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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Vast hidden 'ocean' found under Chinese desert

    07/31/2015 1:22:24 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | July 30, 2015 20:30 BST | By Yasmin Kaye
    Workers digging a well for underground water are dwarfed by the sand dunes of the Taklimakan Desert, 13 September 2003, outside of Tazhong, in China's northwest Xinjiang province. ================================================================================================================== Chinese scientists have discovered what could be a huge hidden ocean underneath one of the driest places on earth, the South China Morning Post reported on 30 July. The Tarim basin in northwestern Xinjiang, China, is one of the driest places on Earth, but the vast amount of salt water concealed underneath could equal 10 times the water found in all five of the Great Lakes in the US. "This is...
  • 'Extinct' fly spotted in Devon 150 years after last sighting

    07/31/2015 1:09:43 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | July 31, 2015 14:22 BST | By Sean Martin
    Raphium pectinatum fly was last seen 150 years ago in Surrey(Rob Wolton / Devon Wildlife Trust) ====================================================================================================================== A fly that was thought to have been extinct for more than 150 years has been spotted in Devon. The Raphium pectinatum fly was last officially noted 150 years back in Surrey on 19 July 1868. The green metallic-looking species was thought to have died out shortly after this but naturalist Rob Wolton, a member of the Devon Fly Group and the Dipterists Forum, said he spotted one alive and well in the Devon Wildlife Old Sludge Beds, a wetland reserve on the...
  • 2000-Year-Old Cat Paw Prints Discovered on Tile

    07/31/2015 12:45:07 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 46 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jul 30, 2015 01:26 PM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    The cat paw print on the Roman roof tile. David Rice ================================================================================================================== Paw prints made by a cat 2,000 years ago have been found on a Roman roof tile kept at a museum in south west England. Dug up in Gloucester in 1969, the tile fragment had long lain unnoticed at Gloucester City Museum. Only recently, a researcher spotted the cat’s paw on the tile while going through the finds from the 1969 archaeological excavation. “At that time the archaeologists seem to have been more interested in digging things up than looking at what they found,” David Rice, curator at...
  • Face the facts people, there is no life on Mars

    07/31/2015 11:20:25 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 53 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 07/24/2015 | Michael Hanlon
    Suddenly, space is getting interesting again. After decades of going boldly nowhere in low Earth orbit, Man, or rather his robotic emissaries, have made some startling discoveries in our Solar System. Cold, distant Pluto is – who would have thought it? – turning out to be one of the most interesting planets (yes, it is a planet) in the Solar System. Before the New Horizons probe turned up earlier this month, astronomers assumed it would be a dull, grey cratered rock. [SNIP] If we find life of any kind out there – whether it be Martian microbes (we have several...
  • Hold the phone, Central! Cellphone radiation can cause cancer: study

    07/31/2015 11:03:32 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    www.nydailynews.com ^ | Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 4:38 PM | BY Meredith Engel
    The scientists were right — your cell phone can give you cancer. There have long been whispers of a cancer connection from your cell — and a new study backs up the claims. "These data are a clear sign of the real risks this kind of radiation poses for human health," study author Igor Yakymenko said. Yakymenko’s meta-study — basically a study of hundreds of other studies — reveals many findings of previous researchers into how radiofrequency from your phone can damage DNA. That damage can add up over time and cause a variety of health problems, like cancer, headaches,...
  • Astronomers find star with three super-Earths

    07/31/2015 10:02:33 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 30, 2015 | Staff
    This artist's rendition released by NASA on July 30, 2015 shows one possible appearance for the planet HD 219134b ======================================================================================================================== Astronomers said Thursday they had found a planetary system with three super-Earths orbiting a bright, dwarf star—one of them likely a volcanic world of molten rock. The four-planet system had been hiding out in the M-shaped, northern hemisphere constellation Cassiopeia, "just" 21 light years from Earth, a team reported in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. It comprises four planets—one giant and three super-Earths orbiting a star dubbed HD219134. Super-Earths have a mass higher than Earth's but are lighter than gas...
  • Earth's Magnetic Shield Is Much Older Than Thought

    07/31/2015 9:55:30 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 21 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 07/30/2015 | J. A. Tarduno, R. D. Cottrell, W. J. Davis, F. Nimmo, R. K. Bono.
    Since 2010, the best estimate of the age of Earth's magnetic field has been 3.45 billion years. But now a researcher responsible for that finding has new data showing the magnetic field is far older. John Tarduno, a geophysicist at the University of Rochester and a leading expert on Earth's magnetic field, and his team of researchers say they believe the Earth's magnetic field is at least four billion years old.
  • What's That Spot On World Ceres?

