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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Fermi's Gamma-ray Moon

    04/29/2016 5:07:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | Friday, April 29, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: If you could only see gamma-rays, photons with up to a billion or more times the energy of visible light, the Moon would be brighter than the Sun! That startling notion underlies this novel image of the Moon, based on data collected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument during its first seven years of operation (2008-2015). Fermi's gamma-ray vision doesn't distinguish details on the lunar surface, but a gamma-ray glow consistent with the Moon's size and position is clearly found at the center of the false color map. The brightest pixels correspond to the...
  • Why Nature Prefers Hexagons

    04/28/2016 6:19:20 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 60 replies
    Nautilus ^ | 7 Apr, 2016 | Phillip Ball
    The geometric rules behind fly eyes, honeycombs, and soap bubbles. How do bees do it? The honeycombs in which they store their amber nectar are marvels of precision engineering, an array of prism-shaped cells with a perfectly hexagonal cross-section. The wax walls are made with a very precise thickness, the cells are gently tilted from the horizontal to prevent the viscous honey from running out, and the entire comb is aligned with the Earth’s magnetic field. Yet this structure is made without any blueprint or foresight, by many bees working simultaneously and somehow coordinating their efforts to avoid mismatched cells....
  • Where Nature Hides the Darkest Mystery of All

    04/28/2016 4:16:35 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Nautilus ^ | 28 Apr, 2016 | Matthew Francis
    There’s no boundary quite like a black hole boundary. No known object in existence has as clear a division between “inside” and “outside” as a black hole. We live and see the outside, and no probe will bring us information about the inside. We can send radio messages or robotic spacecraft, but once they cross over into a black hole’s interior, we’ll never get back those emissaries … or any information about what happened to them. The boundary of a black hole is its event horizon. It’s not a surface in the usual sense—there’s no physical barrier—but it’s very much...
  • How earthquakes might trigger faraway volcanoes

    04/28/2016 9:03:59 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 20 replies
    Science ^ | 4/26/2016 | Ian Randell
    On 14 April, a magnitude-6.2 earthquake struck the Japanese island of Kyushu. Two days later, Japanese officials reported towering plumes of smoke at Mount Aso, a volcano 42 kilometers away from the quake’s epicenter. A small eruption was occurring. Could the distant earthquake have triggered it? Mount Aso has had far bigger eruptions over the past few years, well before the earthquake occurred, so it was probably just a coincidence. But a new study concludes that the idea of so-called far-field triggering is not so far-fetched. Big earthquakes can slosh around the bubbly magma underneath volcanoes hundreds of kilometers away,...
  • Bizarre fourth state of water discovered

    04/28/2016 6:22:09 AM PDT · by Hostage · 56 replies
    gizmag ^ | April 26, 2016 | Michael Franco
    You already know that water can have three states of matter: solid, liquid and gas. But scientists at the Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) have discovered that when it's put under extreme pressure in small spaces, the life-giving liquid can exhibit a strange fourth state known as tunneling. The water under question was found in super-small six-sided channels in the mineral beryl, which forms the basis for the gems aquamarine and emerald. The channels measure only about five atoms across and function basically as cages that can each trap one water molecule. What the researchers found was that in this...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Dust Angel Nebula

    04/28/2016 4:21:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, April 28, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The combined light of stars along the Milky Way are reflected by these cosmic dust clouds that soar some 300 light-years or so above the plane of our galaxy. Dubbed the Angel Nebula, the faint apparition is part of an expansive complex of dim and relatively unexplored, diffuse molecular clouds. Commonly found at high galactic latitudes, the dusty galactic cirrus can be traced over large regions toward the North and South Galactic poles. Along with the refection of starlight, studies indicate the dust clouds produce a faint reddish luminescence, as interstellar dust grains convert invisible ultraviolet radiation to visible...
  • What Is The Strongest Force In The Universe?

