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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Americans Are Dying Faster. Millennials, Too

    10/28/2016 1:38:48 PM PDT · by Smittie · 24 replies ^ | 10/28/2016 | Ben Steverman
    Death awaits all of us, but how patiently? To unlock the mystery of when we’re going to die, start with an actuary. Members of this 200-year-old profession who study risk and uncertainty pore over the data of death to estimate length of life. Putting aside the spiritual, that’s crucial information for insurance companies and pension plans, and it’s also helpful for planning retirement, since we need our money to last as long we do. The latest, best guesses for U.S. lifespans come from a study (PDF) released this month by the Society of Actuaries: The average 65-year-old American man should...
  • 10 Truly Disgusting Facts About Life In Ancient Egypt

    10/27/2016 11:23:39 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 26 replies
    Listverse ^ | October 27, 2016 | Mark Oliver
    Egypt is the land of pyramids and pharaohs, tombs filled with glittering treasures, and powerful men who ruled a country like gods. When we think of ancient Egypt, we think of the wealth and glamour of kings. But we usually leave out the dirty--and disgusting--details.
  • 'Alien megastructure' 1,400 light years away will be looked at for signs of life [tr]

    10/26/2016 10:34:11 AM PDT · by C19fan · 39 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 26, 2016 | Ryan O'Hare
    Scientists scanning the night sky in the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence are turning their telescopes towards a mysterious star, which had been flagged as an ‘alien megastructure’. As part of a $100 million (£81 million) project, backed by Stephen Hawking, astronomers will target the strange stellar object which has baffled scientists since its discovery. Called Tabby’s Star, its regular cycles of dimming have been claimed by some to be a sign of intelligent beings – warranting enough interest for a closer look.
  • Bizarre Fish Face Wins Nikon Photography Prize

    10/25/2016 2:16:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 10/25 | Rachael Lallensack
    If you have never been face-to-face with a fish embryo, now is your chance. This bizarre photo of a 4-day-old zebrafish face is the winner of this year’s Nikon Small World photography contest. Geneticist Oscar Ruiz and his team at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston faced the difficult task of mounting the fish embryo at just the right angle to bring its face in focus of their microscope. As luck would have it, the first image they took was a ringer (above). Now, Ruiz says, they are able to take similarly close time-lapse images of...
  • New Clues to How Lithium Soothes the Bipolar Brain May Shed Light on Other Mental Illnesses

    10/25/2016 2:04:53 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 19 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | Oct. 18, 2016 | Meredith Wadman
    The second century C.E. Greek physician and philosopher Galen advised patients suffering from disorders of the spirit to bathe in and drink hot spring water. Modern day brain scientists have posited that GalenÂ’s prescription delivered more than a placebo effect. Lithium has for decades been recognized as an effective mood stabilizer in bipolar disease, and lithium salts may have been present in the springs Galen knew. Yet exactly how lithium soothes the mind has been less than clear. Now, a team led by Ben Cheyette, a neuroscientist at the University of California in San Francisco (UCSF), has linked its success...
  • Big tech-media mergers raise fresh privacy concerns

    10/25/2016 9:57:30 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 3 replies ^ | 10/25/16 | Rob Lever
    They know how you browse the internet, your favorite TV shows and where you shop and travel. Data collected by internet and media companies is a powerful tool, and the big mergers planned by AT&T with Time Warner and Verizon with Yahoo offer those firms more data that can be used to target consumers with content and advertising. Privacy advocates say the prospect of firms using all that online and offline data without safeguards could be alarming. (emphasis mine ) "Twenty-first century media is all about the ability to gather information on a single individual regardless of where they are—whether...
  • AT&T Is Spying on Americans for Profit, New Documents Reveal

