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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Any structural engineers? (vanity)

    07/27/2015 5:03:59 PM PDT · by taxcontrol · 46 replies
    None ^ | 27 July 2015 | Self
    I recently ran across a web site that sells a frame to bend fence top rail into 20 and 25 foot arches for a high tunnel green house. This got me to thinking about the possibility for using to build a thin shell dome and/or Quonset hut house. I have also run into some articles about how the Japanese have done some research on concrete filled tubes. So put these to together ..... My thought was to build 50' quarter of a circle segments, position them in place to make a high tunnel structure and pump the tubes full of...
  • What About a Mission to Europa?

    07/27/2015 11:59:52 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on July 27, 2015 | Fraser Cain
    Jupiter’s moon Europa has the most water in the entire Solar System. If you took all the water on Earth, collected it into a big sphere, it would measure almost 1,400 kilometers across. Europa’s water would measure nearly 1,800 kilometers.All that water exists in a layer around Europa, encased in a layer of ice. ... According to the plan, a spacecraft will launch in the 2020s, carrying 9 instruments to Europa. Most will be familiar cameras, mass spectrometers, and the like, to study the surface of Europa to a high level of resolution. Over the course of 45 flybys, the...
  • This is for all you N/E Free Republicers...

    07/27/2015 11:31:37 AM PDT · by US Navy Vet · 50 replies
    27 July 2015 | US Navy Vet
    I would like to take my wife to the N/E United States to do some Falltime "Leak Peepin"
  • Israeli Archaeologists Discover 3,000-Year-Old Jar With Inscription of Name From the Bible

    07/27/2015 8:05:18 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 37 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 07/27/2015 | Anugrah Kumar
    Archaeologists in Israel have found a rare inscription of the name of an apparently influential person from the time of King David, a name that is also mentioned in the Bible, according to Israel Antiquities Authority. Archaeologists have discovered a 3,000-year-old large ceramic jar with the inscription of the name "Eshbaal Ben Beda," The Associated Press reported Sunday. The Old Testament book of 1 Chronicles in 8:33 and 9:39 identifies the fourth son of Saul as Eshbaal, also written as as Ish-bosheth. "Ner was the father of Kish, Kish the father of Saul, and Saul the father of Jonathan, Malki-Shua,...
  • The Climate Wars’ Damage to Science

    07/27/2015 6:06:28 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 27 replies
    Quadrant Online ^ | June 2015 | Matt Ridley
    The Climate Wars’ Damage to Science For much of my life I have been a science writer. That means I eavesdrop on what’s going on in laboratories so I can tell interesting stories. It’s analogous to the way art critics write about art, but with a difference: we “science critics” rarely criticise. If we think a scientific paper is dumb, we just ignore it. There’s too much good stuff coming out of science to waste time knocking the bad stuff.Sure, we occasionally take a swipe at pseudoscience—homeopathy, astrology, claims that genetically modified food causes cancer, and so on. But the...
  • Researchers Discover Seaweed that Tastes like Bacon

    07/26/2015 9:22:41 AM PDT · by Diana in Wisconsin · 33 replies
    Business Insider ^ | July 16, 2015 | Barbara Tasch
    Researchers at Oregon State have patented a new strain of seaweed that tastes like bacon when it's cooked. The seaweed, a form of red marine algae, looks like translucent red lettuce. It also has twice the nutritional value of kale and grows very quickly. Did we mention it tastes like bacon? According to Oregon State researcher Chris Langdon, his team started growing the new strain while trying to find a good food source for edible sea snails, or abalone, a very popular food in many parts of Asia. The strain is a new type of red algae that normally grows...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Sombrero Galaxy from Hubble

    07/26/2015 8:36:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | July 26, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why does the Sombrero Galaxy look like a hat? Reasons include the Sombrero's unusually large and extended central bulge of stars, and dark prominent dust lanes that appear in a disk that we see nearly edge-on. Billions of old stars cause the diffuse glow of the extended central bulge. Close inspection of the bulge in the above photograph shows many points of light that are actually globular clusters. M104's spectacular dust rings harbor many younger and brighter stars, and show intricate details astronomers don't yet fully understand. The very center of the Sombrero glows across the electromagnetic spectrum, and...
  • How can Pilots be protected from bright and blinding Laser Beams when pointed up from the ground?