    04/27/2016 7:17:25 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 74 replies
    Forbes ^ | 26 Apr, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    When it comes to the fundamental laws of nature, we can break everything down into four forces that are at the core of everything in the Universe: The strong nuclear force: the force responsible for holding atomic nuclei and individual protons and neutrons together. The electromagnetic force: the force that attracts and repels charged particles, binds atoms together into molecules and life, and causes electric current, among other things. The weak nuclear force: the force responsible for some types of radioactive decay and the transmutation of heavy, unstable fundamental particles into lighter ones. And gravity: the force that bind the...
  • Don’t look now but the Earth is getting greener

    04/27/2016 4:49:20 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 11 replies
    Hotair ^ | 04/27/2016 | Jazz Shaw
    Since both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sander are quite keen to talk about climate change and carbon taxes, let’s take a brief break from the campaign trail and check in on how Mother Gaia is doing these days. We’ve recorded what some climate scientists claim is a string of record warmest months over the past year and if I were judging by the almost snow-free, mild winter we just enjoyed in upstate New York and the rest of the northeast (watch out for the bears) I’d have to agree. So I assume this means we’re all doomed. But oddly...
  • SpaceX planning to be first private company to land on Mars by 2018

    04/27/2016 12:05:14 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    www.mirror.co.uk ^ | Updated 19:23, 27 Apr 2016 | By David Raven
    The company said it is planning to send their Dragon spacecraft to the red planet as early as 2018 SpaceX is planning to be the first private company to land on Mars within the next two years. The company said it is planning to send its Dragon spaceraft to the red planet as early as 2018. Bosses announced their intentions in a statement on Twitter this afternoon. A spokesperson tweeted: "Planning to send Dragon to Mars as soon as 2018. Red Dragons will inform overall Mars architecture, details to come." Earlier this month the US aerospace company successfully landed a...
  • Italian-Americans Live Longer Thanks to This Diet

    04/27/2016 10:48:31 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 15 replies
    New York Post ^ | April 26, 2016 | Michael Kaplan
    It’s 3 p.m. on Arthur Avenue in The Bronx, and Filomena Magavero settles in for a late lunch inside the venerable Mario’s, a favorite Italian restaurant on this strip of Old World butcher shops, fish stores and bakeries. She sips a gin martini (“Is there any other kind?” Magavero gamely asks), and orders filet of flounder oreganata. “Fish is my mainstay,” says the diminutive and neatly coiffed Magavero, eyes sparkling. “Plus, I grew up eating legumes, and I still like my lentils and chickpeas.” As for the martini? “I have one whenever I eat out — which is about five...
  • Occasional Birdy Thread

    04/27/2016 9:42:40 AM PDT · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 26 replies
    Engraved-on-His-hands | April 27, 2016 | Engraved-on-His-hands
    With apologies to Islander7, but I haven't seen an “Occasional Birdy Thread” in awhile, so I thought that I would post one. My pictures aren't as great as those posted by Islander7 or fidelis, but it's kind of like singing. All that you really need to do is to sing (or take bird pictures) well enough to entertain yourself. Blue-winged Teal Greater Yellowlegs Greater Yellowlegs with Blue-winged Teal Greater Yellowlegs Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Osprey Eastern Phoebe Solitary Sandpiper
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Omega Centauri: The Brightest Globular Star Cluster

    04/27/2016 4:48:35 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, April 27, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This huge ball of stars predates our Sun. Long before humankind evolved, before dinosaurs roamed, and even before our Earth existed, ancient globs of stars condensed and orbited a young Milky Way Galaxy. Of the 200 or so globular clusters that survive today, Omega Centauri is the largest, containing over ten million stars. Omega Centauri is also the brightest globular cluster, at apparent visual magnitude 3.9 it is visible to southern observers with the unaided eye. Cataloged as NGC 5139, Omega Centauri is about 18,000 light-years away and 150 light-years in diameter. Unlike many other globular clusters, the stars...
  • There be dragons? Creatures you might find on a real journey to the centre of the Earth