    10/25/2016 9:29:25 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 16 replies
    dailybeast ^ | October 24, 2016 | Kenneth Lipp
    The telecom giant is doing NSA-style work for law enforcement—without a warrant—and earning millions of dollars a year from taxpayers. Hemisphere is a secretive program run by AT&T that searches trillions of call records and analyzes cellular data to determine where a target is located, with whom he speaks, and potentially why. In 2013, Hemisphere was revealed by The New York Times and described only within a Powerpoint presentation made by the Drug Enforcement Administration. The Times described it as a “partnership” between AT&T and the U.S. government; the Justice Department said it was an essential, and prudently deployed, counter-narcotics...
  • Number of STD cases in the US reaches record high as public services 'stretched thin'

    10/25/2016 7:47:16 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 23 replies ^ | 25 October 2016 | Chris Graham
    The number of reported cases of sexually transmitted diseases reached a record high in the US last year, figures show, as officials warned that stretched services meant people were slipping through the "public health safety net". In its latest report, the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention said the sharp rise in syphilis was of particular concern.
  • USGS: Oklahoma quake likely caused by wastewater disposal [anti-fracking barf]

    10/24/2016 3:30:11 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 11 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 24, 2016 5:06 PM EDT
    The third-largest earthquake in Oklahoma was likely triggered by underground disposal of wastewater from oil and natural gas production, the U.S. Geological Survey found in a report issued Monday. The magnitude 5.1 quake that struck northwest of Fairview in February was likely induced by distant disposal wells, the agency said. The USGS report indicated that in the area around where the Fairview quake occurred, the volume of fluid injected had increased sevenfold over three years. …
  • No, the Universe is not expanding at an accelerated rate, say physicists

    10/24/2016 1:58:12 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 64 replies
    Science alert ^ | 10/24/16 | BEC CREW
    This could change everything. Back in 2011, three astronomers were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for their discovery that the Universe wasn’t just expanding - it was expanding at an accelerating rate. The discovery led to the widespread acceptance of the idea that our Universe is dominated by a mysterious force called dark energy, and altered the standard model of cosmology forever. But now physicists say this discovery might have been false, and they have a much larger dataset to back them up. For a bit of background on the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, it was shared between...
  • Ghost fleet: Explorers accidentally find a graveyard of more than 40 perfectly preserved ancient sh

    10/24/2016 12:09:25 PM PDT · by ColdOne · 25 replies ^ | 10/24/16 | Shivali Best
    Full title.......Ghost fleet: Explorers accidentally find a graveyard of more than 40 perfectly preserved ancient shipwrecks at the bottom of the Black Sea............................ The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project has been scouring the sea bed of the Black Sea The primary focus is to carry out geophysical surveys, but over 40 shipwrecks have also been found They are 'astonishingly well preserved' due to the lack of oxygen in the Black Sea's 'dead zone' The findings provide new information on the communities living on the Black Sea coast
  • Evolution vs. God: William Jennings Bryan at the trial of John Scopes

    10/23/2016 7:55:20 PM PDT · by GoldenState_Rose · 8 replies
    California State Dominguez Hills ^ | 1925 | William Jennings Bryan
    It is for the jury to determine whether this attack upon the Christian religion shall be permitted in the public schools of Tennessee by teachers employed by the State and paid out of the public treasury. This case is no longer local: the defendant ceases to play an important part. The case has assumed the proportions of a battle royal between unbelief that attempts to speak through so-called science and the defenders of the Christian faith. speaking through the legislators of Tennessee. It is again a choice between God and Baal; it is also a renewal of the issue in...
  • Connected devices create millions of cyber security weak spots

    10/23/2016 4:42:29 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 21 replies
    financial times ^ | 10/23/16 | Hannah Kuchler
    Default passwords on devices from the digital video recorder in your living room to the security camera in your office threaten the stability of the internet, as hackers build vast networks of “Internet of Things” devices to bombard websites with traffic. The attack on Dyn, a domain name service provider, that disrupted access to high-profile sites such as Twitter, Spotify and the New York Times on Friday, highlighted the risks posed by the billions of devices connected to the internet with little or no cyber security protections. Unidentified hackers took over tens of millions of devices using malicious software called...
  • Turmeric Produces ‘Remarkable’ Recovery in Alzheimer’s Patients

