Science (General/Chat)

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  • Five kids linked to Texas Ebola patient are held in isolation

    10/01/2014 1:38:21 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 7 replies
    New York Post ^ | 10/01/2014 | Chris Perez
    The Texas Ebola patient who was misdiagnosed Friday came in contact with five children over the weekend — who are now being isolated at their homes amid escalating fears of an outbreak. Thomas Eric Duncan has been identified by his sister as the first confirmed case of the deadly disease on US soil — and she says her brother warned health care workers at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas on Friday that he had been visiting the US from Liberia, the Associated Press reports. Duncan — who had a layover in Brussels on his way home — may have...
  • Talking Back to Goliath: Some Advice for Students in the Evolutionary Biology Classroom

    10/01/2014 5:35:13 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 5 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | September 30, 2014 | Paul Nelson
    Talking Back to Goliath: Some Advice for Students in the Evolutionary Biology Classroom Paul Nelson September 30, 2014 2:18 PM | Permalink A student in David Barash's animal-behavior class at the University of Washington might feel a bit like David facing Goliath -- even though Goliath, in this case, happens to be named David. Goliath occupies the podium at the front of the class, holds the professorship, and has the authority of the scientific community (apparently, anyway) on his side. And, like the biblical Goliath, he is confidently outspoken when he delivers what Barash in this past Sunday's NY Times...
  • Ebola May Infect Earth's Entire Population by December 1, 2015; 50-75% Fatal

    09/30/2014 7:40:47 PM PDT · by UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide · 83 replies
    self | 2014-09-30 | UBSOTOS
    Here is the math: Ebola had infected about 4000 known cases by 2014-09-16. Incubation up to 21 days. Rate of new infections during incubation period: R2.0 (i.e. roughly doubling) Population of earth: ~7.2 billion Number of doublings from initial ~4000 to ~8 billion: 21 21 X 21 days = 441 days from September 16, 2014 = December 1, 2015
  • Complex organic molecule found in interstellar space

    09/30/2014 4:03:21 PM PDT · by Natufian · 20 replies
    BBC ^ | 09/26/14 | Michael Eyre
    Scientists have found the beginnings of life-bearing chemistry at the centre of the galaxy. Iso-propyl cyanide has been detected in a star-forming cloud 27,000 light-years from Earth. Its branched carbon structure is closer to the complex organic molecules of life than any previous finding from interstellar space.
  • Archaeologist believes he's found 'Dracula's dungeon'

    09/30/2014 12:34:23 PM PDT · by dware · 16 replies
    Fox News ^ | 09.30.2014 | Kate Seamons
    An archaeologist who has been part of the restoration and excavation effort at Turkey's Tokat Castle believes he has uncovered the dungeons where Vlad the Impaler was once held. Ibrahim Cetin tells the Hurriyet Daily News that the two dungeons that were found were "built like a prison." And while he deems it "hard to estimate" which room the man who served as Dracula's inspiration was held in, "he was around here," he says.
  • Future Smartphones Won’t Need Cell Towers to Connect

    09/30/2014 10:44:32 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 38 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | September 29, 2014 | Tom Simonite
    A new feature being added to the LTE protocol that smartphones use to communicate with cellular towers will make it possible to bypass those towers altogether. Phones will be able to “talk” directly to other mobile devices and to beacons located in shops and other businesses. Known as LTE Direct, the wireless technology has a range of up to 500 meters, far more than either Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. It is included in update to the LTE standard slated for approval this year, and devices capable of LTE Direct could appear as soon as late 2015. LTE Direct has been pioneered...
  • Mysterious feature on Saturn's moon baffles NASA scientists