    07/26/2015 12:44:12 AM PDT · by lee martell · 38 replies
    July, 26, 2015 | lee martell
    The safety of pilots, crew members and passengers has been put at risk repeatedly by people shining laser beams into the cockpit. I don't know very much at all about aviation, probably less than the average person. I do know that I have always been impressed by the Blue Angels as they fly in formation during their annual visit to San Francisco. Considering how well known, and documented this hazard is, and how vulnerable the pilots are, I'm surprised there has been no resolution to the problem. We may as well face it, there will always be goofballs, anarchists, and...
  • Signs of world's first pictograph found in Gobeklitepe

    07/25/2015 4:58:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | July 15, 2015 | Anadolu Agency
    Turkey's Göbeklitepe, the site of the world's oldest temple, may be the home of the first pictograph, according to a scene etched into an obelisk. A scene on an obelisk found during excavations in Göbeklitepe, a 12,000-year-old site in the southeastern province of Sanliurfa, could be humanity's first pictograph, according to researchers... Ercan said the artifacts found in Göbeklitepe provided information about ancient burial traditions. "There were no graves 12,000 years ago. The dead bodies were left outdoors and raptors ate them. In this way, people believed the soul goes to the sky," he added. Ercan said it was called...
  • Hillary And Communications Security

    07/25/2015 4:52:29 PM PDT · by blueunicorn6 · 13 replies
    blueunicorn6 | 7/25/2015 | blueunicorn6
    We have all been watching the story unfold about Hillary Clinton and her e-mails. She refused to use the communications systems provided for her by the American taxpayers. Those systems are "secure", meaning that no unauthorized person can read or hear the communications. Hillary Clinton chose to not use the taxpayer provided secure system. This meant that the government agencies designed to provide secure communications and prevent the enemy from knowing our most important secrets, were intentionally bypassed by our Secretary of State. If you want to know how important communications security is, look at World War II. We knew...
  • Teams digging into history of the earliest people

    07/25/2015 4:51:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    San Antonio Express-News ^ | Saturday, July 25, 2015 | John MacCormack
    In a grassy meadow where eons ago some of America's first settlers camped and chipped stone tools, a precisely dug dirt pit, four yards square, is sinking steadily into the dark soil. And as it descends at a rate of an inch or two a day, the remote excavation northwest of Austin is also traveling backward through the millennia toward the continent's first native people... If all goes well, perhaps quite soon, primitive stone tools, similar to those discovered here a few years ago, will again be unearthed, reinforcing an emerging, if once controversial theory, about when the first humans...
  • Have three climate change scientists been ASSASSINATED? The astonishing claim made by professor

    07/25/2015 4:41:39 PM PDT · by Libloather · 24 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 7/25/15 | Gemma Mullin
    Have three climate change scientists been ASSASSINATED? The astonishing claim made by a Cambridge professor A Cambridge professor has claimed that three scientists investigating climate change in the Arctic may have been assassinated. Professor Peter Wadhams insists Seymour Laxon, Katharine Giles and Tim Boyd could have been murdered by someone possibly working for the oil industry or within government forces. The trio had been studying the polar ice caps - with a focus on sea ice - when they died within a few months of each other in 2013.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Infrared Trifid

    07/25/2015 1:58:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | July 25, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Trifid Nebula, also known as Messier 20, is easy to find with a small telescope, a well known stop in the nebula rich constellation Sagittarius. But where visible light pictures show the nebula divided into three parts by dark, obscuring dust lanes, this penetrating infrared image reveals filaments of glowing dust clouds and newborn stars. The spectacular false-color view is courtesy of the Spitzer Space Telescope. Astronomers have used the Spitzer infrared image data to count newborn and embryonic stars which otherwise can lie hidden in the natal dust and gas clouds of this intriguing stellar nursery. As...
  • Three scientists investigating melting Arctic ice may have been assassinated, professor claims