    10/22/2016 5:32:19 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 89 replies
    The Epoch Times ^ | October 13, 2016 | Sayer Ji
    A diagnosis of AlzheimerÂ’s, sadly, has become almost like a rite of passage in so-called developed countries. AlzheimerÂ’s is considered the most common form of dementia, which is defined as a serious loss of cognitive function beyond what is expected from normal aging in previously unimpaired persons. A 2006 study estimated that 26 million people throughout the world suffer from this condition, and that by 2050, the prevalence will quadruple, by which time one in 85 people worldwide will be afflicted with the disease. Given the global extent of the problem, interest is growing in safe and effective preventive and...
  • Ancient armored fish revises early history of jaws

    10/22/2016 3:56:17 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 20 replies
    Science News ^ | 10/20/16 | Meghan Rosen
    A freaky fish with a head like a dolphin and a body like a tank may be to thank for human jaws. The discovery of a 423-million-year-old armored fish from China suggests that the jaws of all modern land vertebrates and bony fish originated in a bizarre group of animals called placoderms, researchers report in the Oct. 21 Science. “We’ve suddenly realized we had it all wrong,” he says. The jaws of humans — and dogs, salmon, lizards and all other bony vertebrates — contain three key bones: the maxilla and premaxilla of the upper jaw, and the dentary of...
  • Earth faces another ICE AGE within 15 YEARS as Russian scientists discover Sun 'cooling'

    10/22/2016 7:04:55 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 54 replies ^ | 10/22/2016 | Sean Martin
    Experts say that solar activity as low as it currently is has not been seen since the mini-ice age that took place between 1645 and 1715 – a period known as the Maunder Minimum where the entire Thames froze over. A new model has allowed experts to predict solar activity with more accuracy than ever before and it suggests that magnetic activity will fall by 60 per cent between 2030 and 2040. The model looks at the Sun’s ’11-year heartbeat’ – the period it takes for magnetic activity to fluctuate. This cycle was first discovered some 173 years ago. However,...
  • The Mystery of the Bermuda Triangle May Finally Be Solved

    10/21/2016 1:47:15 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 34 replies
    New York Post ^ | October 21, 2016 | Corey Charlton
    Strange clouds forming above the Bermuda Triangle could explain why dozens of ships and planes have mysteriously vanished in the notorious patch of sea. The remarkable new theory suggests the clouds are linked to 170-mph “air bombs” — capable of bringing down planes and ships. Now the riddle could finally be solved after meteorologists speaking to the Science Channel’s “What on Earth?” revealed their findings.
  • Ingham County, Michigan: One Refugee Diagnosed With Multi-Drug Resistant TB;(trunc)

    10/21/2016 2:46:21 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 25 replies
    brietbart ^ | 10/21/16 | michea Patrick Leahy
    Full title : Ingham County, Michigan: One Refugee Diagnosed With Multi-Drug Resistant TB; 22 Percent Have Latent TB. One of the 3,554 refugees resettled in Ingham County, Michigan (Lansing) during the six years beginning October 1, 2010 and ending on September 30, 2016 (FY 2011 to FY 2016) has been diagnosed with multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB), the Ingham County Health Department tells Breitbart News. MDR TB is a very dangerous and expensive to treat type of TB that is a growing world wide problem and has recently become a public health issue in the United States as well. In...
  • New theory may explain the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

    10/21/2016 11:56:34 AM PDT · by rickmichaels · 44 replies
    Toronto Sun ^ | Oct. 21, 2016 | Postmedia Network
    A new theory aims to explain the mysterious disappearance of planes and ships around the Bermuda Triangle. Meteorologists revealed that strange clouds linked to super-powerful “air bombs” could be capable of bringing down large objects,while speaking to Science Channel’s “What on Earth?” According to the New York Post, scientists used satellite imagery to detect “hexagonal”-shaped clouds between 30 and 80 km wide, with a hurricane-like force of 275 km/h, forming over patches of water. “The satellite imagery is really bizarre … the hexagonal shapes of the cloud formations,” said meteorologist Dr. Randy Cerveny. “These types of hexagonal shapes in the...
  • Ancient microbe fossils show earliest evidence of shell making