    09/30/2014 8:38:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    theweek.com ^ | 09-30-2014 10:16am ET | Meghan DeMaria
    NASA's Cassini spacecraft has discovered a "mysterious feature" on Saturn's moon Titan. Scientists are working to determine, what, exactly, this feature might be. NASA reports that the feature is roughly 100 square miles, and it lies in Ligeia Mare, one of Titan's hydrocarbon seas. Cassini's radar has observed the feature twice, but its appearance changed between the two sightings. Scientists suspect the feature's change in appearance could be the result of Titan's changing seasons, which Cassini's current extended mission will monitor. The feature's first sighting was in July 2013, and the radar images depicted a bright spot, which stood out...
  • Australian Meteorologists Caught Fudging Numbers

    09/30/2014 8:35:26 AM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 20 replies
    Heartland.org ^ | 9-19-14 | H. Sterling Burnett
    The Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABM) was recently forced to admit it alters the temperatures recorded at almost all the official weather stations in Australia. The ABM came clean on its temperature fiddling largely because of the fierce scrutiny of Graham Lloyd, environment editor for The Australian and The Weekend Australian, who published a series of articles on the ABM’s number-fudging. Using a process it calls homogenization, ABM has replaced actual temperature measurements with massaged numbers. ABM claims anomalies have arisen in both the historical data and current measurements due to a wide variety of factors unrelated to climate, such...
  • Alleged Meteor Caught on Russian Dash Cam (Again)

    09/30/2014 8:12:33 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | September 30, 2014 | Jason Major on
    Thanks to the ubiquitousness of dashboard-mounted video cameras in Russia yet another bright object has been spotted lighting up the sky over Siberia, this time a “meteor-like object” seen on the evening of Saturday, Sept. 27.
  • SPACEX CRS-4 MISSION: CRS-4 Launch

    09/30/2014 5:42:32 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX
    SpaceX ^ | Fri Sep, 19 2014 10:50 PM PDT — Sat Oct, 18 2014 12:00 PM PDT | SpaceX
    6 days ago At 9:21am ET, Dragon is fully attached to the ISS, its home for the next four weeks. Astronauts will now prepare to open Dragon's hatch to unload cargo, including materials to support more than 255 science experiments.
  • Bats lured to deaths at wind farms ‘because they think turbines are trees’

    09/29/2014 9:41:05 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 45 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8:00PM BST 29 Sep 2014 | Emily Gosden, Energy Editor
    Bats may be lured to their deaths at wind farms because they think turbines are trees in which they can find shelter, food and sex, according to new research. The creatures fly towards slow-moving turbines, only to be killed when gusts of wind spin the blades, scientists investigating “unprecedented” numbers of bat deaths at wind farms suggested. Flashing red lights may need to be installed at wind farms to help prevent the animals making the potentially-fatal mistake, they said. […] About 600,000 bats are estimated to have been killed by wind farms in the US in 2012. …
  • Israeli circumcision device provokes union outcry in South Africa

    09/29/2014 5:01:45 PM PDT · by Phinneous · 31 replies
    Reuters via Yahoo News ^ | 9/29/14 | Reuters
    JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - South Africa may turn to an Israeli circumcision device to reduce the number of young males who die in botched initiation ceremonies, provoking an outcry from union allies of the ruling party who support sanctions against the Jewish state.
  • Our quantum problem

    09/29/2014 4:34:42 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 37 replies
    Aeon ^ | 1/28/14 | Adrian Kent
    In 1909, Ernest Rutherford, Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden took a piece of radium and used it to fire charged particles at a sheet of gold foil. They wanted to test the then-dominant theory that atoms were simply clusters of electrons floating in little seas of positive electrical charge (the so-called ‘plum pudding’ model). What came next, said Rutherford, was ‘the most incredible event that has ever happened to me in my life’. Despite the airy thinness of the foil, a small fraction of the particles bounced straight back at the source – a result, Rutherford noted, ‘as incredible as...
  • 'Cloaking' device uses ordinary lenses to hide objects across range of angles