    04/26/2016 7:27:33 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 33 replies
    The Conversation ^ | 25 Apr, 2016 | Christopher Terrell Nield
    ....Science, of course, has a habit of turning the fantastic into the prosaic. But 150 years on from Verne’s work, researchers have actually begun a project to drill through the Earth’s crust for the first time, hoping to penetrate more than 5km beneath the sea bed to reach the mantle below. Needless to say, it is most unlikely to reveal monsters living inside the Earth. But if we do look down in search of life, what do we find? The best way to find underground creatures is to travel into the depths of a cave. The first things you’re likely...
  • Transhumanists Want to Be Gods

    04/26/2016 1:44:21 PM PDT · by Heartlander · 35 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | April 26, 2016 | Wesley J. Smith
    Transhumanists Want to Be Gods Wesley J. Smith April 26, 2016 1:24 PM | Permalink It is always fun to see what our resident technology-worshipping religious fanatics -- the transhumanists -- are up to. For those who don't know, transhumanism is a futuristic social movement -- eugenic in nature -- that seeks to use biotech, cyber tech, and every other kind of tech to transform humans into a "post-human" species. The movement's goals are right out of a teenage boy's wish list: to live forever with superhero type powers. Take a gander at this by transhumanist proselytizer Zoltan Istvan, as...
  • Particulates, Aerosols, And Climate: The More Important Story

    04/26/2016 11:50:20 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | 2 days ago April 24, 2016 | Guest opinion: Dr. Tim Ball [1]
    The article “US Senate Considering Albedo Modification Geoengineering Proposal” appeared as I finished this article. It commented on the plan to introduce particles into the atmosphere to increase the reflective capability of the Earth’s atmosphere known as the albedo. Most responses correctly identified it as unwise. Isn’t it already happening? Jet contrails from commercial airline flights reduce the amount of sunlight that makes it to the surface, as this satellite image shows:Jet contrails as seen by satellite. Credit: NASA Langley Research Center The Senate proposal is not new. In 2009, John Holdren pushed the same idea as a Daily Mail...
  • Modern DNA Reveals Ancient Male Population Explosions Linked To Migration And Technology

    04/26/2016 11:36:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | April 25, 2016 | Mark Thomson, Sanger Institute
    The largest ever study of global genetic variation in the human Y chromosome has uncovered the hidden history of men. Research published today (25 April) in Nature Genetics reveals explosions in male population numbers in five continents, occurring at times between 55 thousand and four thousand years ago... analysed sequence differences between the Y chromosomes of more than 1200 men from 26 populations around the world using data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project... involved 42 scientists from four continents... Analysing the Y chromosomes of modern men can tell us about the lives of our ancestors. The Y chromosome is...
  • High Alpine Dairying May Have Begun Over 3000 Years Ago

    04/26/2016 11:30:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | April 22, 2016 | Beth Jones, PLOS.org
    Dairy fats on Iron Age pottery sherds, evidence of pre-historic origin for dairying. The discovery of dairy fats on ancient pottery may indicate dairying high in the Alps occurred as early as the Iron Age over 3000 years ago, according to a study published April 21, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Francesco Carrer from the University of York, UK, and colleagues. Dairy farming has long been an important economic and cultural tradition in the European high Alps, but little is known about when and how the practice originated. Using organic residue analysis, the authors of the present...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 6872: A Stretched Spiral Galaxy

    04/26/2016 11:24:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | Tuesday, April 26, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What makes this spiral galaxy so long? Measuring over 700,000 light years across from top to bottom, NGC 6872, also known as the Condor galaxy, is one of the most elongated barred spiral galaxies known. The galaxy's protracted shape likely results from its continuing collision with the smaller galaxy IC 4970, visible just above center. Of particular interest is NGC 6872's spiral arm on the upper left, as pictured here, which exhibits an unusually high amount of blue star forming regions. The light we see today left these colliding giants before the days of the dinosaurs, about 300 million...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Supernova Remnant Simeis 147: The Spaghetti Nebula