    07/31/2015 8:51:48 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    JPL ^ | Unknown | NASA
    What's the spot on World Ceres? Can you guess what's creating those unusual bright spots on Ceres? On March 6, NASA's Dawn spacecraft began orbiting Ceres, the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Even before the spacecraft arrived at the dwarf planet, images revealed mysterious bright spots that captivated scientists and observers alike. Until Dawn gets a closer look over the next few months, it's anyone's guess what those spots could be. So, go ahead! Cast your vote below. - See more at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/dawn/world_ceres/#sthash.bwDwq56N.dpuf
  • Magnetic Pulses Might Provide Long-Lasting Tinnitus Relief: No, It Will Not Suck Your Brain Out

    07/31/2015 8:29:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    www.techtimes.com ^ | July 20, 7:51 AM | By Ted Ranosa
    A new study conducted by researchers from the Oregon Health & Science University and the Veterans Affairs Portland Medical Center suggests that a transcranial magnetic stimulation system typically used for depression treatment could also help alleviate the debilitating effects of a condition known as tinnitus. ===================================================================================================================== Tinnitus is a debilitating condition wherein an individual often hears a ringing or clicking sound even though there are no external sources of the sound present. It currently affects an estimated 45 million people, mostly veteran soldiers, living in the United States, according to the American Tinnitus Association (ATA), and a proven cure for...
  • Job Losses from Coal Closures Dwarf Gains from Wind Industry

    07/31/2015 7:54:24 AM PDT · by rktman · 3 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 7/30/2015 | unknown
    The EPA’s regulation of carbon dioxide emissions from power plants highlights the job-killing transition proposed by the administration. This carbon agenda, which the administration’s public relations team calls the “Clean Power Plan”, threatens to tear down the existing electricity generation infrastructure in the name of carbon dioxide emissions. This carbon agenda will magnify the market-distorting subsidies from the PTC—contributing to an estimated peak of one million job losses—will drain hundreds of billions of dollars from American families through increased energy bills, and will threaten the electric grid by rapidly switching from reliable to intermittent sources of electricity. Further, electricity from...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The ISS and a Colorful Moon

    07/31/2015 4:18:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | July 31, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Tonight's Full Moon, the second Full Moon in July, could be called a blue moon according to modern folklore. But this sharp and detailed mosaic, recorded with telescope and digital camera just before July's first Full Moon, actually does show a colorful lunar surface. The colors have been enhanced in the processed image but are real nonetheless, corresponding to real differences in the chemical makeup of the lunar surface. Also easy to see especially when the Moon is near full phase, bright rays from 85 kilometer wide Tycho crater at the upper right extend far across the lunar surface....
  • Could We Make Artificial Gravity?

    07/30/2015 1:41:07 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Fraser Cain
    The only way to get gravity is with mass. The more mass, the more gravity you get. Without mass, you can’t have gravity. ... The force of gravity that we feel is actually just an acceleration towards the center of the Earth at 9.8 meters per second squared, or 1G. If you were in a spacecraft and it was accelerating away from Earth at a rate of 1G, it would feel exactly the same if you were standing on the ground. ... Want to fly to Jupiter? It would only take about 80 hours of acceleration, and then 80 hours...
  • 'Golden jackals' of East Africa are actually 'golden wolves'

