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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Does colour only exist in our brain? Book argues it is simply a construct of the mind

    05/23/2015 6:28:43 AM PDT · by rickmichaels · 38 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | May 22, 2015 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    Roses aren't red and violets aren't blue. At least that's the premise of a new book, 'Outside Color', which puts forward the debate that colour is, in fact, an illusion. Author Dr Mazviita Chirimuuta uses the book to explore the historical debates that suggest colour doesn't exist - at least not in the literal sense. Light, however, does exist, and it's the mind that transforms that light into colour. 'Of all the properties that objects appear to have,'writes the University of Pittsburgh professor, 'colour hovers uneasily between the subjective world of sensation and the objective world of fact.' Optical illusions,...
  • Human hunting weapons may not have caused the demise of the Neanderthals

    05/23/2015 12:17:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 28, 2015 | Journal of Human Evolution
    "We looked at the basic timeline revealed by similar stone points, and it shows that humans were using them in Europe before they appeared in the Levant - the opposite of what we'd expect if the innovation had led to the humans' migration from Africa to Europe," said Dr. Kadowaki. "Our new findings mean that the research community now needs to reconsider the assumption that our ancestors moved to Europe and succeeded where Neanderthals failed because of cultural and technological innovations brought from Africa or west Asia." By re-examining the evidence, the researchers showed that the comparable stone weapons appeared...
  • Video: Research team discovers plant fossils previously unknown to Antarctica

    05/23/2015 12:10:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 30, 2015 | National Science Foundation
    Sometime about 220 million years ago, a meandering stream flowed here and plants grew along its banks. Something, as yet unknown, caused sediment to flood the area rapidly, which helped preserve the plants. Gulbranson splits open a grey slab of siltstone in the quarry to reveal amazingly well-preserved Triassic plant fossils, as if the leaves and stems had been freshly pressed into the rock only yesterday. "It's a mixture of plants that don't exist anymore," he says, "but we have some plants in these fossil ecosystems that we might know today, like ginkgo." On the one end are fossils from...
  • 5/22/2015 — Whole West coast moved over 48 hours — Oregon Earthquake near Erupting Volcano

    05/22/2015 3:14:25 PM PDT · by Twotone · 52 replies
    Dutch Sinse ^ | May 22, 2015 | Michael Janitch
    Over the past 48 hours the whole of the West coast of the United States has moved on at least a 4.0 magnitude level or greater. Currently, another mid-4.0 magnitude (4.2 M) earthquake has struck the West coast, off the shores of Oregon, near the Axial undersea volcano (which is currently erupting).
  • CAN TWO PEOPLE REPOPULATE EARTH?

    05/22/2015 7:17:18 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    Popular Science ^ | 05/21/2015 | Morgan Kinney
    Sci-Fi movies present no shortage of doomsday scenarios--asteroids, climate change and supervolcanoes just to name a few. But let’s say that one of these situations actually occurs, and humans are annihilated with the exception of one male and one female. Could humanity survive? The answer is a resounding...maybe, with the only certainty being that the surviving couple is going to be very, very busy. Variations on this scenario occur now and again in nature. They’re called bottlenecks, and they include any event that causes a drastic reduction in a population--think overhunting and natural disasters. Certain species, like dandelions, are great...
  • Josh Duggar apologizes amid molestation allegations, quits Family Research Council

    05/22/2015 4:45:51 AM PDT · by MadIsh32 · 84 replies
    Washington Post ^ | May 22nd 2015 | Elahe Izadi
    In the wake of a tabloid report alleging that he molested several underage girls while he was a teenager, reality-television star Josh Duggar said Thursday that he “acted inexcusably” and was “deeply sorry” for what he called “my wrongdoing.” The 27-year-old Duggar, a high-profile member of the evangelical Christian family that stars on TLC’s “19 Kids and Counting,” also resigned his post with the Family Research Council, a conservative lobbying organization. “Twelve years ago, as a young teenager, I acted inexcusably for which I am extremely sorry and deeply regret,” Duggar said in a statement posted on Facebook on Thursday....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Dark and Dusty Sky