    04/26/2016 11:21:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, April 25, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It's easy to get lost following the intricate strands of the Spaghetti Nebula. A supernova remnant cataloged as Simeis 147 and Sh2-240, the glowing gas filaments cover nearly 3 degrees -- 6 full moons -- on the sky. That's about 150 light-years at the stellar debris cloud's estimated distance of 3,000 light-years. This sharp composite includes image data taken through a narrow-band filter to highlight emission from hydrogen atoms tracing the shocked, glowing gas. The supernova remnant has an estimated age of about 40,000 years, meaning light from the massive stellar explosion first reached Earth about 40,000 years ago....
  • 'Trickle of food' helped deep sea creatures survive asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs

    04/25/2016 9:28:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Thursday, April 14, 2016 | Cardiff University
    Study of fossil shells solves unanswered question of how deep sea creatures survived asteroid strike during immense upheaval of the world's oceans... Like the dinosaurs themselves, giant marine reptiles, invertebrates and microscopic organisms became extinct after the catastrophic asteroid impact in an immense upheaval of the world's oceans, yet deep sea creatures managed to survive. This has puzzled researchers as it is widely believed that the asteroid impact cut off the food supply in the oceans by destroying free-floating algae and bacteria. However, in a study published in the April issue of the journal Geology, a team led by researchers...
  • New State of Water Molecule Discovered by federal researchers

    04/25/2016 8:48:38 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 62 replies
    UPI ^ | April 25, 2016 | Brooks Hays
    "This is in complete disagreement with accepted models based on the energies of its vibrational modes," said lead researcher Alexander Kolesnikov.Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have observed water molecules behaving unlike gas, liquid or solid states. Researchers discovered the new state while subjecting water molecules to extreme confinement. When water molecules were pushed into nanoscale tubes or channels in the mineral beryl, the water molecules become delocalized around a ring, with each molecule adopting "an unusual double top-like shape." Researchers described the new molecular state in the journal Physical Review Letters. "This means that the...
  • Hottest Supercars From the Geneva Motor Show

    04/25/2016 6:10:36 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 23 replies
    Real Clear Life ^ | 25 Apr, 2016
    A host of new supercars were unveiled at this year’s Geneva Motor Show. Here’s a look at the eight most innovative and performance-packed automobiles on display there. —Relaxnews Bugatti Chiron The new supercar comes loaded with a 1,500-horsepower W16 engine for 0-62 mph acceleration in 2.5 seconds and a maximum speed of 261 mph. It’s expected to sell for around $2.6 million. McLaren 570GT This supercar has a 570-horsepower V8 biturbo engine and manages 0-62 mph in 3.4 seconds for a top speed of 204 mph. The McLaren 570GT is already available to order for around $217,000.
  • U.S. Senator: 'Global Warming is...the Moral Challenge of Our Generation' [Jeff Merkley]

    04/25/2016 3:11:30 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 23 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | April 25, 2016 | 3:26 PM EDT | (CNSNews.com Staff)
    In a speech he said he was giving “to recognize the importance of the signing” of the Paris climate agreement, Sen. Jeff Merkley (D.-Ore.) declared on the Senate floor last week that “global warming is…the more challenge of our generation.” […] “We know what the stakes are,” the senator said. “We don’t need computer models to look 50 years into the future because the impacts are here today. We see it in our own communities. We see it in our own States. We see it through the impact of droughts, the impact of wildfires, the impact of heat waves, the...
  • Engineers develop micro-sized, liquid-metal particles for heat-free soldering

    04/25/2016 10:53:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    phys.org ^ | April 25, 2016 | Provided by: Iowa State University
    The vial contains liquid-metal particles suspended in ethanol. The particles were used to demonstrate heat-free soldering. Credit: Christopher Gannon/Iowa State University =========================================================================================================== Martin Thuo likes to look for new, affordable and clean ways to put science and technology to work in the world. His lab is dedicated to an idea called frugal innovation: "How do you do very high-level science or engineering with very little?" said Thuo, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Iowa State University and an associate of the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory. "How can you solve a problem with the least amount...
  • Ara Pacis Illuminated: 3D models shed light on shadowy theory [update]