    07/30/2015 10:32:37 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 5 replies
    phys.org ^ | 07-30-2015 | Provided by: Cell Press
    A golden jackal (Canis anthus) from Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Based on genomic results, the researchers suggest this animal be referred to as the African golden wolf, which is distinct from the Eurasian golden jackal (Canis aureus). Credit: D. Gordon E. Robertson ======================================================================================================================= Despite their remarkably similar appearance, the "golden jackals" of East Africa and Eurasia are actually two entirely different species. The discovery, based on DNA evidence and reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 30, increases the overall biodiversity of the Canidae—the group including dogs, wolves, foxes, and jackals—from 35 living species to 36. "This...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way over Uluru

    07/30/2015 1:16:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | July 30, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The central regions of our Milky Way Galaxy rise above Uluru/Ayers Rock in this striking night skyscape. Recorded on July 13, a faint airglow along the horizon shows off central Australia's most recognizable landform in silhouette. Of course the Milky Way's own cosmic dust clouds appear in silhouette too, dark rifts along the galaxy's faint congeries of stars. Above the central bulge, rivers of cosmic dust converge on a bright yellowish supergiant star Antares. Left of Antares, wandering Saturn shines in the night.
  • ...Japan fires world's most powerful laser to produce... 1,000 times the planet's power consumption

    07/29/2015 5:26:48 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | By Ellie Zolfagharifard
    Japan claims to have fired the most powerful laser ever created. Researchers in Osaka were able to produce a 2-petawatt laser beam using a device known as the Laser for Fast Ignition Experiment (LFEX). The power of the 'Death Star'-like beam is equivalent to 1,000 times the world's total electricity consumption, the scientists claim. While it produced a huge amount of power, the energy required for the beam itself is equivalent to that needed to power a microwave for two seconds. The team were able to produce such a high output from low energy by only firing the laser beam...
  • Salt water for lamp designed to serve people without electricity

    07/29/2015 1:49:02 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 57 replies
    phys.org ^ | 07-27-2015 | by Nancy Owano
    A startup team calls their work a product. They also call it a social movement. Many people in the over-7,000 islands in the Philippines lack access to electricity .The startup would like to make a difference. Their main ingredient is salt. Their product is a lamp that takes two tablespoons of salt and a glass of water in order to work. This is from the Sustainable Alternative Lighting, or SALt Corp. This is a startup focused on delivering a cost effective, environmentally safe lamp that runs on salt water. Their lamp could be an alternative to kerosene/battery powered lamps and...
  • No, German Scientists Have Not Confirmed the “Impossible” EMDrive

    07/29/2015 10:27:45 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    io9.com ^ | 7/28/15 10:40am | George Dvorsky
    Two German researchers claim they have produced measurable amounts of thrust using a copy of NASA’s controversial EMDrive. It’s a result that has many people talking, but don’t plan your trip to the to the Alpha Centauri system just yet—the experts we spoke with are all highly skeptical of the study and its findings. As reported in Hacked, the details of the new study are being presented this week by Martin Tajmar, a professor and chair for Space Systems at the Dresden University of Technology, and co-author G. Fiedler, at the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics’ Propulsion and Energy...
  • Strange 'conehead' skeleton unearthed at Russia's Stonehenge:

    07/29/2015 6:21:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 63 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 15:18 EST, 27 July 2015 | Sarah Griffiths
    Elongated head was bound in tribal tradition 2,000 years ago Skeleton with long skull was unearthed in Arkaim, central Russia It's thought to belong to a woman living almost 2,000 years ago Her skull is elongated because it was bound out of tribal tradition Arkaim is known as Russia's Stonehenge because it may have been used by ancient people to study the stars, like the British site A skeleton with an unusual-shaped skull has been unearthed on a site known as Russia's Stonehenge. When images of the remains were first published, UFO enthusiasts rushed to claim they were proof that...
  • Study: Awe-Inspiring Experiences Change Our Perception of Time