    09/29/2014 12:38:35 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    phys.org ^ | Sep 27, 2014 | Provided by University of Rochester
    Inspired perhaps by Harry Potter's invisibility cloak, scientists have recently developed several ways—some simple and some involving new technologies—to hide objects from view. The latest effort, developed at the University of Rochester, not only overcomes some of the limitations of previous devices, but it uses inexpensive, readily available materials in a novel configuration. "There've been many high tech approaches to cloaking and the basic idea behind these is to take light and have it pass around something as if it isn't there, often using high-tech or exotic materials," said John Howell, a professor of physics at the University of Rochester....
  • Real space battles would be more 'Asteroids' than 'Star Wars'

    09/29/2014 11:44:33 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 64 replies
    engadget.com ^ | Sep 28 2014 | Jon Fingas
    You're probably aware that most sci-fi space battles aren't realistic. The original Star Wars' Death Star scene was based on a World War II movie, for example. But have you wondered what it would really be like to duke it out in the void? PBS is more than happy to explain in its latest It's Okay To Be Smart video. -break- ...even close-up combat might not happen. Given the sheer distances and the limits of the speed of light, it might look more like classic naval warfare...
  • New paper: Influence of solar cycles on climate change during the Maunder Minimum

    09/29/2014 11:20:07 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 37 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | September 29, 2014 | Anthony Watts
    Both observational and proxy records of climate change often show quasi periodic variations similar to solar activity cycles over a wide range of time scales. However, the detailed mechanism and the extent of the influence of solar activity on climate change have not been clearly understood. Although the exact role of each of solar parameters on climate change has not been quantitatively clarified, several possible mechanisms are proposed; such as the forcing through total (e.g. Lean et al., 1995) and spectral irradiance (e.g. Haigh 1996; Kodera and Kuroda, 2005), solar wind (e.g. Tinsley, 1996) and the galactic cosmic rays...
  • American Doctor Exposed to Ebola in US for Observation

    09/29/2014 11:07:34 AM PDT · by LucyT · 16 replies
    VOA News ^ | September 28, 2014 7:28 PM | Staff
    An American doctor exposed to Ebola while in Sierra Leone has been flown to the United States. The doctor was flown to a regional airport in the eastern state of Maryland Sunday and walked off the plane wearing a white protective suit. The infectious disease chief at the NIH near Washington would not discuss details about the patient, but said that in general, an exposure to Ebola doesn't necessarily mean someone will become sick.
  • Darwinist Denies Human Exceptionalism in NYT

    09/29/2014 10:11:28 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 9 replies
    National Review Online ^ | September 28, 2014 | Wesley J. Smith
    Darwinist Denies Human Exceptionalism in NYT The New York Times is consistently anti-human exceptionalism, never missing an opportunity to publish articles that seek to reduce humans to just another animal in the forest.Today, the Sunday Review section has University of Washington biology professor, David P. Barash, bragging that he works to destroy faith in his classes (“The Talk”), insisting to his students that science and religion are incompatible.That kind of ideological indoctrination is par for the disturbing course in universities, but not the one of the areas with which I grapple. However, I would be remiss not to point out...
  • Astronomers confirm contamination by stardust in detection of sky ripples

    09/28/2014 10:47:34 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 10 replies
    The Tech ^ | 9-26-14 | Dennis Overbye
    Stardust got in their eyes. In the spring a group of astronomers who go by the name of BICEP announced they had detected ripples in the sky, gravitational waves that were the opening notes of the Big Bang. The finding was heralded as potentially the greatest discovery of the admittedly young century, but some outside astronomers said the group had underestimated the extent to which interstellar dust could have contaminated the results - a possibility that the group conceded in its official report in June. Now a long-awaited report by astronomers using data from the European Space Agency’s Planck satellite...
  • The World's First Genetically Modified Babies Will Graduate High School This Year

