Science (General/Chat)

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  • ‘The Arctic sea ice spiral of death seems to have reversed’

    09/01/2014 8:29:07 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | August 30, 2014 | Anthony Watts
    The headline is a quote by Dr. Judith Curry from a David Rose article in the Sunday Mail: Stunning satellite images show summer ice cap is thicker and covers 1.7million square kilometres MORE than 2 years ago…despite Al Gore’s prediction it would be ICE-FREE by now. The speech by former US Vice-President Al Gore was apocalyptic. ‘The North Polar ice cap is falling off a cliff,’ he said. ‘It could be completely gone in summer in as little as seven years. Seven years from now.’Those comments came in 2007 as Mr Gore accepted the Nobel Peace Prize for his...
  • Claim: Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate, but a ‘pause’ and other studies ...

    09/01/2014 8:05:07 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 22 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | September 1, 2014 | by Anthony Watts
    The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change Claim: Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate, but a ‘pause’ and other studies suggest ice melt isn’t the only factor Anthony Watts / 20 hours ago September 1, 2014 From the University of SouthamptonA new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2cm more than the global average of 6cm.Researchers at the University of Southampton detected the rapid rise in sea-level by studying satellite scans of a region...
  • National Geographic’s Warming Warning – 10 Years Later

    09/01/2014 1:17:33 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 12 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | August 31, 2014 | by Anthony Watts
    Geoff Sherrington writes: National Geographic Magazine had a Global Warming issue in September 2004. New instruments have given new data. By planning now, NatGeo can make a revised issue 10 years later, in September 2014. The 2014 edition should aim to correct what is now known to be wrong or questionable in the 2004 edition. We can help. Here are some quotes that need attention. The first three have some commentary, as is suggested for the remainder.1. “The famed snows of Kilimanjaro have melted more than 80% since 1912.” P.14 This might have been correct at the time of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Airglow Ripples over Tibet

    09/01/2014 12:50:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | September 01, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why would the sky look like a giant target? Airglow. Following a giant thunderstorm over Bangladesh in late April, giant circular ripples of glowing air appeared over Tibet, China, as pictured above. The unusual pattern is created by atmospheric gravity waves, waves of alternating air pressure that can grow with height as the air thins, in this case about 90 kilometers up. Unlike auroras powered by collisions with energetic charged particles and seen at high latitudes, airglow is due to chemiluminescence, the production of light in a chemical reaction. More typically seen near the horizon, airglow keeps the night...
  • Some People Don't Get Bitten By Mosquitoes — Why That's True Will Surprise You

    09/01/2014 10:54:33 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 69 replies
    Business Insider ^ | Sep. 1, 2014, 9:17 AM | Kevin Loria
    In a TED 2014 talk earlier this year in Vancouver, microbial ecologist Rob Knight explained that the bacteria, or microbes, on skin produce different chemicals, some of which smell more attractive to mosquitoes. [....] But there's an equalizer for those that naturally draw swarms of mosquitoes. The same pests are attracted to beer drinkers.
  • "High protein diet linked to spiked cancer risk akin to smoking 20 cigarettes a day: U.S. study"

    09/01/2014 4:30:03 AM PDT · by Jacob Kell · 108 replies
    National Post ^ | Mar. 5, 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    Eating too much protein could be as dangerous as smoking for middle-aged people, a study has found. Research which tracked thousands of adults for nearly 20 years found that those who eat a diet rich in animal protein are four times more likely to die of cancer than someone with a low-protein diet. The risk is nearly as high as the danger of developing cancer from smoking 20 cigarettes each day. Previous studies have shown a link between cancer and red meat, but it is the first time research has measured the risk of death associated with regularly eating too...
  • Real Vanilla Isn't Plain. It Depends On (Dare We Say It) Terroir

    08/31/2014 3:15:10 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 31 replies
    NPR ^ | August 29, 2014 | APRIL FULTON AND ELIZA BARCLAY
    Banish the phrase "plain vanilla" from your lexicon. Why? Because vanilla is one of the most complex spices around, boasting at least 250 different flavor and aroma compounds, only one of which is vanillin, the stuff that can be made artificially in a lab (and is used in a lot of processed foods). And as we discovered in a round-the-world tasting tour of single-origin vanilla beans — the real stuff — the plant has evolved distinctions in flavor and, dare we say it, terroir, at each stage of its turbulent, globetrotting history. You've likely heard of Madagascar Bourbon vanilla. It's...
  • Science Crowns Mozzarella The King Of Pizza Cheese