    10/20/2016 11:51:04 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science News ^ | 10/20/2016 | P. Cohen
    DENVER — Life on Earth got into the shell game more than 200 million years earlier than previously thought. Fossilized eukaryotes — complex life-forms that include animals and plants — discovered in Canada are decked out in armorlike layers of mineral plates, paleobiologist Phoebe Cohen said September 27 at the Geological Society of America’s annual meeting. At about 809 million years old, the find is the oldest evidence of organisms controlling the formation of minerals, a process called biomineralization. ********* The mineral plates themselves are odd. Most modern microbes make shells out of calcium carbonate, but the ancient shells are...
  • NSA Can Access More Phone Data Than Ever

    10/20/2016 11:32:36 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 18 replies
    abcnews ^ | Oct 20, 2016 | Lee Ferran
    Before the signing of the USA Freedom Act in June 2015, one of the NSA's most controversial programs was the mass collection of telephonic metadata from millions of Americans — the information about calls, including the telephone numbers involved, the time and the duration but not the calls' content — under a broad interpretation of the Patriot Act's Section 215. From this large "haystack," as officials have called it, NSA analysts could get approval to run queries on specific numbers purportedly linked to international terrorism investigations. The problem for the NSA was that the haystack was only about 30 percent...
  • (Vanity) Should Pro-Abortion folks watch one?

    10/20/2016 11:04:59 AM PDT · by Gman · 20 replies
    We have all had the opportunity to see various life-saving medical procedures and operations on TV or in a classroom setting. Maybe people that are in favor of Late Term Abortion should watch one too. What's the harm in that?
  • Experts believe mysterious aluminium object ... back 250,000 years 'could be part of ancient UFO'

    10/20/2016 10:43:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 57 replies ^ | Updated 13:15, 20 Oct 2016 | By Kara O'Neill
    Metallic aluminium was not produced by mankind until around 200 years ago - but this appears manufactured making the object a baffling find A piece of aluminium that looks as if it was handmade is being hailed as 250,000-year-old proof that aliens once visited Earth. Metallic aluminium was not really produced by mankind until around 200 years ago, so the discovery of the large chunk that could be up to 250,000 years old is being held as a sensational find. The details of the discovery were never made public at the time because it was pulled out of the earth...
  • Does this mysterious piece of aluminium prove UFOs visited Earth 250,000 years ago?

    10/20/2016 10:27:22 AM PDT · by C19fan · 78 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 20, 2016 | Libby Plummer
    A piece aluminium that looks as if it was handmade is being hailed as 250,000-year-old proof that aliens once visited Earth. The discovery of the mysterious chunk of metal in communist Romania in 1973 was not made public at the time, according to CEN. Testing has since revealed that the object is made of 12 metals and is 90 per cent aluminium with Romanian officials dating it as being 250,000 years old. The initial results were later confirmed by a lab in Lausanne, Switzerland, CEN reports.
  • Europe Lost Contact with Mars Lander 1 Minute Before Touchdown

    10/20/2016 8:10:01 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 34 replies ^ | 10/20/2016 | megan gannon
    Schiaparelli was scheduled to touch down on the Red Planet Wednesday at 10:48 a.m. EDT (1448 GMT). But the spacecraft's handlers could not confirm a successful landing, and were left waiting on a signal. Meanwhile, Schiaparelli's mother ship, the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), successfully entered orbit around Mars. Schiaparelli had been programmed to follow a demanding 6-minute landing sequence that would see the capsule come to a halt from about 13,000 mph (21,000 km/h). The first phases of this sequence went according to plan, Andrea Accomazzo, head of ESA's solar and planetary missions, said at the news conference from ESA's...
  • 2 San Francisco-area earthquake faults found to be connected