    04/25/2016 9:54:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Using NASA data and 3D modeling, Indiana University Bloomington professor Bernard Frischer and his research team have dispelled a long-held theory regarding the relationship between two famous monuments in ancient Rome. The Ara Pacis Augustae, or Altar of Augustan Peace, was built in 9 B.C.E. in ancient Rome's Campus Martius. The marble altar stood as a propagandistic celebration of the peace and prosperity ushered into the new empire by Rome's first emperor, Augustus. Near the Ara Pacis sat a 71-foot-high granite obelisk brought from Egypt by Augustus, which served as the gnomon, or pointer, of a meridian line. Following a...
  • Human skull uncovered in New Jersey during Earth Day cleanup

    04/25/2016 9:40:06 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 26 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Apr 25, 2016 11:45 AM EDT
    An Earth Day effort to clean up a trash-ridden New Jersey river took a grisly turn over the weekend when a volunteer uncovered a human skull. Kelly Offner oversaw the cleanup by United by Blue. She said Monday that volunteers were cleaning up the Cooper River in Pennsauken, across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. …
  • Solar-plane pilots say trip was also test of human endurance

    04/24/2016 8:52:25 PM PDT · by Rabin · 28 replies
    staradvertiser ^ | April 24, 2016 | AP Staff
    MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. The two Swiss pilots, Berny Piccard and Andre Borschberg have been taking turns flying the plane around-the-world since March 2015. Solar Impulse 2, a solar-powered airplane landed in Mountain View, Saturday night following a 62-hour, from Hawaii. The plane’s wings, stretch wider than those of a Boeing 747
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson thinks there's a 'very high' chance the universe is just a simulation

    04/24/2016 7:20:50 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 90 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 04/22/2016 | Kevin Loria
    We trust the scientists around us to have the best grasp on how the world actually works. So at this year's 2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate at the American Museum of Natural History, which addressed the question of whether the universe is a simulation, the answers from some panelists may be more comforting than the responses from others. Physicist Lisa Randall, for example, said that she thought the odds that the universe isn't "real" are so low as to be "effectively zero." A satisfying answer for those who don't want to sit there puzzling out what it would mean for...
  • Earth’s “Magnetosphere” Collapsed in Space Today for Two+ Hours! Trouble Ahead for All of Us

    04/24/2016 2:15:16 PM PDT · by SubMareener · 156 replies
    BPEarthWatch ^ | Apr 24, 2016 | BPEarthWatch
    Earth’s “Magnetosphere” COLLAPSED in space TODAY for two+ hours! Trouble ahead for all of us A stunning and terrifying event has taken place in space surrounding our planet; for two hours today, earth’s “Magnetosphere” COLLAPSED around the entire planet! The magnetosphere is what protects earth from solar winds and some radiation. EARTH’S MAGNETOSPHERE Deep within the Earth, a fierce molten core is generating a magnetic field capable of defending our planet against devastating solar winds. The protective field, called the “magnetosphere” extends thousands of miles into space and its magnetism affects everything from global communication to animal migration and weather...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M16: Pillars of Star Creation

    04/24/2016 7:22:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | Sunday, April 24, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Newborn stars are forming in the Eagle Nebula. This image, taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995, shows evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) emerging from pillars of molecular hydrogen gas and dust. The giant pillars are light years in length and are so dense that interior gas contracts gravitationally to form stars. At each pillars' end, the intense radiation of bright young stars causes low density material to boil away, leaving stellar nurseries of dense EGGs exposed. The Eagle Nebula, associated with the open star cluster M16, lies about 7000 light years away. The pillars of creation were imaged...
  • 1,000 year old Hindu 'Shiva linga' unearthed

    04/24/2016 4:54:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Bangkok Post (and the jokes keep writing themselves) ^ | Friday, April 15, 2016 | Nutjaree Rakrun (seriously?)
    An ancient Hindu phallic symbol believed to be more than 1,000 years old has been found at a local temple in Tha Sala district. Anat Bamrungwong, director of 14th Regional Office of the Fine Arts Department in Nakhon Sithammarat, said Thursday the shiva linga or Hindu phallic symbol is believed to be about 1,300-1,400 years old. Hinduism thrived in Surat Thani and Nakhon Si Thammarat around the 10th-12th centuries, Mr Anat said... The shiva linga has a base which is about 47cm wide and 1 metre long. Its base has flowers carved in relief which in the Tawaravadee style, Mr...
  • N. Korea's SLBM Launch Pictures

