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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Prospector finds monster gold nuggets because it's 1851 apparently

    08/25/2016 2:17:56 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 24 replies
    Mashable ^ | August 24, 2016 | Johnny Lieu
    "Striking gold" is mainly a term to express when someone gets really lucky nowadays, but by golly, someone has actually done it. A 145-ounce gold nugget has been reportedly found in Victoria, Australia by a real life prospector and could be worth more than A$250,000 ($190,710) when it goes to auction. The big 'ol nugget has been named "Friday's Joy" on account of the day it was found.
  • Our Solar System "Is in a Unique Place in the Universe -- Just Right for Life"

    08/25/2016 7:40:44 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 108 replies
    The Daily Galaxy ^ | 23 Aug, 2016
    Our solar system is in a unique area of the universe that's conducive to life, says John Webb and his colleagues at the University of New South Wales, who have carried out intensive study that threatens to turn the world of theoretical physics upside down. The team studied the fine structure in the spectral lines of the light from distant quasars from data from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile with stunning results that showed that one of the constants of nature --the Alpha appears to be different in different parts of the cosmos, supporting the theory that our...
  • Pizza drones are go! Domino's gets NZ drone delivery OK

    08/25/2016 5:58:07 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 29 replies
    NZ Hearld ^ | 08/25/16 | Holly Ryan
    Aerial pizza delivery may sound futuristic but Domino's has been given the green light to test New Zealand pizza delivery via drones. The fast food chain has partnered with drone business Flirtey to launch the first commercial drone delivery service in the world, starting later this year. Domino's Group chief executive and managing director, Don Meij said the company had been investigating innovative and new delivery methods as business had grown. This included looking at robotic delivery, which the government is still considering. Details around where the trial would be held have been kept under wraps - however Domino's said...
  • Crusader-era hand grenade surprises archaeologists

    08/24/2016 3:16:59 PM PDT · by sparklite2 · 48 replies
    Fox News ^ | August 24, 2016 | James Rogers
    A centuries-old hand grenade that may date back to the time of the crusaders is among a host of treasures retrieved from the sea in Israel. The hand grenade was a common weapon in Israel during the Crusader era, which began in the 11th century and lasted until the 13th century, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority. Grenades were also used 12th and 13th century Ayyubid period and the Mamluk era, which ran from the 13th to the 16th century, experts say. Haaretz reports that early grenades were often used to disperse burning flammable liquid. However, some experts believe that...
  • Doctors wake coma patient by JUMP-STARTING his brain using ultrasound

    08/24/2016 10:08:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 48 replies
    www.mirror.co.uk ^ | Updated 17:49, 24 Aug 2016 | by Andrew Gregory
    Within 24 hours the patient's responses had improved and in just three days he was fully conscious and had fist-bumped a doctor. Doctors have woken a coma patient for the first time ever by jump-starting his brain using a pioneering ultrasound technique. A saucer-sized device was put against the side of the 25-year-old patient’s head over a 10 minute period. Each of the 10 half-minute, low-intensity pulses created acoustic energy to stimulate brain tissue. The patient’s responses improved measurably within 24 hours. In three days he was fully conscious and had complete language comprehension. He could nod his head “yes”...
  • Gay men are 2% of population but 55% of AIDS cases: CDC

    08/24/2016 5:47:35 AM PDT · by massmike · 35 replies
    lifesitenews.com ^ | 08/24/2016 | Ben Johnson
    Although homosexual men are a tiny sliver of the U.S. population, they account for the majority of all Americans living with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has announced. Men who have sex with men (MSM) are two percent of the population but make up 55 percent of people who were HIV-positive in 2013, according to a CDC fact sheet released last Wednesday. More than nine out of 10 new HIV diagnoses (92 percent) come from young gay and bisexual MSM, ages 13 to 24. If these trends continue, one of every...
  • Va. geologist: Region should prep for future quakes