    10/19/2016 4:48:32 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 16 replies ^ | October 19, 2016 | Associated Press
    If the Hayward and Rodgers Creek faults broke simultaneously along their combined 118 miles, they could produce a magnitude 7.4 quake, said scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey. Such shaking would be more than five times stronger than the 1989 Loma Prieta quake on the San Andreas Fault that killed over 60 people and collapsed part of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. There hasn't been a major quake on the Hayward Fault in more than 140 years.... "This should be a reminder that folks in the Bay Area need to be prepared for a major earthquake," USGS geophysicist Janet Watt...
  • The Smallest Pistol Seecamp 32 ACP (Video only)

    10/19/2016 11:38:56 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 42 replies ^ | 10-18-2016 | sootch00
    Fun Gun Reviews Presents: The Seecamp 32 ACP Pistol is the Smallest current production semi-auto handgun being made. They are known for their quality and reliability. This is a perfect choice for deep cover conceal-ability or as a back up. Another installment in the Mouse Gun Series.
  • Shelf Life of an Allergy Auto-Injector May Increase to 2 Years

    10/19/2016 8:15:33 AM PDT · by wtd · 7 replies
    Allergic Living ^ | 10/19/2016 | Claire Gagné
    Shelf Life of an Allergy Auto-Injector May Increase to 2 Years Mylan CEO Heather Bresch has faced a barrage of criticism from lawmakers and the allergy community over the price escalation of EpiPen sets. But a secondary point she raised during her September 21 testimony in front of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee was largely overlooked among those who rely on epinephrine auto-injectors: they may soon last longer. “We hope that within the next 12 months we’ll have approved a new formulation that will extend the shelf life,” Bresch said, while trying to defend the company’s research...
  • What Was the Biggest Insect That Ever Lived?

    10/18/2016 12:13:49 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 46 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 10/15/2016 | Liz Langley
    So when our friend Doug Rhodehamel wondered, “What’s the largest insect that ever lived?” Weird Animal Question of the Week went hunting for giants, past and present. We found some ancient behemoths, some lovely ones, and some that could pass for Halloween decorations. A Big Bug’s Life Imagine a dragonfly so big its wings could block your 27-inch TV screen. The largest insect fossils ever found are griffinflies and giant dragonflies, says Matthew Clapham, a paleobiologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Subtle anatomical differences separated the two groups. With wingspans that could reach 27 inches, the largest known...
  • Are you at risk from solar storms?

    10/17/2016 7:50:14 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 40 replies
    daileymail ^ | 10/17/17 | Stacy Liberatore
    First map showing areas in the US at risk of solar storms has been released Experts looked at two factors, one being data from geomagnetic storms The other was data from magnetic materials beneath the Earth's surface Map reveals Minnesota and Wisconsin are at the highest risk in the US But more than half the US hasn't been surveyed due to a lack of funds Solar storms threaten Earth about every 100 years and experts warn we are overdue Copywrite prevents full publication of this article
  • University of Cape Town Student Leader Wants to Scrap Science Because It’s Racist, Oppressive

    10/17/2016 11:20:43 AM PDT · by C19fan · 21 replies
    HeatStreet ^ | October 16, 2016 | William Hicks
    Students in South Africa are embroiled in a “Fees Must Fall” protest, aiming to lower tuition fees and “decolonize” the nation’s schools. These protests are offshoots of the “Rhodes Must Fall” movement which aimed to get names of colonialists off school buildings. At a meeting with the University of Cape Town science faculty, one of these “fallists” took the movement further demanding science too must fall.
  • China to blast 2 astronauts into space on Monday