    09/28/2014 1:27:15 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 29 replies
    TechCrunch ^ | September 28, 2014 | Sarah Buhr
    Remember the sci-fi thriller GATTACA? For those who never saw the film and/or eschewed all pop culture in the late 90's for some reason, it was a popular movie that came out in 1997 about genetically modified human beings. Now some literally genetically modified human babies born that same year are entering their senior year of high school.
  • Italian-Spanish archeologists to launch dig into Luxor tomb

    09/27/2014 10:00:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | September 26, 2014 | Claudio Accogli
    An Italian-Spanish archeological team on Friday prepared to launch a dig in an extraordinary tomb whose discovery was announced six months ago. The tomb belongs to May, an important government officer of the XVIII dynasty, an era ruled by pharoahs such as Tutankhamon and the "heretic" pharoah Akhenaton, who established a sun cult dedicated to the sun disk Aton, among others... The team came upon the tomb of May through a horizontal tunnel located within the Min, which was also visited two centuries ago by the legendary Jean Francois Champollion, considered the father of Egyptology... The few images available show...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Two Black Holes Dancing in 3C 75

    09/27/2014 9:50:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    NASA ^ | September 28, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening at the center of active galaxy 3C 75? The two bright sources at the center of this composite x-ray (blue)/ radio (pink) image are co-orbiting supermassive black holes powering the giant radio source 3C 75. Surrounded by multimillion degree x-ray emitting gas, and blasting out jets of relativistic particles the supermassive black holes are separated by 25,000 light-years. At the cores of two merging galaxies in the Abell 400 galaxy cluster they are some 300 million light-years away. Astronomers conclude that these two supermassive black holes are bound together by gravity in a binary system in part...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Launch and a Landing

    09/27/2014 9:46:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    NASA ^ | September 27, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Taken from an Atlantic beach, Cape Canaveral, planet Earth, four identically framed digital images are combined in this night skyscape. Slightly shifted short star trails dot the sky, but the exposure times were adjusted to follow the flight of a Falcon 9 rocket. The September 21 launch delivered a Dragon X capsule filled with supplies to the International Space Station. Above the bright flare seen just after launch, the rocket's first stage firing trails upward from the left. After separation, the second stage burn begins near center with the vehicle climbing toward low Earth orbit. At the horizon, the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- MAVEN at Mars

    09/27/2014 9:45:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | September 26, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Launched on November 18, 2013, the MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN) spacecraft completed its interplanetary voyage September 21, captured into a wide, elliptical orbit around Mars. MAVEN's imaging ultraviolet spectrograph has already begun its planned exploration of the Red Planet's upper atmosphere, acquiring this image data from an altitude of 36,500 kilometers. In false color, the three ultraviolet wavelength bands show light reflected from atomic hydrogen (in blue), atomic oxygen (in green) and the planet's surface (in red). Low mass atomic hydrogen is seen to extend thousands of kilometers into space, with the cloud of more massive oxygen...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 206 and the Star Clouds of Andromeda

    09/27/2014 9:40:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | September 25, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The large stellar association cataloged as NGC 206 is nestled within the dusty arms of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy. Also known as M31, the spiral galaxy is a mere 2.5 million light-years away. NGC 206 is near top center in this gorgeous close-up of the southwestern extent of Andromeda's disk, a remarkable composite of data from space and ground-based observatories. The bright, blue stars of NGC 206 indicate its youth. In fact, its youngest massive stars are less than 10 million years old. Much larger than the open or galactic clusters of young stars in the disk of our...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Lagoon Nebula in Stars Dust and Gas

    09/27/2014 9:37:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | September 24, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The large majestic Lagoon Nebula is home for many young stars and hot gas. Spanning 100 light years across while lying only about 5000 light years distant, the Lagoon Nebula is so big and bright that it can be seen without a telescope toward the constellation of Sagittarius. Many bright stars are visible from NGC 6530, an open cluster that formed in the nebula only several million years ago. The greater nebula, also known as M8 and NGC 6523, is named "Lagoon" for the band of dust seen to the left of the open cluster's center. A bright knot...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Aurora and Volcanic Light Pillar

