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Need Dog Training Advice - Older dog from Rescue Org (Buford)
CSM on FR (facebook link not actual page for CSM) ^ | 7/2/2013 | CSM

Posted on 07/02/2013 4:45:34 AM PDT by CSM

As many of my FRiends know, I was considering adopting a rescue dog named Buford. The foster brought him by yesterday and at the time he was generally just checking everything out. He is a coon hound and all nose! He is a very beautiful dog, so I'll try to post his pic in the following post. The Vet estimates his age to be between 3 and 4. He is about 75 lbs, but seems much stronger than that!

He seems to be a very smart dog and he does like to be around people. He makes it very evident when he wants attention, which is quite frequently. He has already figured out how to open the screen door and go outside and he knows how to let me know that he wants to be let in. Overall, I would rate his personality as very sweet, but very independent (almost to a point of stubbornness.) I suspect that with patience, this aspect of his personality will adjust as he gets more confidence that we are a pack.

However, there are some behavior issues and I need some advice/help. I had previously raised a dog from puppyhood, so it was much easier. I figured that an older dog could still learn, but I also figured that some instincts would have kicked in. I had no idea that Buford had absolutely NO training whatsoever.

The first issue that has been difficult is his "house training." He continually wants to "mark" his territory indoors. It is easy enough to stop that immediately and take him outdoors. Then he will mark territory outdoors, which is good, however almost immediately upon returning indoors he will find a spot and fully urinate and I am unable to stop him to get him back outside. I need some advice as to how to turn this situation around. The biggest challenge for me is his size and strength, it is much easier to stop a puppy mid action and get the puppy outside. This stronger dog, with stubbornness, simply won't move!

Secondly, he actually wants to climb onto tables, not just "surfing," but to actually climb onto and stand on. He hasn't been successful yet as I have been able to keep him off the tables, but he actually wants to climb on the coffee table to get over to me. I will continue to work on this one, but I am wondering if anyone has any hints for a faster resolution than just patiently teaching.

Thirdly, I don't think he has ever had a name. He doesn't seem to respond to his name and he seems to have no interest in learning a name. However, he does respond to whistles, finger snaps and he has already learned my firm "no." What is the best way for him to learn a name?

Finally, he has absolutely no patience. For example, if he wants attention and you don't immediately pet him then he paws and then will jump up on me. Of course, my pushing his chest down has become easier and easier and he will soon be over that "jumping up" problem. Another example is when I was having my dinner. He was very persistent in trying to get to the food on my plate, so I pinned him down with his leash so that he was forced to lay down and he fought that hard for about 5 minutes, finally he gave up and laid down at my feet nicely. However, I need to figure out if it is possible to teach a dog patience.

So, to summarize, where I need help is: 1. House training an adult dog that has never had any training. 2. Eliminating table climbing! 3. Teaching him a name. 4. Teaching patience (might be eliminating his desire to dominate his new pack)

Thank you Friends for any help you can provide. I will also be consulting some good training books that I used for my previous dog. If anyone wants a great source, check out "Great Owners, Good Dogs."


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I have a 2 week trial period, so if I can see that progress will be made with the house training, then we might enter a permanent relationship. However, if no progress is made in that area, then I don't know if Buford can become an indoor dog.
1 posted on 07/02/2013 4:45:34 AM PDT by CSM
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To: Joe 6-pack

Doggie help needed....


2 posted on 07/02/2013 4:46:01 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: trooprally; BufordP

Ok, i jiust could not resist.... ; D


3 posted on 07/02/2013 4:51:15 AM PDT by HollyB
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To: CSM

I seem to have lost the picture location, for some reason I can’t access the “properties” from my home computer in the same manner as I did before.

You can see the previous pic I posted on post #68 on this previous FR thread: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/bloggers/3035690/posts?page=94#94


4 posted on 07/02/2013 4:51:50 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: CSM
For the urination in the house, you will need a crate. For other training, there is an excellent book, "Train your dog like a pro" by Jean Donaldson. Available on Amazon and you get a DVD to help.

