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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Is Your Gay Neighbor A Serial Killer?

    10/08/2015 5:33:52 PM PDT · by GraceG · 35 replies
    Liberty News Now ^ | 9/1/2015 | Chuck Hoster
    The definition of a serial killer is, “A person who murders three or more people, usually due to abnormal psychological gratification, with the murders taking place over more than a month and including a significant break (a “cooling off period”) between them.” Serial killers may be overwhelmingly male and most likely to be either black or white, but is there a connection for these men between their tendencies and their sexual behavior? Most serial killers are seeking out a thrill. But from where does their blood lust stem? Radford University keeps a database of statistics surrounding serial killers; age, race,...
  • Angry Little Stars Could Produce Life-Friendly Exoplanets

    10/08/2015 3:07:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Discovery News ^ | October 2, 2015 | Ian O'Neill
    Red dwarf stars may be able to support habitable exoplanets after all -- through complex tidal interactions between star and planet, global magnetic fields could evolve, protecting hypothetical life forms from the red dwarfs' ferocious nature. Once identified as the perfect place to search for habitable exoplanets, in recent years, the life-giving reputation of red dwarf stars has taken a downturn. Sure, red dwarfs are abundant in our galaxy and we've spotted many with planetary systems, but the environment surrounding these tiny stars are generally considered to be a bad place for alien life to set up home. For starters,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M83: The Thousand-Ruby Galaxy [A.K.A. the Tidy Bowl galaxy]

    10/08/2015 2:55:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | October 08, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Big, bright, and beautiful, spiral galaxy M83 lies a mere twelve million light-years away, near the southeastern tip of the very long constellation Hydra. Prominent spiral arms traced by dark dust lanes and blue star clusters lend this galaxy its popular name, The Southern Pinwheel. But reddish star forming regions that dot the sweeping arms highlighted in this sparkling color composite also suggest another nickname, The Thousand-Ruby Galaxy. About 40,000 light-years across, M83 is a member of a group of galaxies that includes active galaxy Centaurus A. In fact, the core of M83 itself is bright at x-ray energies,...
  • Mysterious Archaeological Site with Rock Carved Animal Heads Found near Bulgaria’s Sliven

    10/08/2015 2:24:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | October 5, 2015 | Ivan Dikov
    A mysterious archaeological site dubbed "The Rock Herd" which consists of rock carvings of animal heads made by an unknown sculptor in an unknown time period has been found near the eastern Bulgarian city of Sliven... The mysterious archaeological monument consists of a semi-circular rock niche whose edge has been decorated with animal head carvings and reliefs fashioned out of the natural rock material. These carved animal heads themselves forming a semi-circle appear to be diverse in style and craftsmanship. Most of them appear to be cattle, goat and capricorn heads but there are also reliefs of wild animals and...
  • Pigs Unearth Hunter-Gatherer Civilization

    10/08/2015 2:15:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Discovery News ^ | October 7, 2015 | Jennifer Viegas
    Pigs foraging along a Scottish coastline have unwittingly uprooted the earliest evidence for a remote population of hunter-gatherers. The uprooted items, stone tools that have been dated to around 12,000 years ago, are described in the latest issue of British Archaeology. The tools were discovered on the east coast of the Isle of Islay, Scotland, and include sharp points -- likely used for hunting big game -- scrapers and more. Archaeologists Steven Mithen and Karen Wicks of the University of Reading explained to Discovery News that a gamekeeper had previously released the pigs at a local port on Islay to...
  • First Ancient African DNA Sequenced

    10/08/2015 2:10:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Thursday, October 08, 2015 | unattributed
    Science reports that the first prehistoric genome from Africa has been sequenced. The DNA was obtained from the inner ear bones of a 4,500-year-old skeleton discovered in Mota Cave by John and Kathryn Arthur of the University of South Florida. Located in the highlands of Ethiopia, Mota Cave’s cool temperatures helped to preserve the hunter-gatherer’s rare genetic material. Andrea Manica and Marcos Gallego Llorente of the University of Cambridge found that the man, who has been dubbed “Mota,” had brown eyes, dark skin, and three gene variants associated with living at high altitudes. Mota’s genome was compared with samples from...
  • Experiential Archaeology Class Recreates Ancient Ceramics

