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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Hawaii volcano eruption forms new lava 'island' just off coast

    07/16/2018 2:35:55 PM PDT · by ETL · 24 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | July 16, 2018 | Travis Fedschun
    The ongoing eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano and continued lava flows into the sea has created a tiny new landmass off the Big Island, officials revealed Friday. The U.S. Geological Survey said the tiny island formed off the northernmost part of the ocean entry from Fissure 8, and was oozing lava similar to that of the larger lava flow along the coast. In photos posted by the agency, the "island" is just a few meters off shore, and about 20 to 30 feet in diameter. "It's most likely part of the fissure 8 flow that's entering the ocean—and possibly a...
  • Bloodstains on Shroud of Turin are probably fake, experts say

    07/16/2018 12:19:27 AM PDT · by Simon Green · 50 replies
    Fox News ^ | 07/15/18 | Christopher Carbone
    The Shroud of Turin, which has been revered by some Christians as the burial cloth of Jesus, could be a fake, according to a new forensic investigation. The investigation into the bloodstain pattern on the cloth was reported Tuesday in the Journal of Forensic Sciences and is apparently the first such analysis of the controversial shroud. Held in the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Turin, Italy, the shroud shows the image of a crucified man and has been analyzed and scrutinized for many, many years. The Vatican regards it as an icon, rather than a religious relic—and the...
  • Distinctive Projectile Point Technology Sheds Light on Peopling of the Americas

    07/16/2018 12:06:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | July 11, 2018 | Thomas J. Williams, Texas State U
    In the lowest layer of the Area 15 archaeological grounds at the Gault Site in Central Texas, researchers have unearthed a projectile point technology never previously seen in North America, which they date to be at least 16,000 years old, or a time before Clovis. While clear evidence for the timing of the peopling of the Americas remains elusive, these findings suggest humans occupied North America prior to Clovis - considered one of the oldest, if not the oldest, Paleo-Indian culture of North America, and dated to around 11,000 years ago. In 2002, Area 15 of the Gault Site in...
  • Fingerprint of ancient abrupt climate change found in Arctic [Younger Dryas]

    07/15/2018 11:22:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | July 9, 2018 | Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    A research team led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found the fingerprint of a massive flood of fresh water in the western Arctic, thought to be the cause of an ancient cold snap that began around 13,000 years ago... The cause of the cooling event, which is named after a flower (Dryas octopetala) that flourished in the cold conditions in Europe throughout the time, has remained a mystery and a source of debate for decades. Many researchers believed the source was a huge influx of freshwater from melting ice sheets and glaciers that gushed into the North Atlantic... However,...
  • Venus Meets A Crescent Moon (2018)

    07/15/2018 9:28:51 PM PDT · by CaliforniaCraftBeer · 24 replies
    Me ^ | July 15, 2018 | CaliforniaCraftBeer
    Can anyone else go outside and take shoot some decent local photos of tonight's Venus-Moon event with your DSLR? Please NO Interweb photos, ONLY originals from your local view, thanks!
  • Malaria and the Fall of Rome

    07/15/2018 4:42:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    BBC ^ | February 17, 2011 | Andrew Thompson
    Could an ancient children's burial ground contain clues about how one of the world's greatest empires came to an end? Andrew Thompson explores the theory that malaria was the silent killer responsible for the fall of Rome. Today in the west, most people have forgotten how deadly malaria used to be, although there were serious malarial epidemics in many parts of Italy as recently as the 1950s. But each year, mainly in Africa, it still kills over two million people, most of them children. While there are several mentions of a disease sounding very similar to malaria in historical documents...
  • The Best Radiocarbon-dated Site in Recent Iberian Prehistory [sudden end]

    07/15/2018 3:59:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, July 10, 2018 | University of Seville news release
    ...the experts have shown the end of the occupation of this part of the province of Seville happened between the 24th and 23rd centuries BCE, despite evidence of it being frequented and used in the Bronze Age (c. 2200-850 BCE). "In fact, the abandonment of the site seems rather abrupt, without a gradual transition towards a different social model. The possibility that the end of the Valencina settlement was due to a social crisis has been hinted at by the dates obtained from several human skulls separated from the rest of the skeletons in a pit in a Calle Trabajadores...
  • The New Story of Humanity's Origins in Africa

