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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Foreign archaeological missions resume excavating Upper Egypt after 13-year ban

    07/06/2015 11:11:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Cairo Post ^ | 4th of July 2015
    For 13 years, the excavation permissions were limited only to Egyptian missions to explore treasures in Upper Egypt but due to the “successive requests from foreign Universities and researchers, the council agreed to give the licenses after 13 years of suspension,” Amin told Youm7 without going into further details on number of the foreign missions applied for the permits. Allowing any foreign mission to search the Egyptian artifacts should be approved by the Ministry of Tourism and five other sovereignty bodies, former head of the SCA Abdel Halim Nour el-Din told The Cairo Post Saturday. Moreover, the mission should be...
  • An animation just for fun - The Solarbeat: Planetary orbits set to music (ok ok, plus Pluto's orbit)

    07/06/2015 12:05:56 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 3 replies
    Click here to play with the interactive animation. Use the slider to change the speed. Click on other icons to change the scale, bass, etc.
  • Small cosmic 'fish' points to big haul for SKA Pathfinder

    07/06/2015 8:58:49 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 07-06-2015 | Provided by Royal Astronomical Society
    CSIRO's Australian SKA Pathfinder telescope. Credit: CSIRO A wisp of cosmic radio waves, emitted before our solar system was born, shows that a new radio telescope will be able to detect galaxies other telescopes can't. The work, led by Dr James Allison of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) in Australia, was announced today (6 July) at the National Astronomy Meeting in Llandudno, north Wales. The finding was one of the first made with CSIRO's Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), a new radio telescope 300 kilometres inland from the Western Australian town of Geraldton. The discovery...
  • Researcher unravels century-old woolly tale to find truth behind massive bones

    07/06/2015 8:16:58 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | Jul 03, 2015 | by Mark Johnson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Animals go extinct, places too. And stories change. Boaz, a small village in Richland County, Wis., has only 156 people these days. There are a half-dozen streets, a couple of taverns, a small park with a baseball diamond and, on the outskirts, a historic marker describing the village's lone claim to fame: "the Boaz Mastodon." The story on the marker is the one that's been told to schoolchildren for almost a century as they stare up at the mastodon skeleton, enshrined in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Geology Museum. It is a story that, until now, has endured largely unchanged: One...
  • Ancient bobcat buried like a human being [bobkitten]

    07/05/2015 11:24:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Science ^ | July 2, 2015 | David Grimm
    About 2000 years ago in what is today western Illinois, a group of Native Americans buried something unusual in a sacred place. In the outer edge of a funeral mound typically reserved for humans, villagers interred a bobcat, just a few months old and wearing a necklace of bear teeth and marine shells. The discovery represents the only known ceremonial burial of an animal in such mounds and the only individual burial of a wild cat in the entire archaeological record, researchers claim in a new study. The villagers may have begun to tame the animal, the authors say, potentially...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi

    07/05/2015 10:53:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    NASA ^ | July 06, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why is the sky near Antares and Rho Ophiuchi so colorful? The colors result from a mixture of objects and processes. Fine dust illuminated from the front by starlight produces blue reflection nebulae. Gaseous clouds whose atoms are excited by ultraviolet starlight produce reddish emission nebulae. Backlit dust clouds block starlight and so appear dark. Antares, a red supergiant and one of the brighter stars in the night sky, lights up the yellow-red clouds on the lower center of the featured image. Rho Ophiuchi lies at the center of the blue nebula on the left. The distant globular cluster...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Zeta Oph: Runaway Star

    07/05/2015 1:13:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | July 05, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation:
  • The Wright Brothers: Even More Badass Than You Thought

    07/05/2015 12:51:29 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 52 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | July 2, 2015 | Matt Goulet
    For his new book, The Wright Brothers, ­Pulitzer Prize winner David ­McCullough pored over newspaper articles, photographs, and more than 1,000 letters to create a gripping account of Wilbur and Orville's quest to fly.
  • Woolly Mammoth Clones Closer Than Ever, Thanks to Genome Sequencing