    08/31/2014 2:38:09 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 34 replies
    NPR ^ | Maanvi Singh
    Any way you slice it, Americans are obsessed with pizza. One in eight of us are noshing it on any given day, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. And the average American consumes pizza about 39 times a year, according to the NPD Group, a market research firm. The signature of a great American-style pizza is not the toppings du jour but the cheese: hot, gooey mozzarella, with big, dark splotches of caramelization. Pizzerias didn't happen upon that winning recipe by coincidence. Food scientists have been studying and finessing the low-moisture part-skim mozzarella we now put on most of...
  • Possible Cure for Type 1 Diabetes Announced

    08/31/2014 1:18:08 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 34 replies
    Daily Call ^ | August 30. 2014 | Jennifer Runyon
    I know this is a loaded and extremely controversial topic but there’s been a big break in the diabetes world. I thought it needed to be shared because no matter how you feel, it’s a big deal! ViaCyte Inc. has been given FDA approval to begin clinical trials on beta cell encapsulation. You may be wondering why this is a big deal. You see, in Type 1 diabetes the body’s own immune system attacks beta cells found in the pancreas. These beta cells produce insulin and the attack makes them unable to do that. Because the body can no longer...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Space Shuttle and Space Station Photographed Together

    08/30/2014 11:05:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    NASA ^ | August 31, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How was this picture taken? Usually, pictures of the shuttle, taken from space, are snapped from the space station. Commonly, pictures of the space station are snapped from the shuttle. How, then, can there be a picture of both the shuttle and the station together, taken from space? The answer is that during the Space Shuttle Endeavour's last trip to the International Space Station in 2011 May, a supply ship departed the station with astronauts that captured a series of rare views. The supply ship was the Russian Soyuz TMA-20 which landed in Kazakhstan later that day. The above...
  • Basic Mechanisms of a Fire Control Computer (1950's Navy Training Film)

    08/30/2014 8:53:14 PM PDT · by DemforBush · 41 replies
    youtube ^ | n/a | n/a
    A pretty neat little film about the various parts of the mechanical fire control computers of those days, and how they are applied to real-life gunnery issues.
  • African demand for ZMapp Ebola drug grows as it completely heals monkeys in lab test

    08/30/2014 6:42:52 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    Monkeys infected with the Ebola virus survived after being treated with an experimental drug in a study that suggests the drug may be effective even after severe symptoms are present. Monkeys were given three doses of the antibody-based treatment ZMapp starting three to five days after being infected with a lethal dose of Ebola. All 18 monkeys treated with ZMapp survived, while three that were not given the medicine died, according to the results published in the journal Nature. "It is a really, really important study" as it is the longest researchers have waited after infecting monkeys with Ebola to...
  • Neolithic site dating back 5,000 yrs discovered in C China

    08/30/2014 2:37:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    China Daily ^ | Friday, August 29, 2014 | Xinhua
    Archaeologists in Central China's Henan province have excavated a large neolithic settlement complete with moats and a cemetery. The Shanggangyang Site covers an area of 120,000 square meters and sits along a river in Zhengzhou, capital of Henan, dating 5,000 to 6,000 years back to the Yangshao culture, which was widely known for its advanced pottery-making technology. The site features two defensive moats surrounding three sides. Researchers have found relics of three large houses as well as 39 tombs, the large number suggesting several generations resided there, archaeologist Gao Zanling, a member of the Zhengzhou Administration of Cultural Heritage, said....
  • New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits

    08/30/2014 2:32:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | August 28, 2014 | Uppsala University
    The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication... The domestication of animals and plants, a prerequisite for the development of agriculture, is one of the most important technological revolutions during human history. Domestication of animals started as early as 9,000 to 15,000 years ago and initially involved dogs, cattle, sheep, goats and pigs. The rabbit was domesticated much later, about 1,400 years...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Starry Sky under Hollow Hill