    05/22/2015 4:25:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | May 22, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In the dusty sky toward the constellation Taurus and the Orion Arm of our Milky Way Galaxy, this broad mosaic follows dark and faint reflection nebulae along the region's fertile molecular cloud. The six degree wide field of view starts with long dark nebula LDN 1495 stretching from the lower left, and extends beyond the (upside down) bird-like visage of the Baby Eagle Nebula, LBN 777, at lower right. Small bluish reflection nebulae surround scattered fainter Taurus stars, sights often skipped over in favor of the constellation's better known, brighter celestial spectacles. Associated with the young, variable star RY...
  • Family Tree of Dogs and Wolves Is Found to Split Earlier Than Thought

    05/21/2015 10:13:44 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 14 replies
    New York Times ^ | MAY 21, 2015 | JAMES GORMAN
    The ancestors of modern wolves and dogs split into different evolutionary lineages 27,000 to 40,000 years ago, much earlier than some other research has suggested, scientists reported Thursday. The new finding is based on a bone fragment found on the Taimyr Peninsula in Siberia several years ago. When scientists studied the bone and reconstructed its genome — the first time that had been done for an ancient wolf, or any kind of ancient carnivore — they found it was a new species that lived 35,000 years ago. Based on the differences between the genome of the new species, called the...
  • Scientists Map 5,000 New Ocean Viruses

    05/21/2015 4:48:16 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 7 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 5/21/15 | Carl Zimmer
    Scientists Map 5,000 New Ocean Viruses In the few decades since viruses were first found in the oceans, scientists have only been able to identify a handful of species. A new survey has uncovered nearly all the rest. Photographs by Jennifer Brum, Tucson Marine Phage LabA few of the more than 5,000 viruses discovered during the Tara Oceans Expedition. By: Carl ZimmerMay 21, 2015 In March 2011, the Tara, a 36-meter schooner, sailed from Chile to Easter Island — a three-week leg of a five-year global scientific expedition. All but one of the seven scientists aboard the ship spent much...
  • SPACE FLIGHT NOW

    05/21/2015 4:12:48 PM PDT · by SandRat · 5 replies
    GREAT SITE TO KEEP UP ON SPACE HAPPENINGS
  • LHC smashes energy record with test collisions

    05/21/2015 7:41:33 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    bbc ^ | Jonathan Webb
    On Wednesday night, two opposing beams of protons were steered into each other at the four collision points spaced around the LHC's tunnel. The energy of the collisions was 13 trillion electronvolts - dwarfing the eight trillion reached during the LHC's first run, which ended in early 2013. ... Prof David Newbold, from the University of Bristol, works on the CMS experiment. He said the new energies present new technical challenges. "When you accelerate the beams they actually get quite a lot smaller - so the act of actually getting them to collide inside the detectors is really quite an...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 6240: Merging Galaxies

    05/21/2015 3:55:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | May 21, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: NGC 6240 offers a rare, nearby glimpse of a cosmic catastrophe in its final throes. The titanic galaxy-galaxy collision takes place a mere 400 million light-years away in the constellation Ophiuchus. The merging galaxies spew distorted tidal tails of stars, gas, and dust and undergo fast and furious bursts of star formation. The two supermassive black holes in the original galactic cores will also coalesce into a single, even more massive black hole and soon, only one large galaxy will remain. This dramatic image of the scene is a composite of narrowband and near-infrared to visible broadband data from...
  • Physicists find ways to increase antihydrogen production

    05/21/2015 12:33:22 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 5/20/15 | Lisa Zyga
    Physicists find ways to increase antihydrogen production 18 hours ago by Lisa Zyga feature Antihydrogen consists of an antiproton and a positron. Credit: public domain (Phys.org)—There are many experiments that physicists would like to perform on antimatter, from studying its properties with spectroscopic measurements to testing how it interacts with gravity. But in order to perform these experiments, scientists first need some antimatter. Of course, they won't be finding any in nature (due to antimatter's tendency to annihilate in a burst of energy when it comes in contact with ordinary matter), and creating it in the lab has proven to...
  • Law journal publishes special issue examining ‘Breaking Bad’