    07/05/2015 7:03:27 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 23 replies
    Live Science ^ | 07/03/2015 | by Tia Ghose, Senior Writer
    Scientists are one step closer to bringing a woolly mammoth back to life. A new analysis of the woolly mammoth genome has revealed several adaptations that allowed the furry beasts to thrive in the subzero temperatures of the last ice age, including a metabolism that allowed them to pack on insulating fat, smaller ears that lost less heat and a reduced sensitivity to cold. The findings could enable researchers to "resurrect" the ice-age icon — or at least a hybridized Asian elephant with a few of the physical traits of its woolly-haired cousin, said study co-author Vincent Lynch, an evolutionary...
  • Breathtaking ruins of the Soviet space shuttle program

    07/05/2015 5:09:28 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 29 replies
    CNN ^ | July 3, 2015 | Sheena McKenzie
    (CNN)What was once the gleaming pride and joy of the Soviet space program now lies covered in dirt and bird droppings in a disused hangar in Kazakhstan. With their broken windows, missing tiles and ransacked interiors, these shuttles are a haunting -- and fascinating -- piece of space history, rarely seen by the outside world. Indeed, when 36-year-old Russian photographer Ralph Mirebs discovered the derelict shuttles and rocket at Baikonur Cosmodrome, he was touched by the sad end for these "wonderful winged machines."
  • Pirate Hunting: The Search for the Golden Fleece

    07/04/2015 7:12:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Alert Diver ^ | Spring 2015 | Howard Ehrenberg
    In 2008 while we were working in Samaná, renowned treasure hunter Tracy Bowden came to us for assistance in locating a ship that belonged to Capt. Joseph Bannister. Bannister wasn't just any captain -- he was a pirate. And, as we'd soon learn, he was a good one. Bannister was once a reputable captain who spent years sailing between England and Jamaica. But in 1684 he decided to seek fortune and glory by commandeering the Golden Fleece, a ship of 30 to 40 guns with a crew of more than 100 men. The British dispatched a ship that found and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Aurora Australis

    07/04/2015 5:20:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | July 04, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Not fireworks, these intense shimmering lights still danced across Earth's night skies late last month, seen here above the planet's geographic south pole. The stunning auroral displays were triggered as a coronal mass ejection blasted from the Sun days earlier impacted the magnetosphere, beginning a widespread geomagnetic storm. The six fisheye panels were recorded with digital camera and battery in a heated box to guard against -90 degree F ambient temperatures of the long winter night. Around the horizon are south pole astronomical observatories, while beyond the Aurora Australis stretch the stars of the southern Milky Way.
  • Seahorse-inspired robots to assist in surgeries

    07/03/2015 1:46:39 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    zeenews.india.com ^ | Saturday, July 4, 2015 - 00:25
    [The tail] provides a strong, energy-efficient grasping mechanism to cling to things such as seaweed or coral reefs, waiting for food to float by that it can suck into its mouth. At the same time, the square structure of its tail provides adequate flexibility, can bend and twist, and naturally returns to its former shape better than animals with cylindrical tails. Researchers theorised that the square structure of its tail, so rare in nature, must serve a purpose. "We found that this square architecture provides adequate dexterity and a tough resistance to predators, but also that it tends to snap...
  • The Great Wall Of China Is Falling Apart. The Reason? Wind, Rain, And People Stealing Its Bricks!