    07/29/2015 5:22:43 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 6 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 7-23-15 | Madeleine Kruhly
    Although the study looks to investigate several aspects of this emotion, the initial -- and perhaps most intriguing-- hypothesis is pretty striking: the experience of awe will expand your perception of time. In order to prove this theory, and to better understand the effects of awe on the human psyche, scientists Rudd, Vohs, and Aaker conducted three experiments. The first was to test the aforementioned hypothesis that awe can alter time perception; participants unscrambled sentences, watched commercials (with large, striking images), and answered questions about personal beliefs in order to create a perceived time availability index. Having participants write narratives...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Deep Lagoon

    07/29/2015 4:09:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | July 29, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Ridges of glowing interstellar gas and dark dust clouds inhabit the turbulent, cosmic depths of the Lagoon Nebula. Also known as M8, The bright star forming region is about 5,000 light-years distant. But it still makes for a popular stop on telescopic tours of the constellation Sagittarius, toward the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Dominated by the telltale red emission of ionized hydrogen atoms recombining with stripped electrons, this stunning, deep view of the Lagoon's central reaches is about 40 light-years across. Near the center of the frame, the bright hourglass shape is gas ionized and sculpted by...
  • Your Green Car Could Cause Black Rain in China

    07/28/2015 9:27:51 PM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 8 replies
    National Observer ^ | July 28, 2015 15:12 GMT | Charles Mandel
    You may have a "green" car, but it could be causing black rain in China from the graphite mined and used in its lithium ion battery. Two academics at Toronto's York University, Carla Lipsig-Mumme and Caleb Goods, applaud many of the new advances in green technology in recent years, but at the same time warn that those very technologies may come with a host of environmental issues. The pair issue a caution about “superindustrialization” in which the answer to climate change is a matter of “technological adjustment.” In an article recently published in The Conversation and picked up by the...
  • UVM study: Washington DC Sinking Into Sea

    07/28/2015 8:57:40 PM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 59 replies
    University of Vermont ^ | July 28, 2015 20:42 GMT | Joshua E. Brown
    New research confirms that the land under the Chesapeake Bay is sinking rapidly and projects that Washington, D.C., could drop by six or more inches in the next century—adding to the problems of sea-level rise. This falling land will exacerbate the flooding that the nation’s capital faces from rising ocean waters due to a warming climate and melting ice sheets—accelerating the threat to the region’s monuments, roads, wildlife refuges, and military installations. For sixty years, tide gauges have shown that sea level in the Chesapeake is rising at twice the global average rate and faster than elsewhere on the East...
  • [Yesterday] 7.0-magnitude earthquake rocks Indonesia

    07/28/2015 6:10:22 PM PDT · by markomalley · 11 replies
    Earthsky ^ | 7/28/15
    The U.S. Geological Society reported a powerful 7.0-magnitude earthquake that rocked remote eastern Indonesia in the early morning hours today (July 28, 2015). The quake, which struck in a mountainous area of Papua in the early hours, damaged several buildings and is reported to have killed a teenage boy who he fell into a river while fishing beside it, as the quake struck. Today’s quake occurred inland, and no tsunami warning was issued.In 2004, a much more powerful undersea 9.1-magnitude earthquake – third-largest earthquake ever recorded with a seismograph – triggered a tsunami that killed more than 170,000 people in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Rainbows and Rays over Bryce Canyon

    07/28/2015 5:55:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | July 28, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening over Bryce Canyon? Two different optical effects that were captured in one image taken earlier this month. Both effects needed to have the Sun situated directly behind the photographer. The nearest apparition was the common rainbow, created by sunlight streaming from the setting sun over the head of the photographer, and scattering from raindrops in front of the canyon. If you look closely, even a second rainbow appears above the first. More rare, and perhaps more striking, are the rays of light that emanate out from the horizon above the canyon. These are known as anticrepuscular rays...
  • Toxin in Lake Erie puts Toledo drinking water on 'watch'

    07/28/2015 2:04:16 PM PDT · by EBH · 19 replies
    CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The city of Toledo has put its water quality on "watch" status because of the toxins that shut down Toledo's public drinking-water system for three days a year ago. The water is safe to drink, city officials said. Toledo Mayor Paula Hicks-Hudson said the water was put on watch because microcystin had been detected in the intake crib about three miles out in Lake Erie. The toxin was not detected in tap water, she said. "Our water treatment process is effectively removing the microcystin," according to the city's online water-quality dashboard. "We have an advanced warning system...
  • French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

