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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Suitcase nukes closer to fiction than reality

    10/07/2015 8:44:08 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 14 replies
    ABC News ^ | 10/06/2015
    Members of Congress have warned about the dangers of suitcase nuclear weapons. Hollywood has made television shows and movies about them. Even the Federal Emergency Management Agency has alerted Americans to a threat — information the White House includes on its website. But government experts and intelligence officials say such a threat gets vastly more attention than it deserves. These officials said a true suitcase nuke would be highly complex to produce, require significant upkeep and cost a small fortune. Counterproliferation authorities do not completely rule out the possibility that these portable devices once existed. But they do not think...
  • Fire ants escaping South Carolina floods by forming 'islands'

    10/07/2015 7:09:03 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 64 replies
    upi ^ | Oct. 6, 2015 | Ben Hooper
    GREENVILLE, S.C., - South Carolina ants seeking to stay afloat amid flooding in the state are creating their own refuge by forming into "islands of ants." A photojournalist for WHNS-TV spotted what appeared to be mud floating in Greenville County flood waters Sunday, but he soon discovered the clump was actually an "island of ants." A similar video was captured by a photographer for WSAV-TV. Residents across the region reported seeing similar ant islands floating in flooded areas. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology said in a 2013 study that fire ants use their jaws, small claws and adhesive...
  • Wildlife is thriving around Chernobyl since the people left

    10/07/2015 7:00:16 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 20 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10/07/2015
    Wolves are seven times as common in the Chernobyl area than they were (Image: Sergey Gashchak) The site of the world’s worst nuclear accident is now a wildlife haven. The abundance of large animals around Chernobyl, such as deer, elk and wild boar, matches that of nature reserves in the region – and wolves are seven times as common. Some 116,000 people fled the radioactive fallout from the reactor after it exploded in 1986, and another 220,000 were resettled after that, vacating a zone covering some 4200 square kilometres split equally between Belarus and Ukraine. “Whatever negative effects there are...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- La Palma Eclipse Sequence

    10/07/2015 4:14:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | October 07, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: At left, a dramatic image sequence follows late September's total lunar eclipse above a rugged landscape and sea of clouds from the Canary island of La Palma. Composited in a circular fisheye projection, the brightness of the Full Perigee Moon changes drastically in transition from outside the total eclipse phase compared to its dim glow during the 72 minute long totality. At right, a single frame captures the dark red lunar disk in a moment during the total eclipse phase, the Moon deep within Earth's shadow. In fact, the size of the eclipsed Moon image at right approximately illustrates...

    10/06/2015 11:05:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Historic Scotland ^ | 29 September 2015 | unattributed (Alan Bannon, Media & PR Officer)
    Archaeologists in Orkney have uncovered the remains of over 30 buildings dating from around 4000 BC to 1000 BC, together with field systems, middens and cemeteries. The find includes a very rare Bronze Age building which experts believed could have been a sauna or steam house, which may have been built for ritual purposes. EASE Archaeology recently made the exciting discovery on the periphery of the prehistoric Links of Noltland, on the island of Westray in Orkney, next to where the famous ‘Westray Wife’ was found in 2009, which is believed to be the earliest depiction of a human face...
  • Ruins of ancient Egyptian temple unearthed under modern Cairo

    10/06/2015 9:58:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Cairo Post ^ | October 05, 2015 | Rany Mostafa
    The shrine belonged to the 30th Dynasty Pharaoh Nectanebo I (379 B.C.-360 B.C.,)” said Damaty. The mission also unearthed remains of limestone colonnade and a “well-preserved” ceiling that are strongly believed to have been a part of an ancient Egyptian temple, Damaty said, adding that ruins of the mud brick outer enclosure wall surrounded the temple, along with royal bust belonged to the New Kingdom (1580 B.C.-1080 B.C.) Pharaoh Merenptah, were also excavated in the area. Nectanebo I was the founder of the 30th Dynasty: the last native Egyptian royal family to rule ancient Egypt before Alexander the Great conquered...
  • Two physicists earn Nobel Prize for discovering neutrino's chameleon-like powers