    07/15/2018 3:22:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | July 11, 2018 | Ed Yong
    Consider the ancient human fossils from a Moroccan cave called Jebel Irhoud, which were described just last year. These 315,000-year-old bones are the oldest known fossils of Homo sapiens. They not only pushed back the proposed dawn of our species, but they added northwest Africa to the list of possible origin sites. They also had an odd combination of features, combining the flat faces of modern humans with the elongated skulls of ancient species like Homo erectus. From the front, they could have passed for us; from the side, they would have stood out. Fossils from all over Africa have...
  • Romans had whaling industry, archaeological excavation suggests

    07/15/2018 2:09:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Nicola Davis
    Ancient bones found around the Strait of Gibraltar... dating to the first few centuries AD or earlier, belong to grey whales and North Atlantic right whales -- coastal migratory species that are no longer found in European waters. Researchers... add that Romans would not have had the technology to hunt whale species found in the region today -- sperm or fin whales which live further out at sea -- meaning evidence of whaling might not have been something archaeologists and historians were looking out for... The right whale was once widespread in the North Atlantic, with breeding grounds off the...
  • Medieval games board found in search for Pictish monastery [Hnefatafl]

    07/15/2018 1:14:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    The Scotsman (strong and handsome built) ^ | Thursday 05 July 2018 | Alison Campsie
    A medieval gaming board has been found by archaeologists working to find a lost Pictish-era monastery in Aberdeenshire. Archaeologist Ali Cameron said the board found near Old Deer was a "very rare" find with it used to play the Norse strategy game of Hnefatafl. A date for the board has yet to be established but a similar piece found in Birsay, Orkney, in 1989 was dated to the Late Iron Age/Pictish period from the 5th to 9th Century AD. Ms Cameron said: "It is a very rare object and only a few have been found in Scotland, mainly on monastic...
  • First dogs in the Americas arrived from Siberia, disappeared after European contact

    07/15/2018 12:57:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 54 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 5, 2018 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    By comparing genomic signatures from 71 mitochondrial and seven nuclear genomes of ancient North American and Siberian dogs spanning a period of 9,000 years, the research team was able to gain a clearer picture of the history of the first canine inhabitants of the Americas. The oldest dog remains in the Americas date to about 9,000 years ago... These dogs persisted for thousands of years in the Americas, but almost completely vanished after European contact, the researchers found... The team also discovered that the genomic signature of a transmissible cancer that afflicts dogs appears to be one of the last...
  • U.S. GOVERNMENT LIFTS BAN ON CODY WILSON’S 3D PRINTED GUNS

    07/15/2018 10:34:18 AM PDT · by 1_Inch_Group · 19 replies
    3dprintingindustry.com ^ | 11 July 2018 | BEAU JACKSON
    In a seismic decision from the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and U.S. Department of State (DOS), Cody Wilson’s open-source 3D printed firearm file sharing site Defense Distributed is no longer banned from distributing 3D models of guns. In the legal battle it was deemed that the ban was in breach of the First Amendment – imposing censorship on a gun maker’s rights to expression. It was also decided on the basis that certain types of guns are not “inherently military” and, seemingly, present less of a threat to the population.
  • NERF bazooka! (amazing YouTube video)

    07/15/2018 6:10:00 AM PDT · by Ciaphas Cain · 30 replies
    YouTube ^ | April 25, 2018 | Ryan & David
    These guys built a NERF bazooka/rocket launcher and it is positivalutely SCARY and awesome to behold. 2.5" barrel, pneumatic system powered by a 9-volt battery. The "NERF darts" are pool noodles with PVC fittings, put together and look exactly like ginormous official NERF ammo. 3D printed cosmetics including flip-up sights, safety switch and button to fire. Finally it's painted with the same scheme as real NERF toys.Here's the video of it on YouTube.
  • What Ötzi the Iceman ate before he was murdered

