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How the Wild West REALLY looked: Gorgeous sepia-tinted pictures show the landscape as it was charted
Daily Mail Online ^ | May 25, 2012 | Rob Cooper

Posted on 08/17/2013 8:45:52 AM PDT by re_tail20

These remarkable 19th century sepia-tinted pictures show the American West as you have never seen it before - as it was charted for the first time.

The photos, by Timothy O'Sullivan, are the first ever taken of the rocky and barren landscape.

At the time federal government officials were travelling across Arizona, Nevada, Utah and the rest of the west as they sought to uncover the land's untapped natural resources.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Arts/Photography; History; Outdoors
KEYWORDS: arizona; godsgravesglyphs; nevada; timothyosullivan; utah; wildamericanwest

1 posted on 08/17/2013 8:45:52 AM PDT by re_tail20
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To: re_tail20

Gorgeous sepia-tinted pictures show the landscape as it was charted for the very first time


2 posted on 08/17/2013 8:46:23 AM PDT by re_tail20
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To: re_tail20

Hope this hasn’t been posted before. I did check.


3 posted on 08/17/2013 8:47:34 AM PDT by re_tail20
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To: re_tail20

Ltr


4 posted on 08/17/2013 8:49:43 AM PDT by digger48
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To: re_tail20

simply carrying a camera and the necessary equipment such a Glass Plate Negatives....ie. FILM... to make such photos to those locales was a mission of great courage back in those days.

Thank you.


5 posted on 08/17/2013 8:51:55 AM PDT by MeshugeMikey (This Message NOT Approved By The N.S.A.)
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To: re_tail20

When I was a child in the ‘40s and deep into the romance of the weekly Saturday morning “Westerns” that showed at the local movie house, I told my father that when I grew up I wanted to “move out West”. My father laughed and said, “You’re in California, and that’s about as far west as you can get.”

I was so disappointed, since my paved street filled with houses on small lots and kids riding bicycles looked like nothing in the movies.

BTW, my family moved to CA at about the time those early photos were taken. I wonder what those pioneers would thnk now!


6 posted on 08/17/2013 8:53:55 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

Ping


7 posted on 08/17/2013 8:54:02 AM PDT by beaversmom
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To: re_tail20

Very cool.


8 posted on 08/17/2013 8:56:47 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (21st century. I'm not a fan.)
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To: re_tail20

9 posted on 08/17/2013 8:58:49 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: re_tail20

About a year ago ;) Seriously there was almost the identical article with many of those pix a while back. And they are still breathtaking.

I live near the Mohave County AZ pic site. Beautiful area in a desolate 130 deg way. A must see in the winter though.


10 posted on 08/17/2013 8:59:12 AM PDT by Norm Lenhart
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To: re_tail20

Beautiful pictures....I love sepia.


11 posted on 08/17/2013 9:00:48 AM PDT by pallmallman (Q)
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To: re_tail20

very nice..back when the feds didn’t start owning them


12 posted on 08/17/2013 9:02:47 AM PDT by max americana (fired liberals in our company after the election, & laughed while they cried (true story))
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To: re_tail20

Thanks for posting.


13 posted on 08/17/2013 9:07:54 AM PDT by beaversmom
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To: re_tail20

Just stunning. I had the honor and pleasure of riding a bicycle across the country many years ago, and the West is breathtaking. God is amazing in His creation.


14 posted on 08/17/2013 9:09:12 AM PDT by Eccl 10:2 (Prov 3:5 --- "Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding")
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To: re_tail20

Those pictures are awesome. Amazingly clear and in many cases very artistic compositions. It’s like a time machine to be able to see those sort of pictures from the Wild West. Imagine towing the camera equipment of that era around the West.


15 posted on 08/17/2013 9:10:03 AM PDT by Flick Lives (We're going to be just like the old Soviet Union, but with free cell phones!)
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To: re_tail20

Amazing pictures.


16 posted on 08/17/2013 9:12:25 AM PDT by Cyman
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To: re_tail20
I have been to several of those places. It is amazing to think that he went to all of those places before there were real roads. This region is probably the most difficult to travel in America. The land is carved into a fractal pattern of canyons that are difficult to cross, or even go down the river with the flow.

The previous expedition to explore this area was in 1776, by two Spanish priests. They left Santa Fe hoping to discover an easy land route to Monterey, California. They gave up after many months, never reaching California, but documenting the area between the Rockies and California.

These early photographers and painters were the first people who could document the west for the benefit of the people living east. Much of the interest in setting up national parks and preserving the beauty of the west came from viewing these photographs and paintings.

17 posted on 08/17/2013 9:15:07 AM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: re_tail20

Bflr


18 posted on 08/17/2013 9:15:59 AM PDT by colinhester
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To: martin_fierro

depp is an ............


19 posted on 08/17/2013 9:20:25 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: re_tail20

Those are some amazing pictures.