Check out dogforum.com also.

5 posted on 07/02/2013 4:55:58 AM PDT by republicangel
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To: CSM

I have a redbone coonhound we got as a puppy. So slightly different but this is what works for us.

He does not react well to discipline at all. He hates being left out of family activities and will pout. He can be very stubborn when handled wrong.

Positive reinforcement and food works very well. Tell him ‘good boy’ when he does his business outside right after he finishes. Ignore him when he does bad. Literally turn your back on him and ignore him, even leaving the room. You must be a strong leader and never let him go through a doorway before you. Daily exercise is also crucial.

Coonhounds crave attention and approval. From the core of his soul he wants to please you. Just my experience with my coonhound.


6 posted on 07/02/2013 4:56:57 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: HollyB

Ha ha, I should have known that there was an FR Buford! I broke the unspoken rules by not pinging him to my gossiping!


7 posted on 07/02/2013 4:59:57 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: CSM; AnAmericanMother
Then he will mark territory outdoors, which is good, however almost immediately upon returning indoors he will find a spot and fully urinate and I am unable to stop him to get him back outside. I need some advice as to how to turn this situation around.

Use a crate or restrict him to one room. The crate is easier because it immediately places you in control of the situation. When it is time to take him out, place the lead on him and immediately move him outdoors. Praise and reward him for doing his business outdoors. You may also want to bell train him. Hang a bell from a cord that he can reach, from the door leading outside. Ring it each time you take him out. He will then associate the bell with doing his business outside which results in a reward. In time, he will ring the bell to let you know he needs to go out. After you have successfully broken him into this habit, gradually open up more space in the house while still restricting access to other rooms.

I have worked with basset hounds for more than 20 years. It is important to familiarize yourself with breed characteristics. Here is an article on the American Coonhound Read More

I have pinged another freeper with good dog training skills.

8 posted on 07/02/2013 5:00:14 AM PDT by NYer ( "Run from places of sin as from the plague."--St John Climacus)
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To: republicangel

Thanks, I will check out that site for sure.


9 posted on 07/02/2013 5:01:39 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: CSM

My daughter keeps her new dog on a shortened training leash at all times. It is a way to correct by using the leash to get a hold on him without grabbing him. Grab the leash when he tries to get on table or do other things you do not want him to do. The leash makes it easier to get to him.


10 posted on 07/02/2013 5:03:54 AM PDT by Bronzy
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To: CSM

First, good for you!!!! Rescuing an adult dog is a great thing. Second, if you send the dog back after two weeks that’s the end for the dog. He’ll not be adopted again and he will be put down. We have six large rescue dogs now and have had a total of ten over the past 20 years. The dog doesn’t need training. You need training. Go, together, to obedience school. You will learn the skills you need to manage the dog and he will learn limits as he recognizes you as the pack leader. It will be fun. You’ll learn super new stuff and the dog will aim to please you. You will have years of fun together. You will be a better person for it. Oh, is he neutered yet? If not get it done ASAP.


11 posted on 07/02/2013 5:05:05 AM PDT by Repulican Donkey
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To: CSM

two good training sources
Cesar Milan Dog Whisperer- watch shows, contact directly for advice, he rescues many older dogs and corrects behaviors
Monks of New Skete- check out their books. they raise German shepherds so different temperament however they use human—dog bonding and attachment in a gentle way

Buford needs to be confined in a small space (crate or small enclosed area, like enclosure slightly larger than playpen, but not outside! Krep him right in the midst of his new human pack, to watch and observe your household, to join you and be praised for good behavior, to be confined when his behavior is out of bounds like table climbing and peeing

Dog obedience class to to learn to walk onleash and enjoy walkies adventures


12 posted on 07/02/2013 5:07:38 AM PDT by silverleaf (Age Takes a Toll: Please Have Exact Change)
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To: NYer

Crate is a wonderful idea. Put in some toys. Feed him in the crate. Be ready for the “howls” of protest - he’s a coon hound after all - and learn to smile about it.