    07/25/2015 12:27:05 PM PDT · by crusty old prospector · 68 replies
    The U. K. Telegraph ^ | July 25, 2015 | Robert Mendick
    A Cambridge Professor has made the astonishing claim that three scientists investigating the melting of Arctic ice may have been assassinated within the space of a few months. Professor Peter Wadhams said he feared being labelled a “looney” over his suspicion that the deaths of the scientists were more than just an ‘extraordinary’ coincidence. But he insisted the trio could have been murdered and hinted that the oil industry or else sinister government forces might be implicated. The three scientists he identified - Seymour Laxon and Katherine Giles, both climate change scientists at University College London, and Tim Boyd of...
  • Global Mosaic of Pluto in True Color (highest resolution full-face photo released to date)

    07/25/2015 9:33:45 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 35 replies
    NASA ^ | 7/24/15
    Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with color data from the Ralph instrument to create this sharper global view of Pluto. (The lower right edge of Pluto in this view currently lacks high-resolution color coverage.) The images, taken when the spacecraft was 280,000 miles (450,000 kilometers) away from Pluto, show features as small as 1.4 miles (2.2 kilometers). That’s twice the resolution of the single-image view captured on July 13 and revealed at the approximate time of New Horizons’ July 14 closest approach. Image Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
  • Report predicts drones and supersoldiers are the future of warfare

    07/25/2015 4:55:15 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 2 replies
    News.com ^ | 07/24/15
    The report, Visualizing the Tactical Ground Battlefield in the Year 2050, was the result of a workshop held with leaders from the US Defence Department, Army Research Lab, Institute for Defence Analysis and a select number of academia. In the world envisioned, armed drones will patrol the skies searching for enemy targets to eliminate. The use of drones in the current military landscape dictates it is always a human that decides to pull the trigger, but the report suggests soldiers may only have limited control over the smart-robots of the future. “The difference being that in the former, human decisions...
  • Archaeologists find possible evidence of earliest human agriculture

    07/25/2015 3:50:24 AM PDT · by GoneSalt · 6 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | 7/24/2015 | Peter Beaumont
    Israeli archaeologists have uncovered dramatic evidence of what they believe are the earliest known attempts at agriculture, 11,000 years before the generally recognised advent of organised cultivation. The study examined more than 150,000 examples of plant remains recovered from an unusually well preserved hunter-gatherer settlement on the shores of the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel. Previously, scientists had believed that organised agriculture in the Middle East, including animal husbandry and crop cultivation, had begun in the late Holocene period – around 12,000 BC – and later spread west through Europe.
  • Two engraved reliefs unearthed on Red Sea coastline [12th Dynasty]

    07/24/2015 11:55:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Ahram Online ^ | Wednesday, July, 22, 2015 | Nevine El-Aref
    Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty told Ahram Online that studies carried out revealed that the first relief belongs to the Middle Kindom because it bears the cartouche of the seventh king of the 12th Dynasty, King Amenemhat IV, whose reign was characterised by exploration for precious turquoise and amethyst on Punt Island. Meanwhile the second relief, which is in a bad conservation condition, can be dated to the Second Intermediate Period. After restoration, Eldamaty said, more information on the relief would be revealed. Three Roman burials and parts of Berenice Temple's façade were also uncovered as well as a number...
  • New Saliva Test May Catch Alzheimer’s Disease Early

    07/24/2015 10:37:35 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 30 replies
    WTKR ^ | JULY 24, 2015
    A test detecting Alzheimer’s disease early may become easily available thanks to one plentiful bodily substance: saliva, a recently released study shows. The saliva test was presented at the 2015 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Washington this week. Though research is still in its infancy, the saliva test represents the exciting future of diagnostic tools in development for the detection of the neurodegenerative disease. While doctors are currently able to see the difference between a healthy brain and one affected by Alzheimer’s, the study emphasizes the importance of detecting Alzheimer’s-like changes early. “As the field has continue
  • Fossil-Fuel Emissions Causing Huge Impact on Radiocarbon Dating