When I visited the Snake River area, calling it the “Shoshone Falls” was an exaggeration. What I saw was more like the “Shoshone Trickle.” I would love to see the falls sometime.

If you drive the interstate (90 or 94) across the north, you can see some really spectacular scenery.


20 posted on 08/17/2013 9:24:25 AM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: MeshugeMikey
to make such photos to those locales was a mission of great courage back in those days.

I recall my uncle telling me that some of our ancestors served as guides for these wealthy tourists from the East.

The tourist would meet with the locals and ask if they knew of interesting places . They would offer to pay for the tour. They would also ask to be guided to the next settlement further west. Usually by someone who had relatives or acquaintances in that village.

21 posted on 08/17/2013 9:29:55 AM PDT by oldbrowser (We have a rogue government in Washington)
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To: exDemMom

I recognize quite a few of the locations. Scary huh? Love the picture of Pyramid Lake. Which, for those that don’t know, is where the Truckee river ends in it’s flow from Lake Tahoe, which used to be called Lake Bigler. (I just learned that so consider me “new” to the area I guess.)


22 posted on 08/17/2013 9:30:01 AM PDT by rktman (Inergalactic background checks? King hussein you're first up.)
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To: re_tail20

Beautiful pictures!


23 posted on 08/17/2013 9:31:39 AM PDT by boxlunch (Psalm 94)
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To: re_tail20
Fantastic. Reminds me of when I was stationed in New Mexico. At first I was appalled by the emptiness and lack of vegetation. Soon, though, I learned to appreciate its stark beauty. Sometimes I still miss it.
24 posted on 08/17/2013 9:40:22 AM PDT by JoeFromSidney
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To: boxlunch

Bookmark


25 posted on 08/17/2013 9:41:19 AM PDT by publius911 (Look for the Union label, then buy something else.)
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To: martin_fierro

26 posted on 08/17/2013 9:44:48 AM PDT by JoeProBono (Mille vocibus imago valet;-{)
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To: lonevoice

Haunting and beautiful photographs that capture the wild expanse of the desert Southwest and the lives of a dying people.


27 posted on 08/17/2013 10:22:36 AM PDT by Pride in the USA
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To: martin_fierro

Oh, that’s funny....


28 posted on 08/17/2013 10:27:04 AM PDT by flaglady47 (When the gov't fears the people, liberty; When the people fear the gov't, tyranny.)
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To: JoeProBono

You guys are such cards....


29 posted on 08/17/2013 10:28:58 AM PDT by flaglady47 (When the gov't fears the people, liberty; When the people fear the gov't, tyranny.)
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To: re_tail20

This disappoint all the pinkos who teach our kids that the West was wall to wall gun violence and massacres perpetrated by evil American settlers.


30 posted on 08/17/2013 10:58:17 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: martin_fierro


"Probably shouldn't tell them about the giant bats, the poor bastards will find out soon enough"

31 posted on 08/17/2013 11:31:31 AM PDT by TArcher ("TO SECURE THESE RIGHTS, governments are instituted among men" -- Does that still work?)
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To: re_tail20

The resolution in those photos is amazing.
I’m not sure a modern camera could best these.


32 posted on 08/17/2013 11:43:30 AM PDT by Vinnie
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To: re_tail20

Thank-you!.....my first big trip out West last year to Colorado, Texas, Wyoming, Utah, Arizona, Texas etc.....and once you get past the cities much of the scenery is still the same as these photos.....very bleak but beautiful.


33 posted on 08/17/2013 12:09:15 PM PDT by Guenevere (....)
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To: re_tail20

Thanks!!!


34 posted on 08/17/2013 2:24:27 PM PDT by Bradís Gramma (I can do ALL things through Christ Who strengthens me!!)
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To: re_tail20

The photos are amazing. Thanks for posting.


35 posted on 08/17/2013 2:50:58 PM PDT by DefeatCorruption
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

Thanks re_tail20.

36 posted on 08/17/2013 7:38:16 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Two of those pictures are from my county. A third I don't recognize, but the confluence of the Green and the Yampa is in Colorado, not Utah. Names change over time, I guess. Also, there's no h in Yampa any more.

The country is pretty much the same as it was back then. It can be very hard on the unprepared.

37 posted on 08/17/2013 8:59:51 PM PDT by kitchen (Make plans and prepare. You'll never have trouble if you're ready for it. - TR)
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To: re_tail20

Thanks for posting this. I was familiar with O’Sullivan’s pictures from the Civil War, but had no idea he had traveled West. Great pictures. It would be nice to have side by side, “then & now” photos of the identified sites like those done of Gettysburg and Antietam by William A. Frassanito.