    10/08/2015 2:01:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Wednesday, October 07, 2015 | unattributed
    Johns Hopkins University has released Mysteries of the Kylix, a film that follows 13 undergraduate students who worked with a conservator and two potters to recreate the red-figure pottery drinking bowls crafted by Greek artisans between the sixth and fourth centuries B.C. The students practiced throwing pots, decorated them with images and slip, and fired the clay in a kiln that they constructed. They then examined their pottery under a portable x-ray fluorescence instrument. "The idea is to be thoughtful at every stage. To look at clay, make shapes, to choose images and paint, to go through the fire and...
  • Otago Researchers Sequence Kuri Dog Genomes

    10/08/2015 1:55:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Thursday, October 8, 2015 | Ms Karen Greig
    The genetic heritage of New Zealand's first dog, the now extinct kuri, is being unravelled by University of Otago scientists using state-of-the-art ancient DNA analysis. University of Otago PhD student Karen Greig has sequenced the complete, or near complete, mitochondrial genomes of 14 kuri represented by bones recovered from Wairau Bar, one on New Zealand's earliest and most important archaeological sites. Kuri were smallish dogs about the size of cocker spaniels and were brought to New Zealand from East Polynesia in the colonising canoes that arrived in the early fourteenth century AD. They were the only domesticated animal to be...
  • Study: Eurasian Farmers Migrated to Africa 3,000 Years Ago

    10/08/2015 1:15:06 PM PDT · by Theoria · 10 replies
    AP ^ | 08 Oct 2015 | AP
    Scientists say they have extracted ancient DNA from the skull of a man buried in the highlands of Ethiopia 4,500 years ago that supports the theory that Eurasian farmers migrated into Africa some 3,000 years ago. This Stone Age resettlement had previously been theorized, but the rare find allowed scientists to see what DNA looked like well before the time the migration would have taken place. A comparison with modern populations around the world allowed them to see that the migrants left their genetic mark in the furthest corners of Africa. "This is the first ancient human genome found in...
  • ICE ON PLUTO: Now frozen water and BLUE SKY found on dwarf planet giving more hope of life

    10/08/2015 11:20:25 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 73 replies ^ | UBLISHED: 16:40, Thu, Oct 8, 2015 | UPDATED: 18:01, Thu, Oct 8, 2015 | By Jon Austin
    NASA has discovered frozen water and earth-like blue skies on Pluto in another historic development in the search for extraterrestrial life. Just 10 days after confirming that liquid water has been found on Mars, the US space agency revealed the amazing dwarf-planet has both ice and a 'gorgeous' blue sky. A Nasa spokesman said: "New Horizons has detected numerous small, exposed regions of water ice on Pluto. "The discovery was made from data collected by the Ralph spectral composition mapper on New Horizons." There has been repeated speculation Pluto may have a liquid sea under its surface, and confirmation of...
  • CPV Hopeful Soitec Exits the Solar Business (Jan 2015)

    10/08/2015 9:40:13 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 13 replies ^ | January 25, 2015 | by Eric Wesoff
    The zero-billion-dollar CPV business claims another victim. France's Soitec, one of the last companies with a hope of commercializing concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) technology, has abandoned its solar business. The company will "refocus" its efforts "on its electronics business," according to the firm. The company uses opaque language, but the message is clear: Soitec is exiting this business as quickly as possible. A quarterly earnings letter reads, "Soitec has initiated efforts to realize value of solar energy business combining significant restructuring measures going forward and will assess [the] most appropriate scenario to extract value from its solar-related assets in compliance with...
  • Introducing The Information Enigma -- Intelligent Design in a Nutshell

    10/08/2015 6:52:10 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 11 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | October 8, 2015 | David Klinghoffer
    Introducing The Information Enigma -- Intelligent Design in a Nutshell David Klinghoffer October 8, 2015 12:30 AM | Permalink Intelligent design, or ID, may be the most misunderstood scientific idea ever. That's why we are delighted today to unveil an easily accessible twenty-minute crystallization of ID's major argument in the form of a beautifully produced video from Discovery Institute, The Information Enigma. I'm proud to have drafted the script, but the stars are philosopher of science Stephen Meyer and molecular biologist Douglas Axe. See it here: VIDEO:The Information Enigma ID stands out from other scientific ideas in a couple of...
  • Scientists Should Tell Lawrence Krauss to Shut Up Already

