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Chinese professor builds Li-Fi system with retail parts
NETWORK WORLD ^ | November 05, 2013 07:07 AM ET | Michael Kan, IDG News Service

Posted on 11/05/2013 9:44:44 AM PST by Utilizer

Chinese professor Chi Nan has built her own Li-Fi wireless system that can use LED lights to send and receive Internet data.

"I bought the lights from Taobao," she said, referring to the Chinese e-commerce site.

The professor from Fudan University showed off the technology on Tuesday at the China International Industry Fair in Shanghai. Unlike traditional Wi-Fi routers that use radio signals, Chi's system relies on light to send and receive data wirelessly.

Others scientists, especially in the U.K., have also been researching the technology, and dubbed it "Li-Fi". But rather than develop specialized hardware, Chi bought off-the-shelf retail parts to create her system.

(Excerpt) Read more at networkworld.com ...


TOPICS: Computers/Internet; Hobbies; Science
KEYWORDS: diy; hardware; ideas; wireless
This looks interesting. I happen to have quite a few LEDs laying about, and wonder if I can adapt an old network card or hub to utilize similar technology to work with them instead of wires or RF?
1 posted on 11/05/2013 9:44:44 AM PST by Utilizer
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To: Utilizer

“Li-Fi”?

Isn’t that part of Obamacare marketing?


2 posted on 11/05/2013 9:46:38 AM PST by G Larry (Let his days be few; and let another take his office. Psalms 109:8)
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To: Utilizer
This looks interesting. I happen to have quite a few LEDs laying about, and wonder if I can adapt an old network card or hub to utilize similar technology to work with them instead of wires or RF?

Light is RF.

And any network is only going to be line-of-sight.

Light doesn't pass through walls.

3 posted on 11/05/2013 9:47:23 AM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Who knew that one day professional wrestling would be less fake than professional journalism?)
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To: Utilizer

I built something very similar back in Jr HS.
Another Chinese scam looking for funding.


4 posted on 11/05/2013 9:48:27 AM PST by Zathras
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To: Utilizer

Old tech for networking. Limited to line of sight. Limited throughput. Used IR.


5 posted on 11/05/2013 9:50:10 AM PST by dadgum (Overjoyed to be the Pariah.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
Light is RF.

Beg to differ, mate. Started out on CB transceivers, and 27MHz RF is not "Light" by any stretch of the imagination.

As far as not passing through walls, for between rooms all you need is a light pipe with convex ends. Or an Active Repeater, if you do not mind the latency. External, who doesn't know what an "Antenna" is?

6 posted on 11/05/2013 9:52:46 AM PST by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

Why do you say Light is RF?

Can you express your frequency ranges for each?


7 posted on 11/05/2013 9:54:25 AM PST by AlmaKing
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To: dadgum
Old tech for networking. Limited to line of sight. Limited throughput. Used IR.

IR has gotten quite a bit more refined and powerful these days, and Blue LEDs (or ultraviolet) have greater inherent bandwidth.

8 posted on 11/05/2013 9:54:47 AM PST by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

By off the shelf, is this simply taking a fiber-optic card, attaching external LED (CREE 4 for some real throw), and directing it over line of sight?

Nice idea. Android app for sending and receiving Morse works similarly, if brightly using the camera’s led flash to emit.

More fun.


9 posted on 11/05/2013 9:58:20 AM PST by petro45acp (It's a fabian thing.....how do you boil a frog? How's that water feelin right about now?)
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To: Utilizer

Best possible use would be point-to-point pipe between separate buildings.


10 posted on 11/05/2013 9:59:59 AM PST by dadgum (Overjoyed to be the Pariah.)
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To: AlmaKing

11 posted on 11/05/2013 10:00:17 AM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Who knew that one day professional wrestling would be less fake than professional journalism?)
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To: Utilizer

interesting


12 posted on 11/05/2013 10:03:55 AM PST by Democrat_media (IRS rigged election for Obama and democrats by shutting down tea party)
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To: petro45acp
Many moons ago, back in high school we used to build transceivers using flashlight bulbs for communicating. Not much fidelity to them, but fun and you could use stronger bulbs with higher voltages and lenses for greater range.

LEDs are already pretty strong off-the-shelf, and look at the inherent range a simple LED flashlight already has.