38 posted on 08/17/2013 9:23:09 PM PDT by mass55th (Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway...John Wayne)
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To: SunkenCiv; re_tail20

We have a book of photographs of Custer’s 1874 expedition into the Black Hills. What is amazing about it is that the author/historian/photographer who put the book together took a large format camera with the same framing dimensions as Custer’s photographer used, and painstakingly found and setup in the exact same spots, then used the old pictures to meticulously frame the modern photograph identically to the old.

The book has the old and the modern photos on facing pages, so they can be viewed together. Many of the old stumps from fires them are still extant; and some of the trees that in a unique location are still there, only 130 years older/larger; or now a recognizable snag.

The most amazing thing though is that in almost every photo, the modern scene is much more heavily forested, despite settlement. In the 1870s, the entire region was relatively sparsely forested. A couple of shots show Custer’s column in the middle distance, and the modern show the modern road almost exactly in his wagons’ tracks.


39 posted on 08/17/2013 11:43:26 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: re_tail20
Okay, I found this, from the Brit writer, VERY amusing:

Industrial revolution: The mining town of Gold Hill, just south of Virginia City, Nevada, in 1867 was town whose prosperity was preserved by mining a rare silver ore called Comstock Lode.

40 posted on 08/18/2013 12:41:16 AM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: ApplegateRanch

This book?

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0971805318/ref=rdr_ext_tmb


41 posted on 08/18/2013 1:01:02 AM PDT by Drago
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To: Drago

No, this one.

http://www.amazon.com/Black-Hills-Yesterday-Today/dp/0971805334/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1376814872&sr=1-2&keywords=horsted


42 posted on 08/18/2013 1:35:10 AM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: Drago

I should have worded better, instead of giving the impression it was strictly Custer’s expedition; that’s only part of it, though naturally the oldest photos used for comparison.

Also, for the Exploring With Custer, the listed author on Amazon is Grafe, but if you check here http://isbndb.com/subject/black_hills_s_d_and_wyo_discovery_and_exploration one finds out it is actually Grafe and Horsted.

Horsted expanded the scope of the photographic work, and published the book we have.


43 posted on 08/18/2013 1:52:31 AM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: ApplegateRanch
The most amazing thing though is that in almost every photo, the modern scene is much more heavily forested, despite settlement. In the 1870s, the entire region was relatively sparsely forested.

It is a little known and hardly publicized fact that Native Americans used fire to manage the extent of forest and grasslands. The landscape was manipulated for hundreds (if not thousands) of years by the hand of man. Not quite as pristine as most believed and were taught.

44 posted on 08/18/2013 7:50:55 AM PDT by LaRueLaDue
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To: LaRueLaDue

The best thing about the “west” is the relative absence of LIBs...now and then. That lends itself to more civility, sanity and freedom.


45 posted on 08/18/2013 8:17:51 AM PDT by ogen hal (First amendment or reeducation camp)
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To: LaRueLaDue

Ain’t that the truth! I spent many of my formative years in Wintun/Modoc country of N. California, and was well aware of that. In the case there, it wasn’t for planting, but to keep large brush & encroaching scrub down. That encouraged growth of new browse & increased the amount of transition forest areas for better hunting.

Also, though, when ‘slash and burn agriculture’ is mentioned in social studies, the implications are not mentioned, and the kids never think about it. The impression left is that small plots around a village had brush burned off of them for planting of ‘the three sisters’, and all lived in peace and harmony, at one with Nature, until the Evil White Man came.


46 posted on 08/18/2013 9:29:29 AM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: ApplegateRanch

Exactly, you nailed it. It was to increase and promote better hunting areas. And, farther east, to increase grasslands for buffaloe and other prairie game herds (same thing essentially, just different target animals).

Slash/burn agriculture was/is only used in tropical forests, and not in NA. And the North/Central American Native Americans had very a sophistocated agriculture anyway, much more advanced than slash/burn.


47 posted on 08/18/2013 9:55:37 AM PDT by LaRueLaDue
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To: Vinnie

Those wet plate photos are incredible, and the amount of effort to get each one I can only imagine. Humping around a big camera, mixing the collodion, applying it, taking the picture and developing all before the collodion dries, adjusting for temperature on the fly, storing the glass negatives.

This guy was a master. Impressive photos.


48 posted on 08/18/2013 1:54:14 PM PDT by Betis70
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To: LaRueLaDue

Yup. There is a good book on the subject with regards to where I live now (New England), ‘Changes in the Land’. A little preachy at times, but a solid look at how natives tamed the landscape here. Early settlers were impressed by the park-like landscape (tall massive trees, little undergrowth), then a generation later wondered why it became a brambly, thorny thicket.

Easier to attract browsing herbivores like deer to new growth and a LOT easier to shoot them with a bow and arrow if you don’t have thick vegetation in the way.


49 posted on 08/18/2013 2:00:51 PM PDT by Betis70
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To: re_tail20; SunkenCiv

Thanks for the post. Beautiful stuff!


50 posted on 08/19/2013 12:50:01 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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