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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Batteriser is a $2.50 gadget that extends disposable battery life by 800 percent

    06/03/2015 2:58:05 PM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 6 replies
    PC World ^ | 06/01/15 | Jon Phillips
    “The Batteriser has boost circuitry that will boost the voltage from 0.6 volts to 1.5 volts and will maintain voltage at 1.5—which is a brand new battery,” Roohparvar says. “There’s actually no IP [intellectual property] in the boost circuitry. Our technology is really a miniaturization technique that allows us to build the sleeve. We have some IP in some of the IC circuits that are in there, but the key is we’ve been able to miniaturize the boost circuit to a point that no one else has been able to achieve. “ To prove that he’s not peddling snake oil,...
  • RANKED: The 9 unhealthiest restaurant dishes in America

    06/03/2015 8:10:22 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 88 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 06/03/2015 | HAYLEY PETERSON
    A new report by the Center for Science in the Public Interest has identified the unhealthiest restaurant meals in America.For the center's annual "Xtreme Eating" list, its nutrition experts reviewed menus at 200 restaurant chains in the US to find the meals heaviest in calories, saturated fat, sodium, and sugar.Restaurants that made the list include The Cheesecake Factory, Outback Steakhouse, and Red Lobster.Here's the list, ranked lowest to highest by calories.9. The Cheesecake Factory: Warm Apple Crisp (1,740 calories) Center for Science in the Public InterestThis decadent dessert has whipped cream, caramel sauce, apple crumble, and two scoops of ice...
  • Another global warming catastrophe: the Sahara Desert is actually getting greener

    06/03/2015 7:16:51 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 15 replies
    Hotair ^ | 06/02/2015 | Jazz Shaw
    This story is actually quite fascinating and it obviously has something to do with changes in the climate, but just how to explain it all remains a subject of contention. You would think that increasing temperatures would make things worse in the deserts of the world, but in a rather counterintuitive instance of planet watching, it appears that the Sahara desert may actually be shrinking. A few thousand years ago, a mighty river flowed through the Sahara across what is today Sudan. The Wadi Howar—now just a dried-out riverbed for most of the year—sustained not just fish, crocodiles, and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Flyby Image of Saturn's Sponge Moon Hyperion

    06/03/2015 6:22:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | June 03, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why does this moon look like a sponge? To better investigate, NASA and ESA sent the Saturn-orbiting robotic spacecraft Cassini zooming past Saturn's moon Hyperion, once again, earlier this week. One of the images beamed back to Earth is featured above, raw and unprocessed. Visible, as expected, are many unusually shaped craters with an unusual dark material at the bottom. Although Hyperion spans about 250 kilometers, its small gravitational tug on Cassini indicates that it is mostly empty space and so has very low surface gravity. Therefore, the odd shapes of many of Hyperion's craters are thought to result...
  • Research help

    06/03/2015 5:02:28 AM PDT · by shoff · 19 replies
    Self | 06/03/2015 | Steven Hoffman
    I have tried in many different ways to find a listing of government grants. I am not looking to apply but I want to know who is granted my tax dollars. I have found when a group brags about getting one, but is there a listing of grants issued? Similar to the radicals in the sixties who complained their tax dollars going to the “military industrial complex” I don’t think mine should go to La-Raza, Blacklivesmatter, National Action Network, or CAIR among others. Am I looking in the wrong place or is this information purposely not published?
  • Earthquake Fact & Earthquake Fiction

    06/02/2015 3:27:40 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 34 replies
    USGS ^ | May/2015 | USGS
    Fact or Fiction? broken earth cartoon FACT: Earthquakes are sudden rolling or shaking events caused by movement under the Earth’s surface. An earthquake is the ground shaking caused by a sudden slip on a fault. Stresses in the earth's outer layer push the sides of the fault together. Stress builds up and the rocks slip suddenly, releasing energy in waves that travel through the earth's crust and cause the shaking that we feel during an earthquake. Faults are caused by the tectonic plates grinding and scraping against each other as they continuously and slowly move. In California, for example, there...
  • Father, son and holy sawfish! Researchers find ‘virgin birth’ in Florida endangered species