    10/08/2015 6:08:29 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 7 replies
    The Public Discourse ^ | September 28th, 2015 | Edward Feser
    Lawrence Krauss’s “argument” for atheism is like that of an artist who confines himself to using black and white materials and then concludes that, since color doesn’t show up in his drawings of fire engines and apples, it follows that fire engines and apples are not really red. ...Think of it this way: you can’t find out why checkers boards exist by looking at the rules of checkers themselves, which concern only what goes on within the game. The rules tell you how each piece moves, how the game is won, and so forth. But why are the pieces governed...
  • Audit: Scientists in Antarctica prone to alcohol-fueled fights, indecent exposure

    10/08/2015 5:59:17 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 44 replies
    upi ^ | Oct. 7, 2015 | Ben Hooper
    WASHINGTON, - An audit of the U.S. Antarctic Program revealed alcohol-fueled "unpredictable behavior" by scientists including "fights" and "indecent exposure." The health and safety audit, conducted by the National Science Foundation's Office of the Inspector General of the U.S. Antarctic Program, said "alcohol consumption" on the part of scientists has been found to cause "unpredictable behavior" and "has led to fights, indecent exposure, and employees arriving to work under the influence." The program bans alcohol consumption in work areas and during work hours, but one human resources manager interviewed for the report said about 75 percent of disciplinary actions taken...
  • Matt Damon, Martian ecologist

    10/07/2015 9:25:26 AM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 50 replies
    In Capital (volume 3), Karl Marx observed: “In London . . . they can do nothing better with the excrement produced by 4 1/2 million people than pollute the Thames with it, at monstrous expense”. That would not have happened if Matt Damon had been around. Marx was railing against the loss of nutrients from the soil caused by contemporary (and modern) sewage systems. In Ridley Scott’s new 3D blockbuster, The Martian, Damon is inadvertently left behind on Mars by his NASA crew mates and is obliged to survive until help comes. As is so often the way, inspiration strikes...
  • Chimpanzees Shed Light on Origins of Human Walking

    10/07/2015 1:27:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    The torso (the part of the body that includes the ribcage, belly and pelvis) of chimpanzees has long been thought to be a rigid block, best suited for a life of tree climbing. Humans, on the other hand, have long and flexible torsos that aid in walking by allowing us to rotate our upper body in the opposite direction of our lower body. The findings from the paper, titled "Surprising trunk rotational capabilities in chimpanzees and implications for bipedal walking proficiency in early humans," changes the evolutionary view of how early human ancestors walked and what they were able to...
  • A Neolithic causewayed enclosure and other exciting discoveries at Thame, Oxfordshire

    10/07/2015 1:18:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    Cotswold Archaeology ^ | unattributed
    At the end of August, Oxford Cotswold Archaeology (a joint venture between Oxford Archaeology and Cotswold Archaeology) completed the excavation of a site on the edge of Thame in Oxfordshire. The work was carried out in advance of new housing being built by Bloor Homes... Later in the Neolithic, a small henge monument was constructed within the causewayed enclosure. A second, smaller, ring-ditch was located close to the henge and this may also be of later Neolithic date. During the Bronze Age, the site saw virtually no activity or, at least, no activity which left a mark in the archaeological...
  • Greenpeace mulls jump into brown coal biz

    10/07/2015 11:16:04 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 8 replies ^ | 06 Oct 2015 16:06 GMT+02:00 | (AFP/The Local)
    It might sound like one of the environmental group’s protest stunts, but Greenpeace insists it really does want to buy up a series of German brown coal mines and plants offered for sale by Swedish power company Vattenfall. […] Vattenfall had previously said it planned to sell its German lignite plants to make a shift toward renewable energy and reduce its carbon dioxide emissions. Greenpeace said it wants to buy the lignite plants to make sure further production does not take place. …
  • Suitcase nukes closer to fiction than reality