    05/20/2015 3:35:41 PM PDT · by CedarDave · 17 replies
    The Albuquerque Journal ^ | May 19, 2015 | Mike Bush
    The New Mexico Law Review is devoting its entire spring issue to eight contemporary legal issues – as seen through the entertaining but nonetheless very serious lens of a “Breaking Bad” perspective. Eight articles and essays include analyses of criminal procedure, a hypothetical arrest of Walter White, attorney-client communications, police practices, the war on drugs, and morality and the law. The Law Review, edited by University of New Mexico School of Law students, is due out Friday. An electronic version already has been posted online at lawschool.unm.edu/nmlr/current-issue.php. The Law Review’s faculty adviser, Professor Dave Sidhu, described the issue as creative...
  • Shedding new light on 175-year-old principle: New class of swelling magnets ... energize the world

    05/20/2015 11:06:44 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-20-2015 | Provided by Temple University
    A new class of magnets that expand their volume when placed in a magnetic field and generate negligible amounts of wasteful heat during energy harvesting, has been discovered by researchers at Temple University and the University of Maryland. The researchers, Harsh Deep Chopra, professor and chair of mechanical engineering at Temple, and Manfred Wuttig, professor of materials science and engineering at Maryland, published their findings, "Non-Joulian Magnetostriction," in the May 21st issue of the journal, Nature. This transformative breakthrough has the potential to not only displace existing technologies but create altogether new applications due to the unusual combination of magnetic...
  • Is data simply today's CB craze?

    05/20/2015 10:44:31 AM PDT · by Borges · 16 replies
    Cede Magazine ^ | 10/31/1996 | Roger Brown
    For example, at last month's Convergence: Digital Television and Internet conference in San Jose, Stephen Weiswasser, president and CEO of the Americast consortium, was decidedly bearish. "The number of people on-line and the growth rate of on-line is decreasing significantly," he was quoted as saying. "Right now, it appears that the average customer knows that the Web is not all it's cracked up to be." After a bit of analysis, I've determined that Weiswasser is right — and wrong at the same time. Without numbers to back up his claim that the on-line world is shrinking, I won't argue that...
  • Call of Duty increases risk of Alzheimer's disease

    05/20/2015 10:12:08 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 44 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 05/20/15
    University of Montreal study finds video game players navigate the screen using a key area of the brain Millions of boys could be at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and other mental illnesses in later life through playing action video games such as Call of Duty or Assassin's Creed, according to new research. Scientists say players navigate the screen using a key area of the brain called the caudate nucleus, which leads to loss of grey matter in the hippocampus. Previous studies have shown reduced volume in the hippocampus, which controls memory, learning and emotion, is associated with neurological and...
  • Quantum physics: What is really real?

    05/20/2015 9:21:49 AM PDT · by Reeses · 46 replies
    nature.com ^ | 20 May 2015 | Zeeya Merali
    Owen Maroney worries that physicists have spent the better part of a century engaging in fraud. Ever since they invented quantum theory in the early 1900s, explains Maroney, who is himself a physicist at the University of Oxford, UK, they have been talking about how strange it is — how it allows particles and atoms to move in many directions at once, for example, or to spin clockwise and anticlockwise simultaneously. But talk is not proof, says Maroney. “If we tell the public that quantum theory is weird, we better go out and test that's actually true,” he says. “Otherwise...
  • Last Call—for Ice Cubes?

    05/20/2015 6:20:54 AM PDT · by rktman · 19 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 5/20/2015 | Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser
    Better hurry up and fetch your ice cubes! The Antarctic is claimed to be melting at an unprecedented rate. NASA wants you believe that “Massive Antarctic Ice Shelf Will Be Gone Within Years.” More specifically, a team led by Ala Khazendar of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has found that the ice is melting so fast that the shelf will be gone before 2020. Presumably, that’s the good news. The bad news is that it’s all Hullabaloo. Neither the Arctic nor the Antarctic sea-ice is melting at any rate out of the norm. In fact, the opposite is true. As of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Cliff Looming on Comet 67P