    04/23/2016 10:07:21 PM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 9 replies
    Yonhap News ^ | 2016/04/24
  • A new secret to the miracle of breast milk revealed

    04/23/2016 3:14:34 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 13 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4-22-16 | Walter and Eliza Hall Institute
    One of the secrets to rich milk production in lactation has been uncovered by researchers at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute. Their studies have revealed that breast cells develop two nuclei as the breast switches on lactation to nurture the newborn. This change begins to occur in late pregnancy with the generation of vast numbers of cells with two nuclei. The research was led by Professor Jane Visvader, Professor Geoff Lindeman, Dr Anne Rios and Dr Nai Yang Fu, from the institute's ACRF Stem Cells and Cancer Division, and shows that these cells with two nuclei disappear at the...
  • Prehistoric Hand Stencils In Spanish Caves Not Randomly Placed, Say Researchers

    04/23/2016 11:54:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sunday, April 17, 2016 | editors
    Prehistoric cave occupants paid attention to cave wall morphology and touch when creating hand stencils. Human occupants of two caves in Northern Spain put some thought into where they placed their hand stencils on cave walls as much as 37,000 years ago, during Palaeolithic times. The topography and physical characteristics of the walls in the low light conditions of the caves seem to have mattered to them, suggest a team of researchers... What they found was a pattern that indicated selection or attention to certain types of natural cave wall features for placement of the stencils. "In total 80% of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way in Moonlight

    04/23/2016 11:47:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, April 23, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A waning crescent moon, early morning twilight, and Al Hamra's city lights on the horizon can't hide the central Milky Way in this skyscape from planet Earth. Captured in a single exposure, the dreamlike scene looks southward across the region's grand canyon from Jabal Shams (Sun Mountain), near the highest peak in Oman, on the Arabian Peninsula. Mist, moonlight, and shadows still play along the steep canyon walls. Dark rifts along the luminous band of the Milky Way are the galaxy's cosmic dust clouds. Typically hundreds of light-years distant, they obscure starlight along the galactic plane, viewed edge-on from...
  • ‘Be cheerful, live your life:’ Ancient mosaic ‘meme’ found in Turkey’s south

    04/23/2016 2:02:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | April 20, 2016 | Anadolu Agency
    Demet Kara, an archaeologist from the Hatay Archaeology Museum, said the mosaic, which was called the “skeleton mosaic,” belonged to the dining room of a house from the 3rd century B.C., as new findings have been unearthed in the ancient city of Antiocheia. “There are three scenes on glass mosaics made of black tiles. Two things are very important among the elite class in the Roman period in terms of social activities: The first is the bath and the second is dinner. In the first scene, a black person throws fire. That symbolizes the bath. In the middle scene, there...
  • How to Destroy the Earth

    04/22/2016 6:00:42 PM PDT · by molewhacka · 10 replies
    qntm.org ^ | 3/14/2014 | qntm
    Preamble Destroying the Earth is harder than you may have been led to believe. You've seen the action movies where the bad guy threatens to destroy the Earth. You've heard people on the news claiming that the next nuclear war or cutting down rainforests or persisting in releasing hideous quantities of pollution into the atmosphere threatens to end the world. Fools. The Earth is built to last. It is a 4,550,000,000-year-old, 5,973,600,000,000,000,000,000-tonne ball of iron. It has taken more devastating asteroid hits in its lifetime than you've had hot dinners, and lo, it still orbits merrily. So my first piece...
  • Seven Earth Day predictions that failed spectacularly

