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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Planet spotted deep within our galaxy: One of the most distant planets known

    04/19/2015 4:46:01 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 4 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | April 14, 2015 | Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has teamed up with a telescope on the ground to find a remote gas planet about 13,000 light-years away, making it one of the most distant planets known.
  • Palaeolithic remains show cannibalistic habits of human ancestors

    04/19/2015 4:41:17 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 16 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | April 16, 2015 | Natural History Museum
    Analysis of ancient cadavers recovered at a famous archaeological site confirm the existence of a sophisticated culture of butchering and carving human remains, according to a team of scientists from the Natural History Museum, University College London, and a number of Spanish universities.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Ring Galaxy AM 0644-741 from Hubble

    04/19/2015 4:10:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | April 19, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How could a galaxy become shaped like a ring? The rim of the blue galaxy pictured on the right is an immense ring-like structure 150,000 light years in diameter composed of newly formed, extremely bright, massive stars. That galaxy, AM 0644-741, is known as a ring galaxy and was caused by an immense galaxy collision. When galaxies collide, they pass through each other -- their individual stars rarely come into contact. The ring-like shape is the result of the gravitational disruption caused by an entire small intruder galaxy passing through a large one. When this happens, interstellar gas and...
  • Obama’s Earth Day trek to Fla. to highlight climate change

    04/18/2015 5:48:11 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 22 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Apr 18, 2015 11:23 AM EDT | Nedra Pickler
    President Barack Obama plans to celebrate Earth Day by visiting the Florida Everglades. In his weekly radio and Internet address Saturday, Obama says “there’s no greater threat to our planet than climate change.” He says he’ll visit the Everglades on Wednesday to talk about how global warming threatens the U.S. economy. He says rising sea levels are putting the “economic engine for the South Florida tourism industry” at risk. …
  • Congressmen To NASA: Stop Wasting Money On Global Warming Research

    04/18/2015 3:46:46 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    Republican lawmakers chastised the head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Friday, saying the agency’s obsession with global warming is undercutting space exploration programs. “There are 13 other agencies involved in climate change research, but only one that is responsible for space exploration,” Texas Rep. Lamar Smith told NASA administrator Charles Bolden in a hearing. “The administration continues to starve NASA’s exploration programs to fund a partisan environmental agenda,” Smith said. “NASA simply deserves better.” Republicans are concerned that NASA is spending too much money on Earth sciences while cutting funding for space exploration. President Barack Obama’s 2016 budget...
  • The Technocratic Elitism of Modern Environmentalism

    04/18/2015 1:57:21 PM PDT · by Olympiad Fisherman · 8 replies
    The Intellectual Conservative ^ | 4/18/2015 | Mark Musser
    Modern America is saddled with many albatrosses weighing heavily upon the neck of her God given liberties coming from a variety of different directions – everything from the entitlement ethos to leftist political correctness, from a staggering debt never before seen in its history to many foreign despotic enemies lurking behind the shadows of the so-called United Nations, from post-modern socialism and/or environmentalism to an amorality based on Darwinism together with its mutated culture of death wrapped around abortion, divorce, marital infidelity, and a sexual madness that willfully refuses to differentiate between male and female. Enter another serious difficulty that...
  • The First Apple Homepage

    04/18/2015 1:56:09 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 14 replies
    Kevin Fox ^ | April 16, 2015 | Kevin Fox
    Last week I happened across a blog post showing the history of Apple.com over the past 17 years, complete with screenshots culled from the very earliest days of the Internet Archive Wayback Machine. It’s a serious trip down memory lane, but it didn’t go back far enough ... ...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Great Crater Hokusai

    04/18/2015 5:27:28 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | April 18, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: One of the largest young craters on Mercury, 114 kilometer (71 mile) diameter Hokusai crater's bright rays are known to extend across much of the planet. But this mosaic of oblique views focuses on Hokusai close up, its sunlit central peaks, terraced crater walls, and frozen sea of impact melt on the crater's floor. The images were captured by the MESSENGER spacecraft. The first to orbit Mercury, since 2011 MESSENGER has conducted scientific explorations, including extensive imaging of the Solar System's innermost planet. Now running out of propellant and unable to counter orbital perturbations caused by the Sun's gravity,...
  • Scientists find radioactive WWII aircraft carrier off San Francisco coast