    05/20/2015 4:46:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | May 20, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What that looming behind this gravel-strewn hill on Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko? A jagged cliff. The unusual double-lobed nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko lends itself to unusual and dramatic vistas, another of which has been captured by the Rosetta spacecraft that arrived at the comet last September. The featured cometscape, taken last October and digitally enhanced, spans about 850 meters across. Meanwhile, Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko continues to sprout jets as it nears its closest approach to the Sun in August. Along the way, Rosetta will continue listening for signals from Philae, a probe that landed on the nucleus but rebounded to an unknown...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Globular Star Cluster 47 Tucanae

    05/19/2015 2:30:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | May 19, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Globular star cluster 47 Tucanae is a jewel box of the southern sky. Also known as NGC 104, it roams the halo of our Milky Way Galaxy along with over 150 other globular star clusters. The second brightest globular cluster (after Omega Centauri) as seen from planet Earth, 47 Tuc lies about 17,000 light-years away and can be spotted naked-eye near the Small Magellanic Cloud in the constellation of the Toucan. The dense cluster is made up of hundreds of thousands of stars in a volume only about 120 light-years across. Recent observations have shown that 47 Tuc's white...
  • Secret space plane, solar sail and CubeSats launching Wednesday

    05/19/2015 10:08:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    CNN ^ | Amanda Barnett
    How much can you pack on top of one rocket? A United Launch Alliance Atlas V is carrying up the U.S. Air Force's so-called secret space plane, The Planetary Society's solar sail, and several CubeSats, or tiny satellites. The launch window is Wednesday from 10:45 a.m. ET and 2:45 p.m. ET at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. You can watch it on a webcast starting at 10:45 a.m. ET. The Air Force space plane is actually called the X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle. This is the fourth mission for the plane. It looks like a small space shuttle, but...
  • Vanity: Intense seatbelt enforcement this month

    05/19/2015 6:18:09 AM PDT · by Attention Surplus Disorder · 96 replies
    5/19/2015 | none
    That’s why one focus of the Click It or Ticket campaign is nighttime enforcement. Participating law enforcement agencies will be taking a no-excuses approach to seat belt law enforcement, writing citations day and night. In California, the minimum penalty for a seat belt violation is $161. Fair warning.
  • 'Eternal flames' of ancient times could spark interest of modern geologists

    05/18/2015 11:51:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-18-2015 | Provided by Springer
    Seeps from which gas and oil escape were formative to many ancient cultures and societies. They gave rise to legends surrounding the Delphi Oracle, Chimaera fires and "eternal flames" that were central to ancient religious practices - from Indonesia and Iran to Italy and Azerbaijan. Modern geologists and oil and gas explorers can learn much by delving into the geomythological stories about the religious and social practices of the Ancient World, writes Guiseppe Etiope of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Italy. His research is published in the new Springer book Natural Gas Seepage. "Knowing present-day gas fluxes...
  • Computing at the speed of light: Team takes big step toward much faster computers

    05/18/2015 11:32:22 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-18-2015 | Provided by University of Utah
    University of Utah engineers have taken a step forward in creating the next generation of computers and mobile devices capable of speeds millions of times faster than current machines. The Utah engineers have developed an ultracompact beamsplitter—the smallest on record—for dividing light waves into two separate channels of information. The device brings researchers closer to producing silicon photonic chips that compute and shuttle data with light instead of electrons. Electrical and computer engineering associate professor Rajesh Menon and colleagues describe their invention today in the journal Nature Photonics. Silicon photonics could significantly increase the power and speed of machines such...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Auroras and Star Trails over Iceland

    05/18/2015 9:57:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    NASA ^ | May 18, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It was one of the quietest nights of aurora in weeks. Even so, in northern- Iceland during last November, faint auroras lit up the sky every clear night. The featured 360-degree panorama is the digital fusion of four wide-angle cameras each simultaneously taking 101 shots over 42 minutes. In the foreground is serene Lake Myvatn dotted with picturesque rock formations left over from ancient lava flows. Low green auroras sweep across the sky above showing impressive complexity near the horizon. Stars far in the distance appear to show unusual trails -- as the Earth turned -- because early exposures...
  • New species of marine roly poly pillbug discovered near Port of Los Angeles