    08/23/2016 4:10:44 PM PDT · by COBOL2Java · 15 replies
    WTOP News (Washington DC) ^ | August 23, 2016 6:11 pm | Kristi King | @KingWTOP
    Damage from the 2011 earthquake in Louisa County, VirginiaDebris covers the floor of the Miller's Mart food store in Mineral, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)Earthquake damage in Sherman building, an Armed Forces Retirement Home, Washington DC, August 2011. WASHINGTON — The 5.8-magnitude earthquake that hit the D.C. metro area five years ago on Tuesday took many residents by surprise, but subsequent research reveals that earthquakes of even greater magnitude have originated from Central Virginia and a newly discovered fault line could shake the region again. “Within the last 10,000 years or so there have been significant earthquakes,” said David Spears, the...
  • Zika, a Formidable Enemy, Attacks and Destroys Parts of Babies’ Brains

    08/23/2016 12:06:55 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 30 replies
    NY Times ^ | AUG. 23, 2016 | PAM BELLUCK
    The images tell a heartbreaking story: Zika’s calamitous attack on the brains of babies — as seen from the inside. With a macabre catalog of brain scans and ultrasound pictures, a new study details the devastation done to 45 Brazilian babies whose mothers were infected with Zika during pregnancy. The study, published Tuesday in the journal Radiology, is the most comprehensive collection of such images so far, and it reveals a virus that can launch assaults beyond microcephaly, the condition of unusually small heads that has become the sinister signature of Zika. Most of the babies in the study were...
  • You could fit the entire human race into a sugar cube — and 13 other facts...

    08/23/2016 10:34:57 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 67 replies
    Business Insider ^ | Aug. 23, 2016 | Ali Sundermier
    The universe is a crazy place... It's full of exploding stars and immortal jellyfish and it's been kicking around for almost 14 billion years. Here are 14 awesome facts to put it all into perspective. If you unraveled all of the DNA in your body, it would span 34 billion miles, reaching to Pluto (2.66 billion miles away) and back ... 13 times.Source: Business InsiderIn fact, your body contains cosmic relics from the creation of the universe. Almost all of your hydrogen atoms were formed in the Big Bang, about 13.7 billion years ago.Source: PBSAnd when you tune your TV...
  • Is There Such a Thing as "Fat but Fit"?

    08/22/2016 8:27:36 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 50 replies
    August 18, 2016 | Lindzi Wessel
    These findings indicate that fat cells in obese people do something different than in healthy peopleA new study finds striking metabolic differences between fat cells from obese and normal weight people—but it’s not clear what the findings mean to overall health. WHY IT MATTERS: Obesity is associated with complications like diabetes and heart disease. But over the past 15 years, evidence has emerged that a subgroup of obese people are metabolically healthy, meaning they don’t have the insulin resistance, high blood sugar, high cholesterol, and high triglycerides typical of obesity. That has led to questions of whether treating the obesity...
  • A lengthening crack is threatening to cause an Antarctic ice shelf to collapse (Larsen C Ice Shelf)

    08/22/2016 6:20:34 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 43 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 8/22/16 | Andrew Freedman - Mashable
    A large rift is widening across an increasingly fragile Antarctic ice shelf, scientists found. The crack is spreading across the Larsen C Ice Shelf at an increased rate, threatening to carve out an iceberg the size of Delaware while destabilizing a larger area of ice roughly the size of Scotland. When this iceberg calving event happens — no one knows exactly when it will occur, except that it's getting closer — it will be the largest calving event in Antarctica since 2000, the third-biggest ever recorded and the largest from this particular ice shelf, scientists say. About 10 to 12...
  • The North Atlantic: Ground Zero of Global Cooling

    08/22/2016 10:59:47 AM PDT · by onona · 17 replies
    WUWT ^ | August 21 2016 | David Archibald
    The warning signs have been there for some time now – persistent failures of the wheat crop in Norway for example. The North Atlantic is cooling. The cooling trend was evident at the time of an expedition to investigate this phenonemon three years ago.
  • Inconvenient: Giant Coral Reef That ‘Died’ In 2003 Teeming With Life Again