    10/07/2015 8:44:08 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    ABC News ^ | 10/06/2015
    Members of Congress have warned about the dangers of suitcase nuclear weapons. Hollywood has made television shows and movies about them. Even the Federal Emergency Management Agency has alerted Americans to a threat — information the White House includes on its website. But government experts and intelligence officials say such a threat gets vastly more attention than it deserves. These officials said a true suitcase nuke would be highly complex to produce, require significant upkeep and cost a small fortune. Counterproliferation authorities do not completely rule out the possibility that these portable devices once existed. But they do not think...
  • Fire ants escaping South Carolina floods by forming 'islands'

    10/07/2015 7:09:03 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 83 replies
    upi ^ | Oct. 6, 2015 | Ben Hooper
    GREENVILLE, S.C., - South Carolina ants seeking to stay afloat amid flooding in the state are creating their own refuge by forming into "islands of ants." A photojournalist for WHNS-TV spotted what appeared to be mud floating in Greenville County flood waters Sunday, but he soon discovered the clump was actually an "island of ants." A similar video was captured by a photographer for WSAV-TV. Residents across the region reported seeing similar ant islands floating in flooded areas. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology said in a 2013 study that fire ants use their jaws, small claws and adhesive...
  • Wildlife is thriving around Chernobyl since the people left

    10/07/2015 7:00:16 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10/07/2015
    Wolves are seven times as common in the Chernobyl area than they were (Image: Sergey Gashchak) The site of the world’s worst nuclear accident is now a wildlife haven. The abundance of large animals around Chernobyl, such as deer, elk and wild boar, matches that of nature reserves in the region – and wolves are seven times as common. Some 116,000 people fled the radioactive fallout from the reactor after it exploded in 1986, and another 220,000 were resettled after that, vacating a zone covering some 4200 square kilometres split equally between Belarus and Ukraine. “Whatever negative effects there are...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- La Palma Eclipse Sequence

    10/07/2015 4:14:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | October 07, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: At left, a dramatic image sequence follows late September's total lunar eclipse above a rugged landscape and sea of clouds from the Canary island of La Palma. Composited in a circular fisheye projection, the brightness of the Full Perigee Moon changes drastically in transition from outside the total eclipse phase compared to its dim glow during the 72 minute long totality. At right, a single frame captures the dark red lunar disk in a moment during the total eclipse phase, the Moon deep within Earth's shadow. In fact, the size of the eclipsed Moon image at right approximately illustrates...

    10/06/2015 11:05:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Historic Scotland ^ | 29 September 2015 | unattributed (Alan Bannon, Media & PR Officer)
    Archaeologists in Orkney have uncovered the remains of over 30 buildings dating from around 4000 BC to 1000 BC, together with field systems, middens and cemeteries. The find includes a very rare Bronze Age building which experts believed could have been a sauna or steam house, which may have been built for ritual purposes. EASE Archaeology recently made the exciting discovery on the periphery of the prehistoric Links of Noltland, on the island of Westray in Orkney, next to where the famous ‘Westray Wife’ was found in 2009, which is believed to be the earliest depiction of a human face...
  • Ruins of ancient Egyptian temple unearthed under modern Cairo

    10/06/2015 9:58:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Cairo Post ^ | October 05, 2015 | Rany Mostafa
    The shrine belonged to the 30th Dynasty Pharaoh Nectanebo I (379 B.C.-360 B.C.,)” said Damaty. The mission also unearthed remains of limestone colonnade and a “well-preserved” ceiling that are strongly believed to have been a part of an ancient Egyptian temple, Damaty said, adding that ruins of the mud brick outer enclosure wall surrounded the temple, along with royal bust belonged to the New Kingdom (1580 B.C.-1080 B.C.) Pharaoh Merenptah, were also excavated in the area. Nectanebo I was the founder of the 30th Dynasty: the last native Egyptian royal family to rule ancient Egypt before Alexander the Great conquered...
  • Two physicists earn Nobel Prize for discovering neutrino's chameleon-like powers