    07/03/2015 12:01:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Indiatimes ^ | June 30, 2015 | AFP
    Construction first begun in the third century BC, but nearly 6,300 kilometres were built in the Ming Dynasty of 1368-1644, including the much-visited sectors north of the capital Beijing. Of that, 1,962 kilometres has withered away over the centuries, the Beijing Times reported. Some of the construction weathered away, while plants growing in the walls have accelerated the decay, said the report Sunday, citing a survey last year by the Great Wall of China Society. "Even though some of the walls are built of bricks and stones, they cannot withstand the perennial exposure to wind and rain," the paper quoted...
  • An Alternative Approach to Nuclear Fusion: Think Smaller

    07/03/2015 8:59:44 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    motherboard.vice.com ^ | July 2, 2015 // 11:45 AM EST | Emiko Jozuka
    But one group of UK researchers says that the key is to think smaller, and to mash together spherical reactors (a squashed-up version of regular-shaped reactors) and high temperature superconductors to accelerate the development of fusion energy. Their early prototype devices have a 1.2m diameter, and next up, they’re are aiming to build machines that are 3m high with a 2.5m diameter. ... “Instead of making bigger reactors, you go to a higher [magnetic] field that enables you to contain the plasma in an effective way.” ... “The idea is that the tokamak is like a magnetic bottle. On the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Venus and Jupiter are Far

    07/03/2015 7:40:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | July 03, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On June 30 Venus and Jupiter were actually far apart, but both appeared close in western skies at dusk. Near the culmination of this year's gorgeous conjunction, the two bright evening planets are captured in the same telescopic field of view in this sharp digital stack of images taken after sunset from Poznań in west-central Poland. In fact, banded gas giant Jupiter was about 910 million kilometers from Poland. That's over 11 times farther than crescent Venus, only 78 million kilometers distant at the time. But since the diameter of giant planet Jupiter is over 11 times larger than...
  • ISIS Destruction of Ancient Sites Hits Mostly Muslim Targets

    07/03/2015 6:04:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    National Geographic ^ | July 02, 2015 | Kristin Romey
    ISIS has reportedly placed improvised explosive devices (IEDs) around the ancient ruins of Palmyra, in Syria, after recently capturing the adjacent city of Tadmore. The jihadi group has released images of the destruction of two shrines near the site... Michael Danti, co-director of the Syrian Heritage Initiative at the American Schools of Oriental Research, which is monitoring cultural damage in Syria and Iraq, reports that the pattern of IED placement appears to be optimized for "filmed destruction." Multiple independent sources confirmed to Danti that following the IED placement, ISIS members traveled around Tadmor using megaphones to announce their action to...
  • First comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome completed

    07/02/2015 1:34:26 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 07-02-2015 | Provided by University of Chicago Medical Center
    The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic. Credit: Giant Screen Films © 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC ======================================================================== The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic. Mammoth genes that differed from their counterparts in elephants played roles in skin and hair development, fat metabolism, insulin signaling and numerous other traits. Genes linked to physical traits such as skull shape, small ears and short tails were also identified. As a...
  • Robot kills a VW plant worker

    It seems to have happened as technicians were assembling the machine. "When the robot started up, it grabbed the man and thrust him against a metal slab," explains the Local. It's not clear how big the robot is, but a VW spokesperson says it is not one of the newer lightweight models designed to work alongside humans on the production line.
  • Roman Villa Reopens on Wild Tuscan Island

    07/02/2015 11:34:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, July 2, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    The remains of one of the most prestigious maritime villas from Roman times are set to reopen July 2 in a small, almost uninhabited island off the Tuscan coast after been locked for 15 years. Commonly known as "Villa Domitia," the imperial complex stood magnificently 2,000 years ago on the island of Giannutri, a rocky crescent about 3 miles long with thick areas of Mediterranean vegetation... The majestic complex marks Giannutri's most glorious time. Today the southernmost island of the Tuscan archipelago is almost empty -- populated by a huge colony of seagulls and, in summer, by a group of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Venus and Jupiter are Close

    07/02/2015 11:17:19 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | July 02, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On June 30, Venus and Jupiter were close in western skies at dusk. Near the culmination of this year's gorgeous conjunction, the two bright evening planets are captured in the same telescopic field of view in this image taken after sunset from Bejing, China. As the two bright planets set together in the west, a nearly Full Moon rose above the horizon to the south and east. Imaged that night with the same telescope and camera, the rising Moon from the opposite part of the sky is compared with the planetary conjunction for scale in the digitally composited image....
  • Gold coin may be key to solve Sweden's 'Pompeii'