    08/22/2016 9:31:15 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 39 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | August 18, 2016 | Anthony Watts
    From the “global warming and ocean acidification will kill everything, forever” and the “nature always finds a way” department comes this inconvenient truth.Back From The Dead: Giant Coral Reef That ‘Died’ In 2003 Teeming With Life Again In 2003, researchers declared Coral Castles dead. On the floor of a remote island lagoon halfway between Hawaii and Fiji, the giant reef site had been devastated by unusually warm water. Its remains looked like a pile of drab dinner plates tossed into the sea. Research dives in 2009 and 2012 had shown little improvement in the coral colonies.Then in 2015, a team of...
  • Occasional Birdy Thread

    08/21/2016 3:14:07 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 60 replies
    self ^ | Aug 21, 2016 | Me
    It's been 2 1/2 months since the last birdy thread was posted. Florida is a bit too hot for this old man to get out and shoot much in high summer. However, today I had a visitor. A little blue heron was feeding on my front lawn. That seemed a tad unusual. There was also a flock of white ibis. This time of year the ibis begin to gather in larger and larger flocks preparing for their winter migration. I got a face shot of this youngster. Their eyes are cool Several weeks ago I saw a family of Florida...
  • WHY NO ONE BELIEVED EINSTEIN

    08/20/2016 12:22:18 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 57 replies
    JSTOR Daily ^ | 19 Aug, 2016 | MATTHEW WILLS
    WWith hindsight, it seems as though scientific breakthroughs sweep quickly to universal acceptance. A paper is published and everybody says, “Eureka!” But that’s not necessarily the case. Sometimes scientists have too much invested in the status quo to accept a new way of looking at things. This was certainly true when Albert Einstein‘s 1905 paper on “special relativity” first challenged the British conception of ether. Einstein argued that space and time were bound up together (something he would elaborate on in his theory of general relativity of 1915, adding gravity to the mix of space/time), a complicated idea that contradicted...
  • Zika cases jump to 170 in California, sparking travel warnings

    08/19/2016 10:14:53 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 16 replies
    Los Angeles Daily News ^ | 8/19/2016 | Susan Abram
    California health officials on Friday urged travelers returning home from the Olympics as well as countries where Zika is spreading to continue to wear insect repellent and to practice safe sex for several more weeks, to help prevent the spread of the virus in the Golden State. While Zika is spread primarily through the bite of the black-and-white-striped Aedes mosquito, the virus also can be passed through sex, health officials said. They are mostly concerned with people returning home from the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, because Brazil has been hit hard by the virus. “Continue using insect repellent to...
  • New techniques boost understanding of how fish fins became fingers

    08/19/2016 2:56:56 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 44 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/17/2016 | University of Chicago Medical Center
    One of the great transformations required for the descendants of fish to become creatures that could walk on land was the replacement of long, elegant fin rays by fingers and toes. In the Aug. 17, 2016 issue of Nature, scientists from the University of Chicago show that the same cells that make fin rays in fish play a central role in forming the fingers and toes of four-legged creatures. After three years of painstaking experiments using novel gene-editing techniques and sensitive fate mapping to label and track developing cells in fish, the researchers describe how the small flexible bones found...
  • What if we're wrong? New book poses provocative question about human knowledge

    08/19/2016 7:59:16 AM PDT · by Leaning Right · 34 replies
    CBS News ^ | August 18, 2016 | JIM MCLAUCHLIN
    Hindsight is 20/20, right? That’s the premise of a new book that poses the question: What if we were wrong? Chuck Klosterman’s “But What If We’re Wrong?” (Blue Rider Press, 2016) deals with the fact that the great march of history shows us that, well … we’re always wrong. Aristotle had his run as the smartest man on the planet, but he got disproved by Galileo, who was trumped by Newton, until Einstein ruled the roost. And while there have been some hints of “proving Einstein wrong,” nothing has really stuck. But even so, scientific “fact” is a fact only...
  • Trump spokeswoman claims Clinton has rare brain disease

    A top spokesperson for Donald Trump claimed Thursday that Hillary Clinton has brain damage that impairs her ability to communicate. Speaking on MSNBC, Katrina Pierson alleged that Clinton has a disorder called "dysphasia," a condition brought on by brain trauma that erodes a person's ability to speak or comprehend language. "What's new are the other reports or observations of Hillary Clinton's behavior or mannerisms ... as well as her dysphasia, the fact that she's fallen, she has had a concussion, there are really interesting things out there," Pierson said. Trump has long claimed that Clinton lacks the physical stamina to...
  • Have We Reached the Athletic Limits of the Human Body?