    07/24/2015 3:56:42 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 45 replies
    nycity.today ^ | Fri, 07/24/2015 - 13:26 | Gloria Bradley
    Radiocarbon dating which is used to estimate the age of every particular thing on earth is facing big threat from the fossil fuel and carbon in the atmosphere. Researchers said excess of carbon in atmosphere due to burning of fossil fuel could reduce the accuracy of Radiocarbon dating. Heather Graven, a climate-physics researcher at Imperial College London, after an analysis has found that emissions from fossil fuels are artificially raising the carbon age of the atmosphere. ... "Combustion of fossil fuels is diluting the fraction of atmospheric carbon dioxide containing radiocarbon. This is making the atmosphere appear as though it...
  • Stunning Nightside Image Reveals Pluto’s Hazy Skies

    07/24/2015 12:41:41 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | 7/24/15
    July 24, 2015 Stunning Nightside Image Reveals Pluto’s Hazy Skies Pluto sends a breathtaking farewell to New Horizons. Backlit by the sun, Pluto’s atmosphere rings its silhouette like a luminous halo in this image taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft around midnight EDT on July 15. This global portrait of the atmosphere was captured when the spacecraft was about 1.25 million miles (2 million kilometers) from Pluto and shows structures as small as 12 miles across. The image, delivered to Earth on July 23, is displayed with north at the top of the frame. Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI Speeding away from Pluto...
  • Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current

    07/24/2015 10:52:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | July 24, 2015 | by Carla Reiter & Provided by: Argonne National Laboratory
    Typically when referring to electrical current, an image of electrons moving through a metallic wire is conjured. Using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), it is possible to create a current of pure spin (a quantum property of electrons related to its magnetic moment) in magnetic insulators. However, this work demonstrates that the SSE is not limited to magnetic insulators but also occurs in a class of materials known as paramagnets. Since magnetic moments within paramagnets do not interact with each other like in conventional ferromagnets, and thus do not hold their magnetization when an external magnetic field is removed, this...
  • A DNA Search for the First Americans Links Amazon Groups to Indigenous Australians

    07/24/2015 6:56:41 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | July 21, 2015 | By Helen Thompson
    The new genetic analysis takes aim at the theory that just one founding group settled the Americas =========================================================================================================== Brazil's Surui people, like the man pictured above, share ancestry with indigenous Australians, new evidence suggests. (PAULO WHITAKER/Reuters/Corbis) ==================================================================================================================== More than 15,000 years ago, humans began crossing a land bridge called Beringia that connected their native home in Eurasia to modern-day Alaska. Who knows what the journey entailed or what motivated them to leave, but once they arrived, they spread southward across the Americas. The prevailing theory is that the first Americans arrived in a single wave, and all Native American populations...
  • Is the Amazon rainforest MAN-MADE? At least 8 MILLION humans may have lived and farmed the [tr]

    07/24/2015 6:22:31 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 24, 2015 | Richard Gray
    It is often held aloft by environmental campaign groups as an example of one of the last remaining regions of unspoiled habitat left in the world. But instead of being a pristine rainforest untouched by human hands, the Amazon appears to have been profoundly shaped by mankind. An international team of researchers have published evidence that suggests the Amazon was once home to millions of people who lived and farmed in the area now covered by trees.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Ultraviolet Rings of M31

    07/24/2015 5:01:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | July 24, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A mere 2.5 million light-years away the Andromeda Galaxy, also known as M31, really is just next door as large galaxies go. So close and spanning some 260,000 light-years, it took 11 different image fields from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite's telescope to produce this gorgeous portrait of the spiral galaxy in ultraviolet light. While its spiral arms stand out in visible light images of Andromeda, the arms look more like rings in the GALEX ultraviolet view, a view dominated by the energetic light from hot, young, massive stars. As sites of intense star formation, the rings have...
  • Experts warn of possible imminent eruption of Kick’em Jenny volcano