    10/06/2015 5:24:45 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 6 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 10/06/2015 | Amina Khan
    The 2015 Nobel Prize in physics has gone to two scientists for discovering the quirky, shape-shifting behavior of neutrinos — tiny ghostlike particles that fill the universe, traveling close to the speed of light. Takaaki Kajita of the Super-Kamiokande experiment at the University of Tokyo and Arthur B. McDonald of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory at Queen’s University in Canada were awarded the physics Nobel on Tuesday for their discovery that neutrinos oscillate — and thus, that they must have mass. Small as these particles are, the scientists' insight — that neutrinos are chameleon-like particles, switching identities in an instant —...
  • Tech firm is building $1billion city in New Mexico

    10/06/2015 2:47:50 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 40 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 10/6/15
    Telecommunications and tech firm Pegasus Global Holdings is planning to build a full-scale American town in the New Mexico desert, a place which they hope to open to researchers developing technologies for modern living. Pegasus plans to spend $1billion creating the 15-square-mile town, called CITE, with construction to begin sometime next year and opening as early as 2018. CITE will include a town big enough for 35,000 people, with a business district downtown surrounded by terraced housing suburbs - but no one will ever live there. Instead, companies will have the opportunity to test such innovations as driverless vehicles and...
  • The prosecutor said authorities have "mathematical, Judge sets bail in Bellagio craps scheme

    10/06/2015 12:15:01 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 23 replies
    LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL ^ | 6 Oct 2015 | David Ferrara
    Theodore Whiting, the vice president of surveillance for MGM Resorts, told a grand jury that the chance of the group winning as much as they did amounted to roughly one in 452 billion. Each of the men were indicted on dozens of counts of cheating at gambling and theft, according to Chief Deputy District Attorney J. P. Raman. But Cooper is expected to plead guilty to one count of felony theft. Between July 2012 and July 2014, when the timing was right, Branco and Cooper conspired with Granito and Martin to pay off bets that never transpired,
  • NASA Planetary Protection Officer Profiled (EPA for the planets)

    10/06/2015 7:37:52 AM PDT · by Purdue77 · 19 replies
    NYT via AIAA Newsletter ^ | 10/05/2015 | KENNETH CHANG
    The New York Times (10/6, Chang, Subscription Publication) posts a feature on NASA Planetary Protection Officer Catharine Conley, whose job “is not so much protecting Earth from aliens as protecting other planets from Earth.” Conley is responsible for making sure than NASA missions to Mars and elsewhere do not pollute or contaminate alien worlds.
  • Petroglyph in Spain Marks when Atlantic and Mediterranean Cultures Met

    10/06/2015 6:17:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 16 replies ^ | Mon, Oct 05, 2015 | Staff
    Bronze Age rock carving depicts a Mediterranean style boat. Above: A graphic representation of the Auga dos Cebros petroglyph, showing the obvious boat feature at the bottom. This image is a screenshot of the same as depicted in the YouTube video (see below). =================================================================================================================== A unique petroglyph discovered near the Atlantic coast of northern Spain has provided evidence that contacts between ancient Atlantic cultures and contemporaneous cultures of the Mediterranean were earlier and perhaps more intense than previously thought. The rock art panel, located in the Costa dos Castros region and known as Auga dos Cebros, depicts a boat with...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Flying Past Pluto

    10/06/2015 1:16:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | October 06, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What would it look like to fly past Pluto? The robotic New Horizons spacecraft did just this in late July and continues to return stunning pictures of the dwarf planet. Some well-chosen flyby images have now been digitally sequenced to create the featured video. The animation begins by showing New Horizon's approach to the Pluto system, with Pluto and its largest moon Charon orbiting a common center of mass. As the spacecraft bears down on Pluto uniquely, surprising surface features are nearly resolved that, unfortunately, quickly rotate out of view. New Horizons then passes just above and near a...
  • Post-apocalyptic 'beaver' thrived after dinosaurs died