    08/18/2016 10:36:11 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    Scientific American ^ | August 5 | Bret Stetka
    Record-breaking has slowed, but science could find new ways to make us keep getting stronger and fasterAt this month’s summer's Olympic Games in Rio, the world's fastest man, Usain Bolt—a six-foot-five Jamaican with six gold medals and the sinewy stride of a gazelle—will try to beat his own world record of 9.58 seconds in the 100-meter dash. If he does, some scientists believe he may close the record books for good. Whereas myriad training techniques and technologies continue to push the boundaries of athletics, and although strength, speed and other physical traits have steadily improved since humans began cataloguing such...
  • Super-vaccine to guard against all strains of pneumococcal disease (90 strains)

    08/18/2016 12:39:32 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 8 replies
    medicalxpress ^ | August 17, 2016 | Robyn Mills
    Lead researcher James Paton said G-PN would help to increase immune responses to pneumococcus because it kept the antigenic structure of protein surfaces on the bacterium. "Pneumococcus is a big deal in terms of disease and it is the biggest bacterial killer on the planet," he said. "There are currently similar wholesale vaccines being developed, which have used chemical killing but that is nowhere near as good. The fact that gamma radiation is being used to inactivate it makes it a better vaccine.
  • Fourth brain-eating amoeba case of the year being treated ( Florida )

    08/18/2016 11:54:23 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 9 replies
    CNN ^ | 8/18/2016 | Debra Goldschmidt
    An unidentified patient in Florida is being treated after being infected with a brain-eating amoeba last week, according to the Florida Department of Health. It is the fourth known case this year of infection by the parasite Naegleria fowleri. "We believe that the individual contracted the infection after swimming in unsanitary water on a single private property," said Mara Gambineri, the health department's communications director, noting that there is no risk to the general public. The parasite is almost always deadly. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 1962 and 2015 there were 138 known cases of...
  • CNN Launches Drone Operations To Film Americans

    08/18/2016 10:23:02 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 25 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 08/18/16 | Steve Guest
    According to a press release provided to The Daily Caller, Terence Burke, senior vice president of national news, said that “CNN’s cutting-edge development of technology to enhance the way we tell stories is a part of our DNA. We are proud to continue the tradition with CNN AIR, and to establish a unit that will expand our technological capabilities for newsgathering.” CNN has formed the “first media-related research partnership with the Georgia Tech Research Institute” and will be in a direct research agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration. According to the press release, in 2015, “CNN was selected by the...
  • Scientists find a salty way to kill MRSA

    08/18/2016 10:20:21 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 15 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | 8/16/2016 | Angelika Gründling
    Scientists have discovered a new way to attack Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The team, from Imperial College London, have revealed how the bacteria regulates its salt levels. The bacteria are a common source of food poisoning and are resistant to heat and high salt concentrations, which are used for food preparation and storage. The team hope to use this knowledge to develop a treatment that prevents food poisoning by ensuring all bacteria in food are killed. They are also investigating whether these findings could aid the development of a treatment for patients that would work alongside conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus bacterium...
  • 'S*** happens': What Hollywood director told co-ed who accused him and his friend of raping [tr]

    08/18/2016 7:55:50 AM PDT · by C19fan · 13 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | August 18, 2016 | Laura Collins
    The Hollywood director who has described being tried for rape as 'one of the most painful moments' in his life repeatedly changed his story and dismissed his accuser's pleas for help dealing with her trauma her with the words, 's*** happens'. The revelation comes in court records of the trial of Birth of a Nation actor, writer and director Nate Parker, 36, and his then college roommate, now co-writer, Jean Celestin, 36. They were tried and cleared of raping another Penn State University student in Parker's college apartment in 1999, where they had athletic scholarships as members of the college...
  • Airlander 10: Maiden flight at last for longest aircraft