    09/27/2014 9:35:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | September 23, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: That's no sunset. And that thin red line just above it -- that's not a sun pillar. The red glow on the horizon originates from a volcanic eruption, and the red line is the eruption's reflection from fluttering atmospheric ice crystals. This unusual volcanic light pillar was captured over Iceland earlier this month. The featured scene looks north from Jökulsárlón toward the erupting volcano Bárðarbunga in the Holuhraun lava field. Even the foreground sky is picturesque, with textured grey clouds in the lower atmosphere, shimmering green aurora in the upper atmosphere, and bright stars far in the distance. Although...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Earth at Equinox

    09/27/2014 9:33:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | September 22, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Earth is at equinox. Over the next 24 hours, day and night have nearly equal duration all over planet Earth. Technically, equinox transpires at 2:29 am Universal Time tomorrow, but this occurs today in North and South America. This September equinox signal that winter is approaching in the northern hemisphere, and summer is approaching in the south. At equinox, the dividing line between the sunlit half of Earth and the nighttime half of Earth temporarily passes through Earth's north and south spin poles. This dividing line is shown in clear detail in the featured video, taken by the Russian...
  • Water On Earth Is Older Than The Sun

    09/27/2014 4:51:07 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 51 replies
    Science 2.0 ^ | 09/27/2014
    It's no surprise that water was crucial to the formation of life on Earth. What may surprise you is that water on earth is older than the sun itself. Identifying the original source of Earth's water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments came into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. A new paper in Science says that much of our Solar System's water likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space. Water is found throughout the Solar System, not just on Earth; on icy comets and moons, and in the shadowed basins of...
  • A Viking Burial Described by Arab Writer Ahmad ibn Fadlan

    09/27/2014 2:26:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Thor News ^ | May 12, 2012 | unattributed
    ...A 10th century Arab Muslim writer named Ahmad ibn Fadlan produced a description of a funeral of a Scandinavian, Swedish, chieftain who was on an expedition on the eastern route. The account is a unique source on the ceremonies surrounding the Viking funeral, of a chieftain. The dead chieftain was put in a temporary grave which was covered for ten days until they had sewn new clothes for him. One of his thrall women volunteered to join him in the afterlife and she was guarded day and night, being given a great amount of intoxicating drinks while she sang happily......
  • Home owner discovers ancient underground city beneath his house in Anatolia

    09/27/2014 2:17:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | August 25, 2014 | April Holloway
    A home owner living in the Melikgazi district of Kayseri province in Anatolia made a surprising discovery while clearing out an area under his house – a subterranean city, of which 4,000 square metres have been excavated so far, according to a report in Hurriyet Daily News. The region of Anatolia in Turkey is famous for its underground cities, particularly in the region of Cappadocia where more than 40 complete underground cities and 200 underground villages and tunnel towns complete with hidden passages, secret rooms, and ancient temples have been found. Mustafa Bozdemir, 50, was bequeathed a house in Melikgazi...
  • Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after five centuries

    09/27/2014 1:49:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 17, 2014 | Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
    A team of Spanish researchers have obtained the first partial genome sequence of an ancient pig. Extracted from a sixteenth century pig found at the site of the Montsoriu Castle in Girona, the data obtained indicates that this ancient pig is closely related to today's Iberian pig. Researchers also discard the hypothesis that Asian pigs were crossed with modern Iberian pigs. The study, published in Heredity, sheds new light on evolutionary aspects of pig species, and particularly on that of the Iberian breed, considered to be representative of original European Mediterranean populations... The sample dates approximately from the years 1520...
  • Space Station's '42' Crew Links Expedition to 'Hitchhiker's Guide'