    04/17/2015 7:14:21 PM PDT · by logi_cal869 · 35 replies
    San Jose Mercury News ^ | 04/16/2015 | Aaron Kinney
    In a ghostly reminder of the Bay Area's nuclear heritage, scientists announced Thursday they have captured the first clear images of a radioactivity-polluted World War II aircraft carrier that rests on the ocean floor 30 miles off the coast of Half Moon Bay. The USS Independence saw combat at Wake Island and other decisive battles against Japan in 1944 and 1945 and was later blasted with radiation in two South Pacific nuclear tests. The Navy deliberately sank the contaminated ship in 1951 south of the Farallon Islands. The rediscovery of the USS Independence offers a fascinating glimpse into American military...
  • Beyond the lithium ion—a significant step toward a better performing battery

    04/17/2015 2:27:18 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-17-2015 | Provided by University of Illinois at Chicago
    The race is on around the world as scientists strive to develop a new generation of batteries that can perform beyond the limits of the current lithium-ion based battery. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have taken a significant step toward the development of a battery that could outperform the lithium-ion technology used in electric cars such as the Chevy Volt. They have shown they can replace the lithium ions, each of which carries a single positive charge, with magnesium ions, which have a plus-two charge, in battery-like chemical reactions, using an electrode with a structure like those...
  • Engineer improves rechargeable batteries with MoS2 nano 'sandwich'

    04/17/2015 2:21:31 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-17-2015 | Provided by Kansas State University
    Molybdenum disulfide sheets -- which are "sandwiches" of one molybdenum atom between two sulfur atoms -- may improve rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, according to the latest research from Gurpreet Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering. Credit: Kansas State University The key to better cellphones and other rechargeable electronics may be in tiny "sandwiches" made of nanosheets, according to mechanical engineering research from Kansas State University. Gurpreet Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering, and his research team are improving rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The team has focused on the lithium cycling of molybdenum disulfide, or MoS2, sheets, which Singh...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M46 Plus Two

    04/17/2015 10:30:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | April 17, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Galactic or open star clusters are young. These swarms of stars are born together near the plane of the Milky Way, but their numbers steadily dwindle as cluster members are ejected by galactic tides and gravitational interactions. In fact, this bright open cluster, known as M46, is around 300 million years young. It still contains a few hundred stars within a span of 30 light-years or so. Located about 5,000 light-years away toward the constellation Puppis, M46 also seems to contain contradictions to its youthful status. In this pretty starscape, the colorful, circular patch above and right of the...
  • Marines launched a ‘kamikaze’ drone from an Osprey aircraft

    04/17/2015 10:10:41 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 14 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 4/17/15 | Dan Lamothe
    Flying a kamikaze drone armed with explosives from the back of an MV-22 Osprey aircraft, and directing it right into the insurgent’s fighting hole. The Marines tested a small unmanned aircraft known as the Switchblade recently at Twentynine Palms, Calif., flying it directly at targets from both the ground and the back of the Osprey, a long-range aircraft that has rotors like a helicopter, but can fly like a plane once they rotate forward. They were “inert,” with no explosives on board, but the mission went off without a hitch, said Col. James Adams, commanding officer of Marine Aviation Weapons...
  • Sixth extinction, rivaling that of the dinosaurs, should join the big five, scientists say

    04/16/2015 10:10:24 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 21 replies
    American Association for the Advancement of Science ^ | 16 April 2015 5:15 pm | Eric Hand
    Earth has seen its share of catastrophes, the worst being the “big five” mass extinctions scientists traditionally talk about. Now, paleontologists are arguing that a sixth extinction, 260 million years ago, at the end of a geological age called the Capitanian, deserves to be a member of the exclusive club. In a new study, they offer evidence for a massive die-off in shallow, cool waters in what is now Norway. That finding, combined with previous evidence of extinctions in tropical waters, means that the Capitanian was a global catastrophe. “It’s the first time we can say this is a true...
  • One-Third of Dutch GP Physicians Would Kill the Mentally Ill