    08/17/2016 3:14:22 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    BBC ^ | 08/17/2016
    The Airlander 10 - which is part plane and part airship - took off from Cardington Airfield in Bedfordshire. Its original test flight on Sunday was postponed, but it finally left the ground at 19:40 BST. The Ł25m aircraft measures 302ft (92m) long and is about 50ft (15m) longer than the biggest passenger jets. ... Christened the Martha Gwyn, the aircraft was first developed for the US government as a surveillance aircraft but the project was shelved amid defence cutbacks. ... The huge aircraft will be able to stay airborne for around five days during manned flights. HAV claims it...
  • The edge of the universe is closer than we thought...320 million light years smaller

    08/17/2016 5:41:51 AM PDT · by rickmichaels · 95 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Aug. 17, 2016 | Abigail Beall
    If the universe was infinitely old, as we used to assume, then it must be filled with an infinite number of stars and galaxies. So why is the night sky not completely lit up by the light from these stars? This question was first asked by the nineteenth century astronomer Heinrich Olbers, and the answer is, because of the age of the universe, not all of the photons have had enough time to reach us yet. The amount of universe we are able to see is called the observable universe, and according to a pair of astrophysicists, it just got...
  • Scientists on verge of discovering new fifth force that will change how we see the universe

    08/16/2016 6:53:07 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 26 replies
    National Post ^ | Aug. 16, 2016 | John-Michael Schneider
    Since the mid-1970s, modern physics has rested on the knowledge of four fundamental forces of nature: gravity, electromagnetism, the strong nuclear force, and the weak nuclear force. Now scientists are on the verge of discovering a fifth force of nature, which could change the field of physics forever. According to a recent paper published by University of California physicists in the peer-reviewed journal Physical Review Letters, what physicists thought was a new particle of matter could be a new force altogether.
  • Sea ice strongly linked to climate change in past 90 000 years

    08/16/2016 1:44:10 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 31 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 08/16/216
    Expansion and retreat of sea ice varied consistently in pace with rapid climate changes through past 90,000 years, a new study in Nature Communications shows. "The Arctic sea ice responded very rapidly to past climate changes. During the coldest periods of the past 90,000 years the sea ice edge spread relatively quickly to the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, and probably far into the Atlantic Ocean." says first author Ulrike Hoff, a researcher at Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate (CAGE). ... Hoff and colleagues studied the past distribution of sea ice, in the so far longest existing sea ice record...
  • The Constellations Are Sexist

    08/16/2016 9:37:06 AM PDT · by C19fan · 16 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | August 16, 2016 | Leila McNeil
    In her 1968 poem, “Planetarium,” the poet Adrienne Rich wrestles with the crisis of female identity through the lens of astronomy. Rich wrote the poem after learning about the case of Caroline Herschel, a 19th-century, German-born astronomer who discovered eight comets and three nebulae, and drew praise from the King of Prussia and London’s Royal Astronomical Society. Yet Caroline remained obscure compared with her brother, William, who discovered the planet Uranus.
  • It’s Easy to Be an Atheist if You Ignore Science

    08/16/2016 6:51:56 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 19 replies
    The Algemeiner ^ | August 10, 2016 | Rabbi Moshe Averick
    It’s Easy to Be an Atheist if You Ignore Science Although the general public is disconcertingly unaware of it, it is a fact that scientists do not have even the slightest clue as to how life could have begun through an unguided naturalistic process absent the intervention of a conscious creative force.Here are just a few well-chosen statements on the Origin of Life: (2016) “[There is] collective cluelessness…those who say this is well worked out, they know nothing, nothing about chemical synthesis…Those who think that scientists understand the details of life’s origin are wholly uninformed. Nobody understands…when will the scientific...
  • Black hole made in the lab shows signs of quantum entanglement

