about Time-Lies-Warner-Turner's latest crudfest?

19 posted on 01/29/2013 4:15:36 PM PST by a fool in paradise (America 2013 - STUCK ON STUPID)
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To: Durus
but a piece of kryptonite encased in a normal lead bullet doesn't make a strange noise or act in anyway like an abnormal bullet.

Lead shields Superman from the effects of Kryptonite.
20 posted on 01/29/2013 4:25:30 PM PST by Dr. Sivana ("C'est la vie" say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell. -- Chuck Berry)
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To: Dr. Sivana

A kryptonite sniper bullet traveling faster than the speed of sound.


21 posted on 01/29/2013 4:58:53 PM PST by allmendream (Tea Party did not send GOP to D.C. to negotiate the terms of our surrender to socialism)
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To: Dr. Sivana

Lead deforms and splits exposing the kryptonite just like a steel core armor piercing round.


22 posted on 01/30/2013 5:48:35 AM PST by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
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To: Bratch
It’s not hard to see the themes of immigration, belonging, and communal identity that Goyer is driving at (claiming that this is a movie he feels “the world needs right now“)

Boy that just unsold me.

I didn't like that script when it was the lyrics to John Lennon's Imagine.

Great Caesar's ghost!

23 posted on 01/30/2013 5:58:38 AM PST by dead (I've got my eye out for Mullah Omar.)
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To: Durus
Lead deforms and splits exposing the kryptonite just like a steel core armor piercing round.

Supes is still invulnerable until the lead splits. It will bounce off his chest before it splits. It is such a small amount he should be able to move sufficiently away if it bounces nearby.
24 posted on 01/30/2013 7:29:48 AM PST by Dr. Sivana ("C'est la vie" say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell. -- Chuck Berry)
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To: Dr. Sivana

Lead doesn’t bounce. It deforms and splits allowing the pretty green kryptonite to pierce Supermans previously invulnerable skin slicing a wound channel and spreading the poison throught out his body.


25 posted on 01/30/2013 9:03:00 AM PST by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
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To: Durus

Anyone who has ever seen Superman have lead bullets shot at him sees the bullets bounce off his chest. And of course bullets ricochet. So, yeah, at the key mokent of impact, the bullet would bounce, and by the time the k-rock was exposed, the payload would be far enough away.


26 posted on 01/30/2013 9:54:58 AM PST by Dr. Sivana ("C'est la vie" say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell. -- Chuck Berry)
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To: Dr. Sivana

What you are seeing isn’t bullets “bouncing” off Superman but lead deforming, splitting, and fragmenting off a surface harder than steel.


27 posted on 01/30/2013 12:49:18 PM PST by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
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To: SJSAMPLE
I don't think we watched the same movies.

Nolan did pretty well with all three, particularly the last two and ESPECIALLY the last one.

Nolan I slow and b-o-o-o-ring.
Nolan II awful with a lousy ending message (that made no sense until redeemed in...)
Nolan III which served as an antidote to the poison of II. Clearly the best of the Nolan trilogy, but still so dark and dense that it cannot appeal to all ages of viewers.

I’m a Marvel guy, but the Marvel movies haven’t all been that great, either;

Spider-Man (great) AGREED.
Spider-Man II (excellent) AGREED.
Spider-Man III (trash) It was OK - too long, too much story.

X-Men didn’t nearly live up, especially the casting.

OK, that's where I really draw the line! X-Men was very good, X2 was really good and X3 was awesome. Granted, the casting of Cyclops was fairly weak, but Patrick Stewart as Xavier. Ian McKellen as Magneto, Hugh Jackman as Wolverine, Alan Cummings as Nightcrawler and - my favorite - Kelsey Grammer as Beast were inspired choices.

Even X-Men 1st Class had plenty of phenomonal casting. Michael Fassbender as young Magneto, Jennifer Lawrence as young Mystique, January Jones as Emma Frost were good choices. And Kevin Bacon as Sebastian Shaw... genius, pure genius. Sure, the minor characters had very weak casting, but by movie #4 most series sufffer really serious drop-offs. I didn't sense that.

Wolverine was just OK. AGREED, but I loved Liev Schreiber as Sabertooth.

Both HULK movies sucked donkey balls. ESPECIALLY THE 1st one!

Iron Man really brought it out but Avengers just wasn’t that good, bordering on the sucky.

Wow, I couldn't disagree more. I haven't anticipated a movie more AND had my anticipations met and exceeded more than by the Avengers. It was the most fun I've had at the movies since the original Star Wars (IV) in 1977.

28 posted on 01/30/2013 1:37:25 PM PST by Sideshow Bob
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To: Dr. Sivana

That’s not how bullets work.
Lead is soft.
The moment it hits whatever it hits, the lead deforms.
It doesn’t simply bounce off in it’s original form, as if it were made of Superman himself.