    04/16/2015 11:24:28 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 22 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | April 16, 2015 | Wesley J. Smith
    One-Third of Dutch GP Physicians Would Kill the Mentally Ill Wesley J. Smith April 16, 2015 10:26 AM | Permalink Please! Don't tell me that euthanasia doesn't lead straight off a vertical moral cliff. A recent survey of Netherlander MD general practitioners found that very high percentages would kill cancer patients, and one-third would be willing to euthanize the mentally ill. From the PsychCentral story: For mental illness, only 34 percent would consider helping the patient die, and 40 percent would help someone with early-stage dementia to die. The rate was slightly lower for late-stage dementia, at 33 percent. Only?...
  • New brain science shows poor kids have smaller brains than affluent kids

    04/16/2015 5:12:57 AM PDT · by reaganaut1 · 76 replies
    Washington Post ^ | April 15, 2015 | Lyndsey Layton
    New research that shows poor children have smaller brains than affluent children has deepened the national debate about ways to narrow the achievement gap. Neuroscientists who studied the brain scans of nearly 1,100 children and young adults nationwide from ages 3 to 20 found that the surface area of the cerebral cortex was linked to family income. They discovered that the brains of children in families that earned less than $25,000 a year had surface areas 6 percent smaller than those whose families earned $150,000 or more. The poor children also scored lower on average on a battery of cognitive...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- One-Armed Spiral Galaxy NGC 4725

    04/16/2015 4:56:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | April 16, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: While most spiral galaxies, including our own Milky Way, have two or more spiral arms, NGC 4725 has only one. In this sharp color composite image, the solo spira mirabilis seems to wind from a prominent ring of bluish, newborn star clusters and red tinted star forming regions. The odd galaxy also sports obscuring dust lanes a yellowish central bar structure composed of an older population of stars. NGC 4725 is over 100 thousand light-years across and lies 41 million light-years away in the well-groomed constellation Coma Berenices. Computer simulations of the formation of single spiral arms suggest that...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Mystic Mountain Dust Pillars

    04/16/2015 4:54:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | April 15, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It's stars versus dust in the Carina Nebula and the stars are winning. More precisely, the energetic light and winds from massive newly formed stars are evaporating and dispersing the dusty stellar nurseries in which they formed. Located in the Carina Nebula and known informally as Mystic Mountain, these pillar's appearance is dominated by the dark dust even though it is composed mostly of clear hydrogen gas. Dust pillars such as these are actually much thinner than air and only appear as mountains due to relatively small amounts of opaque interstellar dust. About 7,500 light-years distant, the featured image...
  • Rare jungle nut becomes anti-aging rage

    04/15/2015 11:18:09 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    WND ^ | 04-14-2015 | Staff
    'It's going to be the new little wave' For decades, if not centuries, the Amazon dwellers of southern Colombia didn’t make too much of the cacay nut. They fed it to their livestock, used it to treat wounds and chopped down its trees for firewood. But then, a few years ago, the global jet-setting crowd found out what the yellow-ish oil from the protein-rich nut could do for their skin. And suddenly, the cacay (pronounced kahk-ai) has become a red-hot commodity, providing the key ingredient to anti-aging facial creams that can fetch $200 an ounce in beauty shops in Los...
  • Chimps in Senegal found to fashion spears for hunting

    04/15/2015 10:59:08 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 28 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 4/15/15 | Bob Yirka
    (Phys.org)—Members of a troop of chimpanzees living at a site called Fongoli in southeastern Senegal have been observed by scientists fashioning tree branches into spears and using them to hunt and kill bushbabies. The researchers, a combined team with members from the U.S. the U.K. and Germany have published their observations and findings in Royal Society Open Science. In their seven year study of the chimps living at the site, the researchers spotted chimpanzees breaking off tree branches, tearing off smaller branches and leaves, removing the weak tips and sometimes gnawing on the ends to sharpen them. The spears (which...
  • Researchers can trace dust samples using fungal DNA

    04/15/2015 10:22:14 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 1 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 4/15/15
    Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Colorado, Boulder, have developed a statistical model that allows them to tell where a dust sample came from within the continental United States based on the DNA of fungi found in the sample. The primary goal of the research was to develop a new forensic biology tool for law enforcement or archaeologists. "But it may also give us a greater understanding of the invisible ecosystems of microbial life that we know are all around us, but that we don't fully comprehend," says Neal Grantham, a Ph.D. student in statistics at...
  • The Climate Change War Heats Up