    08/15/2016 8:54:32 PM PDT · by brucedickinson · 42 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 8-15-2016 | Rebecca Boyle
    Steinhauer created a sonic black hole using a quantum state of supercold fluid called a Bose-Einstein condensate. The fluid flows through a tube in which lasers constrain the flow at two different energy levels, creating a kind of waterfall. Atoms reach supersonic speeds when they spill over its edge. This serves as the model event horizon. To measure Hawking radiation, he pinged the fluid with a short laser pulse. This created a sound particle known as a phonon, along with a partner particle, near the horizon – just as Hawking suggested happens near a real black hole. He then took...
  • Russians invent new Railgun superweapon

    08/15/2016 8:02:01 PM PDT · by fella · 39 replies
    Russians invent new Railgun superweapon
  • ACADEMIC ABSURDITY OF THE WEEK: FEMINIST CHEMISTRY?

    08/15/2016 12:30:53 PM PDT · by C19fan · 30 replies
    Hot Air ^ | August 15, 2016 | Steven Hayward
    Did you know there is an International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry? Neither did I, but of course it exists, for there really is no crazy identity politics “intersection” that doesn’t have its own journal read by dozens. The IJPC recently offered up a two-part article on “Gender in the Substance of Chemistry,” by Agnes Kovacs, who you will be unsurprised to learn is a professor of gender studies at Central European University in Hungary. Part 1 considers “the ideal gas,” which will certainly prompt a number of obvious suggestions from our regular commenters:
  • Obama: 'One of the Most Urgent Challenges of Our Time is Climate Change'

    08/15/2016 10:42:28 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 46 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | August 15, 2016 | 6:02 AM EDT | Susan Jones
    President Barack Obama picked one of the hottest weekends in the Northeastern U.S. to discuss climate change. “One of the most urgent challenges of our time is climate change,” the vacationing president said in his Saturday radio address. He touted his efforts to cut pollution, including from cars and trucks, assuring Americans, “we’re not done yet.” Obama announced that before he leaves office, “We’ll release a second round of fuel efficiency standards for heavy-duty vehicles. We’ll take steps to meet the goal we set with Canada and Mexico to achieve 50 percent clean power across North America by 2025. And...
  • CNN MSNBC ABC FOX CBS --- In 2013 Obama repealed the "Propaganda Law" (Smith–Mundt Act)

    08/15/2016 4:58:08 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 18 replies
    CNN MSNBC ABC FOX CBS --- In 2013 Obama repealed the "Propaganda Law" (Smith–Mundt Act)'Anti-Propaganda' Ban Repealed, Freeing State Dept. To Direct Its Broadcasting Arm At American Citizens [link to www.techdirt.com (secure)] The NDAA Legalizes The Use Of Propaganda On The US Public [link to www.businessinsider.com] U.S. Repeals Propaganda Ban, Spreads Government-Made News to Americans [link to foreignpolicy.com] US ends ban on 'domestic propaganda' [link to www.rt.com (secure)] US Government-Funded Domestic Propaganda Has Officially Hit The Airwaves [link to www.sfgate.com]  
  • Nissan revolution: could new petrol engine make diesel obsolete?

    08/14/2016 9:50:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    Reuters ^ | August 14, 2016 | Norihiko Shirouzu
    ATSUGI, JAPAN -- Japanese automaker Nissan Motor Co has come up with a new type of gasoline engine it says may make some of today's advanced diesel engines obsolete. The new engine uses variable compression technology, which Nissan engineers say allows it at any given moment to choose an optimal compression ratio for combustion - a key factor in the trade-off between power and efficiency in all gasoline-fuelled engines. The technology gives the new engine the performance of turbo-charged gasoline engines while matching the power and fuel economy of today's diesel and hybrid powertrains - a level of performance and...
  • NASA’s new climate model of ancient Venus shows a picture of a habitable world

    08/14/2016 6:07:49 AM PDT · by fluorescence · 35 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | August 12, 2016 | Ben Guarino
    For a 2-billion-year-long span, ending about 715 million years ago, Venus was likely a much more pleasant spot that it is today. To observe Venus now is to witness a dry and toxic hellscape, where the planet heats up to a scorching 864 degrees Fahrenheit. A super-strong electric wind is believed to suck the smallest traces of water into space. With apologies to Ian Malcolm, life as we know it could not find a way. But travel back in time a few billion years or so. Ancient Venus, according to a new computer model from NASA, would have been prime...
  • How is Ammonium chloride different that mixing ammonia and chlorine?