    09/27/2014 11:32:33 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 35 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | September 26, 2014 07:44am ET | Robert Pearlman
    What do astronauts and cosmonauts, a towel and a paranoid android have in common? The answer is 42. The International Space Station's Expedition 42 crew, who is set to take up residency onboard the orbiting laboratory in November, has embraced the connection between their numerical designation and "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," the Douglas Adams' sci-fi franchise, adopting its imagery and slogans for their official poster and unofficial patch.
  • Liberia: Top Doctor Goes Under Ebola Quarantine

    09/27/2014 7:43:32 AM PDT · by Gadsden1st · 4 replies
    ABC NEWS ^ | Sep 27, 2014 | JONATHAN PAYE-LAYLEH
    Liberia's chief medical officer is placing herself under quarantine for 21 days after her office assistant died of Ebola. Bernice Dahn, a deputy health minister who has represented Liberia at regional conferences intended to combat the ongoing epidemic, told The Associated Press on Saturday that she did not have any Ebola symptoms but wanted to ensure she was not infected. The World Health Organization says 21 days is the maximum incubation period for Ebola, which has killed more than 3,000 people across West Africa and is hitting Liberia especially hard. WHO figures released Friday said 150 people died in the...
  • Earthquakes reported near Mammoth Mountain volcano

    09/27/2014 5:34:42 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 11 replies
    CNN ^ | 9-27-14 | Amanda Watts
    A flurry of small earthquakes rumbling near the Mammoth Mountain Volcano, have been categorized as "volcanic unrest" by the United States Geological Survey. Nearly three dozen earthquakes ranging from magnitude 2.6 to 3.8 have swarmed the area, northeast of Fresno, California, over the last two days. Earthquake swarms in this region are not uncommon. David Shelly, a seismologist with California Volcano Observatory, said this swarm is "bigger than we've seen recently, but normal in the area." He adds they are keeping a close eye on the movement, "but in the larger scheme of things, it's within in the range of...
  • Museum Day Live: Free admission at Participating Museums Saturday

    09/26/2014 9:55:33 PM PDT · by iowamark · 3 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 9/27/2014
    The Museum Day Live! ticket provides free admission for two people. In the spirit of the Smithsonian Museums, which offer free admission every day, Museum Day Live! is an annual event hosted by Smithsonian magazine in which participating museums across the country open their doors to anyone presenting a Museum Day Live! ticket… for free. Click here to view the list of 2014 participating museums. Read about some of the participating museums here.
  • Busy Spaceport: There are Now Five Spaceships Parked at the Space Station

    09/26/2014 6:56:14 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 3 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | September 26, 2014 | Nancy Atkinson on
    Last night, the Expedition 41/42 crew arrived — peeling in on one solar panel on their Soyuz TMA-14M — with the first female cosmonaut to be part of an ISS crew, Elena Serova along with her crewmates cosmonaut Alexander Samokutyaev, and NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore. They took the Soyuz “fast track,” arriving at the station in just under six hours after launch. One of the craft’s solar panels jammed and couldn’t deploy, but the crew docked to Poisk docking compartment without indecent. The arrival of Wilmore, Samokutyaev and Serova returns the station’s crew complement to six. Already on board are...
  • A Wearable Camera That Turns Into a Drone and Flies Off Your Wrist

    09/26/2014 5:32:58 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 9 replies
    Digitalwack ^ | 9/26/2014 | Digitalwack
    Meet Nixie, a wearable camera that flies off your wrist and turns into a remote-controlled quadcopter. It's the bizarre-yet-appealing wearable camera drone nobody asked for... and now we kind of want it. Intel is holding a competition to encourage new wearable technology ideas, and the Nixie is one of the finalists. So far, it's still in development, so the flying wristlet camera is rough around the edges. Team captain Christoph Kohstall eventually wants you to be able to send the the Nixie flying with a gesture. It would recognize where you're standing, snap a picture, then return to the wrist,...
  • Rosetta Mission Sets Date for Historic Comet Landing