    10/05/2015 2:36:03 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 46 replies ^ | 10-05-2015 | By By Will Dunham
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The world had been wrecked. An asteroid impact in Mexico compounded by colossal volcanism in India 66 million years ago had killed about three-quarters of Earth's species including the dinosaurs. But relatively soon afterward, a plucky critter that looked like a beaver was thriving, exemplifying the resilience of the mammals that would arise from the margins of the animal kingdom to become Earth's dominant land creatures. Scientists on Monday announced the discovery in northwestern New Mexico's badlands of the fossil remains of Kimbetopsalis simmonsae, a plant-eating, rodent-like mammal boasting buck-toothed incisors like a beaver that lived just...
  • The 'doomsday' weapon that could wipe out 90% of Americans

    10/05/2015 1:06:40 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 63 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 10/5/15 | Mark Prigg
    Controversial tech boss and presidential candidate John McAfee has warned a 'doomsday' electronic weapon could wipe out 90% of Americans and urged politicians to is the number one threat facing the country. McAfee, who recently announced he is running in 2016, wrote in a blog for Business Insider: 'Experts agree that an all out cyber attack, beginning with an EMP (electromagnetic pulse) attack on our electronic infrastructure, would wipe out 90% of the human population of this country within two years of the attack. 'That means the death of 270 million people within 24 months after the attack.' Read more:...
  • 2015 Nobel Prize in medicine goes to 3 scientists for work on parasite-fighting therapies

    10/05/2015 11:01:22 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 10/05/2015 | Melissa Healy
    Three scientists whose discoveries have driven scourges of the developing world to the brink of eradication have been awarded the Nobel Prize for physiology and medicine. The Nobel Committee announced Monday it had awarded the 2015 prize to 85-year old William C. Campbell, 80-year-old Satoshi Omura and 85-year-old Youyou Tu of China for their discoveries leading to the development of antimicrobial treatments for such tropical diseases as river blindness, lymphatic filariasis (also known as elephantiasis) and malaria. Campbell, an Irish biochemist and parasitologist at Drew University in New Jersey, and Omura, a bioorganic chemist at Kitasato University in Japan and...
  • This European country has the talent for tech innovation [How they educate their children]

    10/05/2015 8:07:23 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 4 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 10/05/2015
    When you think of tech innovation, places like Silicon Valley and Boston spring to mind. But flying under the world's radar is Switzerland, where inventions like a solar plane that just completed the longest solo-flight ever without fuel are born. And while Europe was busy debating bitcoin's future, Switzerland already opened up the region's first bitcoin ATM earlier this year. The country has managed to maintain its No. 1 ranking on the Global Innovation Index for four years in a row. Switzerland's résumé is definitely impressive: The country boasts the second-highest number of patents per person — second to Japan....
  • Weird animal with 'body of buffalo and head of crocodile' baffles everyone [Thailand?]

    10/05/2015 8:01:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 46 replies ^ | Updated 15:25, 5 Oct 2015 | By Kirstie McCrum
    Confusing genetic creations happen all the time, but this is one of the most unusual animals seen in a long time Images have been shared of a most unusual creature spotted in a remote village - and it's the stuff of sci-fi movies. The strange animal appears to have the scaly, rough head and skin of a reptile such as a crocodile. However, on closer inspection, it's also got the body, limbs and hooves of a mammal such as a calf.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Orion Over and Under Tibet

    10/05/2015 3:44:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | October 05, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This night was so serene you could see Orion rise downwards. The unusual spectacle was captured in this single-exposure image, featuring a deep sky around the famous constellation of Orion that appeared both above -- and reflected in -- a peaceful lake in the Gyirong Valley of Tibet, China. Taken last year at this time, the three belt stars of Orion can be seen lined up almost vertically above and below the Himalayan Mountains. The complex Orion Nebula can be seen to the belt stars' right, while the red-glowing circular structure surrounding Orion is Barnard's Loop. Also, the bright...
  • The Next Big Science vs. Church Battle: Can Transhumanism and Christianity Co-Exist?