13 posted on 07/02/2013 5:08:47 AM PDT by Repulican Donkey
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To: CSM
I have found crating to be a pretty good way to teach them that peeing/pooping indoors is bad.
14 posted on 07/02/2013 5:10:14 AM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Who could have known that one day professional wrestling would be less fake than professional news?)
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To: CSM

Can’t help but smile. A 75 pound dog is all muscle, especially a hound. With obediance training, crate training and consistency from you he’ll become the biggest, mushiest lap dog in the world. We have a Great Pyr / Carolina mix who is 97 pounds. He rolls on his back so we can rub his belly and snuggles. Be patient with him and with yourself!


15 posted on 07/02/2013 5:12:31 AM PDT by Repulican Donkey
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To: CSM

Can’t help but smile. A 75 pound dog is all muscle, especially a hound. With obediance training, crate training and consistency from you he’ll become the biggest, mushiest lap dog in the world. We have a Great Pyr / Carolina mix who is 97 pounds. He rolls on his back so we can rub his belly and snuggles. Be patient with him and with yourself!


16 posted on 07/02/2013 5:12:31 AM PDT by Repulican Donkey
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To: CSM

I also recommend a crate for the potty problems. Make it large enough so he can turn around comfortably inside and lay down. If it’s near a door then yes lead him outside on a leash to go as soon as he gets out. Our dog also sleeps in his crate at night. Many dogs like the security. It also keeps him from eating up the cat food. Buford may be drinking way more water than he needs if he can urinate outside and then come inside and do it too. When our dog gets nervous (too much company) he over drinks.
As far as jumping up on tables and your other challenges I would work on getting him to understand the word NO.
And you might consider changing his name if he doesn’t respond to it anyway. Good luck and let us know how it goes.


17 posted on 07/02/2013 5:12:34 AM PDT by MomwithHope (Buy and read Ameritopia by Mark Levin!)
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To: driftdiver; NYer

Thank you both for the perspective on hounds. My previous dog was a Chocolate Lab, so I am noticing some very different characteristics but am also seeing some similarities. The ignoring tip is very good, I will give it a shot. I appreciate your feedback and will begin to implement it immediately.

I have blocked off the rest of the house and we only roam when he is leashed and connected to me. In addition, I have a crate on the way and should have it sometime this week. I can tell that he wants one as a place to sleep. He actually slept on the landing for my stairs last night, which is about the only enclosed, den like place in my house.

I also appreciate the entering/exiting a room or door protocall tip. I will definitely be employing that one.

I am on vacation this week, so I can dedicate a lot of time to training and bonding. I usually use my July vacation to deep clean my house, but it looks like that would be useless right now! ;-)

I have to admit that I am already noticing that he is much calmer this morning. We have had no issues with marking or jumping. He has already learned that when he wants attention, he comes by me and sits. I’d say that is very good progress!


18 posted on 07/02/2013 5:13:40 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: CSM

Dog Bonding advise. Sit down with your. Talk with him about his head as you stroke it, his ears as you touch them. Stroke his legs as you encourage him. Finally and most importantly, pick up his paw and explore it minutely. Message between his toes, nails and webbing. Do that long and gently and regularly. Alway say “Paw”. Very soon your dog will adore you and become a relaxed member of your family.


19 posted on 07/02/2013 5:15:14 AM PDT by Tugo (Never Submit!)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum; CSM

We crated ours and it worked beautifully.

We were told not to use the crate as a punishment. As tempting as it has been we’ve avoided it and think it was the right thing. The crate is for house training and to get them a safe place to go.

Coonhounds are different then any dog I’ve ever owned. With the right technique he is the easiest to train and best dog I’ve ever had. We use cereal and other small bits when training as food rewards work great.