    04/22/2016 12:51:31 PM PDT · by rxsid · 25 replies
    wattsupwiththat ^ | April 22, 2016 | Anthony Watts
    Seven Earth Day predictions that failed spectacularly Anthony Watts / 2 hours ago April 22, 2016 Never Trust The Doom-Mongers: Earth Day Predictions That Were All Wrong Environmentalists truly believed and predicted that the planet was doomed during the first Earth Day in 1970, unless drastic actions were taken to save it. Humanity never quite got around to that drastic action, but environmentalists still recall the first Earth Day fondly and hold many of the predictions in high regard. So this Earth Day, The Daily Caller News Foundation takes a look at predictions made by environmentalists around the original Earth...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 7635: The Bubble Nebula

    04/22/2016 6:42:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | Friday, April 22, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Blown by the wind from a massive star, this interstellar apparition has a surprisingly familiar shape. Cataloged as NGC 7635, it is also known simply as The Bubble Nebula. Although it looks delicate, the 7 light-year diameter bubble offers evidence of violent processes at work. Above and left of the Bubble's center is a hot, O-type star, several hundred thousand times more luminous and around 45 times more massive than the Sun. A fierce stellar wind and intense radiation from that star has blasted out the structure of glowing gas against denser material in a surrounding molecular cloud. The...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Comet, the Owl, and the Galaxy

    04/21/2016 1:45:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, April 21, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Comet C/2014 S2 (PanSTARRS) poses for a Messier moment in this telescopic snapshot from April 18. In fact it shares the 1.5 degree wide field-of-view with two well-known entries in the 18th century comet-hunting astronomer's famous catalog. Outward bound and sweeping through northern skies just below the Big Dipper, the fading visitor to the inner Solar System was about 18 light-minutes from our fair planet. Dusty, edge-on spiral galaxy Messier 108 (upper right) is more like 45 million light-years away. A planetary nebula with an aging but intensely hot central star, the owlish Messier 97 is only about 12...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Galaxy Einstein Ring

    04/21/2016 1:43:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, April 20, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Can one galaxy hide behind another? Not in the case of SDP.81. Here the foreground galaxy, shown in blue in an image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, acts like a huge gravitational lens, pulling light from a background galaxy, shown in red in an image taken in radio waves by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), around it, keeping it visible. The alignment is so precise that the distant galaxy is distorted into part of a ring around the foreground galaxy, a formation known as an Einstein ring. Detailed analysis of the gravitational lens distortions indicate that a...
  • Pioneering Neuroscientist Wilder Penfield: Why Don't We Have Intellectual Seizures?

    04/21/2016 12:30:08 PM PDT · by Heartlander · 70 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | April 21, 2016 | Michael Egnor
    Pioneering Neuroscientist Wilder Penfield: Why Don't We Have Intellectual Seizures? Michael Egnor April 21, 2016 12:00 PM | Permalink Wilder Penfield was a pivotal figure in modern neurosurgery. He was an American-born neurosurgeon at the Montreal Neurological Institute who pioneered surgery for epilepsy. He was an accomplished scientist as well as a clinical surgeon, and made seminal contributions to our knowledge of cortical physiology, brain mapping, and intraoperative study of seizures and brain function under local anesthesia with patients awake who could report experiences during brain stimulation. His surgical specialty was the mapping of seizure foci in the brain of...
  • Earth-like planet may exist in a nearby star system

    04/21/2016 10:25:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    phys.org ^ | April 19, 2016 | Tomasz Nowakowsk
    Artistic representation of the potentially habitable super-Earth Gliese 832c against a stellar nebula background. Credit: PHL @ UPR Arecibo, NASA Hubble, Stellarium. ========================================================================================================== An Earth-like planet may be lurking in a star system located just 16 light years away, according to a new research. The star, named Gliese 832, was recently investigated by a team of astronomers searching for additional exoplanets that may be residing between the two currently known alien worlds in this system. A paper detailing the finding was published online on Apr. 15 in the arXiv journal. Gliese 832 is a red dwarf and has just under...
  • Hubble captures birthday bubble