    04/15/2015 7:22:14 AM PDT · by rktman · 6 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 4/15/2015 | Alan Caruba
    There is so much at stake for the charlatans that have foisted the failed “global warming” hoax, followed by the equally dubious claims and predictions regarding “climate change”, that it should come as no surprise that they have begun to wage a propaganda war on the courageous scientists who led the struggle to educate the public about the truth and the organizations who supported their efforts. Along the way, many groups and publications claiming scientific credentials abandoned those standards to pump out global warming and climate change propaganda. Scientists discovered they could secure grant money for “research” so long as...
  • Live Long and Prosper: The Jewish Story Behind Spock, Leonard Nimoy's Star Trek Character

    04/14/2015 9:18:39 AM PDT · by fishtank · 9 replies
    Yiddish Book Center ^ | 2-6-14 | Leonard Nimoy
    Published on Feb 6, 2014 Leonard Nimoy explains the Jewish story behind the hand-gesture he made famous through his role as Spock on in the Star Trek science fiction series.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Through the Shadow of the Moon

    04/14/2015 4:17:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | April 14, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What would it look like to fly through a total eclipse of the Sun? On a typical place on Earth in the path of the dark shadow of the Moon during a total eclipse, an observer would see the Moon cross the face of the Sun, completely blocking it for a few minutes. A particularly clear view of the darkness created on Earth during last month's total solar eclipse was captured by an aircraft flying through the Moon's umbral shadow. One second of time in the featured time-lapse video corresponds to about one minute of real time. The Moon's...
  • Risk Taker Almost Swept Up By The Tornado in Rochelle, IL

    04/13/2015 9:54:40 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 25 replies
    Live Leak ^ | 4/13/15
    Guy named Sam S. was in a storm of trouble when he was caught inside the Tornado in Rochelle IL, Not only was he unlucky but he also screwed up with bad filming, But for liveleak i managed to fix his mistake during the best shot of the video.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way over Erupting Volcano

    04/13/2015 7:30:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | April 13, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The view was worth the trip. Battling high winds, cold temperatures, and low oxygen, the trek to near the top of the volcano Santa Maria in Guatemala -- while carrying sensitive camera equipment -- was lonely and difficult. Once set up, though, the camera captured this breathtaking vista during the early morning hours of February 28. Visible on the ground are six volcanoes of the Central America Volcanic Arc, including Fuego, the Volcano of Fire, which is seen erupting in the distance. Visible in the sky, in separate exposures taken a few minutes later, are many stars much further...
  • Grilled cheese lovers have more sex, study says

    04/12/2015 12:58:26 AM PDT · by Slings and Arrows · 72 replies
    Fox News ^ | 4/10/11
    Here’s yet another reason to love grilled cheese: Fans of the ooey, gooey sandwiches have more sex, a new study has found. Thirty-two percent of grilled cheese fans have sex at least six times a month, versus 27 percent of those who don't like the sandwich, according to the dating and social-networking site Skout, which released the findings before National Grilled Cheese Day on Sunday.
  • Accelerating universe? Not so fast

    04/12/2015 9:14:56 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | 4/10/15
    Certain types of supernovae, or exploding stars, are more diverse than previously thought, a University of Arizona-led team of astronomers has discovered. The results, reported in two papers published in the Astrophysical Journal, have implications for big cosmological questions, such as how fast the universe has been expanding since the Big Bang. Most importantly, the findings hint at the possibility that the acceleration of the expansion of the universe might not be quite as fast as textbooks say. The team, led by UA astronomer Peter A. Milne, discovered that type Ia supernovae, which have been considered so uniform that cosmologists...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sentinels of the Arctic

    04/12/2015 1:22:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | April 12, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Who guards the north? Judging from the above photograph, possibly giant trees covered in snow and ice. The featured picture was taken a few winters ago in Finnish Lapland where weather can include sub-freezing temperatures and driving snow. Surreal landscapes sometimes result, where common trees become cloaked in white and so appear, to some, as watchful aliens. Far in the distance, behind this uncommon Earthly vista, is a more common sight -- a Belt of Venus that divided a darkened from sunlit sky as the Sun rose behind the photographer. Of course, in the spring, the trees thaw and...
  • Agriculture poses immense threat to environment, German study says