    10/05/2015 3:29:05 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 17 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 10/04/15 | Michael Gryboski
    Can churches engage transhumanism, which may very well be the next big science vs. religion battle, positively or should they absolutely resist this movement, an academic institution in Alabama asked during a multi-day event focused on whether Christianity and Transhumanism could co-exist. Samford University's Center for Science and Religion held the event, titled "Transhumanism and the Church," which took place from Sept. 24-26 and featured 27 presentations with approximately 120 attendees for the opening lecture alone. Transhumanism is the theory that science and technology can be used to advance the evolution of human beings beyond current physical and mental limitations....
  • Scientists discover huge mega tsunami 73,000 years ago. Could it happen again?

    10/04/2015 7:00:40 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 33 replies
    CS Monitor ^ | 10/04/2015 | By Story Hinckley
    Waves the size of the Chrysler building may seem like they belong in a movie trailer, but scientists have recently found that megatsunamis are all too real. Scientists say that 73,000 years ago, a large flank (or slope) from the volcanic island Fogo in the Cape Verde islands off the coast of Africa fell into the ocean and triggered a tsunami that could – quite literally – move mountains. “You’re displacing a huge mass, which must generate movement of water,” Ricardo Ramalho, the lead researcher behind the study, told The Washington Post. “And in the case of volcanic flank collapses...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared

    10/04/2015 2:46:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    NASA ^ | October 04, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This floating ring is the size of a galaxy. In fact, it is a galaxy -- or at least part of one: the photogenic Sombrero Galaxy, one of the largest galaxies in the nearby Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. The dark band of dust that obscures the mid-section of the Sombrero Galaxy in optical light actually glows brightly in infrared light. The above image, digitally sharpened, shows the infrared glow, recently recorded by the orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope, superposed in false-color on an existing image taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope in optical light. The Sombrero Galaxy, also known as...
  • What people in 1900 thought the year 2000 would look like

    10/04/2015 10:29:43 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 54 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | October 4, 2015 | Ana Swanson
    There are few things as fascinating as seeing what people in the past dreamed about the future. "France in the Year 2000" is one example. The series of paintings, made by Jean-Marc Côté and other French artists in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1910, shows artist depictions of what life might look like in the year 2000. The first series of images were printed and enclosed in cigarette and cigar boxes around the time of the 1900 World Exhibition in Paris, according to the Public Domain Review, then later turned into postcards.

    10/04/2015 3:25:54 AM PDT · by knarf · 57 replies
    e-mail. various | October 4, 2015 | knarf
    In the early twentieth century, a farmer decided that he needed to improve the agriculture on his ranch in Nevada. He figured that a well needed to be dug to bring water and nutrients to the soil above. He lived in a barren desert and the water stored deep beneath the Earth’s crust would have provided a more sustainable crop for this harsh and dry area. He knew that a well with ample water was needed to supply bountiful crops. What he didn’t know was what was waiting for him deep below the soil. He began to dig a deep...
  • New NASA images show Pluto’s moon Charon in stunning detail

    10/03/2015 7:42:02 PM PDT · by ETL · 62 replies - Science ^ | October 03, 2015
    NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has sent incredible images of Pluto’s largest moon Charon back to Earth. The latest images reveal the moon’s complex and violent history, according to NASA. “Many New Horizons scientists expected Charon to be a monotonous, crater-battered world; instead, they’re finding a landscape covered with mountains, canyons, landslides, surface-color variations and more,” explained the space agency, in a statement. The high-resolution images, which were taken on July 14 and transmitted to Earth on Sept. 21, reveal a belt of fractures and canyons just north of the moon’s equator. Four times as long as the Grand Canyon, and...
  • Rock samples from Western US teach how to hunt for life on Mars

    10/03/2015 8:35:35 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 10 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/2015 | Alison Olcott Marshall, Nicholas A. Cestari
    The search for life beyond Earth is one of the grandest endeavors in the history of humankind -- a quest that could transform our understanding of our universe both scientifically and spiritually. . . . The search for life beyond Earth is one of the grandest endeavors in the history of humankind -- a quest that could transform our understanding of our universe both scientifically and spiritually.
  • Giant prehistoric lizards co-existed with humans