    06/02/2015 12:41:49 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    www.miamiherald.com ^ | 06-02-2015 | By Jenny Staletovich
    In a new study published Monday in the journal Current Biology, Stony Brook University researchers working with Florida scientists discovered seven endangered sawfish living in two rivers conceived through a process called parthenogenesis — the production of offspring without sex or male sperm, or in simpler terms, “virgin birth.” So ladies, take a bow. Apparently we can do it all. Scientists have long known that insects, crabs and other invertebrates can reproduce without partners. Female birds, reptiles and sharks in captivity have also occasionally surprised scientists with virgin births. But until now, researchers never knew whether the behavior happened in...
  • Medicine's Hidden Roots in an Ancient Manuscript

    06/02/2015 10:45:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 1, 2015 | Mark Schrope
    A Syriac scholar at Philipps University in Marburg, Germany, Dr. Kessel was sitting in the library of the manuscript's owner, a wealthy collector of rare scientific material in Baltimore. At that moment, Dr. Kessel realized that just three weeks earlier, in a library at Harvard University, he had seen a single orphaned page that was too similar to these pages to be coincidence. The manuscript he held contained a hidden translation of an ancient, influential medical text by Galen of Pergamon, a Greco-Roman physician and philosopher who died in 200 A.D. It was missing pages and Dr. Kessel was suddenly...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Polaris and Comet Lovejoy

    06/02/2015 10:34:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | June 02, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: One of these two bright sky objects is moving. On the right is the famous star Polaris. Although only the 45th brightest star in the sky, Polaris is famous for appearing stationary. Once you find it, it will always appear in the same direction -- all night and all day -- for the rest of your life. This is because the northern spin pole of the Earth -- called the North Celestial Pole -- points near Polaris. On the left, about ten million times closer, is Comet Lovejoy, which noticeably changes its sky position by the hour. The featured...
  • Environonsense—eco-faithful rant; DOD enforces EPA swiping water rights

    06/02/2015 7:51:45 AM PDT · by rktman · 2 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 6/2/2015 | A. Dru Kristenev
    Begin with brainwashed college students absurdly demanding their institution of ‘higher learning’, Western Washington University, rescind the masters degree awarded a state senator for admitting being a “climate agnostic.” Sen. Doug Ericksen, who holds a degree in political science and environmental policy, seems to have used the term to illustrate how man-made climate change has become a religion rather than science-based theory. Evidently, that, along with his removing verbiage from legislation referring to climate change as being a threat to the state, was enough to invoke the ire of the eco-faithful to ply WWU to revoke his degree. Thankfully, the...
  • Full Strawberry Moon on June 2, 2015

    06/02/2015 5:45:04 AM PDT · by onyx · 20 replies
    EarthSky ^ | June 2, 2015 | EarthSky
    Tonight – June 2, 2015 – watch for the full moon to group up with the planet Saturn and star Antares in the eastern sky at dusk and nightfall. As our Earth turns underneath the heavens tonight, look for this full moon, Saturn and Antares to move westward across the nighttime sky. The celestial threesome will climb highest up tonight around midnight, and will sit low in the west at dawn June 3. In North America, we commonly call the June full moon the Strawberry Moon. This year’s Strawberry Moon turns precisely full on June 2, 2015 at 16:19...
  • Japan Approves Plan for 26% Cut to Greenhouse Gases

    06/01/2015 9:30:36 PM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 11 replies
    Financial Review ^ | Tuesday, June 2, 2015 13:67 GMT | Chisaki Watanabe
    Cabinet ministers in Japan approved a plan to reduce greenhouse gases by 26 percent by 2030, a goal already criticized by environmental groups as too timid and statistically unsound. The cuts, first unveiled in a draft in April, will use 2013 as a baseline. Acceptance of the draft report was announced by Environment Minister Yoshio Mochizuki Tuesday in Tokyo. Final approval will be sought after public comment. Adopting 2013 as a starting point is contentious because it's a year when Japan recorded its second-highest emissions level ever as it burned more fossil fuels to replace nuclear power lost after the...
  • The Lowly Amphora (and ancient contact across the oceans)