13 posted on 11/05/2013 10:07:24 AM PST by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer

I toyed with the idea of building something like this, but I was thinking of using LED’s for signal acquisition and off-the-shelf CD-player IR lasers for high-bandwidth transmission. The CD auto-focus mechsnism would have to be adapted to multiple-axis pointing and focusing.


14 posted on 11/05/2013 10:07:59 AM PST by Windcatcher (Obama is a COMMUNIST and the MSM is his armband-wearing propaganda machine.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
That is the "Wavelength" function. I defy you to provide details of a standard RF transistor that can detect the ElectroMagnetic radiation of "Light".

I have five and ten gigahertz transceivers, and none of them can detect light at any frequency.

15 posted on 11/05/2013 10:10:31 AM PST by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer

The directionality of this could be interesting, but for that, I would go with a modulated low power laser.


16 posted on 11/05/2013 10:11:41 AM PST by Paradox (Unexpected things coming for the next few years.)
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To: Utilizer
Beg to differ, mate. Started out on CB transceivers, and 27MHz RF is not "Light" by any stretch of the imagination. As far as not passing through walls, for between rooms all you need is a light pipe with convex ends. Or an Active Repeater, if you do not mind the latency. External, who doesn't know what an "Antenna" is?

Radio waves and light are just different wavelengths on the electromagnetic spectrum.


17 posted on 11/05/2013 10:12:12 AM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Who knew that one day professional wrestling would be less fake than professional journalism?)
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To: Utilizer

A photodiode can of course detect light, but good luck getting any bandwidth out of it (grin). I think CD laser pickups are the way to go since they give you almost everything you need.


18 posted on 11/05/2013 10:13:46 AM PST by Windcatcher (Obama is a COMMUNIST and the MSM is his armband-wearing propaganda machine.)
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To: Utilizer
27MHz RF is not "Light" by any stretch of the imagination.

He said light was RF. He did not say all RF was light.

19 posted on 11/05/2013 10:15:04 AM PST by SoothingDave
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Comment #20 Removed by Moderator

To: Windcatcher

I was thinking more along the lines of a cheap five-LED flashlight or several from the Dollar store for a directional beam, add some cheap 2N2222A transistors (about 10/ dollar) and an electret mic for quick and dirty Amplitude Modulation, and if you want to get a bit more fancy, add different coloured filters to the white LEDs to define different bands for separate data streams. Sounds rather fun, now that I think about it.


21 posted on 11/05/2013 10:16:06 AM PST by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
Light is RF

In this case, wouldn't it be Ri-Fi ??

Bad joke aside, you're right in that it's all EM radiation ...

22 posted on 11/05/2013 10:17:46 AM PST by mikrofon (**Wave**)
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To: Windcatcher

Actually, most LEDs can also detect light, if not as strongly as dedicated devices can. I used to work in R&D in Electronics as well as Production Engineering. Quick and dirty, a clear plastic lens in front of the LED to bring up the sensitivity and you can accomplish quite a bit. Just factor in a very low amplitude and noise filtering and simple functions / commands work just fine.


23 posted on 11/05/2013 10:21:24 AM PST by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer
You can make a transmitter and receiver that use visible light. It used to be a science project experiment with a light bulb that flickered when you spoke into the microphone and a receiver that used a photocell to convert the amplitude-modulated light waves into an electrical signal that would be amplified and output to a speaker.

But you're right. Your shortwave receiver won't pick it up, because it's tuned to a different range of frequencies.

24 posted on 11/05/2013 10:24:05 AM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Who knew that one day professional wrestling would be less fake than professional journalism?)
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To: SoothingDave
He said light was RF. He did not say all RF was light.

Hmmm. Never really worked with Optics all that much, but I shall try to think about how to detect the ElectroMagnetic emissions of a light source a bit more as opposed to the optical emanations of a device.

25 posted on 11/05/2013 10:24:21 AM PST by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer

Here’s another thought...UV LED’s are readily available. You can boost your bandwidth just by going to 250nm.


26 posted on 11/05/2013 10:26:57 AM PST by Windcatcher (Obama is a COMMUNIST and the MSM is his armband-wearing propaganda machine.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

Fiber Optics.


27 posted on 11/05/2013 10:43:01 AM PST by Mechanicos (When did we amend the Constitution for a 2nd Federal Prohibition?)
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To: Mechanicos
Li-Fi makes it sound like it's OTA.

Maybe it should be Li-Fi-Fi.