    07/02/2015 9:31:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    The Local ^ | August 18, 2014 | Solveig Rundquist/Oliver Gee
    A small team of archaeologists at Kalmar County museum, in collaboration with Lund University, has been digging at the site for the past three years. The team is studying the Migration Period in Scandinavian history, from about 400 to 550 AD... While the team has found several hundred of the coin already, Monday's discovery was a big one, said archaeologist and project manager Helena Victor. "This is the first one found in an archaeological context," she told The Local. "Normally we find them while we're plowing the field. But we found this one inside a house where we found people...
  • This One Eye Color Is aAsociated with Higher Rates of Alcohol Dependence

    07/02/2015 5:51:21 AM PDT · by Oratam · 54 replies
    MSN.com ^ | July 2, 2015 | Svati Kirsten Narula
    Geneticists at the University of Vermont have revealed links between eye color and alcohol dependency, suggesting it occurs more frequently among people with blue eyes and less frequently among those with dark brown eyes. The study, which offers another piece of evidence that alcohol dependency has a genetic component, involved a sample of 1,263 individual genetic profiles. They were pulled from a database that only contains genetic profiles of people diagnosed with at least one psychiatric illness, which includes an addiction to, or dependence on, drugs or alcohol. For this study, the geneticists filtered the database for patients with alcohol...
  • The Fall and Rise and Fall of Pompeii

    07/01/2015 5:37:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | July 2015 | Joshua Hammer
    ...The two towns remained largely undisturbed, lost to history, through the rise of Byzantium, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. In 1738, Maria Amalia Christine, a nobleman's daughter from Saxony, wed Charles of Bourbon, the King of Naples, and became entranced by classical sculptures displayed in the garden of the royal palace in Naples. A French prince digging in the vicinity of his villa on Mount Vesuvius had discovered the antiquities nearly 30 years earlier, but had never conducted a systematic excavation. So Charles dispatched teams of laborers and engineers equipped with tools and blasting powder to the site of...
  • New Horizons [Probe] Color Images Reveal Two Distinct Faces of Pluto, Series of Spots that Fascinate

    07/01/2015 5:03:19 PM PDT · by Pyro7480 · 22 replies
    NASA ^ | 07/01/2015 | n/a
    New color images from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft show two very different faces of the mysterious dwarf planet, one with a series of intriguing spots along the equator that are evenly spaced. Each of the spots is about 300 miles in diameter, with a surface area that’s roughly the size of the state of Missouri. Scientists have yet to see anything quite like the dark spots; their presence has piqued the interest of the New Horizons science team, due to the remarkable consistency in their spacing and size. While the origin of the spots is a mystery for now, the...
  • Bulgarian Archaeologist Discovers Previously Unknown Ancient Thracian Fortress...[on] Ropotamo River

    07/01/2015 4:58:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | June 30, 2015 | Ivan Dikov
    An ancient fortress unknown to Bulgarian and international archaeology has been discovered in the thick and almost subtropical forests along the Ropotamo River in Southeast Bulgaria, the National Museum of History in Sofia has announced. The discovery has been made by Dr. Ivan Hristov, Deputy Director of the National Museum of History, who has also been excavating several other archaeological sites along Bulgaria's Southern Black Sea coast, including the Talaskara Fortress on Cape Chervenka (Chrisosotira). The previously unknown fortress, which appears to have been inhabited by Ancient Thracians, has been found in "the jungle of the Ropotamo" River, in the...
  • New study shows South Africans using milk-based paint 49,000 years ago

    07/01/2015 4:51:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | June 30, 2015 | Jim Scott, University of Colorado at Boulder
    While the use of ochre by early humans dates to at least 250,000 years ago in Europe and Africa, this is the first time a paint containing ochre and milk has ever been found in association with early humans in South Africa, said Paola Villa, a curator at the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History and lead study author. The milk likely was obtained by killing lactating members of the bovid family such as buffalo, eland, kudu and impala, she said... The powdered paint mixture was found on the edge of a small stone flake in a layer of...
  • Stephen Hawking Pops In For Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook Q&A, Asks About 'Gravity And Other Forces'