    08/30/2014 12:02:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | August 30, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Look up in New Zealand's Hollow Hill Cave and you might think you see a familiar starry sky. And that's exactly what Arachnocampa luminosa are counting on. Captured in this long exposure, the New Zealand glowworms scattered across the cave ceiling give it the inviting and open appearance of a clear, dark night sky filled with stars. Unsuspecting insects fooled into flying too far upwards get trapped in sticky snares the glowworms create and hang down to catch food. Of course professional astronomers wouldn't be so easily fooled, although that does look a lot like the Coalsack Nebula and...
  • Shipwreck off Malta yields 700 B.C. cargo; some of oldest finds of Phoenician times ever

    08/30/2014 6:12:37 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 10 replies
    FOX News ^ | August 25, 2014 | ·Associated Press
    VALLETTA, Malta – Divers near a Maltese island have found an ancient ship's cargo that experts say is yielding what could be some of the oldest Phoenician artifacts.
  • Google announces its own delivery drones project

    08/30/2014 6:04:56 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 27 replies
    Economist ^ | Aug 29th, 2014
    Winging it Google announces its own delivery drones project Aug 29th 2014 | SAN FRANCISCO | Business and finance AT THE end of 2013, Amazon made quite a media splash when it revealed that it had been testing the use of small drones to deliver packages. The company is betting that the airborne marvels will eventually be able to transport parcels to customers within a ten-mile radius of the vast network of warehouses that it runs. But it is not the only tech giant with its eyes on the sky. On August 28th Google announced that its secretive "Google X"...
  • 'Wandering stones' of Death Valley explained

    08/29/2014 3:15:01 PM PDT · by Brother Cracker · 39 replies
    nature ^ | 27 August 2014
    Ending a half-century of geological speculation, scientists have finally seen the process that causes rocks to move atop Racetrack Playa, a desert lake bed in the mountains above Death Valley, California. Researchers watched a pond freeze atop the playa, then break apart into sheets of ice that — blown by wind — shoved rocks across the lake bed. Until now, no one has been able to explain why hundreds of rocks scoot unseen across the playa surface, creating trails behind them like children dragging sticks through the mud. “It’s a delight to be involved in sorting out this kind of...
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of brain boosts memory

    08/29/2014 8:47:09 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 4 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | Provided by Northwestern University
    Stimulating a particular region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. The discovery opens a new field of possibilities for treating memory impairments caused by conditions such as stroke, early-stage Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest and the memory problems that occur in healthy aging. "We show for the first time that you can specifically change memory functions of the brain in adults without surgery or drugs, which have not proven effective," said senior author Joel Voss, assistant professor of medical social...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Wizard Nebula

    08/28/2014 10:03:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | August 29, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Open star cluster NGC 7380 is still embedded in its natal cloud of interstellar gas and dust popularly known as the Wizard Nebula. Seen with foreground and background stars along the plane of our Milky Way galaxy it lies some 8,000 light-years distant, toward the constellation Cepheus. A full moon would easily fit inside this telescopic view of the 4 million year young cluster and associated nebula, normally much too faint to be seen by eye. Made with telescope and camera firmly planted on Earth, the image reveals multi light-year sized shapes and structures within the Wizard in a...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Messier 20 and 21

    08/28/2014 7:32:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | August 28, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The beautiful Trifid Nebula, also known as Messier 20, is easy to find with a small telescope in the nebula rich constellation Sagittarius. About 5,000 light-years away, the colorful study in cosmic contrasts shares this well-composed, nearly 1 degree wide field with open star cluster Messier 21 (top right). Trisected by dust lanes the Trifid itself is about 40 light-years across and a mere 300,000 years old. That makes it one of the youngest star forming regions in our sky, with newborn and embryonic stars embedded in its natal dust and gas clouds. Estimates of the distance to open...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way over Yellowstone

    08/28/2014 7:20:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | August 27, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Milky Way was not created by an evaporating lake. The colorful pool of water, about 10 meters across, is known as Silex Spring and is located in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, USA. Illuminated artificially, the colors are caused by layers of bacteria that grow in the hot spring. Steam rises off the spring, heated by a magma chamber deep underneath known as the Yellowstone hotspot. Unrelated and far in the distance, the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy arches high overhead, a band lit by billions of stars. The above picture is a 16-image panorama taken...
  • New Technology Could End The Debate Over Pipeline Safety