20 posted on 07/02/2013 5:16:50 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: CSM

First, let’s talk about what a Bluetick is genetically programmed to do.

They must work independently of humans and they climb trees after their quarry. So, this is one reason you see the climbing on tables. Hunters don’t care if the dog is uncivilized in the house, because they’re outside dogs.

As for marking, Buford is most likely an outdoor dog, so he’s had no experience with housetraining. Put him on a leash and keep him tied to you when he’s in the house. Watch him like a hawk and don’t walk near your furniture (LOL).

Folks need to research a breed before taking one on as a family member, in particular when adopting a dog bred for work.


21 posted on 07/02/2013 5:18:13 AM PDT by Darnright ("I don't trust liberals, I trust conservatives." - Lucius Annaeus Seneca)
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To: Salamander

Hound Dawg ping (c;


22 posted on 07/02/2013 5:19:53 AM PDT by Darnright ("I don't trust liberals, I trust conservatives." - Lucius Annaeus Seneca)
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To: Repulican Donkey

” Second, if you send the dog back after two weeks that’s the end for the dog. He’ll not be adopted again and he will be put down.”

Thank you for enlightening me to this. It is good to know when working through these issues. I had no idea and simply figured that they would find a more suitable place, one that would keep him as an outside dog.

Your post certainly adds motivation for me to train Buford right....


23 posted on 07/02/2013 5:20:10 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: Repulican Donkey

Good for you on taking care of those dogs. A couple weeks back, I was leaving the facility late out here in the woods and there was this little hound of some kind wandering around the grounds. It had been neglected.

To make a long story short I got it to a no kill shelter and got it some needed care. If someone wanted a sweet older little indoor dog, this one would I could recommend. I visited not to long ago and she looked so much better.

I would have taken her home but the territorial German Shepherd wouldn’t be too tolerant.


24 posted on 07/02/2013 5:20:24 AM PDT by wally_bert (There are no winners in a game of losers. I'm Tommy Joyce, welcome to the Oriental Lounge.)
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To: CSM

I hope it works out. Thank you for giving an older dog a chance.


25 posted on 07/02/2013 5:21:48 AM PDT by wally_bert (There are no winners in a game of losers. I'm Tommy Joyce, welcome to the Oriental Lounge.)
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To: Darnright

“They must work independently of humans and they climb trees after their quarry.”

I had no idea about that one. Thank you, I definitely need to do more research on a coon hound’s intended job. I assumed it was tracking or flushing.

I will admit that this situation was not as well thought out as usual for me. I am regretting that, but I also don’t want to give up on it.

Thank you for your help.


26 posted on 07/02/2013 5:25:00 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: Darnright; CSM
CSM -- firstly, that is extremely good of you to adopt an older dog. you have given him an extension of life.

If you do return him quickly to the pound, he may not get any chance again

What I see is that hs is friendly and good around people -- that is ONE major advantage. And just for that, i would recommend keeping him -- the other aspects can be changed or adjusted to

In your case, I only see the need for spending a lot of time and being patient (I'm sure you are, just hang in there!)

27 posted on 07/02/2013 5:33:40 AM PDT by Cronos (Latin presbuteros>Late Latin presbyter->Old English pruos->Middle Engl prest->priest)
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To: MomwithHope

Crate training is great...our 4-year old Rottie will still climb in her crate for nap...we are currently training a 12-week old Rottie puppy and after howling a bit when first introduced to her crate she now voluntarily goes in during the day.


28 posted on 07/02/2013 5:34:01 AM PDT by Cuttnhorse
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To: reed13

bfl


29 posted on 07/02/2013 5:34:36 AM PDT by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: CSM

We have a black & tan female and a redbone male. You will find they are easier to handle after a mile or two run. They need massive exercise in order to calm down.

We live in the country and ours are outside dogs. On the occasion they are inside, crates and being very firm with them helps.