    07/23/2015 4:06:42 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 19 replies
    he Seismic Research Centre (SRC) of the University of the West Indies has issued an orange alert for the underwater volcano Kick’em Jenny, after strong and sustained signals were recorded in the early hours of this morning suggesting than an eruption could occur with less than 24-hours notice. Instruments monitoring the volcano, located 8km north of Grenada (12.3000° N, 61.6400° W), recorded strong, continuous activity between 1:25 a.m. and 3.am. Grenada, as well as St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Barbados and Trinidad & Tobago are particularly on alert. “Signs of elevated seismicity began on July 11 and continue to present....
  • Bad News from HIV discoverer: 'To develop a cure is almost impossible'

    07/23/2015 2:42:34 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    CNN ^ | 07/23/2015 | Meera Senthilingam
    She's the woman who co-discovered HIV in 1983, and won a Nobel Prize for her work. But next month, French scientist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi will retire from her lab. She spoke with CNN at this week's International AIDS Society Conference, in Vancouver, about activism, the future of HIV and why there's still no cure -- as well as answering questions submitted by our readers on Twitter. Q: At the beginning, the epidemic was in San Francisco in the gay community. How have you seen this change over time? A: The epidemic changed in the gay population, for example, because they were...
  • Testing shows using microwaves to propel a craft into space might work

    07/23/2015 12:10:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    =============================================================================================== A team of researchers at Colorado based Escape Dynamics is reporting that initial tests indicate that it might really be possible to launch space-planes into space using microwaves sent from the ground, to allow for a single stage spacecraft. If the idea pans out, the cost savings for sending satellites (or perhaps humans) into orbit could be considerable. Today's rockets are all based on the same idea, a multi-stage rocket is used, each part filled with propellant that pushes the rocket into space as the propellant is burned. It is a really expensive way to go because the propellant...
  • Tech Company Develops Robots to Replace $15 /Hr Workers – Can Produce 1 Burger Every 10 Seconds

    07/23/2015 5:34:26 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 46 replies
    Gateway Pundit ^ | 07/23/15 | Jim Hoft
    On Wednesday Governor Cuomo’s New York Wage Board set a new minimum wage for New York City’s 200,000 fast food workers. City establishments will now be required to offer employees at least $15 per hour by the end of 2018. The move also makes it cost effective for companies to fire humans and hire robots. Momentum Machines has developed a robot that can put out one burger every 10 seconds.
  • Russian, Japanese, US crew reach ISS despite minor mishap

    07/23/2015 5:21:31 AM PDT · by csvset · 2 replies
    France 24 ^ | 23 july 2015 | Anna Smolchenko
    MOSCOW (AFP) - Astronauts from Russia, Japan and the United States Thursday docked successfully with the International Space Station after a two-month delay, despite a minor hiccup. The Soyuz TMA 17M rocket -- carrying cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, US astronaut Kjell Lindgren and Kimiya Yui of Japan -- blasted off from the Baikonur cosmodrome on schedule after a two-month delay caused by the failure of a Russian rocket during an unmanned resupply mission. The launch and the docking were successful even though one solar array -- a type of power supply that captures energy from the sun -- did not deploy...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Comet PanSTARRS, Moon, and Venus

    07/23/2015 3:41:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | July 23, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It is the object to the left of the big tree that's generating much recent excitement. If you look closely, there you can see Comet PanSTARRS, complete with two tails. During July, this comet has increased markedly in brightness and has just passed its closest approach to Earth. The statuesque tree in the center is a Norfolk Island Pine, and to either side of this tree are New Zealand Pohutukaw trees. Over the trees, far in the distance, are bright Venus and an even brighter crescent Moon. If you look even more closely, you can find Jupiter hidden in...
  • Scientist warns world to 'think twice before replying to alien signals from outer space'