    06/01/2015 10:43:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies
    The Mathisen Corollary ^ | Monday, February 6, 2012 | David Warner Mathisen
    Professor Elizabeth Lyding Will (1924 - 2009...) was one of the world's leading authorities on amphoras, an ancient two-handled container that her research demonstrated to be vitally important for tracing ancient trade patterns and for opening windows on tremendous amounts of information about ancient life and commerce. In a 2000 article entitled "The Roman Amphora: learning from storage jars," she discusses the diverse uses of "the lowly Roman amphora -- a two-handled clay jar used by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans to ship goods," describing both its main usage for the transportation of liquids including wine, olive oil, and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Pulsating Aurora over Iceland

    05/31/2015 10:01:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | June 01, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why do some auroras pulsate? No one is sure. Although this unusual behavior has been known for a long time, the cause remains an active topic of research. Featured here is a dramatic video that captured some impressive pulsating auroras in mid-March over Svínafellsjökull Glacier in Iceland. The 48-second video is shown is not time-lapse. The real-time pulsations are exemplified by sequences where the astrophotographer is visible moving about in the foreground. A close inspection of the enigmatic flickering sky colors reveals that some structures appear to repeat, while others do not. The quick rapidity of the pulsations seen...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Supernova 1994D and the Unexpected Universe

    05/31/2015 8:55:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | May 31, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Long ago, far away, a star exploded. Supernova 1994D, visible as the bright spot on the lower left, occurred in the outskirts of disk galaxy NGC 4526. Supernova 1994D was not of interest for how different it was, but rather for how similar it was to other supernovae. In fact, the light emitted during the weeks after its explosion caused it to be given the familiar designation of a Type Ia supernova. If all Type 1a supernovae have the same intrinsic brightness, then the dimmer a supernova appears, the farther away it must be. By calibrating a precise brightness-distance...
  • Education System now Graduating Al Gores from public schools

    05/31/2015 7:41:42 AM PDT · by rktman · 3 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 5/31/2015 | Judi MacLeod
    Teaching school age children how to be politically correct far exceeds educating them. In education, indoctrination has become a lucrative cottage industry, because it can count of the support of generous government grants. Rather than school kids wanting to talk about the family’s next planned trip to Disneyland, they will be probing the size of their parents’ carbon footprint, per the instructions of their classroom teacher—and coming up with creative ways to shrink it.
  • USGS Retracts Three ‘Ghost’ Earthquakes, Blames Northern California Sensors

    05/30/2015 7:06:05 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    l a times ^ | Ben Welsh
    In the past two days, malfunctions in the network of sensors that detect earthquakes in Northern California have issued three false alarms, forcing the U.S. Geological Survey to make a series of embarrassing retractions.. Just after midnight Friday morning, a magnitude 6.7 quake struck off the coast of Alaska. When its waves reached sensors operated by the Northern California Seismic Network, they were mistakenly interpreted as a 5.1 temblor near the Oregon border in Lewiston, officials say. ... The error occurred again Saturday morning after a magnitude 7.8 quake struck off the coast of Japan and the same Northern California...
  • It's not over 'til Saturn's squidgy moon sings: Cassini probe set for final Hyperion fly-by

    05/30/2015 3:45:24 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    .theregister.co.uk ^ | Kelly Fiveash
    Mission scientists have hopes of seeing different terrain on Hyperion than the mission has previously explored in detail during the encounter, but this is not guaranteed. Hyperion (168 miles, 270 kilometres across) rotates chaotically, essentially tumbling unpredictably through space as it orbits Saturn. Because of this, it’s challenging to target a specific region of the moon's surface, and most of Cassini's previous close approaches have encountered more or less the same familiar side of the craggy moon.
  • Sex, drugs and Philistines: A biblical psychedelic scene

