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Science (General/Chat)

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  • China Could Have a Meltdown-Proof Nuclear Reactor Next Year

    02/12/2016 7:12:14 AM PST · by C19fan · 15 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | February 11, 2016 | Richard Martin
    In what would be a milestone for advanced nuclear power, China’s Nuclear Engineering Construction Corporation plans to start up a high-temperature, gas-cooled pebble-bed nuclear plant next year in Shandong province, south of Beijing. The twin 105-megawatt reactors—so-called Generation IV reactors that would be immune to meltdown—would be the first of their type built at commercial scale in the world.
  • New Shape-Shifting Polymer Holds 1,000 Times Its Own Mass - Watch Out Plastic Man!

    02/11/2016 8:22:07 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    Tech Times ^ | February 11, 10:24 PM | James Maynard,
    One challenge facing researchers was learning how to control crystallization of the polymer. As similar shape-shifting materials are stretched or cooled, atomic strands of polymer molecules re-align, driving the object to stay in the "temporary" alignment. This process makes it more and more difficult to bring the object back to its "relaxed," original form. Individual "linkers" were used to connect the molecules, reducing the effects of crystallization in the new polymer. By carefully controlling the placement of the linking chains, researchers were able to precisely direct the turning point of the material. When the new polymer is removed from the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- LIGO Detects Gravitational Waves from Merging Black Holes

    02/11/2016 4:37:17 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    NASA ^ | February 11, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Gravitational radiation has been directly detected. The first-ever detection was made by both facilities of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in Washington and Louisiana simultaneously last September. After numerous consistency checks, the resulting 5-sigma discovery was published today. The measured gravitational waves match those expected from two large black holes merging after a death spiral in a distant galaxy, with the resulting new black hole momentarily vibrating in a rapid ringdown. A phenomenon predicted by Einstein, the historic discovery confirms a cornerstone of humanity's understanding of gravity and basic physics. It is also the most direct detection of...
  • Belief in all-knowing, punitive gods aided the growth of human societies, study says

    02/11/2016 12:45:38 PM PST · by Reeses · 28 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 2/10/2016 | Amina Khan, cheap labor reporter
    Belief in moral-watching, all-knowing, punitive gods might have helped human societies grow far beyond small, close-knit groups, a new study shows. Researchers who ran an experiment with a total of 591 people in eight different small-scale societies around the world found that people who believed their deity of choice knew about their misdeeds and would punish them were more likely to play fairly in a game where money was on the line. The findings, described in the journal Nature, hint at the integral role that certain religious beliefs may have played in the dramatic expansion of human societies.
  • 100 years later scientists prove Einstein's theory

    02/11/2016 10:27:40 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 19 replies
    INN ^ | 2/11/2016, 7:22 PM | (Arutz Sheva Staff)
    It took a century, but the theory from Albert Einstein handwritten neatly on paper that is now yellowing has finally been vindicated. Israeli officials on Thursday offered a rare look at the documents where Einstein presented his ideas on gravitational waves, a display that coincided with the historic announcement that scientists had glimpsed the first direct evidence of his theory. [...] In a landmark discovery for physics and astronomy, international scientists announced in Washington on Thursday that they had glimpsed the first direct evidence of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. Einstein's theory states that mass warps space and time,...
  • Some 5,000 years ago, silver mining on the shores of the Aegean Sea

    02/11/2016 12:14:54 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | February 10, 2016 | Ghent University
    Underground, the morphology and the organization of the mining infrastructure allow to distinguish several phases of activity. The archaeological data gathered and observed during the latest phase of the 2015 campaign: pottery, stone hammers made of a volcano-sedimentary rock quarry, point towards a high dating for the earliest phase of mining activities in the area (Late Neolithic / Early Helladic: around 3200 BC). If future research confirms this hypothesis, the chronological framework of mining in the region of Attica and the Aegean world would be profoundly modified. The Classical phase is by far the most perceptible; omnipresent, it is remarkable...
  • NASA delays space station cargo run due to mold on packing bags