    07/22/2015 8:36:50 PM PDT · by garjog · 145 replies
    Press Reader ^ | Thursday 23 July 2015 | VICTORIA RICHARDS
    Professor Matthew Bailes said 'the history of weak civilisations contacting more advanced civilisations is not a happy one' "... he warned that making contact with aliens capable of transmitting powerful signals to Earth over tens of thousands of light years could lead humanity into disaster, because they're likely to be so much more advanced."
  • Human Skin Gets Thinner In Space, International Space Station Study

    07/22/2015 1:16:51 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    newseveryday.com ^ | 22 Jul '15 14:43PM | Ashwin Subramania -
    "We use femtosecond laser pulses. We scan the skin and we get signals from the skin, particularly fluorescence, as well as another signal called second harmonic generation. So with these two signals we can build up images and get a precise look into the skin with a high resolution. The resolution is a factor of one thousand (times) better than ultrasound....." "So far we've got interesting results from three astronauts. It seems that there is a strong production of collagen; so suddenly these astronauts have more collagen. It means there is some sort of anti-ageing effect, at least in the...
  • Pluto’s Moons Nix and Hydra Get Real / New Pluto Mountain Range Discovered

    07/22/2015 11:38:16 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on July 21, 2015 | Bob King
    Nix looks like a strawberry-flavored jelly bean, but that reddish region with its vaguely bulls-eye shape hints at a possible crater on this 26 miles (42 km) long by 22 miles (36 km) wide moon. Hydra, which measures 34 x 25 miles (55 x 40 km), displays two large craters, one tilted to face the Sun (top) and the other almost fully in shadow. Differences in brightness across Hydra suggest differences in surface composition. Now we’ve seen three of Pluto’ family of five satellites. Expect images of Pluto’s most recently discovered moons, Styx and Kerberos, to be transmitted to Earth...
  • Mayors endorse UN sustainability goals at Vatican

    07/22/2015 10:23:16 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 9 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jul 22, 2015 12:14 PM EDT
    Mayors emboldened by an appeal from Pope Francis are committing themselves to a new set of U.N. goals to end poverty and promote sustainable development over the next 15 years. At the end of a two-day Vatican summit on Wednesday, several dozen mayors from around the world unanimously adopted a declaration pledging to endorse the goals and work to implement them in their home cities. …
  • Record Global Temperatures? Don't Get Too Heated Up

    07/22/2015 6:40:38 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 5 replies
    IBD ^ | 07/21/2015
    While leaders meet in the Vatican for a climate conference, talk of record high global temperatures will fuel hysteria. But there's truly nothing to see here. Voices of the unreasonable screeched Tuesday across St. Peter's Square. California Gov. Jerry Brown was the most colorful. He took the opportunity to call anyone who doesn't believe in man-made global warming as he does a "denier," which is also the pejorative used to describe those who say the Holocaust never happened. He also called those who don't conform to his way of thinking "troglodytes." New York Mayor Bill de Blasio joined the choir,...
  • Man Sought After Head-Butting Winter Haven Bus (Knocked out, w/vid)

    07/22/2015 5:47:16 AM PDT · by Sam's Army · 15 replies
    The Ledger ^ | July 22, 2015 | Kaitlyn Pearson
    WINTER HAVEN | Police are looking for a man who angrily launched himself head-first into the doors of a bus in Winter Haven on Saturday morning. Video from Winter Haven police shows a man exiting the bus at the Winter Haven bus terminal, 555 Ave. E. NW, after it made its regular stop about 11:35 a.m. The man wanted to travel to a new destination, and the bus driver told him he'd have to pay an additional $2 before he could go anywhere else, police spokeswoman Jamie Brown said. Brown said the passenger became extremely agitated when he realized he...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Gamma-ray Rain from 3C 279