28 posted on 11/05/2013 10:46:27 AM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Who knew that one day professional wrestling would be less fake than professional journalism?)
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To: Utilizer

Why does Network World have to be excerpted? It’s taking more than a minute to load all the ads and horse crap on that site.


29 posted on 11/05/2013 10:51:15 AM PST by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Utilizer

Trying to find out how fast it would operate...

Li-Fi, however, could be deployed in everyday LED bulbs, with light-based Internet connections covering the interior of entire homes or buildings. The data connection speeds can also reach several gigabits per second. Chi’s own system runs at 150 Mbps by using a small number of LED bulbs each at one watt.

“With a more powerful LED light, we can reach 3.5 Gbps speeds,” she added. Both the router and receiver are fitted with LED bulbs so that they can send data, and also installed with a chip that can process the signals.


30 posted on 11/05/2013 10:52:01 AM PST by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Utilizer

Because it is dependent on light, the technology can’t penetrate walls or work in complete darkness.
***Wouldn’t complete darkness make an LED based system work BETTER?


31 posted on 11/05/2013 10:54:35 AM PST by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Kevmo
Sorry, mate. I use Ghostery, AdBlock, and AdblockPlus and really did not notice.

I can FReepmail you the article essence if you wish, but I always make it a habit to excerpt for the sake of brevity and to keep the bandwidth down.

32 posted on 11/05/2013 11:05:16 AM PST by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer

Your confusing Electromagnetic with RF. Xrays are electromagnetic that doesn’t mean your transceiver can pick it up because it isn’t tuned to the frequency in question - just like it isn’t tuned to pick up the visible light spectrum - it is all electromagnetic waves. RF is one subset of frequencies in the electromagnetic spectrum.


33 posted on 11/05/2013 11:07:28 AM PST by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothings)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

” It used to be a science project experiment with a light bulb that flickered when you spoke into the microphone and a receiver that used a photocell to convert the amplitude-modulated light waves into an electrical signal that would be amplified and output to a speaker.”

Hmmmm,,, Seems just about like the Tremolo/Vibrate-oh in my 64 Fender Vibroverb! But we call the parts “The Roach.”


34 posted on 11/05/2013 11:13:45 AM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: Utilizer
Utilizer said: "... but I shall try to think about how to detect the ElectroMagnetic emissions of a light source a bit more as opposed to the optical emanations of a device."

The optical emanations of a light source ARE electromagnetic emissions.

The history of our understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum is full of very interesting discoveries.

Maxwell in the 1800s was able to use the known properties of electric and magnetic fields to derive the speed of propagation of electromagnetic waves. Remarkably, the speed matched the already known speed of light. It was this "coincidence" which suggested later experiments which established that light was indeed a form of electromagnetic wave.

What has been traditionally referred to as "short wave", the neighborhood of 40 meter wavelengths, turn out to be some of the longest waves that one deals with in the various uses of electromagnetic waves. Light waves have wavelengths around the diameter of an atom, say about 1 angstrom.

One angstrom is 1e-10 meters, which means one-tenth of one-billionth of a meter. Now that is really a "short wave".

The reason why light doesn't penetrate the walls of a house is related to its wavelength. The close match between the wavelength of the light and the size of the atoms making up the wall causes a greater amount of interaction of the light with the wall. This is seen in the form of absorption of the light and conversion to heat or the reflection of the light.

The transparency of a window is due to the fact that much visible light is able to penetrate the window with very little interaction with the atoms in the window. In a similar fashion, radio waves of much longer wavelengths are able to penetrate walls because of the fact that they interact very little with the atoms in the walls.

35 posted on 11/05/2013 11:41:51 AM PST by William Tell
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

Yes, so visible is not considered RF.


36 posted on 11/05/2013 3:18:14 PM PST by AlmaKing
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To: AlmaKing
A distinction without a difference.

They are both on the spectrum of electromagnetic waves.

37 posted on 11/05/2013 3:40:10 PM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Who knew that one day professional wrestling would be less fake than professional journalism?)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

Unless you’re an engineer like me.

Anyway, nothing worth arguing over.


38 posted on 11/06/2013 10:47:50 AM PST by AlmaKing
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To: Utilizer

Would this not be much more secure, in that the broadcast area of light can be better contained?


39 posted on 11/06/2013 11:53:37 AM PST by BlueMondaySkipper (Involuntarily subsidizing the parasite class since 1981)
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