    02/10/2016 8:25:46 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    rueters ^ | Thu Feb 11, 2016 5:44am IST | irene klotz
    NASA's next cargo run to the International Space Station will be delayed for at least two weeks after black mold was found in two fabric bags used for packing clothing, food and other supplies, the U.S. space agency said on Wednesday. The source of the mold, a common fungal growth in humid climates like Florida's, is under investigation by NASA and Lockheed Martin, which prepares NASA cargo for launch aboard two commercial carriers, Orbital ATK and privately owned SpaceX. An Orbital Cygnus cargo ship was more than halfway packed for the launch, scheduled for March 10, when the mold was...
  • N. Korean Long-range Missile Launch [Video from NK State TV]

    02/10/2016 7:17:36 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 7 replies
    Chosun Ilbo ^ | 2016/02/11
    N. Korean Long-range Missile Launch [Video from State TV] Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVogypIs2Lk
  • Meteorite probably didn't kill man in India, NASA says

    02/10/2016 3:42:34 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    fox news ^ | 02/10/2016
    The Times of India reports that the meteorite's blast left a crater 5 feet deep and 2 feet wide. Police recovered a black, pockmarked stone weighing 0.39 ounces, it said. However, NASA scientists in the U.S. said in a public statement that photos of the site were more consistent with "a land based explosion," The New York Times reports. In an email to The New York Times, NASA's Planetary Defense Officer Lindley Johnson explained that death by meteorite impact is so rare that one has never been confirmed in recorded history. "There have been reports of injuries, but even those...
  • Thanks to science, you can soon wipe out your worst memories

    02/10/2016 10:38:19 AM PST · by Red Badger · 76 replies
    nypost.com ^ | February 10, 2016 | 3:29am | By Reed Tucker
    Imagine being able to erase your most traumatic memories. For a soldier, that would mean no longer being haunted by images from the battlefield. For a movie critic, no longer recalling having seen “Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2.” It’s just one of the fascinating peeks into the mystery of the human mind chronicled on “Memory Hackers,” airing Wednesday at 9 p.m. on PBS’ “Nova.” “Memory is an inherently interesting thing,” the show’s writer, director and producer, Michael Bicks, tells The Post. “You think you know what it is, but when you think about it, you realize that you don’t.” Many...
  • Scientists discover hidden galaxies behind the Milky Way (explanation for "The Great Attractor?")

    02/10/2016 10:28:26 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 18 replies
    UWA ^ | 2/10/16
    Hundreds of hidden nearby galaxies have been studied for the first time, shedding light on a mysterious gravitational anomaly dubbed the Great Attractor. Despite being just 250 million light years from Earth—very close in astronomical terms—the new galaxies had been hidden from view until now by our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Using CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope equipped with an innovative receiver, an international team of scientists were able to see through the stars and dust of the Milky Way, into a previously unexplored region of space. The discovery may help to explain the Great Attractor region, which appears to...
  • In Japan, small shakes presage big quakes

    02/10/2016 10:10:07 AM PST · by JimSEA · 3 replies
    Nature ^ | January 28, 2016 | Alexandra Wietz
    Clusters of tiny earthquakes that happen every three years could help to signal when the next big one will hit Japan, researchers report in Science1. Small, subtle quakes happen in many places where a slab of sea floor dives beneath a continent, such as in the US Pacific Northwest or off the coast of Chile. But the study of seismic activity in Japan is the first to show that they happen in regular episodes, and that those events can precede larger earthquakes. If the same patterns hold in other earthquake-prone regions, they could improve seismic risk estimates there, too. Related...
  • End of fossil fuels? China close to creating 'ARTIFICIAL STAR' three times hotter than the sun

    02/10/2016 9:00:37 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 79 replies
    Daily Express ^ | 02/10/2016 | Tom Batchelor
    SCIENTISTS in China are a step closer to creating an 'artificial sun' using nuclear fusion, in a breakthrough that could break mankind's reliance on fossil fuels and offer unlimited clean energy forever more. Chinese experts last week successfully produced hydrogen gas more than three times hotter than the core of the Sun. Crucially, the scientists were able to maintain that temperature -- 50 million degrees C -- for 102 seconds. The experiment means nuclear fusion experts are a step nearer to replacing depleting fossil fuels with limitless nuclear energy powered by the ultra-high temperature gas. Until now, Germany has been...
  • The third Forth bridge: New crossing's three concrete towers stand tall- thanks to 23,000 MILES [tr]