    07/22/2015 4:28:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | July 22, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: If gamma-rays were raindrops a flare from a supermassive black hole might look like this. Not so gently falling on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope from June 14 to June 16 the gamma-ray photons, with energies up to 50 billion electron volts, originated in active galaxy 3C 279 some 5 billion light-years away. Each gamma-ray "drop" is an expanding circle in the timelapse visualization, the color and maximum size determined by the gamma-ray's measured energy. Starting with a background drizzle, the sudden downpour that then trails off is the intense, high energy flare. The creative and calming presentation of...
  • Scientists Trace an Ancient Connection Between Amazonians and Australasians

    07/22/2015 3:07:40 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    The New York Times ^ | July 21, 2015 | James Gorman
    Some people in the Brazilian Amazon are very distant relations of indigenous Australians, New Guineans and other Australasians, two groups of scientists who conducted detailed genetic analyses reported Tuesday. But the researchers disagree on the source of that ancestry. The connection is ancient, all agree, and attributable to Eurasian migrants to the Americas who had some Australasian ancestry, the scientists said. But one group said the evidence is clear that two different populations came from Siberia to settle the Americas 15,000 or more years ago. The other scientific team says there was only one founding population from which all indigenous...
  • New Horizons Finds Second Mountain Range in Pluto’s ‘Heart’

    07/21/2015 7:05:27 PM PDT · by cripplecreek · 11 replies
    Pluto’s icy mountains have company. NASA’s New Horizons mission has discovered a new, apparently less lofty mountain range on the lower-left edge of Pluto’s best known feature, the bright, heart-shaped region named Tombaugh Regio (Tombaugh Region). These newly-discovered frozen peaks are estimated to be one-half mile to one mile (1-1.5 kilometers) high, about the same height as the United States’ Appalachian Mountains. The Norgay Montes (Norgay Mountains) discovered by New Horizons on July 15 more closely approximate the height of the taller Rocky Mountains. The new range is just west of the region within Pluto’s heart called Sputnik Planum...
  • French tTeen’s HIV in Remission Years After Medication Discontinued

    07/21/2015 5:14:49 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 17 replies
    Toronto Star ^ | Tue Jul 21 2015 | Lenny Bernstein
    Cases of long-term interruption are particularly rare in children. Researchers must now determine whether the teenager is one of a group of so-called “elite controllers.” This undated photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a scanning electron micrograph of multiple round bumps of the HIV-1 virus on a cell surface. Doctors are reporting that an 18-year-old French woman born with the HIV virus has had an unprecedented remission This undated photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a scanning electron micrograph of multiple round bumps of the HIV-1 virus on a cell...
  • Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway—With Me in It

    07/21/2015 2:40:25 PM PDT · by Pelham · 34 replies
    Youtube ^ | July 21, 2015 | Andy Greenberg
    Are modern computer-heavy vehicles vulnerable to being hijacked by computer hackers? They are indeed, as computer security hasn't kept pace with what hackers can do.
  • Ford Mustang vs. BMW M4: Which sports coupe comes out on top?

    07/21/2015 10:30:56 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 42 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | July 20, 2015 | Bengt Halvorson
    The Ford Mustang and BMW M4, at face value, probably don’t appear to have a whole lot in common. They go at it from opposite ends of the enthusiast landscape: The Mustang is the quintessential pony car—an American icon by almost any definition—while the BMW M4 builds on decades of finely groomed performance pedigree. Price-wise there’s a vast difference, too; you could get two high-performance, V-8-powered Mustang GT Coupes for approximately the price of a base BMW M4. Yet these two models have become more closely aligned than you might think, in recent years. Both models are nearly identical in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Comet Tails and Star Trails

    07/21/2015 9:22:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | July 21, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: After grazing the western horizon on northern summer evenings Comet PanSTARRS (also known as C/2014 Q1) climbed higher in southern winter skies. A visitor to the inner Solar System discovered in August 2014 by the prolific panSTARRS survey, the comet was captured here on July 17. Comet and colorful tails were imaged from Home Observatory in Mackay, Queensland, Australia. The field of view spans just over 1 degree. Sweeping quickly across a the sky this comet PanSTARRS was closest to planet Earth about 2 days later. Still, the faint stars of the constellation Cancer left short trails in the...
  • Biblical Text from 500 A.D. Deciphered from Charred Scroll