    04/12/2015 12:37:01 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 22 replies
    EurActiv ^ | 04/10/2015 – 08:12 | Nicole Sagener
    Conventional agriculture is causing enormous environmental damage in Germany, warns a study by the country’s Federal Environment Agency, saying a transition to organic farming and stricter regulation is urgently needed. EurActiv Germany reports. Spanning over 50% of the country, agriculture takes up by far the biggest amount of land in the country, and is one of its most important economic sectors. But intensive farming still harms the environment to an alarming extent, according to a study conducted by the Federal Environment Agency (UBA). The use of pesticides and fertilizers, as well as intensive animal husbandry, have a negative impact on...
  • Radiometric Dating: How Rocks Can Look Older Than They Are

    04/11/2015 6:13:49 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 24 replies
    CEH ^ | 04/82015
    Researchers find that the most common dating method can produce “spuriously old” dates.A team from Europe took a closer look at how uranium-lead ages are determined, and found problems. One of the assumptions going into dating zircons (zirconium silicate crystals encasing uranium that decays to lead) is that the clock is “reset” when the parent rock under goes the high heat and pressure of metamorphism. This team found that nanosphere inclusions of extraneous metallic lead (Pb) can confuse the dating technique, making the rock look older than it is. Writing in PNAS, they say:Zircon (ZrSiO4) is the most commonly used...
  • This Mountain on Mars Is Leaking

    04/11/2015 4:22:45 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 38 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Jason Major
    As the midsummer Sun beats down on the southern mountains of Mars, bringing daytime temperatures soaring up to a balmy 25ºC (77ºF), some of their slopes become darkened with long, rusty stains that may be the result of water seeping out from just below the surface. The image above, captured by the HiRISE camera aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Feb. 20, shows mountain peaks within the 150-km (93-mile) -wide Hale Crater. Made from data acquired in visible and near infrared wavelengths the long stains are very evident, running down steep slopes below the rocky cliffs. These dark lines, called...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Venus in the West

    04/11/2015 4:04:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | April 11, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In the coming days, Venus shines near the western horizon at sunset. To find Earth's sister planet in twilight skies just look for the brilliant evening star. Tonight very close to the Pleiades star cluster, Venus dominates this springtime night skyscape taken only a few days ago near the town of Lich in central Germany. Also known as the Seven Sisters, the stars of the compact Pleiades cluster appear above Venus in this picture. The budding tree branches to its left frame bright star Aldebaran, the eye of Taurus the Bull, and the V-shaped Hyades star cluster.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 2903: A Missing Jewel in Leo

    04/11/2015 4:02:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | April 10, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Barred spiral galaxy NGC 2903 is only some 20 million light-years distant. Popular among amateur astronomers, it shines in the northern spring constellation Leo, near the top of the lion's head. That part of the constellation is sometimes seen as a reversed question mark or sickle. One of the brighter galaxies visible from the northern hemisphere, NGC 2903 is surprisingly missing from Charles Messier's catalog of lustrous celestial sights. This colorful image from a small ground-based telescope shows off the galaxy's gorgeous spiral arms traced by young, blue star clusters and pinkish star forming regions. Included are intriguing details...
  • Dog cancer detection '98% reliable'

    04/11/2015 4:00:36 PM PDT · by gorush · 30 replies
    Guernsey Press ^ | April 11, 2015 12:32 am | unknwn
    The Italian study backs up tests carried out by the charity Medical Detection Dogs, which is based in Buckinghamshire. Its co-founder Dr Claire Guest said its own research had found a 93% reliability rate when detecting bladder and prostate cancer, describing the new findings as "spectacular". The latest research, by the Department of Urology at the Humanitas Clinical and Research Centre in Milan, involved two German shepherds sniffing the urine of 900 men - 360 with prostate cancer and 540 without. Scientists found that dog one got it right in 98.7% of cases, while for dog two this was 97.6%....
  • Defying The Odds, Mixed-Race Twin Girls Are Born Different Colors: One Is Black And The Other White.