    02/10/2016 6:25:17 AM PST · by C19fan · 15 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | February 9, 2016 | Hugo Gye
    It will use 150,000 tonnes of concrete - nearly as much as the whole of the London Olympics - and contain enough cable to go around the world three times. And at £1.14billion the new bridge over the Firth of Forth is one of the biggest civil engineering projects undertaken in Britain in recent years, creating 1,300 jobs. Designed to take some of the strain off the old Forth Road bridge, which was recently closed due to safety fears, the Queensferry crossing is now taking shape with the three towers which will support the structure in place.
  • Video: World’s First ‘Oblique’ Icebreaker Breaks Ice Sideways

    02/10/2016 5:46:11 AM PST · by SWAMPSNIPER · 23 replies
    gcaptain.com ^ | February 9, 2016 | gcaptain
    Built by Arctech Helsinki for the Russian Ministry of Transport, the Icebreaking Multipurpose Emergency and Rescue Vessel Baltika is a first-of-its-kind icebreaker built with an asymmetrical hull allowing for not only ahead and astern icebreaking, but also “oblique” icebreaking for a greater angle of attack.
  • Old trees reveal Late Antique Little Ice Age (LALIA) around 1,500 years ago

    02/10/2016 12:58:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Tree-ring measurements have revealed a period of extreme cold in Eurasia between 536 and around 660 CE. It coincides strikingly with the Justinian plague, migrations of peoples and political turmoil in both Europe and Asia... WSL dendroclimatologist Ulf Buntgen and his fellow researchers were able for the first time to precisely reconstruct the summer temperatures in central Asia for the past 2,000 years. This was made possible by new tree-ring measurements from the Altai mountains in Russia. The results complement the climatological history of the European Alps, stretching back 2,500 years, that Buntgen and collaborators published in 2011 in the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Galaxies in the River

    02/10/2016 12:40:02 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | February 10, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Large galaxies grow by eating small ones. Even our own galaxy practices galactic cannibalism, absorbing small galaxies that get too close and are captured by the Milky Way's gravity. In fact, the practice is common in the universe and illustrated by this striking pair of interacting galaxies from the banks of the southern constellation Eridanus, The River. Located over 50 million light years away, the large, distorted spiral NGC 1532 is seen locked in a gravitational struggle with dwarf galaxy NGC 1531 (right of center), a struggle the smaller galaxy will eventually lose. Seen edge-on, spiral NGC 1532 spans...
  • Great Attractor Mystery Solved! [tr]

    02/09/2016 6:52:05 PM PST · by sparklite2 · 12 replies
    Great Attractor Mystery Solved! --"Hundreds of Galaxies Discovered Hidden Behind the Milky Way" Hundreds of hidden nearby galaxies have been studied for the first time, shedding light on a mysterious gravitational anomaly dubbed the Great Attractor, which appears to be drawing the Milky Way and hundreds of thousands of other galaxies towards it with a gravitational force equivalent to a million billion Suns. Despite being just 250 million light years from Earth--very close in astronomical terms--the new galaxies had been hidden from view until now by our own galaxy, the Milky Way. "The Milky Way is very beautiful of course...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Rise and Fall of Supernova 2015F

    02/09/2016 3:12:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | February 09, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Sit back and watch a star explode. The actual supernova occurred back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth, but images of the spectacular event began arriving last year. Supernova 2015F was discovered in nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2442 by Berto Monard in 2015 March and was unusually bright -- enough to be seen with only a small telescope. The pattern of brightness variation indicated a Type Ia supernova -- a type of stellar explosion that results when an Earth-size white dwarf gains so much mass that its core crosses the threshold of nuclear fusion, possibly caused by a lower mass...
  • Nuclear Fusion Breakthrough: China Heats Hydrogen Plasma to 50 Million Degrees

    02/09/2016 1:41:50 PM PST · by Reeses · 47 replies
    Futurism.com ^ | Feb 9 2016 | Futurism
    Physicists in China have sustained hydrogen plasma at 49.999 million degrees for 102 seconds, beating Germany's recent record (which was just a quarter of a second). SUSTAINING THE HEAT Barely a week after Germany's latest Stellerator reactor was able to sustain a cloud of hydrogen plasma for a quarter of a second at 80 million degrees Celsius, news from China indicated that Germany might now have new competition on the block. Chinese physicists have announced that their own nuclear fusion reactor, called the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), has produced and sustained hydrogen plasma at 49.999 million degrees Celsius for...
  • More Gravitational Wave Rumors: Colliding Black Holes?