    04/21/2016 10:07:08 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    phys.org ^ | April 21, 2016 | Provided by: ESA/Hubble Information Centre
    The Bubble Nebula, also known as NGC 7653, is an emission nebula located 11,000 light-years away. This stunning new image was observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to celebrate its 26th year in space. Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team =============================================================================================================== This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, released to celebrate Hubble's 26th year in orbit, captures in stunning clarity what looks like a gigantic cosmic soap bubble. The object, known as the Bubble Nebula, is in fact a cloud of gas and dust illuminated by the brilliant star within it. The vivid new portrait of this dramatic scene...
  • Jurrasic lion park? We’re apparently going to try to revive extinct cave lions

    04/21/2016 9:15:31 AM PDT · by C19fan · 32 replies
    Hot Air ^ | April 21, 2016 | Jazz Shaw
    This is some news that actually cropped up last month which caught my eye, but we haven’t gotten a chance to circle back to it until now. If you’re in the market for one of the more exotic pet options out there you may have the chance to look into getting yourself a Panthera Leo Spelaea, better known as the Eurasian cave lion. Under most circumstances this would seem like a bit of a tall order because the big cat has been extinct for more than 12,000 years. (Some time during the end of the last ice age.) Up until...
  • Scientist warns MEGA EARTHQUAKE threatening millions will hit USA as early as FRIDAY

    04/21/2016 7:57:16 AM PDT · by PROCON · 128 replies
    express.co.uk ^ | April 21, 2016 | JON AUSTIN
    Jim Berkland, a former US Geological Survey scientist, who once famously predicted the Loma Prieta quake, said mega quakes usually strike at a new moon or full moon because of the gravitation effect on the Earth…and the next full moon is on FRIDAY. The maverick, now retired, scientist spoke out after eight powerful earthquakes struck across south Asia and the pacific in the past 80 hours, claiming hundreds of lives in Japan and Ecuador. Mr Berkland predicted on October 13, 1989, an earthquake of magnitude 3.5 to 6.0 would strike San Francisco within the next week. Four days later on...
  • The #1 Risk To Earth

    04/21/2016 3:13:12 AM PDT · by fella · 34 replies
    YouTube ^ | 21 April 2016 | Suspicious Observers
    The #1 Risk To Earth
  • Egyptian Amulet Bearing Name of Pharaoh Found in Soil from Temple Mount

    04/21/2016 1:29:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | April 19th, 2016 | JNi.Media
    The amulet was discovered by Neshama Spielman, a twelve year-old girl from Jerusalem who came with her family to participate in the Temple Mount Sifting Project. “While I was sifting, I came across a piece of pottery that was different from others I had seen, and I immediately thought that maybe I had found something special,” said Spielman. “It’s amazing to find something thousands of years old from ancient Egypt all the way here in Jerusalem! Celebrating Passover this year is going to be extra meaningful to me.” The Passover festival, commemorating the Biblical account of the ancient Israelites Exodus...
  • Is Trump America's Jean-Marie Le Pen?

    04/14/2016 3:37:32 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 20 replies
    PJ Media ^ | April 14, 2016 | Michael Gurfinkel
    It is quite tempting to draw parallels between the Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders movements in America and the populist movements that have been rocking European politics for many years. There seems indeed to be, on both sides of the Atlantic, a growing discontent about traditional politics and a feeling among ordinary citizens of being betrayed by a complacent and pathetically incompetent Establishment. As a result, we are seeing a swing to both right-wing and left-wing demagogues. The parallel between Trump and the French Far Right leader Jean-Marie Le Pen, who founded the French National Front and passed it to...
  • Mice flown in space show nascent liver damage

    04/20/2016 10:02:28 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    n a discovery with implications for long-term spaceflight and future missions to Mars, a researcher at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has found that mice flown aboard the space shuttle Atlantis returned to Earth with early signs of liver disease. "Prior to this study we really didn't have much information on the impact of spaceflight on the liver," said the study's lead author Karen Jonscher, PhD, an associate professor of anesthesiology and a physicist at CU Anschutz. "We knew that astronauts often returned with diabetes-like symptoms but they usually resolved quickly." But the prospect of liver damage raises...