    08/28/2014 7:03:58 PM PDT · by bananaman22 · 2 replies
    Oilprice.com ^ | 28/08/2014 | James Stafford
    Who could have ever imagined that North America would surpass Saudi Arabia as the world’s largest producer of oil and natural gas liquids? A decade ago, that would have seemed laughable. Yet that’s exactly what has happened; and it’s not just Saudi Arabia that has been left in North America’s dust -- Russia has, too.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Flying Past Neptune's Moon Triton

    08/28/2014 6:55:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    NASA ^ | August 26, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What would it look like to fly past Triton, the largest moon of planet Neptune? Only one spacecraft has ever done this -- and now, for the first time, images of this dramatic encounter have been gathered into a movie. On 1989 August 25, the Voyager 2 spacecraft shot through the Neptune system with cameras blazing. Triton is slightly smaller than Earth's Moon but has ice volcanoes and a surface rich in frozen nitrogen. The first sequence in the video shows Voyager's approach to Triton, which, despite its unusual green tint, appears in approximately true color. The mysterious terrain...
  • Scientists Reveal the Genetic Prehistory of the New World Arctic Peoples

    08/28/2014 6:29:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, August 28, 2014 | unattributed
    Paleo-Eskimo people occupied the Arctic for more than 4,000 years, say researchers... Maanasa Raghaven of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues have tested this scenario by conducting genomic sequencing on extractions of 169 ancient human bone, teeth and hair samples from Arctic Siberia, Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. They compared them to the same from two present-day Greenlandic Inuit, two Nivkhs, one Aleutian Islander, and two Athabascans. What they found provides a new picture of the population history of the North American Arctic. Their analyses supports the model of the arrival of Paleo-Eskimos into North America as a separate migration from...
  • American Indian Oral Traditions and Ohio's Earthworks

    08/28/2014 6:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog ^ | August 25, 2014 | Brad Lepper
    ...So, while my Journal of Ohio Archaeology paper concludes rather pessimistically that there are no documented early American Indian traditions that speak reliably to the original purpose and meaning of the ancient earthworks, there is no reason to believe that traditional stories of contemporary tribes with historic roots in the eastern Woodlands could not include themes and elements that echo, if faintly, traditions of the Hopewell culture. And if that’s conceivable, and I think it is, then it would be worthwhile to look for them... One reason why it’s important to take seriously what American Indians have had to say...
  • Utah's Great Gallery rock art younger than expected, say scientists [1K-2K]

    08/28/2014 6:13:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 25, 2014 | Mary-Ann Muffoletto
    "The most accepted hypotheses pointed to the age of these paintings as 2,000 to 4,000 years old or perhaps even 7,000 to 8,000 years old," says Pederson, associate professor in USU's Department of Geology and lead author on the paper. "Our findings reveal these paintings were likely made between 1,000 to 2,000 years ago." The USU-led team's findings strike a key point about the art's creators: They may have co-existed with the Fremont people, who are credited with carving distinctly different pictographs found in the same region. "Previous ideas suggested a people different from the Fremont created the paintings because...
  • Mystery of Death Valley's moving rocks solved

    08/28/2014 6:11:20 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 9 replies
    AP ^ | 29 August 2014 | Anonymous
    For years scientists have theorized about how large rocks — some weighing hundreds of pounds — zigzag across Racetrack Playa in Death Valley National Park, leaving long trails etched in the earth. Now two researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, have photographed these "sailing rocks" being blown by light winds across the former lake bed. Richard Norris and James Norris said the movement is made possible when ice sheets that form after rare overnight rains melt in the rising sun, making the hard ground muddy and slick. On Dec. 20, 2013, the...
  • Hadrian's Wall dig unearths 2,000-year-old toilet seat

    08/28/2014 6:07:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    BBC News ^ | August 27, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000-year-old, perfectly preserved wooden toilet seat at a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland. Experts at Vindolanda believe it is the only find of its kind and dates from the 2nd Century. The site, near Hexham, has previously revealed gold and silver coins and other artefacts of the Roman army. The seat was discovered in a muddy trench, which was previously filled with rubbish. Dr Andrew Birley, director of excavations at Vindolanda, said: "We know a lot about Roman toilets from previous excavations at the site and from the wider Roman world, which have included...
  • 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    08/28/2014 6:00:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, August 20, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea. The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. The scientists found several pottery vessels beside the sarcophagus, and the tomb also contained...
  • Ancient DNA Sheds New Light on Arctic's Earliest People