    07/15/2018 5:56:09 AM PDT · by ETL · 35 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | July 13, 2018 | Laura Geggel, Senior Writer
    A mere 2 hours before his grisly murder about 5,300 years ago, Ötzi the iceman chowed down on some mouthwatering morsels: wild meat from ibex and red deer, cereals from einkorn wheat and — oddly enough — poisonous fern, a new study finds. It's unclear why Ötzi ate the toxic fern, known as bracken (Pteridium aquilinum). But it's possible that he used the fern to wrap his food, almost like a piece of plastic wrap, and then unintentionally ingested some of the toxic spores the fern left behind, said study co-senior researcher Albert Zink, head of the Eurac Research Institute...
  • New evidence: The bones of the 'Princes in the Tower' show no relationship to Richard III

    07/15/2018 2:52:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    johnashdownhill.com ^ | July 27, 2016 | Press Release for The Secret Queen by The History Press
    The dental record reveals that Richard III had no congenitally missing teeth, in sharp contrast to the 'bones in the urn', where both skulls are said to present this genetic anomaly. Previously it has been argued that this feature provided strong evidence of the royal identity of the 'bones in the urn'. It was claimed that the 'Princes' inherited their missing teeth from their grandmother, Cecily, Duchess of York. But Dr Ashdown-Hill's latest discovery strongly suggests that the 'bones in the urn' are not related to Cecily's son, Richard III, who was a first degree relative of the 'Princes'. Scientific...
  • Alexandra Semyonova: Heritability of Behavior in the Abnormally Aggressive Dog

    07/14/2018 5:39:07 PM PDT · by Norski · 29 replies
    Dogsbite.org ^ | May 5, 2009 | Alexandra Semyonova
    View Academic Paper DogsBite.org was recently introduced to a variety of works by internationally acclaimed animal behaviorist Alexandra Semyonova -- born in the U.S. and educated at John Hopkins University and University College London. Semyonova writes with breathtaking honesty about issues that matter the most: the reality of selecting for aggression and the repeated denial by humane organizations and dog breeders that such selection bears no hereditary significance. Semyonova's 8-page academic paper explains, in easily understandable terms, the roots and results of selective breeding. Semyonova states in the opening sentence, "Probably everyone understands that all dog breeds we have created...
  • Is using magnets and copper wiring to power light bulbs a money saver?

    Aside that it is neat, is it actually worth the expense over time?
  • Researchers reconstruct the genome of the ‘first animal’

    07/14/2018 8:14:11 AM PDT · by Moonman62 · 54 replies
    IMPC ^ | 7/9/2018 | Jordi Paps
    Humans and mice share approximately 98% of genes, and have similar physiology and anatomy. This is because we share a relatively recent common ancestor, around 80 million-years-ago. In contrast, the ancestor of all animals lived over 500 million-years-ago. As genomic data becomes available for more animal species a detailed family tree can be created, allowing novel insight into the genomes of long extinct species. In the guest post below Jordi Paps summarises recent research that attempts to reconstruct the genome of the ‘first animal’ by using the genomic data available on living animals. The first animals emerged on Earth at...
  • Giant hogweed severely burns Virginia boy, 17, sending him to hospital, report says

    07/14/2018 7:50:17 AM PDT · by SMGFan · 29 replies
    MSN / Fox News ^ | July 13, 2018
    A Virginia teen suffered significant burns to his face and arm after reportedly being exposed to hogweed. Alex Childress, 17, was inflicted with second-and third-degree burns after unknowingly touching the plant while he was working outside at his landscaping job on Tuesday, according to the Richmond Times-Dispatch. Childress reportedly believed the plant was a weed and went to remove it from the ground. A person's skin can burn and blister after coming in contact with sap from the plant. Childress’ father, Justin, recalled to the outlet how his son told him he had a “really bad sunburn.” “The top layer...
  • Researchers Solve Mystery of 1,800-Year-Old Basel Papyrus

    07/13/2018 4:18:58 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    Sci-news ^ | 7/13/18 | Enrico de Lazaro
    A team of scientists at the University of Basel, Switzerland, has discovered that a 1,800-year-old papyrus from the Basel Papyrus Collection is an ancient medical text from late antiquity and that it was likely written by the famous Roman physician Galen. The University Library in Basel possesses a collection of 65 papyri, mostly in Greek and several in Coptic, Hieratic and Latin. Less than half of this collection was published by Ernst Rabel in 1917 in Papyrusurkunden der Öffentlichen Bibliothek der Universität zu Basel. With mirror writing on both sides, one of the Basel papyri — dubbed P.Basel 1A —...