    05/30/2015 1:00:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | May 28, 2015 | Daniel Bernstein
    The now-lackluster central Israeli town of Yavneh was apparently once the center of a thriving drug scene, according to Israeli researchers. Cutting-edge technology has allowed archaeologists to find traces of hallucinogenic materials, used over 3,000 years ago by the biblical Philistine people for spiritual rituals, Haaretz reported Thursday. Mind-altering potions and plants were commonplace in many ancient cultures, which believed that using the substances intensified the mystical experience of worshipers. In some cases, in which adherents had to endure physically painful ceremonies, the substances also served to numb the pain. In an upcoming symposium in Jerusalem's Hebrew University, aptly titled...
  • Hidden hazards that could trigger huge quakes and tsunamis off Californian coast (trunc)

    05/30/2015 6:46:30 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    Dailymail.com ^ | 29 May 2015 | Ellie Zolfagharifard For
    Researchers say that several long faults could cause magnitude 8.0 quakes and tsunamis within 90 miles (145km) of the coast. 'We're dealing with continental collision,' said geologist Mark Legg of Legg Geophysical in Huntington Beach, California, regarding the cause of the offshore danger. 'That's fundamental. That's why we have this mess of a complicated logjam.' The logjam Legg referred to is composed of blocks of the Earth's crust caught in the ongoing tectonic battle between the North American tectonic plate and the Pacific plate. The blocks are wedged together all the way from the San Andreas Fault on the east,...
  • Google Wants to Turn Your Clothes Into a Computer

    05/30/2015 6:15:31 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 11 replies
    NY Times ^ | 05/29/15 | Conor Dougherty
    On Friday, the second day of its annual developer conference, Google I/O, one of the search giant’s semi-secretive research divisions announced a project that aims to make conductive fabrics that can be weaved into everyday clothes. The effort, called Project Jacquard, is named for the French inventor of the Jacquard Loom, which revolutionized textile manufacturing and helped pave the way for modern computing. Much like the screens on mobile phones, these fabrics could register the user’s touch and transmit information elsewhere, like to a smartphone or tablet computer. They are made from conductive yarns that come in a rainbow of...
  • Large Sunken Byzantine Ship Discovered in Black Sea off... Crimean Peninsula

    05/30/2015 4:58:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | May 26, 2015 | Ivan Dikov
    The Byzantine vessel has been found at a depth of 82 meters, and is up to 120-125 meters long... The divers have found hundreds of amphorae which were allegedly transported on the sunken vessel, and probably contained oils or wine... there are over 100 amphorae, most of which are intact and sealed with wax, and that the shipwreck must be at least 1,000 years old. The average size of the amphorae is about 75 cm (appr. 2.5 feet) in height, and 50 cm (app. 1.7 feet) in length... The Russian underwater archaeologists and divers are not even sure whether the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Messier Craters in Stereo

    05/30/2015 3:06:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | May 30, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Many bright nebulae and star clusters in planet Earth's sky are associated with the name of astronomer Charles Messier, from his famous 18th century catalog. His name is also given to these two large and remarkable craters on the Moon. Standouts in the dark, smooth lunar Sea of Fertility or Mare Fecunditatis, Messier (left) and Messier A have dimensions of 15 by 8 and 16 by 11 kilometers respectively. Their elongated shapes are explained by an extremely shallow-angle trajectory followed by the impactor, moving left to right, that gouged out the craters. The shallow impact also resulted in two...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Saturn at Opposition

    05/29/2015 2:15:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | May 29, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Telescopic observers on Earth have been treated to spectacular views of Saturn lately as the ringed planet reached its 2015 opposition on May 23 at 0200 UT. Of course opposition means opposite the Sun in Earth's sky. So near opposition Saturn is up all night, at its closest and brightest for the year. These sharp images taken within hours of the Sun-Earth-Saturn alignment also show the strong brightening of Saturn's rings known as the opposition surge or the Seeliger Effect. Directly illuminated, the ring's icy particles cast no shadows and strongly backscatter sunlight toward planet Earth, creating the dramatic...
  • How James Patterson's novel 'Zoo' became a series on CBS