    10/15/2016 9:29:32 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 17 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 15, 2016 11:52 PM EDT
    Chinese officials unveiled plans for Monday’s launch of the country’s latest space mission in which two astronauts will be blasted into space and will dock with an orbiting space lab. The Shenzhou 11 spacecraft will be launched at 7:30 a.m., said Wu Ping, deputy director of China’s manned space engineering office, in a televised news conference. The Shenzhou mission will take off aboard a Long March-2F carrier rocket from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center on the edge of the Gobi Desert in northern China. …
  • The Universe Contains 10 to 20 Times More Galaxies Than We Thought

    10/15/2016 2:43:17 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 78 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | 10/13/16 | Jay Bennett
    A new study from a team of international astronomers, led by astrophysicists from the University of Nottingham with support from the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), has produced some astounding results: The universe contains at least two trillion galaxies, 10 times more than the highest previous estimates. What's more, the new study suggests that 90 percent of all galaxies are hidden from us, and only the remaining 10 percent can be seen at all, even with our most powerful telescopes. The paper detailing the study was published today in the Astrophysical Journal. "We are missing the vast majority of galaxies because...
  • K-12: Teaching Knowledge vs. Teaching Ideology

    10/15/2016 2:21:21 PM PDT · by BruceDeitrickPrice · 17 replies
    American Thinker ^ | September 24, 2016 | Bruce Deitrick Price
    In 1974, Jamie Escalante took a job at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles, California. He found himself in a challenging situation: teaching math to Hispanic students at a rundown school known for violence and drugs. While many dismissed his students as unteachable, Escalante pushed them to reach their potential. He started an advanced mathematics program with a handful of students. He was so successful a testing service accused his students of cheating. They weren’t. Hollywood made a fine movie out of the story called “Stand and Deliver” (1988). Escalante’s students were the last ones expected to succeed academically...
  • Watch Leftist Students Say Science Is Racist and Should Be Abolished

    10/15/2016 9:48:57 AM PDT · by bkopto · 45 replies
    Reason ^ | 10/14/2016 | Robbie Soave
    Students at the University of Cape Town in South Africa brought some interesting concerns before the science faculty this week: namely, they think science as it is currently understood must be abolished. "The whole thing should scratched off, especially in Africa," said one of the students. Essentially, these students believe that modern scientific understanding is too Eurocentric. But according to the student, witchcraft is like Isaac Newton's theory of gravity—it's just one way of explaining the world, among many. "Decolonising the science would mean doing away with it entirely and starting all over again to deal with how we respond...
  • Strange signals from 234 stars could be ET – or human error

    10/15/2016 7:33:11 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 17 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 14 Oct, 2016 | Shannon Hall
    It’s a bold claim. Two astronomers think they have spotted messages from not just one extraterrestrial civilisation, but 234 of them. The news has sparked a lively debate in the field as other astronomers think the claim is premature and are working fast to get to the bottom of the signals. In 2012, Ermanno Borra at Laval University in Quebec suggested that an extraterrestrial civilisation might use a laser as a means of interstellar communication. If the little green men simply flashed a laser toward the Earth like a strobe light, we would see periodic bursts of light hidden in...
  • Prologium makes Lithium-Ceramic batteries that can’t explode

    10/14/2016 6:31:51 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies
    Semiaccurate ^ | Oct 10, 2016 | by Charlie Demerjian
    Solid state electrolytes and ceramics don’t burn well Taiwanese battery maker Prologium has a lithium ceramic battery that bends, folds, cuts, and doesn’t explode. SemiAccurate takes a look at the interesting bits surrounding their solid state electrolyte batteries.First a little background, I have been writing about why batteries explode for over a decade, the first one I recall was in February of 2004 shortly after The Inquirer posted the first pictures of a laptop in mid-kaboom. Sorry no links because of this and this.
  • Quantum-dot solar windows evolve with 'doctor-blade' spreading