    04/11/2015 1:39:30 PM PDT · by Perdogg · 49 replies
    An incredibly rare quirk of genetics has produced twin baby girls with totally different skin color: one sister has black skin and the other is white. The resulting effect is so stunning that even the babies’ own father says it is hard to believe that they are related.
  • New understanding of electromagnetism could enable 'antennas on a chip'

    04/11/2015 10:29:03 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 30 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 4/8/15
    New understanding of electromagnetism could enable 'antennas on a chip' Apr 08, 2015 Enlarge Anechoic chamber. Credit: University of Cambridge A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have unravelled one of the mysteries of electromagnetism, which could enable the design of antennas small enough to be integrated into an electronic chip. These ultra-small antennas - the so-called 'last frontier' of semiconductor design - would be a massive leap forward for wireless communications. In new results published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the researchers have proposed that electromagnetic waves are generated not only from the acceleration of electrons,...
  • The Black Pharaoh in Denmark

    04/10/2015 9:57:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, April 10, 2015 | editors
    It has been said that the period between 760 BCE to 656 BCE in Egypt was the 'age of the black pharaohs'. It was during this time that ancient Egypt was ruled by a dynasty or succession of kings from Nubia, the Kingdom of Kush, a rival African kingdom just to its south in what is today northern Sudan. Beginning with king Kashta's successful invasion of Upper Egypt, what became known as the 25th Dynasty achieved the reunification of Lower Egypt, Upper Egypt, and also Kush (Nubia), the largest Egyptian empire since the New Kingdom. They introduced new Kushite cultural...
  • 8-foot-long carnivorous cat-eating lizards are invading Florida

    04/10/2015 7:06:52 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 87 replies
    Business Insider via Yahoo News ^ | 4/10/15 | Kevin Loria
    Wildlife officials armed with shotguns will be increasing patrols of Palm Beach County canals from once a month to four to six times a month to try to hunt the reptiles down, according to the Sun Sentinel. The plan is to catch or shoot the lizards on sight — they've got 20 in Palm Beach since July.
  • Beyond “Fermi’s Paradox” II: Questioning the Hart-Tipler Conjecture

    04/10/2015 11:52:04 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 66 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Paul Patton
    The argument claiming that extraterrestrials don’t exist was actually proposed by the astronomer Michael Hart, in a paper he published in 1975. Hart supposed that if an extraterrestrial civilization arose in the galaxy it would develop interstellar travel and launch colonizing expeditions to nearby stars. These colonies would, in turn, launch their own starships spreading a wave of colonization across the galaxy. How long would the wave take to cross the galaxy? Assuming that the starships traveled at one tenth the speed of light and that no time was lost in building new ships upon arriving at the destination, the...
  • Brain Scans Can Predict If Child with Autism Will Have Poor Language Skills

    04/10/2015 8:11:14 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 8 replies
    HNGN ^ | 04/10/2015 | By Julie Sabino
    A study found that poor language skills and language delays can be predicted even before the child is diagnosed with autism. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that affects one's social, communication and behavior. There is no medical test yet used to rule out if a child has autism, but symptoms are usually detected as early as 18 months or younger. However, some are not diagnosed until they are older, which delays the help that they need. Language delays are very common in ASD children, and doctors usually recommend speech therapy. Researchers at at the University of California,...
  • Our Sun was Late to the Milky Way's Baby Boom Party

    04/09/2015 6:07:43 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Ian O'Neill
    The further [sic] astronomers look into the universe, the longer into the past they can see. As light travels at a finite speed (the speed of light), studying a galaxy 1 billion light-years away corresponds to a time when the universe was 1 billion years younger than it is now. So by surveying Milky Way-like galaxies at different distances from us, we can see how our galaxy may have looked in the past. And by doing this, astronomers have created a timeline and identified when the Milky Way likely had the most intense period of stellar birth. “This study allows...
  • Arctic ‘Carbon Bomb’ Theory Falls Flat

    04/09/2015 2:29:56 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 19 replies
    dailycaller.com ^ | Michael Bastasch
    A new study debunks the theory that melting permafrost in the Arctic region will release a “carbon bomb” that will cause catastrophic global warming. “The data from our team’s syntheses don’t support the permafrost carbon bomb view,” A. David McGuire, a climate scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, said in a statement. News reports have hyped up the study saying melting Arctic permafrost could release lots of carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere — only adding to worries that global warming will get out of control....
  • NASA | A Story of Ozone: The Earth’s Natural Sunscreen