    05/29/2015 11:52:53 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 15 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | May 29, 2015 | T.L. Stanley
    No need to head to the multiplex for big action, special effects and hair-raising thrills, says bestselling author James Patterson, when the CBS adaptation of his novel, "Zoo," promises all that — and rampaging wildlife, to boot. "It should give the summer movies a run for their money," said Patterson, a populist literary star perhaps best known for his Alex Cross franchise, less so for being understated. "There's horror, sci-fi, suspense. It's kind of James Patterson meets Stephen King meets Michael Crichton. It's a scary fable."
  • California’s largest lake is slipping away amid an epic drought

    05/29/2015 11:06:23 AM PDT · by CedarDave · 49 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | May 28, 2015 | Todd C. Frankel
    The Salton Sea is the largest lake in California, 360 square miles of unlikely liquid pooled in the middle of the Sonoran Desert. Now the sea is slipping away. The Salton Sea needs more water — but so does just about every other place in California. And what is happening here perfectly illustrates the fight over water in the West, where epic drought has revived decades-old battles and the simple solutions have all been tried. Allowing the Salton Sea to shrink unabated would be catastrophic, experts say. Dried lake bed, called playa, is lighter and flies farther than ordinary soil....
  • Woman meets man who got dead brother's face in transplant

    05/29/2015 10:29:38 AM PDT · by windcliff · 20 replies
    Hindustan Times ^ | May 29 2015 | unknown
    In an emotional get-together, a woman has met for the first time a man who received her late brother's face in a groundbreaking transplant. Rebekah Aversano visited Richard Norris at his Virginia home and stroked his face — which once belonged to her 21-year-old brother Josh. "Do you mind if I touch it?" Aversano asked during the emotional meeting filmed by "60 Minutes Australia'. The family of Aversano had donated the face of Josh to Richard Norris, who had suffered severe facial disfigurement after accidentally shooting himself in 1997 when he was 22. Norris, now 39, had undergone dozens of...
  • A bicycle demonstrates that knowledge does not equal understanding

    05/29/2015 2:57:17 AM PDT · by rickmichaels · 22 replies
    SmarterEveryDay | April 24, 2015 | Destin Sandlin
    Many people believe you never forget how to ride a bike, but Destin Sandlin of the YouTube series Smarter Every Day might have just proved that theory wrong. When a fellow engineer presents him with a bicycle built so that the wheel turns the opposite direction of the handlebars, Destin realizes that this seemingly simple challenge is almost impossible. As Destin and behavioral scientists explain, this happens because our brains are so preconditioned to certain movements and muscle memory that going against these natural instincts is incredibly difficult. In fact, it is much easier for a child than an adult...
  • Two giant black holes might crash into each other in 21 years

    05/28/2015 6:23:02 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 57 replies
    Geek.com ^ | 5/23/15 | Ryan Whitwam
    In the center of most galaxies (ours included) there is a supermassive black hole that holds everything together. However, one galaxy 10.5 billion light years away looks like it might have two black holes, and just like in Highlander, there can be only one. Scientists believe the pair are going to crash into each other in just 21 years. This could provide an unprecedented opportunity to observe the mind-boggling physics of such an event. The galaxy in question doesn’t have a snazzy name — it’s known only as PSO J334.2028+01.4075. It’s what is known as a quasar, or an “active...
  • Experiment confirms quantum theory weirdness

    05/28/2015 6:02:31 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 50 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 5/27/15
    The bizarre nature of reality as laid out by quantum theory has survived another test, with scientists performing a famous experiment and proving that reality does not exist until it is measured. Physicists at The Australian National University (ANU) have conducted John Wheeler's delayed-choice thought experiment, which involves a moving object that is given the choice to act like a particle or a wave. Wheeler's experiment then asks - at which point does the object decide? Common sense says the object is either wave-like or particle-like, independent of how we measure it. But quantum physics predicts that whether you observe...
  • What is Lunar Regolith?