    10/03/2015 7:44:05 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 23 replies ^ | October 01, 2015 | Walt Bonner
    While the concept of men battling 16–foot prehistoric lizards sounds like something out of a 50’s sci-fi flick, a new discovery in Australia has revealed that such encounters may have occurred. According to a study appearing in Quaternary Science Reviews, researchers from the University of Queensland have found a tiny fossil that belonged to a giant lizard bone 50,000 years ago, indicating that gigantic reptiles and humans once co–existed.
  • Farmer digs up woolly mammoth bones in Michigan soy field

    10/03/2015 12:37:51 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Washington Post ^ | October 2, 2015 | Rachel Feltman
    James Bristle of Lima Township was digging in a soybean field Monday when he and his friend pulled up what they first thought was a bent, muddy old fence post. But it was actually the rib bone of an ancient woolly mammoth... University of Michigan professor Daniel Fisher... believes that the mammoth died between 11,000 and 15,000 years ago. Most mammoths were gone by 10,000 years ago... “We get calls once or twice a year about new specimens like this,” Fisher told The Washington Post. But they’re usually mastodons. It’s a bit more unusual to find a mammoth, the group...
  • The Iceman Cameth [Solutreans, Pre-Clovis]

    10/02/2015 11:41:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, October 2, 2015 | Patrick Hahn
    All early American ancestors hailed from East Asia and Siberia? Not so fast, says a prominent scientist... Stanford shows me some other artifacts. In addition to bifacial spear points, there are bone points, spear throwers, bow drills, hammerstones, scrapers, and flat stones that still retain traces of birch sap, which may have been used to apply waterproof seals to their boats. “Everything the Solutreans had, they have here,” Stanford explains. “Of course, that’s just coincidence.” Then he laughs that infectious laugh of his... Stanford opens another drawer and shows some spear points recovered from Tennessee. The points are over 14,000...
  • Mass Grave Found in California Reveals Prehistoric Violence Against ‘Outsiders’

    10/02/2015 11:34:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Western Digs ^ | September 28, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    ...Now, chemical analysis has revealed that the men were far from home when they were killed, up to several days’ journey from where they were born and raised. The discovery is only the most recent example of violence among prehistoric hunter-gatherers in the region, anthropologists say. But it bears important lessons about the nature of conflict and warfare in pre-contact California... The grave was unearthed in 2012 during the construction of a shopping center in the town of Pleasanton, in the Amador Valley just east of Oakland... One of the men suffered a severe blow above the left eye, causing...
  • Could Cramond hold the secret of Scotland during Dark Ages?

    10/02/2015 11:26:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    City of Edinburgh ^ | Thursday, 1st October 2015 | unattributed
    The mass burial in Cramond, believed to be the oldest occupied village in Scotland, was uncovered in 1975 during an excavation of a Roman Bathhouse found at the site of a car park. Forty years later, a team led by the City of Edinburgh Council has embraced modern science to examine the remains of nine individuals found in the grave with fascinating results. The evidence has disproved an early theory that the bodies were victims of the bubonic plague, instead dating the individuals back another 800 years to the 6th Century AD. Thanks to state-of-the-art computer programming, researchers were able...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Blue Blood Moon

    10/02/2015 10:54:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | October 03, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This sharp telescopic snapshot caught late September's Harvest Moon completely immersed in Earth's dark umbral shadow, at the beginning of a total lunar eclipse. It was the final eclipse in a tetrad, a string of four consecutive total lunar eclipses. A dark apparition of the Full Moon near perigee, this total eclipse's color was a deep blood red, the lunar surface reflecting light within Earth's shadow filtered through the lower atmosphere. Seen from a lunar perspective, the reddened light comes from all the sunsets and sunrises around the edges of a silhouetted Earth. But close to the shadow's edge,...
  • Signs of ancient megatsunami could portend modern hazard