    10/13/2016 11:34:58 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies ^ | 12/12/2016
    [A] Los Alamos National Laboratory research team demonstrates an important step in taking quantum dot, solar-powered windows from the laboratory to the construction site by proving that the technology can be scaled up from palm-sized demonstration models to windows large enough to put in and power a building. "We are developing solar concentrators that will harvest sunlight from building windows and turn it into electricity, using quantum-dot based luminescent solar concentrators," said lead scientist Victor Klimov. Klimov leads the Los Alamos Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP). Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are light-management devices that can serve as large-area sunlight...
  • Pushing Forced Birth Control in Netherlands

    10/13/2016 10:30:11 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 17 replies
    National Review ^ | 10/8/2016 | Wesley J. Smith
    Pushing Forced Birth Control in Netherlands Progressive cultural ideas are like viruses. A noxious notion starts one place and soon it spreads like a, well, cultural plague. That is why the proposal from Rotterdam to subject some women to mandatory contraception is so wrong and concerning. From The Independent story: Rotterdam city council has called for mothers, judged to be incapable to raise children, to be given compulsory contraception by court order. The Dutch council has launched a voluntary contraception drive for 160 women believed to be at risk due to learning difficulties, psychological issues or addiction, reports. The alderman responsible...
  • How One Scientist Decoded the Mysterious Sounds of the Northern Lights

    10/13/2016 5:13:18 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    Live Science ^ | October 12, 2016 06:48am ET | Tom Metcalfe
    For more than 15 years, a lone scientist in southern Finland has spent countless winter nights among the snowy fields and frozen lakes around his village, in pursuit of one of the most ephemeral mysteries of the heavens: the faint, almost phantasmagorical sounds heard during intense displays of the aurora borealis, or northern lights. The epic study by acoustician Unto K. Laine includes the first audio recordings of the muffled crackling or popping sometimes heard overhead during spectacular aurora displays. ... Laine has shown the sounds are real, and he thinks he has found what causes them: sparks of electricity...
  • Promising News For Children With Peanut Allergies

    10/12/2016 9:03:01 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies
    NBC DFW ^ | 10/12 | Bianca Castro
    New research shows children, some as young as nine-months-old, with peanut allergies can successfully become desensitized to nuts by eating small doses of peanut protein. To reduce the risk of life-threatening allergic reactions, researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have been studying the use of oral immunotherapy to reduce sensitivity to peanut proteins. The published a new report that found the therapy to be 81 percent effective in preschool-aged children. Only a handful of oral immunotherapy programs exist in Texas. Medical City Dallas has been running its current program for eight years with high success, according...
  • ‘Beardog’ Discovery oOffers Clues to How Canines Evolved

    10/11/2016 11:05:20 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    KOIN6 ^ | October 11, 2016 | David Mercer
    <p>For decades a fossilized carnivore jawbone sat largely unnoticed in a drawer at Chicago’s Field Museum.</p> <p>Now the scientist who grew curious when he opened that drawer has established with a colleague that the fossil belonged to an early, long-extinct relative of dogs, foxes and weasels known as a beardog. The Field Museum fossil and another at the University of Texas each represent a new genus, the taxonomic rank above species.</p>
  • Lifting the veil on Queen of Sheba's perfume

    10/11/2016 2:38:39 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 25 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/11/2016 | CNRS
    It is one of the oldest fragrances in the world. Nicolas Baldovini's team at the Institut de chimie de Nice (CNRS/UNS) has just discovered the components that give frankincense its distinctive odor: two molecules found for the first time in nature, named "olibanic acids" by the scientists. Their research results have just been published online, on the website of the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition. It is mentioned more than twenty times in the Bible, where it is one of the gifts offered by the Three Wise Men. Frankincense (also called olibanum1), one of the world's oldest fragrances, is a...
  • European Spacecraft Prepares to Land on Mars Next Week