    07/21/2015 8:17:21 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    Discovery ^ | Jul 20, 2015 06:06 PM ET // by | Rossella Lorenzi
    Virtual unwrapping software has revealed verses from the Book of Leviticus in a charred parchment scroll, making it the oldest biblical text after the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced on Monday. Found 45 years ago inside the Holy Ark of the synagogue at Ein Gedi, on the western shore of the Dead Sea, the 2.7-inch scroll was dated by C14 analysis to about 500 AD. “This is the first time in any archaeological excavation that a Torah scroll was found in a synagogue, particularly inside a Holy Ark,” the IAA said in a statement. ... To...
  • Art Bell is returning to American radio tonight

    07/20/2015 6:22:51 PM PDT · by Cringing Negativism Network · 225 replies
    artbell.com/ ^ | self | self
    OK the time has arrived. Art Bell returns to American radio in two hours. Tonight.
  • Stephen Hawking announces $100 million hunt for alien life

    07/20/2015 5:36:42 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 50 replies
    The Washington Post's Speaking of Science ^ | July 20, 2015 | Rachel Feltman
    On Monday, famed physicist Stephen Hawking and Russian tycoon Yuri Milner held a news conference in London to announce their new project: injecting $100 million and a whole lot of brain power into the search for intelligent extraterrestrial life, an endeavor they're calling Breakthrough Listen. "We believe that life arose spontaneously on Earth," Hawking said at Monday's news conference, "So in an infinite universe, there must be other occurrences of life." Geoffrey Marcy, a University of California, Berkeley, astronomer who found most of our first exoplanets, also spoke at the event as part of the group's brain trust....
  • A $100 Million Infusion for SETI Research (two parts: Breakthrough Listen and Breakthrough MESSAGE)

    07/20/2015 5:02:44 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    Centauri Dreams ^ | 7/20/15 | Paul Gilster
    A $100 Million Infusion for SETI Researchby Paul Gilster on July 20, 2015 SETI received a much needed boost this morning as Russian entrepreneur Yuri Milner, along with physicist Stephen Hawking and a panel including Frank Drake, Ann Druyan, Martin Rees and Geoff Marcy announced a $100 million pair of initiatives to reinvigorate the search. The first of these, Breakthrough Listen, dramatically upgrades existing search methods, while Breakthrough Message will fund an international competition to create the kind of messages we might one day send to other stars, although the intention is also to provoke the necessary discussion and debate...
  • Search for extraterrestrial intelligence gets a $100-million boost

    07/20/2015 3:24:26 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 23 replies
    Nature ^ | 7/20/15 | Zeeya Merali
    Russian billionaire Yuri Milner announces most comprehensive hunt for alien life.You could say that the silence has been deafening. Since its beginnings more than half a century ago, the dedicated search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) has failed to detect the presence of alien civilizations. But at London’s Royal Society today (20 July), Russian billionaire Yuri Milner announced a shot in the arm for SETI: a US$100-million decadal project to provide the most comprehensive hunt for alien communications so far. The initiative, called Breakthrough Listen, will see radio telescopes at Green Bank in West Virginia, the Parkes Observatory in Australia, and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Comet PanSTARRS and a Crescent Moon

    07/20/2015 7:06:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | July 20, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A comet has brightened quickly and unexpectedly. Discovered last year, Comet C/2014 Q1 (PanSTARRS) is expected to be visible now for a few days to the unaided eye, just after sunset, from some locations. The comet rounded the Sun on July 6 and apparently has shed quite a bit of gas and dust. Today it is now as close as it will ever get to the Earth, which is another factor in its recent great apparent brightness and the large angular extent of its tails. In the featured image taken two days ago, Comet PanSTARRS is seen sporting a...