    10/06/2015 5:24:45 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 7 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 10/06/2015 | Amina Khan
    The 2015 Nobel Prize in physics has gone to two scientists for discovering the quirky, shape-shifting behavior of neutrinos — tiny ghostlike particles that fill the universe, traveling close to the speed of light. Takaaki Kajita of the Super-Kamiokande experiment at the University of Tokyo and Arthur B. McDonald of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory at Queen’s University in Canada were awarded the physics Nobel on Tuesday for their discovery that neutrinos oscillate — and thus, that they must have mass. Small as these particles are, the scientists' insight — that neutrinos are chameleon-like particles, switching identities in an instant —...
  • Tech firm is building $1billion city in New Mexico

    10/06/2015 2:47:50 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 41 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 10/6/15
    Telecommunications and tech firm Pegasus Global Holdings is planning to build a full-scale American town in the New Mexico desert, a place which they hope to open to researchers developing technologies for modern living. Pegasus plans to spend $1billion creating the 15-square-mile town, called CITE, with construction to begin sometime next year and opening as early as 2018. CITE will include a town big enough for 35,000 people, with a business district downtown surrounded by terraced housing suburbs - but no one will ever live there. Instead, companies will have the opportunity to test such innovations as driverless vehicles and...
  • The prosecutor said authorities have "mathematical, Judge sets bail in Bellagio craps scheme

    10/06/2015 12:15:01 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 23 replies
    LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL ^ | 6 Oct 2015 | David Ferrara
    Theodore Whiting, the vice president of surveillance for MGM Resorts, told a grand jury that the chance of the group winning as much as they did amounted to roughly one in 452 billion. Each of the men were indicted on dozens of counts of cheating at gambling and theft, according to Chief Deputy District Attorney J. P. Raman. But Cooper is expected to plead guilty to one count of felony theft. Between July 2012 and July 2014, when the timing was right, Branco and Cooper conspired with Granito and Martin to pay off bets that never transpired,
  • NASA Planetary Protection Officer Profiled (EPA for the planets)

    10/06/2015 7:37:52 AM PDT · by Purdue77 · 19 replies
    NYT via AIAA Newsletter ^ | 10/05/2015 | KENNETH CHANG
    The New York Times (10/6, Chang, Subscription Publication) posts a feature on NASA Planetary Protection Officer Catharine Conley, whose job “is not so much protecting Earth from aliens as protecting other planets from Earth.” Conley is responsible for making sure than NASA missions to Mars and elsewhere do not pollute or contaminate alien worlds.
  • Petroglyph in Spain Marks when Atlantic and Mediterranean Cultures Met

    10/06/2015 6:17:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies ^ | Mon, Oct 05, 2015 | Staff
    Bronze Age rock carving depicts a Mediterranean style boat. Above: A graphic representation of the Auga dos Cebros petroglyph, showing the obvious boat feature at the bottom. This image is a screenshot of the same as depicted in the YouTube video (see below). =================================================================================================================== A unique petroglyph discovered near the Atlantic coast of northern Spain has provided evidence that contacts between ancient Atlantic cultures and contemporaneous cultures of the Mediterranean were earlier and perhaps more intense than previously thought. The rock art panel, located in the Costa dos Castros region and known as Auga dos Cebros, depicts a boat with...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Flying Past Pluto

    10/06/2015 1:16:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | October 06, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What would it look like to fly past Pluto? The robotic New Horizons spacecraft did just this in late July and continues to return stunning pictures of the dwarf planet. Some well-chosen flyby images have now been digitally sequenced to create the featured video. The animation begins by showing New Horizon's approach to the Pluto system, with Pluto and its largest moon Charon orbiting a common center of mass. As the spacecraft bears down on Pluto uniquely, surprising surface features are nearly resolved that, unfortunately, quickly rotate out of view. New Horizons then passes just above and near a...
  • Post-apocalyptic 'beaver' thrived after dinosaurs died