    04/09/2015 10:38:56 AM PDT · by Rodamala · 18 replies
    NASA Goddard ^ | Apr 6, 2015 | NASA Goddard
    In this talk, Dr. Paul Newman tells the story of how scientists and policy-makers safeguarded the Earth’s ozone layer and the world we avoided by by regulating chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) . Back in the 60s, we used chlorofluorocarbons, a chlorine-containing chemical, in everything from hairsprays and deodorants to foam products and air conditioners. But in 1974, chemists Sherwood Rowland and Mario Molina published a paper claiming CFCs were destroying the ozone layer. The Molina-Rowland paper launched a debate in the scientific community that ultimately led to the halls of the United Nations. Today, more than 191 countries have signed the Montreal...
  • Origins of Russian fireball found: Scientists say... [similar orbit to asteroid 2014 UR116]

    04/09/2015 10:36:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | April 8, 2015 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    ...the Kola fireball had a 'disturbingly similar' path to asteroid 2014 UR116, which is due to pass by the moon in 2017. Spotted on April 19 last year, researchers used camera footage to help recreate its trajectory and hunt down any remaining fragments... This led researchers to the Annama meteorite, which is an ordinary H5 chondrite -- a group of space rocks with high strength that make up 31 per cent of meteorite falls. The computer model compared the orbit of Annama, a 1,100lb (500kg) rock, with the evolution of a dozen orbits of near-Earth asteroids... Vladimir Lipunov, a professor...
  • Russian Hunters Discover 10,000-year-old Frozen Woolly Rhino in River

    04/09/2015 10:06:56 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 41 replies
    OutdoorHub ^ | 2/27/15 | Daniel Xu
    Paleontologists are calling a recent find in the Russian region of Yakutia a “sensation.” Last September, Aleksandr Banderov and his hunting party were traveling near the Semyulyakh River when they uncovered the preserved carcass of an adolescent wholly rhinoceros, a species that roamed the frozen landscapes of Europe and northern Asia during the last Ice Age. The hunters initially thought it was a reindeer frozen in the ice, but quickly realized it was something much older. “We were sailing past a ravine and noticed hair hanging on the top of it,’ Alexander told The Siberian Times. “At first we thought...
  • Obama Keeps Telling Renewable Energy Lies

    04/09/2015 9:11:55 AM PDT · by rktman · 14 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 4/9/2015 | Alan Caruba
    Imagine you wanted to get in your electric car and drive a considerable distance. It wouldn’t take long for your car to run out of power, so you would have to have another car, one using gasoline, to drive behind you to make sure you reached your destination. That’s a description of “renewable energy”, wind and solar, in America today because they both require backup from traditional energy sources such as coal, oil, natural gas, and nuclear. And “renewable energy” based on “free” sun and wind power costs more to produce and purchase. Need it be said that the sun...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Golden Gate Eclipse

    04/09/2015 4:05:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | April 09, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Shadows play on the water and in the sky in this panoramic view of the April 4 total lunar eclipse over San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge. Just within planet Earth's shadow the Full Moon's disk is still easy to spot at its brief total phase. The urban night skyscape was composed to cover the wide range of brightness visible to the eye. The shortest total lunar eclipse of the century, this eclipse was also the third in a string of four consecutive total lunar eclipses, a series known as a tetrad. Coming in nearly six month intervals, the previous...
  • NASA predicts alien life could be found by 2025

    04/08/2015 6:07:34 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 118 replies
    CBS News ^ | 04/08/2015 | By MICHAEL CASEY
    Bolstered by a flurry of recent discoveries, NASA scientists believe they could find evidence of alien life in the universe as early 2025. Much of the excitement has been around the discovery of water in so many unexpected places. Several planets including Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune (and their moons) are believed to possess water in their atmosphere and interiors and the five icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn have shown strong evidence of oceans beneath their surfaces. "I'm going to say we are going to have strong indications of life beyond earth within a decade and I think...
  • Buried Mars Glaciers are Brimming With Water

    04/08/2015 2:47:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 42 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Irene Klotz
    Radar images previously revealed thousands of buried glacier-like formations in the planet’s northern and southern hemispheres. That data has now been incorporated into computer models of ice flow to determine the glaciers’ size and hence how much water they contain. “We have looked at radar measurements spanning 10 years back in time to see how thick the ice is and how it behaves. A glacier is, after all, a big chunk of ice and it flows and gets a form that tells us something about how soft it is. We then compared this with how glaciers on Earth behave and...