    07/01/2015 4:36:32 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 3 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | Wednesday, Jul 1, 2015 | Riya Bhattacharjee
    When Mark Zuckerberg does Townhall Q&As on Facebook to hear from users, he gets thousands of questions. Sometimes famous people ask questions. On Tuesday, Stephen Hawking asked him a question. "I would like to know a unified theory of gravity and the other forces. Which of the big questions in science would you like to know the answer to and why?" the world-famous physicist posted on Facebook through a verified account. His question received over 6,000 likes. "I don't think Mark would wanna answer this," one Facebook user joked. "Mr. Hawking wins the best question Q&A award," another quipped. "Epic,...
  • Ancient footprint discovery leaves lasting impression at Vindolanda

    07/01/2015 4:25:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Vindolanda Trust ^ | Tuesday, June 30, 2015 | Sonya Galloway
    Nowhere gets you closer to the Romans on Hadrian's Wall than the fort and settlement of Vindolanda, the extraordinary hoard of personal artefacts gives you a unique insight into the lives of people living here 2000 years ago. The latest addition to the collection of artefacts from the current excavation has certainly made an impression on everyone. Someone 2000 years ago quite literally put their foot in it and as a result a volunteer digging at the site has unearthed a tile with a clear imprint of a human foot that accidentally, or perhaps mischievously stood on the freshly made...
  • 5,500-Year-Old Fingerprint Found on Ceramic Vessel

    07/01/2015 4:17:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Discovery News ^ | June 26, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Danish archaeologists doing a survey ahead of the construction of the Femern Belt link scheme, an immersed tunnel that will connect the German island of Fehmarn with the Danish island of Lolland, have found a 5,500-year old-ceramic vessel bearing the fingerprint of the artisan who made it. The vessel is known with the name "funnel beaker," a kind of ceramics which features a flat bottom with a funnel shaped neck. Such earthenware is characteristic of the Funnel Beaker Culture (4000 – 2800 B.C.), which represents the first farmers in Scandinavia and the north European plain. It was found in pieces...
  • Jerusalem family finds 2,000-year old mikveh underneath living room

    07/01/2015 4:11:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | Tammuz 14, 5775 (July 1, 2015) | Nir Hasson
    A Jerusalem family ripping up its living room floor found a staircase lost for 2,000 years, leading to a large ritual bath carved out of bedrock. It took the family some years to call in the authorities and show them the discovery beneath their house, in the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ein Kerem. Throughout the interim, the family blocked off the entrance to the mikveh with wooden doors, and simply continued to live over it. When they did call in the Israel Antiquities Authority, beneath the doors, the archaeologists found the carved stone staircase leaving to a big mikveh, 3.5 meters...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Venus, Jupiter, and Noctilucent Clouds

    07/01/2015 3:18:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | July 01, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you seen the passing planets yet? Today the planets Jupiter and Venus pass within half a degree of each other as seen from Earth. This conjunction, visible all over the world, is quite easy to see -- just look to the west shortly after sunset. The brightest objects visible above the horizon will be Venus and Jupiter, with Venus being the brighter of the two. Featured above, the closing planets were captured two nights ago in a sunset sky graced also by high-level noctilucent clouds. In the foreground, the astrophotographer's sister takes in the vista from a bank...
  • US Vaccine Researcher Sentenced to Prison for Fraud

    07/01/2015 3:13:54 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    Nature ^ | 01 July 2015 | Sara Reardonc
    The case of Dong-Pyou Han illustrates the uneven nature of penalties for scientific misconduct.Rare is the scientist who goes to prison on research misconduct charges. But on 1 July, Dong-Pyou Han, a former biomedical scientist at Iowa State University in Ames, was sentenced to 57 months for fabricating and falsifying data in HIV vaccine trials. Han has also been fined US$7.2 million and will be subject to three years of supervised release after he leaves prison. His case had a higher profile than most, attracting interest from a powerful US senator. Han’s harsh sentence raises questions about how alleged...
  • Giant sinkholes spotted on Rosetta's comet