    10/05/2015 2:36:03 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 52 replies ^ | 10-05-2015 | By By Will Dunham
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The world had been wrecked. An asteroid impact in Mexico compounded by colossal volcanism in India 66 million years ago had killed about three-quarters of Earth's species including the dinosaurs. But relatively soon afterward, a plucky critter that looked like a beaver was thriving, exemplifying the resilience of the mammals that would arise from the margins of the animal kingdom to become Earth's dominant land creatures. Scientists on Monday announced the discovery in northwestern New Mexico's badlands of the fossil remains of Kimbetopsalis simmonsae, a plant-eating, rodent-like mammal boasting buck-toothed incisors like a beaver that lived just...
  • The 'doomsday' weapon that could wipe out 90% of Americans

    10/05/2015 1:06:40 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 63 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 10/5/15 | Mark Prigg
    Controversial tech boss and presidential candidate John McAfee has warned a 'doomsday' electronic weapon could wipe out 90% of Americans and urged politicians to is the number one threat facing the country. McAfee, who recently announced he is running in 2016, wrote in a blog for Business Insider: 'Experts agree that an all out cyber attack, beginning with an EMP (electromagnetic pulse) attack on our electronic infrastructure, would wipe out 90% of the human population of this country within two years of the attack. 'That means the death of 270 million people within 24 months after the attack.' Read more:...
  • 2015 Nobel Prize in medicine goes to 3 scientists for work on parasite-fighting therapies

    10/05/2015 11:01:22 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 10 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 10/05/2015 | Melissa Healy
    Three scientists whose discoveries have driven scourges of the developing world to the brink of eradication have been awarded the Nobel Prize for physiology and medicine. The Nobel Committee announced Monday it had awarded the 2015 prize to 85-year old William C. Campbell, 80-year-old Satoshi Omura and 85-year-old Youyou Tu of China for their discoveries leading to the development of antimicrobial treatments for such tropical diseases as river blindness, lymphatic filariasis (also known as elephantiasis) and malaria. Campbell, an Irish biochemist and parasitologist at Drew University in New Jersey, and Omura, a bioorganic chemist at Kitasato University in Japan and...
  • This European country has the talent for tech innovation [How they educate their children]

    10/05/2015 8:07:23 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 4 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 10/05/2015
    When you think of tech innovation, places like Silicon Valley and Boston spring to mind. But flying under the world's radar is Switzerland, where inventions like a solar plane that just completed the longest solo-flight ever without fuel are born. And while Europe was busy debating bitcoin's future, Switzerland already opened up the region's first bitcoin ATM earlier this year. The country has managed to maintain its No. 1 ranking on the Global Innovation Index for four years in a row. Switzerland's résumé is definitely impressive: The country boasts the second-highest number of patents per person — second to Japan....
  • Weird animal with 'body of buffalo and head of crocodile' baffles everyone [Thailand?]

    10/05/2015 8:01:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 46 replies ^ | Updated 15:25, 5 Oct 2015 | By Kirstie McCrum
    Confusing genetic creations happen all the time, but this is one of the most unusual animals seen in a long time Images have been shared of a most unusual creature spotted in a remote village - and it's the stuff of sci-fi movies. The strange animal appears to have the scaly, rough head and skin of a reptile such as a crocodile. However, on closer inspection, it's also got the body, limbs and hooves of a mammal such as a calf.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Orion Over and Under Tibet

    10/05/2015 3:44:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | October 05, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This night was so serene you could see Orion rise downwards. The unusual spectacle was captured in this single-exposure image, featuring a deep sky around the famous constellation of Orion that appeared both above -- and reflected in -- a peaceful lake in the Gyirong Valley of Tibet, China. Taken last year at this time, the three belt stars of Orion can be seen lined up almost vertically above and below the Himalayan Mountains. The complex Orion Nebula can be seen to the belt stars' right, while the red-glowing circular structure surrounding Orion is Barnard's Loop. Also, the bright...
  • The Next Big Science vs. Church Battle: Can Transhumanism and Christianity Co-Exist?

    10/05/2015 3:29:05 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 17 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 10/04/15 | Michael Gryboski
    Can churches engage transhumanism, which may very well be the next big science vs. religion battle, positively or should they absolutely resist this movement, an academic institution in Alabama asked during a multi-day event focused on whether Christianity and Transhumanism could co-exist. Samford University's Center for Science and Religion held the event, titled "Transhumanism and the Church," which took place from Sept. 24-26 and featured 27 presentations with approximately 120 attendees for the opening lecture alone. Transhumanism is the theory that science and technology can be used to advance the evolution of human beings beyond current physical and mental limitations....
  • Scientists discover huge mega tsunami 73,000 years ago. Could it happen again?