    05/28/2015 4:02:36 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    The surface of the Moon is covered with a fine powdery material that scientists refer to it as “lunar regolith”. Nearly the entire lunar surface is covered with regolith, and bedrock is only visible on the walls of very steep craters. The Moon regolith was formed over billions of years by constant meteorite impacts on the surface of the Moon. Scientists estimate that the lunar regolith extends down 4-5 meters in some places, and even as deep as 15 meters in the older highland areas. ... However, landings performed by robotic Surveyor spacecraft showed that the lunar soil was firm...
  • A century on, experts crack mystery of holes in Swiss cheese

    05/28/2015 10:05:08 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-28-2015 | Staff
    Eureka! After about a century of research, Swiss scientists have finally cracked the mystery of the holes in Swiss cheese. Despite what you may have been told as a child, they are not caused by mice nibbling away inside cheese wheels. Experts from Agroscope, a state centre for agricultural research, said the phenomenon—which marks famous Swiss cheeses such as Emmental and Appenzell—was caused by tiny bits of hay present in the milk and not bacteria as previously thought. They found that the mystery holes in such cheeses became smaller or disappeared when milk used for cheese-making was extracted using modern...
  • California Earthquake Prediction: Experts Rubbish Claim that Massive 9.8 Tremor Will Hit West Coast

    05/28/2015 7:18:41 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    ibtimes ^ | May 27, 2015 15:56 IST | Johnlee Varghese
    The 24-minute-long earthquake prophecy video, which has now been watched by over half-a-million people, predicts a massive 9.8 earthquake will hit California at 4pm local time on 28 May. The clip published by Frank Hoogerbeets, the founder and president of Ditrianum Media, claims he was able to assess the 'horrific' event using a computer program called Solar System Scope. The Huffington Post UK citing Hoogerbeets noted that his theory was based on the calculation that the 9.8 quake will strike when "no less than five planetary alignments will converge with the Earth." He claims that even Nostradamus, the famous French...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Nearby Spiral Galaxy NGC 4945

    05/28/2015 4:59:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | May 28, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Large spiral galaxy NGC 4945 is seen edge-on near the center of this cosmic galaxy portrait. In fact, NGC 4945 is almost the size of our own Milky Way Galaxy. Its own dusty disk, young blue star clusters, and pink star forming regions standout in the sharp, colorful telescopic image. About 13 million light-years distant toward the expansive southern constellation Centaurus, NGC 4945 is only about six times farther away than Andromeda, the nearest large spiral galaxy to the Milky Way. Though the galaxy's central region is largely hidden from view for optical telescopes, X-ray and infrared observations indicate...
  • Fire ants invade North Texas with heavy rains

    05/27/2015 1:58:36 PM PDT · by Daffynition · 114 replies
    WFAA.com ^ | May 21, 2015 | Philip Townsend
    The ants take turns walking on one another to stay out of the water and survive. They eventually build dense circles like the one Nathan captured on his phone. "I was floored when I saw them," said Nathan's dad, Dwayne. "I had never seen anything like that."
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Approaching Pluto

    05/27/2015 1:32:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | May 27, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Here comes Pluto. NASA's robotic New Horizons spacecraft is now beyond the orbit of Neptune and closing fast on the Solar System's most famous unexplored world. The featured time lapse video shows Pluto and Pluto's largest moon, Charon, orbiting their common center of mass in 13 frames taken from April 12 to April 18. Although blurry, images in the video now rival even the best images of Pluto yet taken from Earth. New Horizons remains on schedule to zoom past the distant dwarf planet on July 14.
  • Most European men descend from a handful of Bronze Age forefathers

    05/27/2015 10:33:04 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 63 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 05/27/2015 | University of Leicester
    Geneticists from the University of Leicester have discovered that most European men descend from just a handful of Bronze Age forefathers, due to a 'population explosion' several thousand years ago. The project, which was funded by the Wellcome Trust, was led by Professor Mark Jobling from the University of Leicester's Department of Genetics and the study is published in the journal Nature Communications. The research team determined the DNA sequences of a large part of the Y chromosome, passed exclusively from fathers to sons, in 334 men from 17 European and Middle Eastern populations. This research used new methods for...
  • NASA Selects Mission Science Instruments Searching for Habitability of Jupiter’s Ocean Moon Europa