    09/26/2014 1:39:30 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    NBC ^ | published September 26th 2014, 10:37 am
    The European Space Agency says it will attempt to land the first spacecraft on a comet on Nov. 12. The maneuver is due to take about seven hours, starting from the moment its unmanned probe Rosetta releases the 100-kilogram (220-pound) Philae lander at 3:35 a.m. ET. Because of the 28 minutes it takes the signal to travel back to Earth, confirmation of a successful landing on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko won't arrive until about shortly after 11 a.m. ET that day. In a statement issued Friday, ESA said it has a backup plan in case there's a problem with the preferred landing...
  • Cosmic inflation is dead, long live cosmic inflation!

    09/26/2014 11:54:05 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 19 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 09/26/2014 | Michael Slezak
    Inflation is dead, long live inflation! The very results hailed this year as demonstrating a consequence of inflationary models of the universe – and therefore pointing to the existence of multiverses – now seem to do the exact opposite. If the results can be trusted at all, they now suggest inflation is wrong, raising the possibility of cyclic universes that existed before the big bang. In March experimentalists announced that primordial gravitational waves had been discovered. The team behind the BICEP2 Telescope in Antarctica had observed telltale twists and turns in the polarisation of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB)...
  • GOCE reveals gravity dip from ice loss (w/ Video)

    09/26/2014 11:36:29 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | 09-26-2014 | Provided by European Space Agency
    Although not designed to map changes in Earth's gravity over time, ESA's extraordinary satellite has shown that the ice lost from West Antarctica over the last few years has left its signature. More than doubling its planned life in orbit, GOCE spent four years measuring Earth's gravity in unprecedented detail. Scientists are now armed with the most accurate gravity model ever produced. This is leading to a much better understanding of many facets of our planet – from the boundary between Earth's crust and upper mantle to the density of the upper atmosphere. The strength of gravity at Earth's surface...
  • IBM increases the power of the sun ( 60% ...This could change things)

    09/26/2014 9:00:56 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 38 replies
    Fudzilla ^ | Friday, 26 September 2014 08:55 | Nick Farrell
    Because you can never have too much tan Biggish Blue boffins have come up with a way of increasing the sun's radiation by 2,000 times while also producing fresh water and air conditioning. IBM and Switzerland-based Airlight Energy today announced a new parabolic dish uses a dense array of water-cooled solar chips that can convert 80 per cent of the sun's radiation into useful energy.Dubbed the “Concentrator PhotoVoltaics (CPV) system the gear which looks like a 33-foot-high sunflower, can generate 12 kilowatts of electrical power and 20 kilowatts of heat on a sunny day — enough to power several average...
  • Why India's Mars mission is so cheap - and thrilling [Cheaper than the Hollywood Film: 'Gravity']

    09/25/2014 8:30:42 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 49 replies
    BBC News ^ | 09/25/2014 | Jonathan Amos
    India's space programme has succeeded at the first attempt where others have failed - by sending an operational mission to Mars. The Mangalyaan satellite was confirmed to be in orbit shortly after 0800, Indian time. It is, without doubt, a considerable achievement. This is a mission that has been budgeted at 4.5bn rupees ($74m), which, by Western standards, is staggeringly cheap. The American Maven orbiter that arrived at the Red Planet on Monday is costing almost 10 times as much. Back in June, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi even quipped that India's real-life Martian adventure was costing less than the...
  • Curiosity Mars rover drills into base of Mount Sharp

    09/25/2014 5:19:17 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    BBC ^ | 25 September 2014 Last updated at 14:36 ET | Jonathan Amos
    The robot used its power tool to grind out a sample from a pale, flat slab at a location dubbed "Pahrump Hills". Curiosity has previously drilled into three rocks to collect powdered tailings for analysis in its sophisticated onboard laboratories. This latest acquisition should give scientists a taster for the type of sediments that lie ahead. The Nasa rover is driving into the nearby foothills of Mount Sharp, a 5km peak at the centre of Mars' Gale Crater. Researchers hope the chemistry of the rocks at the base of this mountain will reveal new details about the environmental history of...
  • FBI blasts Apple, Google for locking police out of phones