    07/28/2015 12:23:38 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday. "A large adult tooth—we can't say if it was from a male or female—was found during excavations of soil we know to be between 550,000 and 580,000 years old, because we used different dating methods," paleoanthropologist Amelie Viallet told AFP. "This is a major discovery because we have very few human fossils from this period in Europe," she said. The tooth was found in the Arago cave near the village of Tautavel, one...
  • 'Impossible' rocket drive works and could get to Moon in four hours

    07/28/2015 11:20:36 AM PDT · by Mellonkronos · 70 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | July 28, 2015 | Sarah Knapton
    [Now this would be really cool! Hope it pans out!] 'Impossible' rocket drive works and could get to Moon in four hoursThe British designed EM Drive actually works and would dramatically speed up space travel, scientists have confirmedBy Sarah Knapton, Science Editor 6:04PM BST 28 Jul 2015 Interplanetary travel could be a step closer after scientists confirmed that an electromagnetic propulsion drive, which is fast enough to get to the Moon in four hours, actually works. The EM Drive was developed by the British inventor Roger Shawyer nearly 15 years ago but was ridiculed at the time as being scientifically...
  • Any structural engineers? (vanity)

    07/27/2015 5:03:59 PM PDT · by taxcontrol · 48 replies
    None ^ | 27 July 2015 | Self
    I recently ran across a web site that sells a frame to bend fence top rail into 20 and 25 foot arches for a high tunnel green house. This got me to thinking about the possibility for using to build a thin shell dome and/or Quonset hut house. I have also run into some articles about how the Japanese have done some research on concrete filled tubes. So put these to together ..... My thought was to build 50' quarter of a circle segments, position them in place to make a high tunnel structure and pump the tubes full of...
  • What About a Mission to Europa?

    07/27/2015 11:59:52 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on July 27, 2015 | Fraser Cain
    Jupiter’s moon Europa has the most water in the entire Solar System. If you took all the water on Earth, collected it into a big sphere, it would measure almost 1,400 kilometers across. Europa’s water would measure nearly 1,800 kilometers.All that water exists in a layer around Europa, encased in a layer of ice. ... According to the plan, a spacecraft will launch in the 2020s, carrying 9 instruments to Europa. Most will be familiar cameras, mass spectrometers, and the like, to study the surface of Europa to a high level of resolution. Over the course of 45 flybys, the...
  • This is for all you N/E Free Republicers...

    07/27/2015 11:31:37 AM PDT · by US Navy Vet · 51 replies
    27 July 2015 | US Navy Vet
    I would like to take my wife to the N/E United States to do some Falltime "Leak Peepin"
  • Israeli Archaeologists Discover 3,000-Year-Old Jar With Inscription of Name From the Bible

    07/27/2015 8:05:18 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 37 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 07/27/2015 | Anugrah Kumar
    Archaeologists in Israel have found a rare inscription of the name of an apparently influential person from the time of King David, a name that is also mentioned in the Bible, according to Israel Antiquities Authority. Archaeologists have discovered a 3,000-year-old large ceramic jar with the inscription of the name "Eshbaal Ben Beda," The Associated Press reported Sunday. The Old Testament book of 1 Chronicles in 8:33 and 9:39 identifies the fourth son of Saul as Eshbaal, also written as as Ish-bosheth. "Ner was the father of Kish, Kish the father of Saul, and Saul the father of Jonathan, Malki-Shua,...
  • The Climate Wars’ Damage to Science

    07/27/2015 6:06:28 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 29 replies
    Quadrant Online ^ | June 2015 | Matt Ridley
    The Climate Wars’ Damage to Science For much of my life I have been a science writer. That means I eavesdrop on what’s going on in laboratories so I can tell interesting stories. It’s analogous to the way art critics write about art, but with a difference: we “science critics” rarely criticise. If we think a scientific paper is dumb, we just ignore it. There’s too much good stuff coming out of science to waste time knocking the bad stuff.Sure, we occasionally take a swipe at pseudoscience—homeopathy, astrology, claims that genetically modified food causes cancer, and so on. But the...
  • Researchers Discover Seaweed that Tastes like Bacon