    08/13/2016 10:53:00 AM PDT · by rey · 33 replies
    I know never to mix cleaners and to certainly never mix ammonia and chlorine but many cleaners contain ammonium chloride. Is this not essentially ammonia and chlorine? If not, how does it differ? If it is similar, what is done to it so it doesn't kill the user? I am obviously not a chemist and have merely an nodding acquaintance with the periodic table, so I would ask that your explanations be simplified as much as possible, as Einstein said, "As simple as possible but no simpler." Thanks
  • Eye lens radiocarbon reveals centuries of longevity in the Greenland shark 400 yo)

    08/12/2016 12:42:21 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 23 replies
    Science ^ | 8/8/2016 | Julius Nielsen
    We tend to think of vertebrates as living about as long as we do, give or take 50 to 100 years. Marine species are likely to be very long-lived, but determining their age is particularly difficult. Nielsen et al. used the pulse of carbon-14 produced by nuclear tests in the 1950s—specifically, its incorporation into the eye during development—to determine the age of Greenland sharks. This species is large yet slow-growing. The oldest of the animals that they sampled had lived for nearly 400 years, and they conclude that the species reaches maturity at about 150 years of age. The Greenland...
  • Is it fair for Caster Semenya to compete against women at the Rio Olympics? [Intersex]

    08/12/2016 10:12:35 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    SI ^ | August 11, 2016 | Tim Layden
    It is likely that on the night of Saturday, Aug. 20, in the Olympic Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, a 25-year-old South African woman named Caster Semenya will win a gold medal. Her victory will come in the 800 meters, a race in which her times have been approaching a decades-old world record thought by many in the sport to be unapproachable. Her performance will be stunning: She is 5'10" and weighs 161 pounds, with muscular arms, broad shoulders and narrow hips. She has a severe jawline, hard and strong, and a competitor's unflinching eyes. In a 2009 article, Ariel...
  • Scientists Modified This $40 Cotton Candy Machine To Spin Artificial Organs

    08/12/2016 9:07:32 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    www.fastcodesign.com ^ | 02-10-2016 | John Brownlee via Vanderbilt News
    An off-the-shelf cotton candy machine from Target spins together gelatinous cubes of living capillaries. Go to your local fair and watch a carny spin you a cone of candy floss. You might not know it, but that's how your body is put together: the structure of cotton candy is remarkably similar to the fibrous tissue that knits together our organs and our bones. Now, a team of researchers are showing how a souped-up cotton candy machine could be the key to 3-D printing artificial organs on demand. In a new article published in the Advanced Healthcare Materials journal, an assistant...
  • Anybody Know What This IS? [vanity I guess]

    08/11/2016 9:12:28 PM PDT · by Paleo Pete · 97 replies
    Anyone happen to know what this thing is?
  • Audi Develops Suspension that Generates Electricity, Boosts MPG

    08/11/2016 9:07:18 AM PDT · by nascarnation · 16 replies
    TTAC ^ | 08/11/2016 | Steph Willems
    Audi just announced a new suspension system that harvests wasted energy and turns it into electricity, capable of adding juice to a vehicle’s 48-volt electrical subsystem. The automaker calls the system “eROT” after the electromechanical rotary dampers that capture kinetic energy and store it in a battery. Currently in the prototype phase, the system does away with conventional shock absorbers, replacing them with lever arms connected to a small gearbox and alternator. “Every pothole, every bump, every curve induces kinetic energy in the car,” said Stefan Knirsch, Audi’s technical development boss, in a release. “Today’s dampers absorb this energy, which...
  • Tabby’s Star: More weirdness