    10/11/2016 11:02:04 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies ^ | Samantha Mathewson,
    Launched on March 14, the ExoMars mission rocketed two connected spacecraft, the Trace Gas Orbiter and its Schiaparelli lander, toward Mars. The two spacecraft are expected to separate on Sunday (Oct. 16), and if all goes according to plan, the Schiaparelli lander will descend on the Martian surface three days later. While the Schiaparelli lander is on the Martian surface, the Trace Gas Orbiter will orbit the Red Planet and study its atmosphere. The Schiaparelli spacecraft is set to land in Mars' Meridiani Planum region, close to the planet's equator. It will enter the Martian atmosphere at about 13,000 mph...
  • SpaceX Anomaly Updates

    10/11/2016 8:07:58 AM PDT · by Ray76 · 23 replies
    SpaceX ^ | Sep 23, 2016
    Three weeks ago, SpaceX experienced an anomaly at our Launch Complex 40 (LC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This resulted in the loss of one of our Falcon 9 rockets and its payload. The Accident Investigation Team (AIT), composed of SpaceX, the FAA, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and industry experts, are currently scouring through approximately 3,000 channels of engineering data along with video, audio and imagery. The timeline of the event is extremely short – from first signs of an anomaly to loss of data is about 93 milliseconds or less than 1/10th of a second. The majority...
  • Believe it or not, the bees are doing just fine

    10/10/2016 9:07:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    Washington Post ^ | October 10 at 6:00 AM | Christopher Ingraham
    You've probably heard the bad news by now that bees were recently added to the endangered species list for the first time. But if you're part of the 60 percent of people who share stories without actually reading them, you might have missed an important detail: namely, that the newly endangered bees are a handful of relatively obscure species who live only in Hawaii. The bees you're more familiar with — the ones that buzz around your yard dipping into flowers, making honey, pollinating crops and generally keeping the world's food supply from collapsing? Those bees are doing just fine,...
  • New fault discovered in southern California near the San Andreas

    10/09/2016 2:24:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    fox ^ | 10/07/2016 | Rob Verger
    <p>"The extended nature of time since the most recent earthquake on the Southern San Andreas has been puzzling to the earth sciences community,” Graham Kent, a Nevada state seismologist and coauthor on a new study announcing the discovery, said in a statement.</p>
  • NASA rethinks approach to Mars exploration

    10/08/2016 1:15:55 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 13 replies ^ | Alexandra Witze
    Starting in the 2020s, scientists who participate in the agency’s Mars missions might no longer design and build their own highly specialized payloads to explore the red planet. Instead, planetary scientists could find themselves operating much as astronomers who use large telescopes do now: applying for time to use a spacecraft built with a generic suite of scientific instruments. The proposed change is spurred by NASA’s waning influence at Mars. The agency’s long-running string of spacecraft is winding to a close, and international and commercial interests are on the rise. By the middle of the next decade, European, Chinese, Emirati...
  • It's The End Of The Fringed-Limbed Tree Frog Species When 'Toughie' Died

    10/08/2016 12:41:51 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 33 replies
    Science World Report ^ | 10/7/16 | Elaine Hannah
    The handsome yet loneliest frog, the fringed-limbed tree frog, is dead, which signifies the end of this species. Toughie was the name of the last known member of a fringe-limbed tree frog species that won the hearts of movie directors and racing car drivers. Advertisement Huffington Post reported that Toughie was found dead on September 26 at its home at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. He had inhabited there since 2005. The National Geographic said that Toughie was a symbol of the extinction crisis. Mark Mandica, who worked with the amphibian and whose young son named the frog said that Toughie's...
  • IBM’s Power Roadmap Extended By Chip Breakthrough

    10/08/2016 11:00:51 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 14 replies ^ | July 9, 2015 | Timothy Prickett Morgan
    Hot on the heels of the closing of the deal that divests its semiconductor business and places it in the hands of Globalfoundries, the former chip making business of AMD that is controlled by the government of Abu Dhabi, IBM and its academic and chip industry partners have announced that they have successfully etched chips with transistors that are 7 nanometers in size – significantly smaller than current processes and extending the Moore’s Law curve one more step.It is a big step, however, based on a mix of new technologies that have not been tested in volume production before,...