    07/26/2015 9:22:41 AM PDT · by Diana in Wisconsin · 33 replies
    Business Insider ^ | July 16, 2015 | Barbara Tasch
    Researchers at Oregon State have patented a new strain of seaweed that tastes like bacon when it's cooked. The seaweed, a form of red marine algae, looks like translucent red lettuce. It also has twice the nutritional value of kale and grows very quickly. Did we mention it tastes like bacon? According to Oregon State researcher Chris Langdon, his team started growing the new strain while trying to find a good food source for edible sea snails, or abalone, a very popular food in many parts of Asia. The strain is a new type of red algae that normally grows...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Sombrero Galaxy from Hubble

    07/26/2015 8:36:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | July 26, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why does the Sombrero Galaxy look like a hat? Reasons include the Sombrero's unusually large and extended central bulge of stars, and dark prominent dust lanes that appear in a disk that we see nearly edge-on. Billions of old stars cause the diffuse glow of the extended central bulge. Close inspection of the bulge in the above photograph shows many points of light that are actually globular clusters. M104's spectacular dust rings harbor many younger and brighter stars, and show intricate details astronomers don't yet fully understand. The very center of the Sombrero glows across the electromagnetic spectrum, and...
  • How can Pilots be protected from bright and blinding Laser Beams when pointed up from the ground?

    07/26/2015 12:44:12 AM PDT · by lee martell · 38 replies
    July, 26, 2015 | lee martell
    The safety of pilots, crew members and passengers has been put at risk repeatedly by people shining laser beams into the cockpit. I don't know very much at all about aviation, probably less than the average person. I do know that I have always been impressed by the Blue Angels as they fly in formation during their annual visit to San Francisco. Considering how well known, and documented this hazard is, and how vulnerable the pilots are, I'm surprised there has been no resolution to the problem. We may as well face it, there will always be goofballs, anarchists, and...
  • Signs of world's first pictograph found in Gobeklitepe

    07/25/2015 4:58:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | July 15, 2015 | Anadolu Agency
    Turkey's Göbeklitepe, the site of the world's oldest temple, may be the home of the first pictograph, according to a scene etched into an obelisk. A scene on an obelisk found during excavations in Göbeklitepe, a 12,000-year-old site in the southeastern province of Sanliurfa, could be humanity's first pictograph, according to researchers... Ercan said the artifacts found in Göbeklitepe provided information about ancient burial traditions. "There were no graves 12,000 years ago. The dead bodies were left outdoors and raptors ate them. In this way, people believed the soul goes to the sky," he added. Ercan said it was called...
  • Hillary And Communications Security

    07/25/2015 4:52:29 PM PDT · by blueunicorn6 · 13 replies
    blueunicorn6 | 7/25/2015 | blueunicorn6
    We have all been watching the story unfold about Hillary Clinton and her e-mails. She refused to use the communications systems provided for her by the American taxpayers. Those systems are "secure", meaning that no unauthorized person can read or hear the communications. Hillary Clinton chose to not use the taxpayer provided secure system. This meant that the government agencies designed to provide secure communications and prevent the enemy from knowing our most important secrets, were intentionally bypassed by our Secretary of State. If you want to know how important communications security is, look at World War II. We knew...
  • Teams digging into history of the earliest people

    07/25/2015 4:51:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    San Antonio Express-News ^ | Saturday, July 25, 2015 | John MacCormack
    In a grassy meadow where eons ago some of America's first settlers camped and chipped stone tools, a precisely dug dirt pit, four yards square, is sinking steadily into the dark soil. And as it descends at a rate of an inch or two a day, the remote excavation northwest of Austin is also traveling backward through the millennia toward the continent's first native people... If all goes well, perhaps quite soon, primitive stone tools, similar to those discovered here a few years ago, will again be unearthed, reinforcing an emerging, if once controversial theory, about when the first humans...
  • Have three climate change scientists been ASSASSINATED? The astonishing claim made by professor