    05/18/2015 9:05:18 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 37 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | 05/18/2015 | Staff
    A new research paper published in the open access journal ZooKeys reports on a discovery made during a Los Angeles class fieldtrip—a new species of marine pillbug (Crustacea: Isopoda). While documenting that new species, a second new species of pillbug originally collected 142 years ago by biologists on a wooden sailing ship in Alaska was discovered in a collection room at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) by researchers Adam Wall and Dr. Regina Wetzer. The Los Angeles discovery was made during a Loyola Marymount University field trip for an invertebrate zoology lab course taught by NHM...
  • Heads or Tails: The Problem of Evolving Animal Body Plans

    05/18/2015 6:16:43 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 7 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | May 15, 2015 | Ann Gauger
    Heads or Tails: The Problem of Evolving Animal Body Plans Ann Gauger May 15, 2015 3:17 AM | Permalink Nearly all the animals we know have bilateral symmetry at some stage of their lives, meaning they have right and left halves that are mirror images of each other. These animals also have a head and a tail, a top and a bottom to them. The technical terms are anterior/posterior (A/P) and dorsal/ventral (D/V) axes (plural for axis, not the wood-chopping instrument). The exceptions are things like sponges, jellyfish, sea anemones, and small creatures like the Volvox I wrote about last...
  • The 10 smartest countries based on math and science

    05/17/2015 8:27:19 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 57 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 05/13/2015 | Matthew Speiser
    Singapore is the smartest country in the world, followed by Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, Finland, Estonia, Switzerland, Netherlands and Canada rounding out the top 10. The BBC says this is the conclusion of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), an economic think tank that outlined its findings in a new report ranking countries' school systems based on students math and science test scores. The report – which the BBC received early access to – will be formally presented at the World Education Forum in South Korea next week. Of the 76 countries ranked, the top half...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 2440: Pearl of a New White Dwarf

    05/17/2015 11:50:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | May 17, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Like a pearl, a white dwarf star shines best after being freed from its shell. In this analogy, however, the Sun would be a mollusk and its discarded hull would shine prettiest of all! In the above shell of gas and dust, the planetary nebula designated NGC 2440, contains one of the hottest white dwarf stars known. The glowing stellar pearl can be seen as the bright dot near the image center. The portion of NGC 2440 shown spans about one light year. The center of our Sun will eventually become a white dwarf, but not for another five...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Ares 3 Landing Site: The Martian Revisited

    05/16/2015 5:45:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | May 16, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This close-up from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's HiRISE camera shows weathered craters and windblown deposits in southern Acidalia Planitia. A striking shade of blue in standard HiRISE image colors, to the human eye the area would probably look grey or a little reddish. But human eyes have not gazed across this terrain, unless you count the eyes of NASA astronauts in the scifi novel The Martian by Andy Weir. The novel chronicles the adventures of Mark Watney, an astronaut stranded at the fictional Mars mission Ares 3 landing site corresponding to the coordinates of this cropped HiRISE frame. For...
  • Google’s Homemade Self-Driving Cars to Hit Roads This Summer

    05/16/2015 6:22:18 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 33 replies
    RedCode.net ^ | 05/15/2015 | Mark Bergen
    Here’s something that irks Chris Urmson: Sometimes people will get in self-driving cars, the spectacularly complex piece of technology he runs at Google and to which he has devoted most of his scientific career, and leave with a shrug. Once, Urmson was riding in one of Google’s Lexus SUVs down a freeway. Several minutes in, his fellow passenger turned to him, nonplussed. “That’s it?” Urmson, recalling the story on Google’s Mountain View campus earlier this week, threw up his hands: “Do you have any idea how hard this is?!” Soon, there may be many more blasé reactions to one of...
  • First Warm-Blooded Fish Found (opah or moonfish)