    05/26/2015 5:06:39 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Ken Kremer
    In a major move forward on a long dreamed of mission to investigate the habitability of the subsurface ocean of Jupiter’s mysterious moon Europa, top NASA officials announced today, Tuesday, May 26, the selection of nine science instruments that will fly on the agency’s long awaited planetary science mission to an intriguing world that many scientists suspect could support life. “We are on our way to Europa,” proclaimed John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington, at a media briefing today outlining NASA’s plans for a mission dedicated to launching in the early to mid-2020s. ... “The...
  • Mystery Methane on Mars: The Saga Continues

    05/26/2015 12:13:04 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 30 replies
    Astrobiology Magazine ^ | May 14, 2015 | Johnny Bontemps
    A scientist has raised questions about the latest detection of methane on Mars, suggesting that NASA’s rover could be responsible for the mysterious burp. Highly unlikely, but not impossible, says the Curiosity team.
  • Some Devoted New Englanders Went for a Stroll in 1651 and Haven't Stopped Since

    05/26/2015 7:46:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | Updated May 23, 2015 | Ben Leubsdorf
    Paul King hiked through deep woods and scrambled over boulder-strewn hills, hunting for his next clue. "It's still here," he exclaimed at the sight of a bent red pine tree, one of eight landmarks demarcating the border between two northern New Hampshire towns: Albany, population 735, and Madison, home to 2,500 people and a famously large rock. The towns hired Mr. King, a surveyor, to spend a sunny day in early May fulfilling a 17th-century duty that has survived into the era of Google Maps... [and GPS]
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Starburst Galaxy M94

    05/26/2015 7:03:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | May 26, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What could cause the center of M94 to be so bright? Spiral galaxy M94 has a ring of newly formed stars surrounding its nucleus, giving it not only an unusual appearance but also a strong interior glow. A leading progenitor hypothesis holds that an elongated knot of stars known as a bar rotates in M94 and has generated a burst of star formation in the inner ring. Recent observations have revealed the outer, fainter ring is not closed and relatively complex. M94, pictured here spans about 30,000 light years, lies about 15 million light years away, and can be...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Galaxy Tree

    05/25/2015 12:23:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | May 25, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: First came the trees. In the town of Salamanca, Spain, the photographer noticed how distinctive a grove of oak trees looked after being pruned. Next came the galaxy. The photographer stayed up until 2 am, waiting until the Milky Way Galaxy rose above the level of a majestic looking oak. From this carefully chosen perspective, dust lanes in the galaxy appear to be natural continuations to branches of the tree. Last came the light. A flashlight was used on the far side of the tree to project a silhouette. By coincidence, other trees also appeared as similar silhouettes across...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Space Shuttle Rising

    05/25/2015 12:23:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | May 24, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's that rising from the clouds? The space shuttle. Sometimes, if you looked out the window of an airplane at just the right place and time, you could have seen something very unusual -- a space shuttle launching to orbit. Images of the rising shuttle and its plume became widely circulated over the web shortly after Endeavour's final launch in 2011 May. The above image was taken from a shuttle training aircraft by NASA and is not copyrighted. Taken well above the clouds, the image can be matched with similar images of the same shuttle plume taken below the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 7822 in Cepheus

    05/25/2015 12:23:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | May 23, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Hot, young stars and cosmic pillars of gas and dust seem to crowd into NGC 7822. At the edge of a giant molecular cloud toward the northern constellation Cepheus, the glowing star forming region lies about 3,000 light-years away. Within the nebula, bright edges and dark shapes are highlighted in this colorful skyscape. The image includes data from narrowband filters, mapping emission from atomic oxygen, hydrogen, and sulfur into blue, green, and red hues. The atomic emission is powered by energetic radiation from the hot stars, whose powerful winds and radiation also sculpt and erode the denser pillar shapes....
  • Fewer students study botany, more plant collections closing