    08/11/2016 4:31:57 AM PDT · by samtheman · 32 replies
    http://earthsky.org/ ^ | August 10, 2016 | Deborah Byrd
    Remember Tabby’s Star? It’s the star that astronomer Tabetha Boyajian – who reported its strangeness in a Ted Talk in February, 2016 – famously called “the most mysterious star in the galaxy.” It’s mysterious because astronomers have never seen another star do what this star does. One explanation for the strange dimming of its light is that the star has an alien-built megastructure – a Dyson sphere – around it. Does it? Will we ever know for sure? Those are unanswered questions, but, while you’re pondering it, here’s the latest on this wonderful star. On August 3, 2016, two astronomers...
  • Genetic testing on animals in Germany tripled over decade

    08/10/2016 6:41:14 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 5 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 10 Aug 2016 11:30 GMT+02:00 | (DPA/The Local)
    A new study reveals that genetic manipulation of mice, rats, cows and pigs has increased threefold since 2004. Between 2004 and 2013, the number of tests conducted using genetically modified animals in Germany nearly tripled, according to reports by Funke Mediengruppe, citing a study by research group Testbiotech, which investigates the “consequences of genetic engineering”. In total nearly 950,000 animals, mainly mice and rats, were genetically tested in 2013 alone — one third of all animals on which scientific testing was conducted during that year in Germany. …
  • Pearland mom fights for transgender daughter's rights

    08/10/2016 4:33:18 PM PDT · by Extremely Extreme Extremist · 32 replies
    KHOU.COM ^ | 10 AUGUST 2016 | JACQUELINE CREA
    PEARLAND, TEXAS - The state of Texas heads to court on Friday to defend its bid to block the Obama administration’s recent guidance that said public schools should allow transgender students to use restrooms according to their gender identity. It’s not just lawmakers who are fighting over the issue -- it’s the people who are living it every day, including a 4-year-old and her mother in Pearland. As soon as she could, Kai Shappley gravitated towards dresses and dolls. But even though she was born a boy named Joseph Paul, she made it clear what she identified as. “By age...
  • Evidence from China shows how plants colonized the land

    08/10/2016 10:15:05 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 14 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/8/2016 | University of Bristol
    New fossil finds from China push back the origins of deep soils by 20 million years, new research has uncovered. This is a key part of the stepwise conquest of the land and transformation of the continents, researchers from the universities of Peking and Bristol have discovered. One of the greatest transitions in Earth history was the greening of the land. Up to 450 million years ago, there was no life outside water, and the land surface was a rocky landscape. Without plants there were no soils, and the rocky landscape eroded fast. Then the first tiny plants crept out...
  • Royal palace discovered in area believed to be birthplace of King Arthur

    08/10/2016 1:38:35 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 28 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 8/3/16 | Nicola Harley
    A royal palace has been discovered in the area reputed to be the birthplace of King Arthur. The palace discovered at Tintagel in Cornwall is believed to date from the sixth century - around the time that the legendary king may have lived. They believe the one-metre thick walls being unearthed are from a 6th century palace belonging to the rulers of the ancient south-west British kingdom of Dumnonia. Excavations have been taking place at the site as part of a five-year research project being run by English Heritage at the 13th century Tintagel Castle in Cornwall to find out...
  • International ocean drilling expedition [on] causes of the Indian Ocean 2004 earthquake/tsunami

    08/08/2016 6:52:12 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 7 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/8/2016 | University of Southampton
    The devastating earthquake that struck North Sumatra and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands on Boxing Day (26 December) in 2004 caused a tsunami that inundated coastal communities around the Indian Ocean, killing over 250,000 people in 14 countries. That earthquake was caused by a slip on a subduction zone plate boundary fault beneath the eastern Indian Ocean. Now, over the coming weeks, a team of international researchers are returning to offshore Sumatra to collect marine sediments, rocks and fluids from this particular zone for the first time to gain a better understanding of the materials and to collect data for...