    10/04/2015 7:00:40 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 33 replies
    CS Monitor ^ | 10/04/2015 | By Story Hinckley
    Waves the size of the Chrysler building may seem like they belong in a movie trailer, but scientists have recently found that megatsunamis are all too real. Scientists say that 73,000 years ago, a large flank (or slope) from the volcanic island Fogo in the Cape Verde islands off the coast of Africa fell into the ocean and triggered a tsunami that could – quite literally – move mountains. “You’re displacing a huge mass, which must generate movement of water,” Ricardo Ramalho, the lead researcher behind the study, told The Washington Post. “And in the case of volcanic flank collapses...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared

    10/04/2015 2:46:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    NASA ^ | October 04, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This floating ring is the size of a galaxy. In fact, it is a galaxy -- or at least part of one: the photogenic Sombrero Galaxy, one of the largest galaxies in the nearby Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. The dark band of dust that obscures the mid-section of the Sombrero Galaxy in optical light actually glows brightly in infrared light. The above image, digitally sharpened, shows the infrared glow, recently recorded by the orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope, superposed in false-color on an existing image taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope in optical light. The Sombrero Galaxy, also known as...
  • What people in 1900 thought the year 2000 would look like

    10/04/2015 10:29:43 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 54 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | October 4, 2015 | Ana Swanson
    There are few things as fascinating as seeing what people in the past dreamed about the future. "France in the Year 2000" is one example. The series of paintings, made by Jean-Marc Côté and other French artists in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1910, shows artist depictions of what life might look like in the year 2000. The first series of images were printed and enclosed in cigarette and cigar boxes around the time of the 1900 World Exhibition in Paris, according to the Public Domain Review, then later turned into postcards.

    10/04/2015 3:25:54 AM PDT · by knarf · 57 replies
    e-mail. various | October 4, 2015 | knarf
    In the early twentieth century, a farmer decided that he needed to improve the agriculture on his ranch in Nevada. He figured that a well needed to be dug to bring water and nutrients to the soil above. He lived in a barren desert and the water stored deep beneath the Earth’s crust would have provided a more sustainable crop for this harsh and dry area. He knew that a well with ample water was needed to supply bountiful crops. What he didn’t know was what was waiting for him deep below the soil. He began to dig a deep...
  • New NASA images show Pluto’s moon Charon in stunning detail

    10/03/2015 7:42:02 PM PDT · by ETL · 64 replies - Science ^ | October 03, 2015
    NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has sent incredible images of Pluto’s largest moon Charon back to Earth. The latest images reveal the moon’s complex and violent history, according to NASA. “Many New Horizons scientists expected Charon to be a monotonous, crater-battered world; instead, they’re finding a landscape covered with mountains, canyons, landslides, surface-color variations and more,” explained the space agency, in a statement. The high-resolution images, which were taken on July 14 and transmitted to Earth on Sept. 21, reveal a belt of fractures and canyons just north of the moon’s equator. Four times as long as the Grand Canyon, and...
  • Rock samples from Western US teach how to hunt for life on Mars

    10/03/2015 8:35:35 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 10 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/2015 | Alison Olcott Marshall, Nicholas A. Cestari
    The search for life beyond Earth is one of the grandest endeavors in the history of humankind -- a quest that could transform our understanding of our universe both scientifically and spiritually. . . . The search for life beyond Earth is one of the grandest endeavors in the history of humankind -- a quest that could transform our understanding of our universe both scientifically and spiritually.
  • Giant prehistoric lizards co-existed with humans

    10/03/2015 7:44:05 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 23 replies ^ | October 01, 2015 | Walt Bonner
    While the concept of men battling 16–foot prehistoric lizards sounds like something out of a 50’s sci-fi flick, a new discovery in Australia has revealed that such encounters may have occurred. According to a study appearing in Quaternary Science Reviews, researchers from the University of Queensland have found a tiny fossil that belonged to a giant lizard bone 50,000 years ago, indicating that gigantic reptiles and humans once co–existed.
  • Farmer digs up woolly mammoth bones in Michigan soy field