    02/09/2016 10:55:05 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    space.com ^ | 2/9/16 | Ian O'Neill
    More Gravitational Wave Rumors: Colliding Black Holes? By Ian O'Neill, Discovery News February 9, 2016 08:15am ET MORE This computer simulation shows the production of gravitational waves during a black hole collision.Credit: MPI for Gravitational Physics/W.Benger-Zib More gravitational wave discovery rumors are flying, but this time they've taken a specific -- and, possibly, really exciting -- new twist. And what's more, we should find out whether the astrophysical rumor mill is correct or not by the end of this week; a National Science Foundation press announcement is planned for 10:30 a.m. ET on Thursday (Feb. 11), billed as an opportunity...
  • The Lies of Rachel Carson

    02/09/2016 4:38:50 AM PST · by ATOMIC_PUNK · 20 replies
    http://www.21stcenturysciencetech.com ^ | from the Summer 1992 | by Dr. J. Gordon Edwards
    Dedication: A Lie Dedication. In the front of the book, Carson dedicates Silent Spring as follows: “To Albert Schweitzer who said ‘Man has lost the capacity to foresee and to forestall. He will end by destroying the Earth.’” This appears to indicate that the great man opposed the use of insecticides. However, in his autobiography Schweitzer writes, on page 262: “How much labor and waste of time these wicked insects do cause us ... but a ray of hope, in the use of DDT, is now held out to us.” Upon reading his book, it is clear that Schweitzer was...
  • Announcement Thursday on Einstein's gravitational waves

    02/09/2016 12:29:36 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 6 replies
    phys.org ^ | February 8, 2016 | AFP
    Scientists are set to make a major announcement Thursday on efforts to pinpoint the existence of gravitational waves, or ripples of space and time that transport energy across the universe. The waves themselves have never before been directly measured, though Albert Einstein said a century ago they were out there, according to his theory of general relativity. They are believed to form around massive objects like black holes and neutron stars, warping space and time. If gravitational waves have been spotted, it would mark one of the biggest scientific discoveries of our time, filling in a major gap in our...
  • DNA evidence uncovers major upheaval in Europe near end of last Ice Age

    02/08/2016 11:24:59 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | February 4, 2016 | Current Biology, Cell Press
    DNA evidence lifted from the ancient bones and teeth of people who lived in Europe from the Late Pleistocene to the early Holocene -- spanning almost 30,000 years of European prehistory -- has offered some surprises, according to researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Feb. 4, 2016. Perhaps most notably, the evidence shows a major shift in the population around 14,500 years ago, during a period of severe climatic instability... The researchers pieced this missing history together by reconstructing the mitochondrial genomes of 35 hunter-gatherer individuals who lived in Italy, Germany, Belgium, France,...
  • 200,000 fish bones suggest ancient Scandinavian people were more complex than thought

    02/08/2016 10:58:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | February 8, 2016 | Elsevier
    200,000 fish bones discovered in and around a pit in Sweden suggest that the people living in the area more than 9000 years ago were more settled and cultured than we previously thought. Research published in the Journal of Archaeological Science suggests people were storing large amounts of fermented food much earlier than experts thought. The new paper reveals the earliest evidence of fermentation in Scandinavia, from the Early Mesolithic time period, about 9,200 years ago. The author of the study, from Lund University in Sweden, say the findings suggest that people who survived by foraging for food were actually...
  • Gravitational Waves and How They Distort Space

    02/08/2016 7:24:43 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 52 replies
    universe today ^ | 02/08/2016 | Markus Pössel
    February 11, 10:30 EST, there will be a big press conference about gravitational waves by the people running the gravitational wave detector LIGO. It's a fair bet that they will announce the first direct detection of gravitational waves, predicted by Albert Einstein 100 years ago. If all goes as the scientists hope, this will be the kick-off for an era of gravitational wave astronomy: for learning about some of the most extreme and violent events in the cosmos by measuring the tiny ripples of space distortions that emanate from them. In the words of the eminent relativist John Wheeler, Einstein’s...
  • Ask Ethan: Are We Due For An Extinction Event On Earth?