    07/01/2015 2:40:21 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    On average, each of these quasi-circular holes are as wide as two football fields placed together, and some are as deep as the Washington monument is tall. ... The pits can be found clustered in just a few regions on the comet's surface. There are small groups of them on both the "head" and "body" of the rubber-duck-shaped comet, but nearly all of them appear in the comet's northern hemisphere. Cameras on Rosetta's OSIRIS instrument have spotted dust jets shooting out of some of the deeper depressions, but those that are more shallow do not seem to be active. The...
  • Toyota’s new hydrogen-powered car has a record-setting range

    07/01/2015 2:37:08 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 32 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 07/01/2015 | Graham Rapier
    Toyota has been very vocal about its lofty plans for the new Mirai. After severing ties with Tesla in 2014, Toyota has shifted its focus toward fuel cells and away from all-electric cars. On Wednesday, Toyota announced that the Mirai had achieved an EPA-estimated range of 312 miles. That’s the longest range of any zero-emission vehicle on the market today, including electric vehicles. “Toyota realized in the early 90’s that electrification was key to the future of the automobile,” said Toyota’s North America CEO Jim Lentz in a statement “Just as the Prius introduced hybrid-electric vehicles to millions of customers...
  • Flatworm uses 'hypodermic penis' to inject sperm into own head

    07/01/2015 2:24:31 PM PDT · by dynachrome · 43 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 7-1-15 | Philip Oldfield
    The pursuit of reproductive success in the animal kingdom sometimes calls for extreme measures. But few creatures can match the hermaphrodite flatworm, which scientists have discovered can reproduce by injecting sperm into its own head. The tiny aquatic worm, Macrostomum hystix, is able to self-fertilise because it produces both eggs and sperm. Although it prefers to reproduce with other flatworms, when no mating opportunities are present it resorts to using its needle-like penis to inject sperm into its own head. The sperm then swim down the creature’s transparent body to fertilise eggs in the tail region, leading to viable offspring.
  • Iron Age warrior lived with arrowhead in spine

    07/01/2015 7:20:54 AM PDT · by dware · 28 replies
    Live Science via Fox News ^ | 07.01.2015 | Laura Geggel
    A horrific spinal injury caused by a bronze arrowhead didn't immediately kill an Iron Age warrior, who survived long enough for his bone to heal around the metal point, a new study of his burial in central Kazakhstan finds. "This found individual was extremely lucky to survive," said study researcher Svetlana Svyatko, a research fellow in the school of geography, archaeology and paleoecology at Queen's University Belfast in Northern Ireland. "It's hard to get a vertebral wound without damaging the main blood vessels, which would have resulted in an immediate death."
  • Rice University installs powerful electron microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution

    07/01/2015 5:12:17 AM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 16 replies
    Rice University has installed the Titan Themis scanning/transmission electron microscope, which will enable scientists from Rice as well as academic and industrial partners to view and analyze materials at angstrom-scale (one-tenth of a nanometer) resolution, about the size of a single hydrogen atom. Images will be captured with a variety of detectors, including X-ray, optical and multiple electron detectors and a 4K-resolution camera (will create 4K ultra HD images). The microscope gives researchers the ability to create three-dimensional structural reconstructions and carry out electric field mapping of subnanoscale materials. Electron microscopes use beams of electrons rather than light to illuminate...
  • Ohio Senator Rob Portman statement on Supreme Court same sex marriage ruling.