    10/02/2015 2:34:09 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies ^ | 10-02-2015 | Provided by: Columbia University
    Geologists think that the eastern slope of Fogo volcano crashed into the sea some 65,000 to 124,000 years ago, leaving a giant scar where a new volcano can be seen growing in this satellite image. Credit: NASA ========================================================================================================================================= Scientists working off west Africa in the Cape Verde Islands have found evidence that the sudden collapse of a volcano there tens of thousands of years ago generated an ocean tsunami that dwarfed anything ever seen by humans. The researchers say an 800-foot wave engulfed an island more than 30 miles away. The study could revive a simmering controversy over whether sudden...
  • vanity - the real story behind water on Mars

    10/02/2015 10:56:37 AM PDT · by InvisibleChurch · 1 replies
  • IBM engineers carbon nanotube transistors to replace silicon in computing

    10/02/2015 10:07:16 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 23 replies ^ | October 1, 2015 11:00 AM | Dean Takahashi
    Above: IBM's carbon nanotubes have tiny circuits that are fractions of a meter apart.Image Credit: IBM Carbon nanotubes are the leading candidate to replace silicon in semiconductor chips after the decades-long run of silicon electronics runs out. And IBM is hoping to usher along that transition with a new breakthrough being announced today.In the October 2 issue of the journal Science, IBM researchers say they have overcome one of the most daunting challenges around carbon nanotube transistors, which are the building blocks of electronic circuits with dimensions that are measured in billionths of a meter. Carbon nanotubes may be...
  • Mummification was commonplace in Bronze Age Britain

    10/02/2015 1:12:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    University of Sheffield ^ | 1 October 2015 | Sean Barton
    Building on a previous study conducted at a single Bronze Age burial site in the Outer Hebrides, Dr Booth used microscopic analysis to compare the bacterial bioerosion of skeletons from various sites across the UK with the bones of the mummified bodies from Yemen and Ireland. Archaeologists widely agree that the damp British climate is not favourable to organic materials and all prehistoric mummified bodies that may be located in the UK will have lost their preserved tissue if buried outside of a preservative environment such as a bog. Dr Booth, who is now based at the Department of Earth...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Charon: Moon of Pluto

    10/01/2015 9:50:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | October 02, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A darkened and mysterious north polar region informally known as Mordor Macula caps this premier high-resolution portrait of Charon, Pluto's largest moon. Captured by New Horizons near its closest approach on July 14, the image data was transmitted to Earth on September 21. The combined blue, red, and infrared data is processed to enhance colors, following variations in surface properties with a resolution of about 2.9 kilometers (1.8 miles). In fact, Charon is 1,214 kilometers (754 miles) across, about 1/10th the size of planet Earth but a whopping 1/2 the diameter of Pluto itself. That makes it the largest...

    10/01/2015 11:32:01 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 27 replies
    Breitbart ^ | 10/01/2015 | by JAMES DELINGPOLE
    Scientists have discovered a hitherto unknown cooling process which may pose a serious threat to man-made global warming theory. According to a study by the Institute of Catalysis and Environment in Lyon (IRCELYON, CNRS / University Lyon 1) and the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS), the oceans are producing unexpectedly large quantities of isoprene – a volatile organic compound (VOC) – which is known to have a cooling effect on climate. Isoprene is a gas that is formed by both the vegetation and the oceans. It is very important for the climate because this gas can form particles that...
  • Advanced aliens could 'conquer and colonise' our planet, warns Stephen Hawking

    10/01/2015 7:22:28 AM PDT · by PROCON · 130 replies ^ | Sep. 30, 2015 | Jeff Parsons
    The world famous physicist has admitted that if aliens came to visit Earth, the outcome might not be a positive oneStephen Hawking has tackled the mysteries of the universe his entire life. Now the world-renowned scientist has some new things to say about a potential alien invasion . "If aliens visit us, the outcome could be much like when Columbus landed in America, which didn’t turn out well for the Native Americans," Professor Hawking told El País . "Such advanced aliens would perhaps become nomads, looking to conquer and colonize whatever planets they can reach," he said.
  • Evolution's Top Example Topples