    05/15/2015 4:07:23 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 20 replies
    Live Science ^ | May 14, 2015 | Stephanie Pappas
    The car-tire-size opah is striking enough thanks to its rotund, silver body. But now, researchers have discovered something surprising about this deep-sea dweller: It's got warm blood. That makes the opah (Lampris guttatus) the first warm-blooded fish every discovered. Most fish are ectotherms, meaning they require heat from the environment to stay toasty. The opah, as an endotherm, keeps its own temperature elevated even as it dives to chilly depths of 1,300 feet (396 meters) in temperate and tropical oceans around the world.
  • McCain on Global Warming

    05/15/2015 3:32:25 PM PDT · by Don Corleone · 30 replies
    Senator McCain correespondence | 5/15/15 | Sen. McCain
    Thank you for contacting me regarding climate change. I appreciate knowing your thoughts on this issue. Last year, President Obama announced a plan to address climate change. Unfortunately, most of the Administration's proposals would simply impose burdensome regulations on American business that would be harmful to the U.S. economy. While I welcome the opportunity to debate proposals in the Senate, I do not support the use of executive orders to implement policy and place costly new regulations on the American industry. According to extensive international scientific studies, including reports by the National Academy of Sciences and the Intergovernmental Panel on...
  • Analysis of bones found in Romania offer evidence of human and Neanderthal interbreeding in Europe

    05/15/2015 1:52:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-14-2015 | Bob Yirka
    A Neanderthal skeleton, left, compared with a modern human skeleton. Credit: American Museum of Natural History DNA testing of a human mandible fossil found in Romania has revealed a genome with 4.8 to 11.3 percent Neanderthal DNA—its original owner died approximately 40,000 years ago, Palaeogenomicist Qiaomei Fu reported to audience members at a Biology of Genomes meeting in New York last week. She noted also that she and her research team found long Neanderthal sequences. The high percentage suggests, she added, that the human had a Neanderthal in its family tree going back just four to six generations. The finding...
  • Researchers demonstrate method that reduces friction between two surfaces to almost zero...

    05/15/2015 1:36:22 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 23 replies
    05-15-2015 | Bob Yirka
    A team of researchers working at Argonne National Laboratory, in Illinois, has found a way to dramatically reduce friction between two macroscopic scale surfaces—to near zero. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they accidently discovered the method and why they believe it might be useful for real world applications. As most people are aware, friction causes energy loss and wear and tear on mechanical parts—lubricants such as oil are used to help reduce friction and to dissipate heat, but scientists would really like to find a way to prevent it from happening in the...
  • 40 VolcanoesThe Ring Are Erupting Right Now, And 34 Of Them Are Along Of Fire

    05/15/2015 7:04:07 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 62 replies
    The Economic Collapse ^ | 05/14/15 | Michael Snyder
    As I have written about previously, there were a total of 3,542 volcanic eruptions during the entire 20th century. When you divide that number by 100, that gives you an average of about 35 volcanic eruptions per year. So the number of volcanoes that are erupting right now is well above the 20th century’s average for an entire calendar year. especially seems to be true of the Ring of Fire. If you are not familiar with the Ring of Fire, just imagine a giant ring that runs around the outer perimeter of the Pacific Ocean. Approximately 90 percent of all...
  • Airplane vs. Wind Turbine

    05/15/2015 6:59:57 AM PDT · by pabianice · 5 replies
    Google ^ | April, 2008
    October 2008 ACCIDENT April 4, 2008 - aircraft registered N511TE Event: two collisions with wind turbines. Cause: determination to reach the destination, Flight plan view, the conditions adverse weather. Consequences and damage: ends of the left and right wings sectioned. Aircraft: Beechcraft D 55. Date and time: vendredi April 4, 2008 17 h 20. Operator: private. Location: Plouguin (29), a place called "Lescoat". Type of flight: trip. Persons on board: Driver + 1. Qualifications and experience: driver age of 48, licencedepiloteprivéde1972 issued by the United States, qualifications MS, land and seaplane MEP, IR / ME, 7400 flight hours, 1476 of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Jupiter, Ganymede, Great Red Spot