    09/25/2014 3:05:24 PM PDT · by re_tail20 · 41 replies
    Washington Post ^ | September 25, 2014 | Craig Timberg and Greg Miller
    FBI Director James B. Comey sharply criticized Apple and Google on Thursday for developing forms of smartphone encryption so secure that law enforcement officials cannot easily gain access to information stored on the devices — even when they have valid search warrants. His comments were the most forceful yet from a top government official but echo a chorus of denunciation from law enforcement officials nationwide. Police have said that the ability to search photos, messages and Web histories on smartphones is essential to solving a range of serious crimes, from murder to child pornography to attempted terrorist attacks. “There will...
  • Series of fireballs light up Eastern US sky

    09/25/2014 2:28:05 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    theindychannel.com ^ | Sep 25, 2014
    A series of fireballs lit up the night sky across the eastern U.S. Tuesday night and Wednesday morning just hours apart. ... More than 420 witnesses reported seeing the fireball streaking across the sky, with those reports from Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Illinois and Indiana. Among the reports AMS received in Indiana, one person in Greenwood described the fireball as having "small reddish sparks as it snuffed out, scattered in all directions." ... Three of the four reported fireballs happened within 90 minutes of each other, with the other reports over New Jersey, Tennessee and Florida. "It is rare that multiple...
  • California Drought May Be Cause for Mt. Shasta Mudslide

    09/25/2014 2:18:44 PM PDT · by B4Ranch · 15 replies
    http://www.accuweather.com ^ | September 24, 2014; | Mark Leberfinger
    U.S. Forest Service officials continue to monitor a mudslide that occurred Saturday at Mt. Shasta in northern California.The mudslide began around 3 p.m. PDT Saturday and continued through the night in Mud Creek Canyon, a Forest Service spokeswoman said in a news release.The cause of the mudslide is believed to be due to the drought conditions which have left Mt. Shasta's glaciers exposed to the sun's heat.A mudslide from Mt. Shasta crosses Pilgrim Creek Road in northern California on Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014. (Photo/U.S. Forest Service/Steve Bachmann)A mudslide from Mt. Shasta merges into the McCloud River in northern California on...
  • The Shellshock Bug In About Four Minutes (video)

    09/25/2014 12:57:00 PM PDT · by servo1969 · 13 replies
    youtube.com ^ | 9-25-2014 | Tom Scott
    Remember Heartbleed? Well, this is probably worse. Here's a (somewhat simplified) explanation of what Shellshock actually is. Don't worry: I haven't included instructions on how to actually exploit it. The moral of the story is: keep your security patches up to date!
  • This is what it takes to outfit an airplane with WIFI. (video)

    09/25/2014 4:58:53 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 9 replies
    dump.com ^ | 9-24-2014 | United Airways
    http://www.dump.com/airplanewifi/https://hub.united.com/en-us/news/products-services/pages/united-installs-satellite-wi-fi.aspx
  • Trying to replicate the amazing camouflage abilities of the octopus

    09/24/2014 8:16:13 PM PDT · by Jet Jaguar · 4 replies
    Stars and Stripes ^ | Sept 24, 2014 | By Ivan Amato
    At first glance, the thumbnail-size grids of 256 minuscule black squares seem to have nothing to do with the octopus, squid and cuttlefish that inspired them. But these high-tech microconstructions of polymers, semiconductors, light sensors and heating elements are what you get when scientists attempt to replicate the camouflaging ability of the animal world. One of the goals of the scientists' work, which explains the Navy's financial support of the project, is to invent synthetic skins that can recast their textures, colors and patterns to match their surroundings — match them well enough that the skins and what's underneath...