    08/28/2014 4:40:35 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 17 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 8-28-14 | Heather Pringle
    The earliest people in the North American Arctic remained isolated from others in the region for millennia before vanishing around 700 years ago, a new genetic analysis shows. The study, published online Thursday, also reveals that today's Inuit and Native Americans of the Arctic are genetically distinct from the region's first settlers. Inuit hunters in the Canadian Arctic have long told stories about a mysterious ancient people known as the Tunit, who once inhabited the far north. Tunit men, they recalled, possessed powerful magic and were strong enough to crush the neck of a walrus and singlehandedly haul the massive...
  • Phoenician Artifacts Recovered Off Coast of Malta

    08/28/2014 4:25:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | Monday, August 25, 2014 | unattributed
    Scientists from the French National Research Agency and Texas A&M University are part of a team that has recovered 20 Phoenician grinding stones and 50 amphorae about one mile off the coast of Malta’s Gozo Island. Timothy Gambin of the University of Malta told the Associated Press that the ship was probably traveling between Sicily and Malta when it sank ca. 700 B.C. The team will continue to look for other artifacts and parts of the vessel, which sits at a depth of almost 400 feet and is one of the oldest shipwrecks to be discovered in the central Mediterranean....
  • "Slaves' Hill" Was Home to High-Status Craftsmen

    08/28/2014 3:44:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Thursday, August 28, 2014
    New information from excavations in southern Israel’s Timna Valley by Erez Ben-Yosef and Lidar Sapir-Hen of Tel Aviv University suggests that the laborers who smelted copper at the site 3,000 years ago were skilled craftsmen of high social status. Since the 1930s, it has been thought that the Iron Age camp was inhabited by slaves because of the massive barrier that had been unearthed and the harsh conditions created by the furnaces and desert conditions. The well-preserved bones, seeds, fruits, and fabric that have been recently recovered tell a different story, however. “The copper smelters were given the better cuts...
  • The most complete Ebola genome yet: What it can tell us

    08/28/2014 3:27:01 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    L.A. Times ^ | August 28, 2014, 3:04 PM | Deborah Netburn
    An international team of team of scientists has sequenced the RNA of 99 Ebola virus samples collected during the early weeks of the outbreak in Sierra Leone. The feat, described Thursday in the journal Science, gives researchers a powerful new tool in their effort to contain the deadly virus. ... Scientists are already scouring that sequence for clues to help them design effective drugs and vaccines. It could take years to find them all, said Sabeti, who studies infectious diseases at Harvard and at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Mass. For now, evidence embedded in the RNA reveals that the...
  • New Technology Could End The Debate Over Pipeline Safety

    08/28/2014 2:21:07 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    OIL PRICE ^ | 08/28/2014 | James Stafford
    Who could have ever imagined that North America would surpass Saudi Arabia as the world’s largest producer of oil and natural gas liquids? A decade ago, that would have seemed laughable.Yet that’s exactly what has happened; and it’s not just Saudi Arabia that has been left in North America’s dust -- Russia has, too. The surge in North American oil and gas production is arguably the most important development in energy over the last decade. That’s the good news. The not so good news is that North America doesn’t have nearly enough oil and gas pipelines to accommodate its 11-million-barrel-a-day...
  • Mystery of California's 'Wandering Stones' solved

    08/28/2014 10:20:39 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 32 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 4:07PM BST 28 Aug 2014 | By Hannah Marsh
    It's a geological enigma that's had scientists speculating for half a century. But the mystery behind Death Valley's 'Wandering Stones' has finally been uncovered. It was previously unknown what caused the rocks to move across Racetrack Playa, a desert lake bed in the mountains above California's Death Valley, leaving their distinctive trails behind them. But researchers have witnessed a thin layer of water freezing over the lake, before breaking into sheets the thickness of a window pane and nudging the rocks as they were blown by the breeze. “It’s a delight to be involved in sorting out this kind of...
  • Great news: You’re paying for a 1 year experiment to find out if the universe is a hologram

    08/28/2014 8:57:00 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 56 replies
    Hotair ^ | 08/28/2014 | Jazz Shaw
    Remember that episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation where Professor Moriarty tried to escape from the holodeck? Well, the folks at Fermilab probably saw it, since they are currently launching a one year series of tests to find out if our entire universe is a hologram. Do we live in a 2D hologram? There’s no short answer, but physicists believe it may be possible. The holographic principle — a property of particle physics’ string theory — proposes that information about a region of space can be ascertained by the information on the surface that surrounds it — much...
  • Constitutional chutzpah