They do like to ride, especially our black & tan will “load up” in a heart beat.

Get ready for the digging, they are real excavators...


30 posted on 07/02/2013 5:34:36 AM PDT by El Laton Caliente (NRA Life Member & www.Gunsnet.net Moderator)
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To: NYer
It is important to familiarize yourself with breed characteristics.

So very true!

We adopt Weims and a lot of folks are turned off by the breed's characteristics. We like the breed's behavior, it fits us and our lifestyle, and what we've found is when we adopt one, they pretty much all act the same.

31 posted on 07/02/2013 5:34:49 AM PDT by memyselfandi59
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To: Repulican Donkey

The dog is probably a little confused with new surroundings, and his new owner. I have had a wonderful vet, through three dachshunds, and that is no easy task, lol. Dr. Youngs first and foremost principle with dogs is that they need to understand, for their sake, who is the dominant. That would be the owner. When you feel comfortable with Buford that he does not bite and you need his attention to learn........get on the floor, gently roll him on his back, get on top of him, disable his movement, gain eye contact and his attention and don’t look away. When he stops resisting and looks away, pet him and give him a good boy and let him up. Training will start to be much easier at that point and after a few of these moments he will forever be yours.


32 posted on 07/02/2013 5:37:19 AM PDT by Toespi
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To: CSM

CSM, you have definitely got a good heart. I’m getting ready to put my German Shepherd in the van and go do an informational program for the local girl scout camp. I want these young ladies to make their future pet dogs lifetime companions, so I will give them information on how to train and socialize a dog to be a joy, rather than a poor critter they take to the pound in desperation.

You can make Buford a more civilized dog. You can do this. BUT, you will put many hours into the process. Here are a couple of links to info on the breed:

http://www.ukcdogs.com/

http://www.akc.org/

Now, UKC has more experience with this treeing hound. They’ve got a forum where you can communicate with people who know and love the breed.

Feel free to private mail me if I can dig up more resources for you.


33 posted on 07/02/2013 5:41:35 AM PDT by Darnright ("I don't trust liberals, I trust conservatives." - Lucius Annaeus Seneca)
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To: Toespi; CSM

No offense Toespi, but this dog could very well panic if alfa rolled and CSM could be hurt.

Do NOT roll an adult dog you’re bonding with!!!!


34 posted on 07/02/2013 5:45:44 AM PDT by Darnright ("I don't trust liberals, I trust conservatives." - Lucius Annaeus Seneca)
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To: AnAmericanMother; Titan Magroyne; Badeye; SandRat; arbooz; potlatch; afraidfortherepublic; ...
WOOOF!

Computer Hope

The Doggie Ping list is for FReepers who would like to be notified of threads relating to all things canid. If you would like to join the Doggie Ping Pack (or be unleashed from it), FReemail me.

35 posted on 07/02/2013 5:46:01 AM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Qui me amat, amat et canem meum.)
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To: CSM
Highly recommended for you and Buford, CSM. There is a section on adopting and integrating an older dog into your household/pack, and it's available at most book stores...


36 posted on 07/02/2013 5:48:19 AM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Qui me amat, amat et canem meum.)
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To: CSM

Was Buford his original name or a name the shelter gave him? If it was his original name, you might want to change it in case he associates the name “Buford” with abuse from his previous owner. If the shelter gave him the name, he just may not have been called it enough. Calling him and giving him treats when he responds should work wonders in getting the desired response.

I may get flamed for this, but with his size and strength, you may want to consider a pinch collar for walking him. After my 42-pound rescue pup managed to pull me off my feet hard enough that I ended up breaking my left hip, and on the advice of my vet, I got one for Aubrey. She took to it immediately, and I think it makes her feel more secure and connected to me. Leerburg calls it “power steering for dogs” and it really is. It’s not fun being dragged down the street by your dog, and the lack of control is dangerous for you and your dog.