    02/08/2016 2:49:40 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 47 replies
    Forbes/Science ^ | 6 Feb, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    While a great many people argue about how and whether the human race will end, there's no doubt as to the primary cause and catalyst of the last major extinction here on Earth: a massive, large body from outer space colliding with Earth. Some 65 million years ago, an asteroid about 5-10 kilometers in diameter struck what is now the Gulf of Mexico, wiping out roughly 30-50% of the species on our world and ending the age of the dinosaurs. Are we headed for another such event in the near future? Reader David Bertone wants to know: I have a...
  • Are Electric Cars Really Green? (Video)

    02/08/2016 12:30:59 PM PST · by servo1969 · 25 replies
    Prager University ^ | 2-8-2016 | Bjorn Lomborg
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17xh_VRrnMU Do electric cars really help the environment? President Obama thinks so. So does Leonardo DiCaprio. And many others. The argument goes like this: Regular cars run on gasoline, a fossil fuel that pumps CO2 straight out of the tailpipe and into the atmosphere. Electric cars run on electricity. They don't burn any gasoline at all. No gas; no CO2. In fact, electric cars are often advertised as creating "zero emissions." But do they really? Let's take a closer look. First, there's the energy needed to produce the car. More than a third of the lifetime carbon-dioxide emissions from an...
  • Early human ancestor didn't have the jaws of a nutcracker

    02/08/2016 9:25:11 AM PST · by JimSEA · 29 replies
    Science Daily ^ | February 8, 20 | Washington University in St. Louis
    South Africa's Australopithecus sediba, discovered in 2008 at the archaeological site of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, is again helping us to study and understand the origins of humans. Research published in 2012 garnered international attention by suggesting that a possible early human ancestor had lived on a diverse woodland diet including hard foods mixed in with tree bark, fruit, leaves and other plant products. But new research by an international team of researchers now shows that Australopithecus sediba didn't have the jaw and tooth structure necessary to exist on a steady diet of hard foods....
  • Scientists question Tamil Nadu government's claim that meteorite blast killed bus driver in Vellore

    02/08/2016 7:25:12 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    timesofindia.indiatimes.com ^ | Feb 8, 2016, 08.18 PM IST | Bosco Dominique & Karthikeyan Hemalatha
    Witnesses said the blast left a crater 5ft deep and 2ft wide. =================================================================================================================================== A meteorite crashed into an engineering college in Vellore district on Saturday , causing an explosion that killed one man and injured three others, the Tamil Nadu government said on Sunday. Scientists, however, said it wasn't clear how the government concluded that a meteorite strike caused the blast. There has been no established death due to a meteorite hit in recorded history, they said. If a meteorite indeed caused the death, bus driver Kamaraj will be the first person ever to have died in a meteorite strike....
  • Was it a meteorite? Tests will determine what killed Indian man

    02/08/2016 7:22:15 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    cnn ^ | 7:27 AM ET, Mon February 8, 2016 | Roshni Majumdar and Tim Hume
    )—Indian scientists will examine remains from an object that fell from the sky Saturday, causing a large explosion which killed a man, to determine if it is a meteorite, police say. If the object is confirmed to be a meteorite - a fragment of a comet or asteroid that has fallen to Earth - the death would be the first fatality from a meteorite on record, it is believed. P. K. Senthil Kumari, the police chief in Vellore district in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, told CNN that the object struck the grounds of an engineering school at...
  • Universal karma? Indian man believed first to be killed by meteorite

    02/07/2016 10:54:23 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 22 replies
    rt | reuters ^ | 2/8/16 | Steven Watt
    An Indian may be the first known human being to have been killed by a meteorite hit. Authorities said that a small celestial body struck a southern college campus, killing a bus driver and injuring three others in an incident initially reported as a bomb. The "mysterious explosion" that took place on Saturday in Vellore, a city in the south Indian state of Tamil, has been confirmed as a meteorite impact by Chief Minister J Jayalalithaa.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Light Pillars over Alaska