    08/28/2014 6:26:15 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 1 replies
    New York Post ^ | August 27, 2014 | Seth Lipsky
    There are three ways something can become what the US Constitution calls the “supreme law of the land.” It can be made part of the Constitution by amendment, it can be passed by Congress as a law or it can be ratified by the Senate as a treaty. President Obama can’t get his climate-change agreement made supreme law of the land by any of those constitutional routes. Not even close. The Republican House doesn’t want it. The Democratic Senate won’t act. That’s because the people don’t want it. They’re no dummies. Even in drought-stricken California, the Hill newspaper reports, Democratic...
  • Eye Problems From Space Affect At Least 21 NASA Astronauts: Study

    08/27/2014 4:22:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 27, 2014 | Elizabeth Howell on
    How does microgravity affect your health? One of the chief concerns of NASA astronauts these days is changes to eyesight. Some people come back from long-duration stays in space with what appears to be permanent changes, such as requiring glasses when previously they did not. And the numbers are interesting. A few months after NASA told Universe Today that 20% of astronauts may face this problem, a new study points out that 21 U.S. astronauts that have flown on the International Space Station for long flights (which tend to be five to six months) face visual problems. These include “hyperopic...
  • Scientists raised these fish to walk on land

    08/27/2014 3:03:48 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 25 replies
    The Verge ^ | August 27, 2014 | Arielle Duhaime-Ross
    Raising fish on land seems like the sort of idea you’d get while recovering from general anesthesia. But for three McGill University researchers, it made perfect sense. How else would you find out what behavioral and physiological changes might have taken place when fish first made the move from sea to land over 400 million years ago? "I used to look at fins and their motion, and I always thought it was so interesting and complex," says Emily Standen, lead author of a study published in Nature today, and an evolutionary biomechanics researcher who now works at the University of...
  • Where's the Intelligent Design in Ohio House Bill 597?

    08/27/2014 7:41:49 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 5 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | August 27, 2014 | Casey Luskin
    Where's the Intelligent Design in Ohio House Bill 597? Casey Luskin August 27, 2014 5:56 AM | Permalink Just as they did back in 2006, the Darwin Lobby and the media have concocted a story that intelligent design is going to be taught in Ohio. According to a recent article in the Columbus Dispatch, "Intelligent design could be taught with Common Core's repeal," Ohio House Bill 597 "would allow intelligent design and creationism to be taught alongside evolution in science classes." You might expect that a bill to "allow intelligent design and creationism to be taught alongside evolution" would say...
  • Japan lab unable to replicate stem cell results

    08/27/2014 7:33:48 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 2 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 27, 2014 10:12 AM EDT | Elaine Kurtenbach
    The Japanese laboratory that retracted a paper reporting a potentially major breakthrough in stem cell research said Wednesday its researchers have not managed to replicate the results. Scientists at the government-affiliated Riken Center for Developmental Biology said they are still trying to match results reported in two papers published by the journal Nature in January and then retracted in July. […] (Riken scientist Haruko) Obokata and other researchers in Boston and Japan participating in the project said they used a simple procedure to turn ordinary cells from mice into stem cells. They exposed cells from spleens of newborn mice to...
  • Why Government Researchers Think We May Be Living in a 2D Hologram

    08/27/2014 7:06:43 AM PDT · by Ghost of SVR4 · 39 replies
    http://motherboard.vice.com/ ^ | 4-26-2014 | JASON KOEBLER
    Operating with cutting-edge technology out of a trailer in rural Illinois, government researchers started today on a set of experiments that they say will help them determine whether or not you and me and everything that exists are living in a two-dimensional holographic universe. It sounds completely off-the-walls insane, but the incongruities between Albert Einstein's theory of relativity and some of Max Planck's discoveries about the nature of matter can only be explained if we're living in a Matrix-style holographic illusion, according to Craig Hogan, director of the Department of Energy's Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics. ..... If so, that...
  • Report: Response to climate-change survey led to CEO's departure from PR Giant, Edelman