    06/30/2015 3:28:36 PM PDT · by Cap'n Crunch · 23 replies
    Senator Portman website ^ | June 26, 2015 | Senator Portman
    June 26, 2015 Portman Statement on Legalization of Same-Sex Marriage “The issue of marriage equality is one that divides people of principle, and I understand that. In 2013, I decided to support marriage equality after I came to understand this issue better in the context of my own family. I can't help but view today's Supreme Court decision through that same lens. And as a father, I welcome today's decision. As I have said before, I would have preferred for this issue to be resolved by the democratic process in the states because I think you build a more lasting...
  • US Military's Hypersonic Jet Could Fly 5 Times the Speed of Sound

    06/30/2015 1:54:10 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 64 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | June 30, 2015 07:14am ET | by Elizabeth Howell
    The U.S. military is reportedly developing a hypersonic jet plane that could soar at up to five times the speed of sound — faster than a bullet, which generally travels at Mach 2, or twice the speed of sound. The new hypersonic vehicle, which could take flight by 2023, builds upon research from a 2013 test flight of an experimental hypersonic vehicle, the X-51A Waverider, according to Military.com. The $300 million X-51A program began in 2004. The program's final test flight occurred May 1, 2013, when the unmanned Waverider reached a top speed of Mach 5.1 (more than five times...
  • Scientists name the deepest cave-dwelling centipede after Hades—the Greek god of the underworld

    06/30/2015 1:48:02 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-30-2015 | Provided by Pensoft Publishers
    The newly discovered Hades centipede. Credit: J. Bedek An international team of scientists has discovered the deepest underground dwelling centipede. The animal was found by members of the Croatian Biospeleological Society in three caves in Velebit Mts, Croatia. Recorded as deep as -1100 m the new species was named Geophilus hadesi, after Hades, the God of the Underworld in the Greek Mythology. The research was published in the open access journal ZooKeys. Lurking in the dark vaults of some of the world's deepest caves, the Hades centipede has also had its name picked to pair another underground-dwelling relative named after...
  • Fallen Egypt archaeologist wants international Grand Museum [ Zahi Hawass is back! ]

    06/30/2015 12:24:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-30-2015 | By Brian Rohan
    In this June 18, 2015 photo, Zahi Hawass, Egypt's former head of antiquities, stands next to his new book, "The legend of Tutankhamun," as he speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in his office in Cairo. For more than a decade, he was the self-styled Indiana Jones of Egypt, presiding over its antiquities and striding through temples and tombs as the star of TV documentaries that made him an international celebrity. But four years after the 2011 uprising that toppled President Hosni Mubarak and nearly ended his own career, Hawass can be found in a cramped office, lamenting...
  • Samsung develops lithium-ion battery with nearly double the life

    06/30/2015 12:08:20 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-30-2015 | Bob Yirka
    A team of researches affiliated with Samsung's Advanced Institute of Technology, along with colleagues from other institutions in Korea has found a way to greatly extend lithium-ion battery life. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the team describes their new technique and the results they achieved using it. Consumers want their phone batteries to last longer—that is no secret, and battery life has been extended, but mostly due to improved efficiency of the electronics that depend on it. Researchers at phone companies and elsewhere have been working hard to find a way to get more power out...
  • Many Options, No Single Solution to Nation's Traffic Snarls

    06/30/2015 10:47:03 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 38 replies
    ABC News ^ | June 27, 2015 | Joan Lowy
    The problem is clear: Traffic congestion will become significantly worse and more widespread without big changes in how people and products get around. Build more roads. Build more public transit. Rely on new technology. The possible solutions are many, but none is easy or cheap. A few ways to ease the nation's gridlock: ——— PUBLIC TRANSIT RENAISSANCE Ridership on public buses, trains and subways has reached its highest level nationally since the 1950s, and transit boosters cite this as evidence that expanded service and routes is a good investment. The nation's driving capital, Los Angeles, is making a multibillion-dollar investment...
  • Spiky monsters: New species of 'super-armored' worm discovered