    05/15/2015 4:03:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    NASA ^ | May 15, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In this sharp snapshot, the Solar System's largest moon Ganymede poses next to Jupiter, the largest planet. Captured on March 10 with a small telescope from our fair planet Earth, the scene also includes Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the Solar System's largest storm. In fact, Ganymede is about 5,260 kilometers in diameter. That beats out all three of its other fellow Galilean satellites, along with Saturn's Moon Titan at 5,150 kilometers and Earth's own Moon at 3,480 kilometers. Though its been shrinking lately, the Great Red Spot's diameter is still around 16,500 kilometers. Jupiter, the Solar System's ruling gas...
  • GE ENGINEERS JUST MADE A FULLY-FUNCTIONAL 3D PRINTED JET ENGINE

    05/14/2015 3:35:57 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | 05/14/2015 | Mike Murphy
    If you needed any more proof that you can make absolutely anything with a 3D printer, check out this video from GE. To showcase the versatility of 3D printing as a manufacturing process, a team of engineers at GE recently built a fully-functional, backpack-sized jet engine made entirely from 3D-printed parts. And it’s not just for show either — the team actually fired the engine up and took it up to 33,000 RPMs to demonstrate how robust the parts are. Now, obviously, since this is a jet turbine we’re talking about here, it wasn’t printed in ABS with the latest...
  • Traces of Ancient Earthquakes

    05/14/2015 12:45:29 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 11 replies
    Live Science ^ | 4/22/2016 | Becky Oskin
    PASADENA, Calif. — Shattered cave formations in the central United States may preserve one of the longest records of powerful earthquakes in this region. Historical records from European settlers provide vivid accounts of deadly earthquakes in states such as Missouri, Tennessee and Illinois. For instance, in 1811 and 1812, people saw the ground ripple like ocean waves when the New Madrid Fault Zone unleashed earthquakes thought to be greater than magnitude 8. However, no written accounts exist from before Europeans arrived. And most earthquake faults in the Midwest are hidden deep beneath the surface, so scientists can't dig into the...
  • This Strange Metal Might Be the Newest State of Matter

    05/14/2015 10:48:49 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 37 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | 12 may 2015 | John Wenz
    Researchers at Japan's Tohoku University are making a bold claim: an entirely new state of matter. The team, led by Kosmas Prassides, says they've created what's called a Jahn-Teller metal by inserting rubidium, a strange alkali metal element, into buckyballs, a pure carbon structure which has a spherical shape from a series of interlocking polygons (think of the Epcot Center, but in microscopic size.) Advertisement - Continue Reading Below Buckyballs, which are somewhat related to other supermaterials like graphene and carbon nanotubes, are already known for their superconductive capabilities. Here, while combining buckyballs and rubidium, the researchers created a...
  • Stephen Hawking warns computers will overtake humans within 100 years

    05/14/2015 4:46:48 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 28 replies
    Tech World ^ | 05/14/15 | Sam Shead
    Stephen Hawking today warned that computers will overtake humans in terms of intelligence at some point within the next century. Speaking at the Zeitgeist 2015 conference in London, the internationally renowned cosmologist and Cambridge University professor, said: “Computers will overtake humans with AI at some within the next 100 years. When that happens, we need to make sure the computers have goals aligned with ours.” Hawking, who signed an open letter alongside Elon Musk earlier this year warning AI development should not go on uncontrolled, added: “Our future is a race between the growing power of technology and the wisdom...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Dwarf Planet, Bright Spot

    05/14/2015 3:45:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | May 14, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Now at Ceres, Dawn's camera recorded this closer view of the dwarf planet's northern hemisphere and one of its mysterious bright spots on May 4. A sunlit portrait of a small, dark world about 950 kilometers in diameter, the image is part of a planned sequence taken from the solar-powered spacecraft's 15-day long RC3 mapping orbit at a distance of 13,600 kilometers (8,400 miles). The animated sequence shows Ceres' rotation, its north pole at the top of the frame. Imaged by Hubble in 2004 and then by Dawn as it approached Ceres in 2015, the bright spot itself is...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Magnificent Horsehead Nebula