Also, do not use a retractable leash! Dogs can get up an incredible head of steam if the brake fails, and the resultant jerk can do real damage to you, e.g., broken hip. Six foot leads are fine.

Do not lose heart. You have only had Buford a couple of days and he is probably as baffled as you are about what is expected. Older dogs really are the best, although they do come with their own set of quirks. We only rescue adult dogs, and it just heartwarming to help them become the good dogs they are meant to be.


37 posted on 07/02/2013 6:01:21 AM PDT by LSAggie
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To: CSM

He needs to be kennel trained. kennels are a great tool for breaking bad habits.


38 posted on 07/02/2013 6:02:15 AM PDT by chris37 (Heartless.)
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To: Darnright

CSM, this could overrule my suggestion because he is right, it can be a touchy situation, but is still a terrific method of gaining control, maybe something to consider when you know your dog better.


39 posted on 07/02/2013 6:03:49 AM PDT by Toespi
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To: CSM

He's gorgeous.

40 posted on 07/02/2013 6:07:59 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: CSM

We have a an 80-lb Lab that we got from a shelter when he was about 2. I am sure the dispositions are quite different, but I’ll tell you what worked for us.

We crated him for the first week, and that worked for most of the house. We have a screened-in porch, however, that he regarded as outside for a time. For that, we used an enzyme-based spray on his urination spots.

For jumping up, we used a trick, I saw on Victoria whatshername’s show. When the dog tries to jump up on you, do not make eye contact and turn away. Also, when he pesters for more petting while you are sitting down and taking a break, cross your arms over your chest and stare at the ceiling. He will get the message an lie down.

We taught our dog his name by saying his name every time we fed him. Same trick with our cat.

Good luck. And God bless you for rescuing an adult dog.


41 posted on 07/02/2013 6:11:41 AM PDT by Bigg Red (Restore us, O God of hosts; let your face shine, that we may be saved! -Ps80)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

God love him! A great looking guy!


42 posted on 07/02/2013 6:13:30 AM PDT by Toespi
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To: LSAggie

“Was Buford his original name or a name the shelter gave him? If it was his original name, you might want to change it in case he associates the name “Buford” with abuse from his previous owner. If the shelter gave him the name, he just may not have been called it enough. Calling him and giving him treats when he responds should work wonders in getting the desired response.”

The shelter gave him the name and he has actually gone from 1 shelter to a 2nd and then to a foster in the last month. So, he hasn’t had any consistency at all. The original shelter knew of his home situation and they don’t think that those owners name any of their dogs, so we suspect that he has never had an actual name to respond too...

I think if I remember to not call him dog, as in good dog, and use Buford instead, then maybe it will catch on.


43 posted on 07/02/2013 6:16:02 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: NYer

“He will then associate the bell with doing his business outside which results in a reward. In time, he will ring the bell to let you know he needs to go out. After you have successfully broken him into this habit, gradually open up more space in the house while still restricting access to other rooms”

LOL My sister did this with a mixed breed she got and it’s worked so well that the dog rings the bell about 20 times a day. I think part beagle and apparently really food driven.


44 posted on 07/02/2013 6:28:10 AM PDT by freeangel ( (free speech is only good until someone else doesn't like it)
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To: LSAggie; CSM

I don’t know what a “pinch collar” is, but my trainer insisted that I use a “prong collar” for my wild child, 78 lb Golden when were in Basic Obedience, or whenever I had him out in public. Furthermore, she had my husband sharpen a few of the points. After a year, or so, we didn’t need it any more, but when I first got him (as a 2 year old) he would pull me all over the place and dropped me into the mud one time when I was wearing white wool slacks and a butter yellow blazer!

After obedience training, that dog could walk without a leash and was a delightful companion. We lost him in Feb. to pancreatic cancer, and we miss him dearly.


45 posted on 07/02/2013 6:29:07 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: CSM

Well our neighbor got a beautiful Coon hound pup and it is now full grown and an outside dog. They really are not the best choice for a housedog. They are stubborn and somewhat hard to train and they are really bred for hunting like most hounds.