    10/01/2015 6:16:47 AM PDT · by lasereye · 74 replies
    On February 24, 1988, evolutionary biologist Richard Lenski began an ingenious ongoing experiment to test and demonstrate evolution. He and his coworkers have nursed thousands of generations of the common gut bacterium Escherichia coli, feeding them broth with limited nutrients. The team watched for decades to see if the germs might evolve a solution to this low-nutrient challenge. After about 31,500 generations, some finally cracked the code and changed. Evolution promoter Richard Dawkins wrote that this was “a beautiful example of evolution in action,” and that “creationists hate it.”1 The Harvard Gazette recently wrote, “Though the bacteria were originally genetically...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Eclipsed in Southern Skies

    10/01/2015 1:05:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | October 01, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This stunning panorama in southern skies was recorded on the colorful night of September 27/28 from Carngegie Las Campanas Observatory. A diffuse glow and dark rifts of the central Milky Way hang over domes of the twin 6.5 meter Magellan telescopes. But most eye-catching is the deep red glow of the Moon. Immersed in Earth's shadow during the much anticipated perigee-total-lunar eclipse, the Moon's surface reflects the light of sunsets and sunrises scattered and refracted into the planet's cone-shaped umbra. Along with the dramatic hue of the eclipsed Moon, other colors of that night captured by the sensitive digital...
  • 1st Century AD Inscription Found in Ancient Thracian Tomb... Solon's 'Prayer to the Muses'

    10/01/2015 12:31:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | September 25, 2015 | Ivan Dikov
    The 1st century AD inscription which has recently been discovered printed (most likely, by accident) on an ancient vessel in an Ancient Thracian burial mound near the town of Tatarevo in Southern Bulgaria has been found out to be a verse from the poem “Prayer to the Muses” by Ancient Greek poet and statesman Solon. The inscription, which was printed on a clay vessel, was found in August 2015 by the archaeologists excavating a Thracian tumulus (burial mound) repeatedly targeted by treasure hunters in the town of Tatarevo, Parvomay Municipality, in Southern Bulgaria. The vessel with the “printed” inscription in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Seasonal Streaks Point to Recent Flowing Water on Mars

    09/30/2015 1:04:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | September 30, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What creates these changing streaks on Mars? Called Recurring Slope Linea (RSL), these dark features start on the slopes of hills and craters but don't usually extend to the bottom. What's even more unusual is that these streaks appear to change with the season, appearing fresh and growing during warm weather and disappearing during the winter. After much study, including a recent chemical analyses, a leading hypothesis has emerged that these streaks are likely created by new occurrences of liquid salty water that evaporates as it flows. The source for the briny water is still unclear, with two possibilities...
  • Michelle Stirling: Paris is about saving green investors, not the Earth

    09/30/2015 11:49:19 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 10 replies
    Recently, it was revealed that Volkswagen had been duping diesel-emissions tests on some of its high-end environmentally friendly cars. People were outraged. The CEO resigned. About the same time, Alberta Premier Rachel Notley told the Alberta Chambers of Commerce that her province had better get its environmental house in order or it would have measures imposed upon it. She also said that Alberta has “bad air.”Really? I challenge that statement. In 2011, Canada’s air was judged to be the third highest quality in the world. In 2006, Environment Canada reported that Red Deer was an unusual hot spot for poor...
  • Scientists think they know how to test the parallel universes theory - for real

    09/30/2015 9:03:31 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 58 replies
    Science Alert ^ | 09/30/2015 | EUGENE LIM, Published by The Conversation.
    The existence of parallel universes may seem like something cooked up by science fiction writers, with little relevance to modern theoretical physics. But the idea that we live in a 'multiverse' made up of an infinite number of parallel universes has long been considered a scientific possibility - although it is still a matter of vigorous debate among physicists. The race is now on to find a way to test the theory, including searching the sky for signs of collisions with other universes. It is important to keep in mind that the multiverse view is not actually a theory, it...
  • Evolution: Will the Dinosaur Paradigm Be Next to Fall?