    07/25/2015 4:41:39 PM PDT · by Libloather · 24 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 7/25/15 | Gemma Mullin
    Have three climate change scientists been ASSASSINATED? The astonishing claim made by a Cambridge professor A Cambridge professor has claimed that three scientists investigating climate change in the Arctic may have been assassinated. Professor Peter Wadhams insists Seymour Laxon, Katharine Giles and Tim Boyd could have been murdered by someone possibly working for the oil industry or within government forces. The trio had been studying the polar ice caps - with a focus on sea ice - when they died within a few months of each other in 2013.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Infrared Trifid

    07/25/2015 1:58:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | July 25, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Trifid Nebula, also known as Messier 20, is easy to find with a small telescope, a well known stop in the nebula rich constellation Sagittarius. But where visible light pictures show the nebula divided into three parts by dark, obscuring dust lanes, this penetrating infrared image reveals filaments of glowing dust clouds and newborn stars. The spectacular false-color view is courtesy of the Spitzer Space Telescope. Astronomers have used the Spitzer infrared image data to count newborn and embryonic stars which otherwise can lie hidden in the natal dust and gas clouds of this intriguing stellar nursery. As...
  • Three scientists investigating melting Arctic ice may have been assassinated, professor claims

    07/25/2015 12:27:05 PM PDT · by crusty old prospector · 68 replies
    The U. K. Telegraph ^ | July 25, 2015 | Robert Mendick
    A Cambridge Professor has made the astonishing claim that three scientists investigating the melting of Arctic ice may have been assassinated within the space of a few months. Professor Peter Wadhams said he feared being labelled a “looney” over his suspicion that the deaths of the scientists were more than just an ‘extraordinary’ coincidence. But he insisted the trio could have been murdered and hinted that the oil industry or else sinister government forces might be implicated. The three scientists he identified - Seymour Laxon and Katherine Giles, both climate change scientists at University College London, and Tim Boyd of...
  • Global Mosaic of Pluto in True Color (highest resolution full-face photo released to date)

    07/25/2015 9:33:45 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 35 replies
    NASA ^ | 7/24/15
    Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with color data from the Ralph instrument to create this sharper global view of Pluto. (The lower right edge of Pluto in this view currently lacks high-resolution color coverage.) The images, taken when the spacecraft was 280,000 miles (450,000 kilometers) away from Pluto, show features as small as 1.4 miles (2.2 kilometers). That’s twice the resolution of the single-image view captured on July 13 and revealed at the approximate time of New Horizons’ July 14 closest approach. Image Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
  • Report predicts drones and supersoldiers are the future of warfare

    07/25/2015 4:55:15 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 2 replies
    News.com ^ | 07/24/15
    The report, Visualizing the Tactical Ground Battlefield in the Year 2050, was the result of a workshop held with leaders from the US Defence Department, Army Research Lab, Institute for Defence Analysis and a select number of academia. In the world envisioned, armed drones will patrol the skies searching for enemy targets to eliminate. The use of drones in the current military landscape dictates it is always a human that decides to pull the trigger, but the report suggests soldiers may only have limited control over the smart-robots of the future. “The difference being that in the former, human decisions...
  • Archaeologists find possible evidence of earliest human agriculture

    07/25/2015 3:50:24 AM PDT · by GoneSalt · 6 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | 7/24/2015 | Peter Beaumont
    Israeli archaeologists have uncovered dramatic evidence of what they believe are the earliest known attempts at agriculture, 11,000 years before the generally recognised advent of organised cultivation. The study examined more than 150,000 examples of plant remains recovered from an unusually well preserved hunter-gatherer settlement on the shores of the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel. Previously, scientists had believed that organised agriculture in the Middle East, including animal husbandry and crop cultivation, had begun in the late Holocene period – around 12,000 BC – and later spread west through Europe.
  • Two engraved reliefs unearthed on Red Sea coastline [12th Dynasty]