    08/26/2014 2:48:29 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 7 replies
    PR Week ^ | 08/2014 | Lindsay Stein and Frank Washkuch ,
    Edelman global CEO Richard Edelman said in a conversation with an editor of Vice’s Motherboard blog that former US CEO Mark Hass was fired from the agency in part because of the way he responded to an investigation into PR agencies’ work with climate-change deniers. Quoted by Motherboard senior editor Brian Merchant, the chief executive of the world’s largest PR agency said, "We fired the head of our US [division] in part because of that stupid note he wrote, about, you know, how we don’t answer these kinds of things." In response to inquiries from the Climate Investigations Center that...
  • N.C. State students develop nail polish to detect date rape drugs

    08/26/2014 12:31:37 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 30 replies
    Washington Times ^ | 8-25-14 | Jessica Chasmer
    Four male students at North Carolina State University have developed a prototype for a new nail polish line that changes color when it comes into contact with date rape drugs. Ankesh Madan, Tasso Von Windheim, Tyler Confrey-Maloney, and Stephan Gray founded Undercover Colors, coined as “the first fashion company working to prevent sexual assault,” The Mary Sue reported. A woman paints her nails with the polish, and when her nails come into contact with a liquid, the color will change if drugs like Rohypnol, Xanax, or GHB are present. “In the U.S., 18% of women will be sexually assaulted in...
  • Historian Claims The Louvre Museum Holds Ancient Amphipolis Tomb Treasures

    08/26/2014 10:56:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    greece.greekreporter.com ^ | Aug 26, 2014 | by Daphne Tsagari
    A prominent Greek historian claims that it is possible for the Louvre Museum in Paris to possess artifacts from the ancient Greek tomb currently being excavated by archaeologists in Amphipolis, Greece. The fame of the ancient Greek treasures allegedly hidden in the Amphipolis tomb has recently raised concerns whether the monument will be found intact, or if it had been looted in the past. Historian, Sarantis Kargakos, speaking to Antenna TV, said that the tomb has been looted in the past and that the monument’s interior won’t be intact. “At the spot where Ancient Amphipolis is found, a village named...
  • Greek archaeologists enter large underground tomb [Amphipolis update]

    08/26/2014 10:13:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 08/25/2014 | Staff
    Archaeologists excavating an ancient tomb under a massive burial mound in northern Greece have entered the underground structure, which appears to have been looted in antiquity. The Culture Ministry said Monday that archaeologists have partially investigated the antechamber of the tomb at Amphipolis and uncovered a marble wall concealing one or more inner chambers. However, a hole in the decorated wall and signs of forced entry outside the huge barrel-vaulted structure indicate the tomb was plundered long ago. The excavation will continue for weeks. The tomb dates between 325 B.C.—two years after the death of ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the...
  • How Long Do CDs Last? It Depends, But Definitely Not Forever

    08/26/2014 9:52:12 AM PDT · by a fool in paradise · 57 replies
    NPR ^ | August 18, 2014 5:21 PM ET | Laura Sydell
    Many institutions have their archives stored on CDs — but the discs aren't as stable as once thought. There is no average life span for a CD, says preservationist Michele Youket, "because there is no average disc." --- Back in the 1990s, historical societies, museums and symphonies across the country began transferring all kinds of information onto what was thought to be a very durable medium: the compact disc. Now, preservationists are worried that a lot of key information stored on CDs — from sound recordings to public records — is going to disappear. Some of those little silver discs...
  • RoboBrain marks the dawn of cloud robotics

    08/26/2014 5:56:19 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 9 replies
    Load The Game ^ | August 25, 2014 | Emily Smith
    RoboBrain marks the dawn of cloud robotics Posted by: Emily Smith August 25, 2014 in Tech RoboBrain is the new attempt of artificial intelligence researchers to create a cloud-based database that would help out existing and future robots. In theory, RoboBrain is supposed to be a massive database of all the information robots have been taught so far and offers the possibility of increasing that knowledge as well. The main idea behind RoboBrain is that the cumulative knowledge robots have been able to gather should be collected in the same place, namely cloud storage, and made available to every robot...
  • The story of the A-10 and why the F-35 cannot replace it. (video)

    08/26/2014 4:58:24 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 46 replies
    wimp.com ^ | 8-26-2014 | wimp.com
    Pierre Sprey is one of the original designers of the A-10 Warthog during the 1970s. He provides insight into why the aircraft is so loved by ground troops in the military, and why its recent retirement from Air Force operations is so hotly debated.