    02/07/2016 9:21:12 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    NASA ^ | February 08, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening behind those houses? Pictured here are not auroras but nearby light pillars, a nearby phenomenon that can appear as a distant one. In most places on Earth, a lucky viewer can see a Sun-pillar, a column of light appearing to extend up from the Sun caused by flat fluttering ice-crystals reflecting sunlight from the upper atmosphere. Usually these ice crystals evaporate before reaching the ground. During freezing temperatures, however, flat fluttering ice crystals may form near the ground in a form of light snow, sometimes known as a crystal fog. These ice crystals may then reflect ground...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Advanced LIGO: Gravitational Wave Detectors Upgraded

    02/07/2016 10:18:53 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    NASA ^ | February 07, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Accelerate a charge and you'll get electromagnetic radiation: light. But accelerate any mass and you'll get gravitational radiation. Light is seen all the time, but, so far, a confirmed direct detection of gravitational radiation has been elusive. When absorbed, gravitational waves create a tiny symmetric jiggle similar to squashing a rubber ball and letting go quickly. Separated detectors can be used to discern gravitational waves from everyday bumps. Powerful astronomical sources of gravitational radiation would coincidentally jiggle even detectors on opposite ends of the Earth. Pictured here are the four-kilometer-long arms of one such detector: the LIGO Hanford Observatory...
  • Europe’s shift to dark green forests stokes global warming—study

    02/07/2016 8:09:47 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 24 replies
    Reuters ^ | Thu Feb 4, 2016 2:25pm EST | Alister Doyle
    An expansion of Europe's forests towards dark green conifers has stoked global warming, according to a study on Thursday at odds with a widespread view that planting more trees helps human efforts to slow rising temperatures. Forest changes have nudged Europe's summer temperatures up by 0.12 degree Celsius (0.2 Fahrenheit) since 1750, largely because many nations have planted conifers such as pines and spruce whose dark color traps the sun's heat, the scientists said. Lighter-colored broad-leafed trees, such as oak or birch, reflect more sunlight back into space, but have lost ground to fast-growing conifers, used for everything from building...
  • Hillary: Halt all fossil fuel extraction on federal lands

    02/07/2016 5:40:33 AM PST · by rktman · 32 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 2/7/2016 | Dan Calabrese
    If you enjoyed paying $1.59 a gallon for gas this past weekend, understand a few things. To the extent domestic production affects this, the oil industry is mostly gettings its resources on private lands. That's because Obama, while he's happy to take credit for the increased productivity and lower prices, is fighting new leases on federal lands wherever he can. That's how he can reassure his left-wing base he's an enemy of the oil industry while also taking credit for the low prices. But there is some oil being extracted on federal lands, and if that stopped all at once,...
  • Anodizing (Or the beauty of corrosion)

    02/06/2016 8:20:33 PM PST · by Utilizer · 26 replies
    YouTube ^ | Published on Feb 24, 2014 | Anna Berney
    Anodizing (Or the beauty of corrosion) Bill describes how metals like aluminum and titanium are made resistant to corrosion by growing an oxide layer into the metals. These is the same process used on many Apple products.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Five Planets at Castell de Burriac

    02/06/2016 7:12:45 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | February 06, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: February's five planet line-up stretches across a clear sky in this predawn scene. A hilltop Castell de Burriac looms in the foreground, overlooking the town of Cabrera de Mar near Barcelona, Spain, planet Earth. The mosaicked, panoramic image looks south. It merges three different exposure times to record a bright Last Quarter Moon, planets, seaside city lights, and dark castle ruins. Seen on February 1st the Moon was near Mars on the sky. But this week early morning risers have watched it move on, passing near Saturn and finally Venus and Mercury, sliding along near the ecliptic toward the...
  • Is This Ancient Greek 'Laptop' Proof That Time Travel Is Real? [in short, no]

    02/06/2016 2:35:49 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 105 replies
    Yahoo -- ABC News Network ^ | February 5, 2016 | some wackadoodle
    A statue showing a young girl holding up what appears to be a laptop -- complete with USB ports -- has sparked a frenzy among conspiracy theorists. The statue, 'Grave Naiskos of an Enthroned Woman with an Attendant' is in The J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California. 'I am not saying that this is depicting an ancient laptop computer,' said YouTuber StillSpeakingOut. 'But when I look at the sculpture I can't help but think about the Oracle of Delphi, which was supposed to allow the priests to connect with the gods to retrieve advanced information and various aspects.' In...
  • Saudi Chemist Invents New Medical Technique

    02/06/2016 11:12:47 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 30 replies
    Arab News ^ | Tuesday 2 February 2016
    A Saudi woman has used her expertise in chemistry to develop a new device that can carry drugs to points of inflammation in the body. Ghada Mutlaq Al-Mutairi, 39, who currently lives in the United States and holds a doctorate in chemical engineering, works at the University of California. She received a $3 million global innovation award from HIN, the largest organization supporting scientific research in the United States. Her device, which was recognized as one of the four most important inventions by the United States Congress in 2012, provides a way to penetrate the body, detect inflammation, and provide...
  • Can slow creep along thrust faults help forecast megaquakes?