    06/30/2015 9:59:45 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-29-2015 | Provided by University of Cambridge
    Collinsium ciliosum, a Collins' monster-type lobopodian from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba biota of China. Credit: Javier Ortega-Hernández A new species of 'super-armoured' worm, a bizarre, spike-covered creature which ate by filtering nutrients out of seawater with its feather-like front legs, has been identified by palaeontologists. The creature, which lived about half a billion years ago, was one of the first animals on Earth to develop armour to protect itself from predators and to use such a specialised mode of feeding. The creature, belonging to a poorly understood group of early animals, is also a prime example of the broad variety...
  • Asteroid Day Takes Aim at Our Cosmic Blind Spot: Threats From Above

    06/30/2015 5:08:46 AM PDT · by Old Sarge · 8 replies
    NBC ^ | 29 JUN 2015 | Alan Boyle
    Scientists and spacefliers will be focusing attention on near-Earth objects when the first-ever Asteroid Day plays out on Tuesday — not so much to raise money, but to raise awareness about the potential threat from above and what to do about it. That last part is the hard part, says Tom Jones, a planetary scientist and former NASA astronaut who's an adviser for Asteroid Day. He told NBC News that the biggest consciousness-raiser hit us two years ago, in the form of a nuclear-scale meteor blast that shook the Russian city of Chelyabinsk. "That was a crystallizing event for people...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- An Unusual Mountain on Asteroid Ceres

    06/29/2015 9:49:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | June 30, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What created this large mountain on asteroid Ceres? No one is yet sure. As if in anticipation of today being Asteroid Day on Earth, the robotic spacecraft Dawn in orbit around Ceres took the best yet image of an unusually tall mountain on the Asteroid Belt's largest asteroid. Visible at the top of the featured image, the exceptional mountain rises about five kilometers up from an area that otherwise appears pretty level. The image was taken about two weeks ago from about 4,400 kilometers away. Although origin hypotheses for the mountain include volcanism, impacts, and plate tectonics, clear evidence...
  • History of Geology: Outburst flood from Glacier de Tete Rousse: A past and future threat

    06/29/2015 5:53:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    History of Geology ^ | August 2010 | David Bressan
    Before 1878, in a period with increased rate of ablation, a supraglacial lake formed in the centre of the glacier, this lake subsequently became covered by ice and snow. The collapse of the glacier tongue in 1892 finally released the accumulated water, a large cavity 40m in diameter and 20m high containing estimated 20.000 cubic meters water at the glacier terminus remained as testimony. From this lower cavity, an 85m long intraglacial conduit led to the upper cavity (the former lake) with an additional volume of 80.000 cubic meters. [History of Geology: Outburst flood from Glacier de Tete Rousse: A...
  • A Deep, Dark Mystery [Helium leakage from Earth's mantle in Los Angeles Basin]

    06/29/2015 4:25:13 PM PDT · by markomalley · 32 replies
    UC Santa Barbara ^ | 6/29/15 | Julie Cohen
    UC Santa Barbara geologist Jim Boles has found evidence of helium leakage from the Earth’s mantle along a 30-mile stretch of the Newport-Inglewood Fault Zone in the Los Angeles Basin. Using samples of casing gas from two dozen oil wells ranging from LA’s Westside to Newport Beach in Orange County, Boles discovered that more than one-third of the sites — some of the deepest ones — show evidence of high levels of helium-3 (3He).Considered primordial, 3He is a vestige of the Big Bang. Its only terrestrial source is the mantle. Leakage of 3He suggests that the Newport-Inglewood fault is deeper...
  • Artificial Intelligence Machine Gets Testy With Its Programmer

    06/29/2015 10:36:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 56 replies
    WSJ ^ | 1:56 pm ET Jun 26, 2015 | By Amir Mizroch
    Researchers have shown that machines are inching closer to self-learning, and perhaps even copping a little attitude. Over at Google, a computer program using a database of movie scripts was asked again and again by researchers to define morality. It struggles to do so, and in a conversation recorded by its human engineers, becomes exasperated and ends the conversation by lashing out at its human inquisitor. Here’s part of the exchange, as related in a paper presented this week: Human: Tell me the definition of morality. Machine: I don’t have ethics. Human: Look, I need help; I need to know...