We have a Beagle and we love him to death and now at aged 16+ he is a wonderful inside dog but I would not get another one.


46 posted on 07/02/2013 6:30:58 AM PDT by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: CSM
Names: Single syllable names are always better because they are easier to hear and understand. Use the dogs name before command. “Duke, sit” “Duke, stay” etc.

Marking: Take him out frequently. Clean the old stains completely. Praise him when pees outside. Look for any sign that he might need to go.

Training: Ignore the Dog Whisperer advice. His method is one of intimidation and domination. He kicks and jabs at the dogs. Do you want a dog that's afraid of you or a loving friend? Victoria Stillwell’s Positive training is a much better alternative.

Begging/Climbing/Patience: You can't teach a dog patience but you can teach them down and stay. Once he learns to stay you can eat in peace.

47 posted on 07/02/2013 6:40:02 AM PDT by BubbaBasher ("Liberty will not long survive the total extinction of morals" - Sam Adams)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Thank you for reposting the pic. I am still learning the “html picture posting.” ;-)


48 posted on 07/02/2013 6:48:31 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

“dropped me into the mud one time when I was wearing white wool slacks and a butter yellow blazer!”

OK, I hate to say it but that made me laugh. Not at you, but with you! LOL


49 posted on 07/02/2013 6:50:59 AM PDT by CSM (Keeper of the Dave Ramsey Ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: CSM

I am no trainer but I’ve been successful with the all the dogs I have owned.

With an older rescue I resign myself to the fact that there will probably be unwanted results for the first couple of weeks.

With potty training I make sure I have a great cleaning tote set up. I don’t crate, I don’t hit, rub noses, or get physical at all. I find that dogs are shamed pretty easily, I use that.

I mostly use a leash every hour or so to take them out about every hour, even at night. If I notice one trying to go potty inside, I make a big noisy deal of it. I usually make a big emphasis on the first syllable of their name— BUUUUUUford!!! NO! bad! bad! bad! Then I promptly leash and take outside, even before cleaning.

When back inside I will get all my cleaning supplies and let them watch while I scrub, complain and whine— bad, bad bad! I make a big deal of it, they will usually hang head, twist ears back and forth— they KNOW. Mine have always HATED being shamed.

I have not dealt with many male dogs as I favor females because of the hiking males do. In my den the two sofas are near the patio door and my dogs love to lean on the sofa ends or lay against them, I let them but I keep a nice towel draped over the ends they favor. Maybe while you train you could use a terry plastic backed cloth over your cloth furniture?

With the table jumping it might just be how he was raised. Many people keep their hounds outside in small cages/kennels with wooden shelter boxes in them, the dogs always seem to get on top of the boxes. At least that is what I have observed. It will probably just take time and patience for that to stop.

My dogs learned what furniture they are allowed on but it took time and patience. They can’t get on my living room or den sofas but they can get on our bed and the loft sofas. I do cover my living room sofa if we are going to leave them alone, because they will sneak up to watch out the window. I can see the pillows knocked over and wrinkles in the cushions, so I know they broke the rules. hahaha!

He will learn, it will just take time, patience and consistency. Shame them, they HATE it!

Tote: My favorite spot cleaner is Blue Magic Carpet stain and spot lifter, it is usually found in the automotive section. The large bottles of hydrogen peroxide are handy, too. For scrubbing and cleaning the area I use Bissell pet stain and odor. 3-4 old towels, a good scrub brush that has the handle over it, a roll of paper towels and gloves.

My dogs almost NEVER go inside and if one does, she is sick. They just don’t do it, it is too embarrassing for them. Good luck and I hope it works out for you and Buford!


50 posted on 07/02/2013 6:58:59 AM PDT by Irenic (The pencil sharpener and Elmer's glue is put away-- we've lost the red wheel barrow)
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