    10/03/2015 12:37:51 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Washington Post ^ | October 2, 2015 | Rachel Feltman
    James Bristle of Lima Township was digging in a soybean field Monday when he and his friend pulled up what they first thought was a bent, muddy old fence post. But it was actually the rib bone of an ancient woolly mammoth... University of Michigan professor Daniel Fisher... believes that the mammoth died between 11,000 and 15,000 years ago. Most mammoths were gone by 10,000 years ago... “We get calls once or twice a year about new specimens like this,” Fisher told The Washington Post. But they’re usually mastodons. It’s a bit more unusual to find a mammoth, the group...
  • The Iceman Cameth [Solutreans, Pre-Clovis]

    10/02/2015 11:41:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, October 2, 2015 | Patrick Hahn
    All early American ancestors hailed from East Asia and Siberia? Not so fast, says a prominent scientist... Stanford shows me some other artifacts. In addition to bifacial spear points, there are bone points, spear throwers, bow drills, hammerstones, scrapers, and flat stones that still retain traces of birch sap, which may have been used to apply waterproof seals to their boats. “Everything the Solutreans had, they have here,” Stanford explains. “Of course, that’s just coincidence.” Then he laughs that infectious laugh of his... Stanford opens another drawer and shows some spear points recovered from Tennessee. The points are over 14,000...
  • Mass Grave Found in California Reveals Prehistoric Violence Against ‘Outsiders’

    10/02/2015 11:34:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Western Digs ^ | September 28, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    ...Now, chemical analysis has revealed that the men were far from home when they were killed, up to several days’ journey from where they were born and raised. The discovery is only the most recent example of violence among prehistoric hunter-gatherers in the region, anthropologists say. But it bears important lessons about the nature of conflict and warfare in pre-contact California... The grave was unearthed in 2012 during the construction of a shopping center in the town of Pleasanton, in the Amador Valley just east of Oakland... One of the men suffered a severe blow above the left eye, causing...
  • Could Cramond hold the secret of Scotland during Dark Ages?

    10/02/2015 11:26:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    City of Edinburgh ^ | Thursday, 1st October 2015 | unattributed
    The mass burial in Cramond, believed to be the oldest occupied village in Scotland, was uncovered in 1975 during an excavation of a Roman Bathhouse found at the site of a car park. Forty years later, a team led by the City of Edinburgh Council has embraced modern science to examine the remains of nine individuals found in the grave with fascinating results. The evidence has disproved an early theory that the bodies were victims of the bubonic plague, instead dating the individuals back another 800 years to the 6th Century AD. Thanks to state-of-the-art computer programming, researchers were able...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Blue Blood Moon

    10/02/2015 10:54:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | October 03, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This sharp telescopic snapshot caught late September's Harvest Moon completely immersed in Earth's dark umbral shadow, at the beginning of a total lunar eclipse. It was the final eclipse in a tetrad, a string of four consecutive total lunar eclipses. A dark apparition of the Full Moon near perigee, this total eclipse's color was a deep blood red, the lunar surface reflecting light within Earth's shadow filtered through the lower atmosphere. Seen from a lunar perspective, the reddened light comes from all the sunsets and sunrises around the edges of a silhouetted Earth. But close to the shadow's edge,...
  • Signs of ancient megatsunami could portend modern hazard

    10/02/2015 2:34:09 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies ^ | 10-02-2015 | Provided by: Columbia University
    Geologists think that the eastern slope of Fogo volcano crashed into the sea some 65,000 to 124,000 years ago, leaving a giant scar where a new volcano can be seen growing in this satellite image. Credit: NASA ========================================================================================================================================= Scientists working off west Africa in the Cape Verde Islands have found evidence that the sudden collapse of a volcano there tens of thousands of years ago generated an ocean tsunami that dwarfed anything ever seen by humans. The researchers say an 800-foot wave engulfed an island more than 30 miles away. The study could revive a simmering controversy over whether sudden...