    07/24/2015 11:55:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Ahram Online ^ | Wednesday, July, 22, 2015 | Nevine El-Aref
    Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty told Ahram Online that studies carried out revealed that the first relief belongs to the Middle Kindom because it bears the cartouche of the seventh king of the 12th Dynasty, King Amenemhat IV, whose reign was characterised by exploration for precious turquoise and amethyst on Punt Island. Meanwhile the second relief, which is in a bad conservation condition, can be dated to the Second Intermediate Period. After restoration, Eldamaty said, more information on the relief would be revealed. Three Roman burials and parts of Berenice Temple's façade were also uncovered as well as a number...
  • New Saliva Test May Catch Alzheimer’s Disease Early

    07/24/2015 10:37:35 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 30 replies
    WTKR ^ | JULY 24, 2015
    A test detecting Alzheimer’s disease early may become easily available thanks to one plentiful bodily substance: saliva, a recently released study shows. The saliva test was presented at the 2015 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Washington this week. Though research is still in its infancy, the saliva test represents the exciting future of diagnostic tools in development for the detection of the neurodegenerative disease. While doctors are currently able to see the difference between a healthy brain and one affected by Alzheimer’s, the study emphasizes the importance of detecting Alzheimer’s-like changes early. “As the field has continue
  • Fossil-Fuel Emissions Causing Huge Impact on Radiocarbon Dating

    07/24/2015 3:56:42 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 45 replies
    nycity.today ^ | Fri, 07/24/2015 - 13:26 | Gloria Bradley
    Radiocarbon dating which is used to estimate the age of every particular thing on earth is facing big threat from the fossil fuel and carbon in the atmosphere. Researchers said excess of carbon in atmosphere due to burning of fossil fuel could reduce the accuracy of Radiocarbon dating. Heather Graven, a climate-physics researcher at Imperial College London, after an analysis has found that emissions from fossil fuels are artificially raising the carbon age of the atmosphere. ... "Combustion of fossil fuels is diluting the fraction of atmospheric carbon dioxide containing radiocarbon. This is making the atmosphere appear as though it...
  • Stunning Nightside Image Reveals Pluto’s Hazy Skies

    07/24/2015 12:41:41 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | 7/24/15
    July 24, 2015 Stunning Nightside Image Reveals Pluto’s Hazy Skies Pluto sends a breathtaking farewell to New Horizons. Backlit by the sun, Pluto’s atmosphere rings its silhouette like a luminous halo in this image taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft around midnight EDT on July 15. This global portrait of the atmosphere was captured when the spacecraft was about 1.25 million miles (2 million kilometers) from Pluto and shows structures as small as 12 miles across. The image, delivered to Earth on July 23, is displayed with north at the top of the frame. Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI Speeding away from Pluto...
  • Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current

    07/24/2015 10:52:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | July 24, 2015 | by Carla Reiter & Provided by: Argonne National Laboratory
    Typically when referring to electrical current, an image of electrons moving through a metallic wire is conjured. Using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), it is possible to create a current of pure spin (a quantum property of electrons related to its magnetic moment) in magnetic insulators. However, this work demonstrates that the SSE is not limited to magnetic insulators but also occurs in a class of materials known as paramagnets. Since magnetic moments within paramagnets do not interact with each other like in conventional ferromagnets, and thus do not hold their magnetization when an external magnetic field is removed, this...
  • A DNA Search for the First Americans Links Amazon Groups to Indigenous Australians

    07/24/2015 6:56:41 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | July 21, 2015 | By Helen Thompson
    The new genetic analysis takes aim at the theory that just one founding group settled the Americas =========================================================================================================== Brazil's Surui people, like the man pictured above, share ancestry with indigenous Australians, new evidence suggests. (PAULO WHITAKER/Reuters/Corbis) ==================================================================================================================== More than 15,000 years ago, humans began crossing a land bridge called Beringia that connected their native home in Eurasia to modern-day Alaska. Who knows what the journey entailed or what motivated them to leave, but once they arrived, they spread southward across the Americas. The prevailing theory is that the first Americans arrived in a single wave, and all Native American populations...