    05/14/2015 3:42:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | May 13, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Sculpted by stellar winds and radiation, a magnificent interstellar dust cloud by chance has assumed this recognizable shape. Fittingly named the Horsehead Nebula, it is some 1,500 light-years distant, embedded in the vast Orion cloud complex. About five light-years "tall", the dark cloud is cataloged as Barnard 33 and is visible only because its obscuring dust is silhouetted against the glowing red emission nebula IC 434. Stars are forming within the dark cloud. Contrasting blue reflection nebula NGC 2023, surrounding a hot, young star, is at the lower left. The gorgeous featured image combines both narrowband and broadband images....
  • Scientists want to send a fish-like ‘soft robot’ to swim the oceans of Europa

    05/13/2015 3:20:44 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    washington post ^ | Abby Ohlheiser
    Europa, one of the many moons of Jupiter, is a very promising address in the solar system for those who say it's possible we'll find life beyond Earth right here in the Milky Way. For one thing, researchers have pretty good evidence that a giant liquid ocean exists below the moon's icy crust. A group of researchers at Cornell has come up with an idea for an animal-like underwater rover that could one day explore Europa. The "soft robot" proposal just won a $100,000 grant from NASA's Innovative Advanced Concepts initiative -- an award for project ideas that are at...
  • Video: Research team discovers plant fossils previously unknown to Antarctica

    05/13/2015 11:13:48 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    National Science Foundation ^ | 4/28/2015 | Eric Gulbranson
    Erik Gulbranson, a visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, trudges up a steep ridge overlooking his field camp of mountain tents and pyramid-shaped Scott tents in Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys. A brief hike nearly to the top of a shorter ridge ends at the quarry, where picks and hammers have chopped out a ledge of sorts in the slate-grey hillside. Sometime about 220 million years ago, a meandering stream flowed here and plants grew along its banks. Something, as yet unknown, caused sediment to flood the area rapidly, which helped preserve the plants. Gulbranson splits open a grey slab...
  • Record Antarctic ice: Mawson base might have to relocate

    05/12/2015 6:27:32 PM PDT · by smartyaz · 6 replies
    WUWT ^ | 5/12/15 | Eric Worrall
    The record busting growth of Antarctic ice is threatening the viability of Australia’s Mawson Antarctic research station. According to The Australian; Satellite observations show a new daily record being set for ­Antarctic sea ice every day for the past two weeks. Annual records have also been broken every year for the past three years. Rob Wooding, general manager of the Australian Antarctic Division’s Operations Branch, said expanding sea ice was now causing serious problems. Last year, fuel supplies were flown to Australia’s Mawson base by helicopter because the harbour had failed to clear. Dr Wooding said the situation was “unsustainable”.
  • Physicists Are Philosophers, Too

    05/12/2015 6:16:56 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 12 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 5/8/15 | Victor J. Stenger, James A. Lindsay and Peter Boghossian
    Physicists Are Philosophers, Too In his final essay the late physicist Victor Stenger argues for the validity of philosophy in the context of modern theoretical physics By Victor J. Stenger, James A. Lindsay and Peter Boghossian | May 8, 2015 The ongoing feud between physicists and philosophers cuts to the heart of what science can tell us about the nature of reality. EditorÂ’s Note: Shortly before his death last August at the age of 79, the noted physicist and public intellectual Victor Stenger worked with two co-authors to pen an article for Scientific American. In it Stenger and co-authors address...
  • Breakup fears for massive (Larsen C) Antarctic ice shelf: study

    05/12/2015 6:08:47 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 45 replies
    AFP on Yahoo News ^ | 5/12/15 | Richard Ingham
    Paris (AFP) - The largest ice shelf in the Antarctic peninsula is being thinned by warmer seas and air and could catastrophically break up, scientists said on Wednesday. The loss of the Larsen C ice shelf could occur within a century but an earlier collapse cannot be ruled out, with major consequences for global sea levels, they said. "We now know that two different processes are causing Larsen C to thin and become less stable," said Paul Holland from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) who led the new research. "If this vast ice shelf... was to collapse, it would allow...