    09/30/2015 8:54:13 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 32 replies
    CEH ^ | 09/30/2015
    “Cold dinosaur” fossils have paleontologists questioning everything they thought they knew about dinosaur physiology. What else is up for grabs?How did dinosaurs survive far north in Alaska? That’s what researchers are asking about dinosaur bones excavated along the Colville River. The 30-foot hadrosaur is the northernmost dinosaur skeleton discovered so far. Science Daily quotes one of the researchers:“The finding of dinosaurs this far north challenges everything we thought about a dinosaur’s physiology,” said FSU Professor of Biological Science Greg Erickson. “It creates this natural question. How did they survive up here?” The Prince Creek Formation is said to be...
  • Weird blobfish-looking sofa shark discovered in Scottish waters for first time

    09/30/2015 8:19:29 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies ^ | September 29, 2015 12:44 BST | By Hannah Osborne
    The sofa shark had never been found in Scottish waters before - Scottish Shark Tagging Programme ====================================================================================================================== A species of shark that looks like a massive blobfish has been discovered off the coast of Scotland for the first time. The false catfish (also known as a sofa shark) was found by scientists conducting a deep sea survey with Marine Scotland. Pseudotrakias microdon live at depths of between 500m and 1,400m. For this reason, they are rarely encountered but have been caught in locations around the world, including the western Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean. They normally swim close to the...
  • How climate change is making Antarctica royally crabby (+video)

    09/30/2015 6:37:58 AM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 25 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 9-29-2015 | Eva Botkin-Kowacki
    Warming waters on the Antarctic continental shelf could be inviting to King crabs, a predator that has been unable to live in those chilly waters for tens of millions of years. Ocean waters are getting hotter, and that could make Antarctica crabby.  Warming global temperatures are prompting many animals to shift their ranges. One of those animals, the King crab, could be moving into shallower waters off the Western coast of Antarctica, where it hasn't been found for tens of millions of years.  The royal crustaceans, Lithodidae, now live on the continental slope off the western Antarctic Peninsula, a surprise...
  • 2200 year old walrus bones suggest the most famous medieval chess set might be Icelandic in origin

    09/30/2015 1:06:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Icelandmag ^ | September 28, 2015 | staff
    Carbon dating of walrus bones found in Snæfellsnes peninsula indicates that the bones are at least 2000 years old. A large number of walrus skulls and walrus tusks have been found around Garðafjara beach on the south coast Snæfellsnes. The first skull was discovered 1884. All in all the bones of 50 walruses have been found, most in the past 50 years. Biologists argue this indicates Snæfellsnes was the home of a sizable walrus colony prior to the settlement of Iceland. Large pre-settlement colonies of walruses in Iceland A previous theory, explaining the concentration of bone discoveries, speculated they came...
  • Scans show Pompeii victims 'in good health' [other than being dead]

    09/30/2015 12:36:18 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    The Local ^ | September 29, 2015 | Patrick Browne
    A recently launched project that is performing CAT scans on the remains of Pompeii victims contained within plaster casts has revealed that good health was widespread among people of the ancient city. “For sure, they ate better than we did,” orthodontist Elisa Vanacore said during a press conference in Pompeii on Tuesday, after analyzing some of the initial results. “They have really good teeth – they ate a diet that contained few sugars, and was high in fruit and vegetables,” she added, perhaps busting the image of Romans as decadent banquet-loving individuals who loved nothing more than a good binge...
  • Fit for a God? Ancient Booty Discovered in Transylvania

    09/30/2015 12:32:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Live Science ^ | September 29, 2015 | Owen Jarus
    Two large stashes of bronze weapons and jewelry, from the eighth century B.C., have been discovered in southern Transylvania, in Romania. The hoards date back to a time before minted currency had been invented or writing had spread to this part of Europe. Within the collections, which held 300 and 50 objects, respectively, the researchers discovered double axes, short swords and spears. They also found brooches, foot and arm bracelets, pendants, torques (a kind of neck ring), beads, and hairpins. (All the jewelry was made of bronze.) The researchers found parts of horse harnesses, as well. [See Photos of the...