Once it deforms, the same way it would if it hit a steel plate, the Kryptonite core would be exposed and Supes would get what’s coming to his pansie ass ;)


29 posted on 01/30/2013 2:19:48 PM PST by SJSAMPLE
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To: Sideshow Bob

Wolverine isn’t your typical Hollyweird actor height.
He’s a “runt” by his own admission.

Storm was dreadful.
Jean Grey was dreadful.
Cyclops was weak, especially for a leader.

Stewart and McKellan were admittedly FANTASTIC.

Rogue was pitiful, as were most of the Xavier student body.

First Class was great, but mainly because of Fassbender and the use of the 1960s timeline. Cold War and Mutants - Teh Win.

Avengers just didn’t bring it, but it was good to see an actual Dr. Bruce Banner and not a punching bag. Black Widow sure didn’t sound Russian at any point in any of her movies or scenes, and I have a hard time believing whats-her-face in that role.


30 posted on 01/30/2013 2:25:40 PM PST by SJSAMPLE
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To: SJSAMPLE
The moment it hits whatever it hits, the lead deforms. The lead may well deform upon contact, but you cannot tell me that bullets don't ricochet. It doesn't matter if it's Kryptonite undercoating is exposed after the hit, the bullet is long gone; the energy in the deformed lead has to go somewhere, and Superman is the immovable object at the time of impact.

By the way, you can more easily get his pansy a** by using copper bullets. With all those bystanders around the ricocheting bullets, I am amazed that an innocent bystander hasn't taken one in the temple, violating Superman's Code Against Killing (definitely post WW II)


31 posted on 01/30/2013 3:55:14 PM PST by Dr. Sivana ("C'est la vie" say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell. -- Chuck Berry)
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To: SJSAMPLE
Superman BEFORE the Code Against Killing:



Superman AFTER the Code Aginst Killing:


32 posted on 01/30/2013 4:00:25 PM PST by Dr. Sivana ("C'est la vie" say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell. -- Chuck Berry)
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To: Dr. Sivana

Yep.
They de-nutted Supes.


33 posted on 01/31/2013 6:46:20 AM PST by SJSAMPLE
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To: SJSAMPLE
Storm was dreadful.
Jean Grey was dreadful.
Cyclops was weak, especially for a leader...
Rogue was pitiful, as were most of the Xavier student body.

Was it the casting that was bad or the actors themselves OR was it the writing and characterization?

I will agree that casting Halle Barry as Storm was typical Hollywood PC casting and that she has sleepwalked the role in each film. Barry was too old and too American for the role, but I think the producers were trying to add "star" power to the cast. In my head, I always envisioned a younger version of the model Iman as Storm.

I thought Famke Jansen was OK as Jean Grey and the movies' storyline and characterization was pretty good.

Cyclops was a complete disappointment in the story, characterization AND casting. Marsden was terrible in a terrible role and completely unlikeable character.

I will agree and disagree in part with you on Rogue. In X1, the character and writing was OK. I thought Anna Paquin did a good job in the first film, but by X2 & X3 the actress and the role became nothing but whiny non-entities.

First Class was great, but mainly because of Fassbender and the use of the 1960s timeline. Cold War and Mutants - Teh Win.

I liked the clever storyline and thought Kevin Bacon was pretty awesome as a villain (Bacon's & Fassbender's German diction was flawless, btw). But Oliver Platt was savagely underused in the film and the supporting mutant roles were not well cast at all - especially Beast & Banshee.

Avengers just didn’t bring it, but it was good to see an actual Dr. Bruce Banner and not a punching bag. Black Widow sure didn’t sound Russian at any point in any of her movies or scenes, and I have a hard time believing whats-her-face in that role.

I thought Scarlett Johannsen was a good choice when first cast in the role in Iron Man II. I could almost buy her Russian spy thing. The thing that bothered me is that she is clearly 25 pounds heavier than when first cast. Apparently she must have found solace in a pallet full of Ben & Jerry's after being dumped by Ryan Reynolds. Go back and "check the tape" - in IMII, Scarlett was yummy in that skin tight Widow suit. In Avengers, she looked dumpy - especially when contrasted with a positively-smoking Cobie Smulders (who must have lost 15 lbs. from her "How I Met Your Mother" role to fit into her SHIELD catsuit).

Overall, I thought Avengers was outstanding as the 6th "sequel" and culmination in the Marvel series (Iron Man 1&2, Thor, Capt America and the second Hulk movies). The dialog was great and the hero spotlight was well-shared. It was entertaining, fun and light and - unlike Nolan's morose Dark Knight trilogy - you didn't need to be a comic book geek to enjoy the film or the story (although I will admit to formerly being a comic book geek having once owned 210 of the first 275 issues of the original Avengers books - issues 8-74 & 129-275).

Oh well, everyone has their own opinion.

34 posted on 01/31/2013 11:50:03 AM PST by Sideshow Bob
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