    05/25/2015 9:39:52 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 38 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 25, 2015 12:36 PM EDT | Claudia Lauer
    The teeming plant world could become a virtual mystery in the coming decades as college students increasingly shy away from studying botany and universities across the U.S. shutter their long-standing herbaria. Since 1988, the number of research universities offering botany degrees has dropped by half, according to National Science Foundation research funding statistics. And the National Center for Education Statistics reports that fewer than 400 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral botany degrees were awarded in 2012. Educators say that’s because students are being pushed into more modern, technology-related majors. Current botanists fear that will lead to a dearth of people able...
  • Forget boobs and long legs: what men really look for in women

    05/25/2015 5:58:29 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 181 replies
    Men value intelligence in women far above large breasts and long legs, a Cambridge evolutionary biologist has claimed. Although having a large bust and never-ending pins are deemed by western culture as the epitome of femininity, when choosing a mother for their children, men look for brains first, Professor David Bainbridge, of the University of Cambridge said that intelligence is by far the most attractive quality for men looking for a long term partner because it demonstrates that his chosen partner is likely to be a responsible parent.
  • New Mexico investigator explains chupacabra sightings with climate change

    05/24/2015 3:40:22 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 16 replies
    mySanAntonio ^ | Joshua Fechter
    An investigative author from New Mexico with a history of scientifically debunking the chupacabra myth says he can explain sightings of the mythical creature. "When you do DNA testing on these alleged chupacabras, they're known animals," Benjamin Radford, who authored the 2011 book "Tracking the Chupacabra," told New Mexico television station KOB. "They are coyotes or dogs. In some cases, they're raccoons. The hairlessness can be explained by a disease called sarcoptic mange, which is caused by skin mites." Animals with advanced mange often die when exposed to cold, but because of warmer temperatures brought on by climate change, those...
  • Green Activists Explain How To Brainwash Children With Climate Pornography

    05/24/2015 11:15:13 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 5 replies
    Breitbart London ^ | 24 May 2015 | James Delingpole
    As the Jesuits almost said: “Give a child until he is seven and I will show you the fully indotcrinated, yogurt-weaving, polar-bear-hugging eco-loon.” Such, at any rate, has been the message at one of the panel discussions at this year’s luvvie-fest of impeccably correct thinking, the Hay Literary Festival, where a group of “CliFi” (climate fiction) authors have been singing the praises of brainwashing the impressionable young through the medium of kiddie-friendly climate pornography. […]David Thorpe, author of the book Stormteller, said […] “You can try to be seriously subversive and try to infect their minds with these viral ideas...
  • Computer Program Learning to Read Paleo-Hebrew Letters

    05/23/2015 11:40:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 4/30/2015 | Robin Ngo
    Tel Aviv University researchers are writing a computer program that can read Paleo-Hebrew letters inscribed on First Temple period ostraca. Researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) are developing a computer program that can read a script used by the Israelites over 2,600 years ago... The project was begun by TAU Professor of Archaeology Israel Finkelstein and Professor of Physics Eliezer Piasetsky six years ago. Since then, the researchers have enlisted the help of epigraphy, archaeology and math experts along with TAU Ph.D. math students Arie Shaus, Shira Faigenbaum-Golovin and Barak Sober. At the center of this ambitious project are First...
  • Google Tone Shares Links To Computers Within Earshot Using Beeps And Boops

    05/23/2015 9:46:54 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 21 replies
    Popular Science ^ | 05/22/15 | Jason Cipriani
    A new Chrome extension, called Google Tone, released this week makes it possible to share a URL with another computer in the room using a series of beeps and boops. The concept is dead simple yet instantly instills a sense of disbelief. A computer making seemingly random sounds can transmit the URL for the tab I have open in Chrome across the room? Get out. Full of skepticism, I decided to put it to the test. I installed the Chrome extension on a MacBook Air and a HP laptop running Windows 10. And you know what? It works! Click on...