    02/06/2016 10:36:54 AM PST · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 2/4/2016 | University of California
    In Japan and areas like the Pacific Northwest where megathrust earthquakes are common, scientists may be able to better forecast large quakes based on periodic increases and decreases in the rate of slow, quiet slipping along the fault. This hope comes from a new study by Japanese and UC Berkeley seismologists, looking at the more than 1,000-kilimeter-long fault off northeast Japan where the devastating 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake originated, generating a tsunami that killed thousands. There, the Pacific Plate is trundling under the Japan plate, not only causing megaquakes like the magnitude 9 in 2011, but giving rise to a chain...
  • Could You Stomach the Horrors of 'Halftime' in Ancient Rome?

    02/06/2016 10:26:13 AM PST · by EveningStar · 73 replies
    Live Science ^ | February 4, 2016 | Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz
    The enormous arena was empty, save for the seesaws and the dozens of condemned criminals who sat naked upon them, hands tied behind their backs. Unfamiliar with the recently invented contraptions known as petaurua, the men tested the seesaws uneasily. One criminal would push off the ground and suddenly find himself 15 feet in the air while his partner on the other side of the seesaw descended swiftly to the ground. How strange. In the stands, tens of thousands of Roman citizens waited with half-bored curiosity to see what would happen next and whether it would be interesting enough to...
  • 100-Foot Asteroid to Buzz Earth Next Month

    02/06/2016 2:42:17 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 32 replies
    Discovery ^ | 2/5/16 | Mike Wall
    An asteroid as long as a basketball court will give Earth a close shave next month — though scientists aren’t sure just how close. The near-Earth asteroid 2013 TX68, which is thought to be about 100 feet (30 meters) in diameter, will zoom past our planet on March 5. The space rock could come as close as 11,000 miles (17,700 kilometers) — less than 5 percent of the distance from Earth to the moon — or stay up to 9 million miles (14.5 million km) away during the flyby, NASA officials said. “The variation in possible closest-approach distances is due...
  • Apollo 14 Mission To Fra Mauro (1971)

    02/06/2016 1:07:43 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 3 replies
    YouTube ^ | NASA/JSC
    Apollo 14 Mission To Fra Mauro (1971) [documentary] Courtesy: NASA/JSC
  • Pluto’s Mysterious, Floating Hills

    02/05/2016 7:38:13 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 22 replies
    NASA ^ | 4 Feb, 2016 | NASA
    The nitrogen ice glaciers on Pluto appear to carry an intriguing cargo: numerous, isolated hills that may be fragments of water ice from Pluto's surrounding uplands. These hills individually measure one to several miles or kilometers across, according to images and data from NASA's New Horizons mission. The hills, which are in the vast ice plain informally named Sputnik Planum within Pluto's 'heart,' are likely miniature versions of the larger, jumbled mountains on Sputnik Planum's western border. They are yet another example of Pluto's fascinating and abundant geological activity. Because water ice is less dense than nitrogen-dominated ice, scientists believe...
  • Mysterious Martian "Cauliflower" May Be the Latest Hint of Alien Life

    02/05/2016 1:23:16 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    smithsonianmag.com ^ | 02/01/2016 | Sarah Scoles
    The hunt for signs of life on Mars has been on for decades, and so far scientists have found only barren dirt and rocks. Now a pair of astronomers thinks that strangely shaped minerals inside a Martian crater could be the clue everyone has been waiting for. In 2008, scientists announced that NASA's Spirit rover had discovered deposits of a mineral called opaline silica inside Mars's Gusev crater. That on its own is not as noteworthy as the silica's shape: Its outer layers are covered in tiny nodules that look like heads of cauliflower sprouting from the red dirt. No...
  • Galactic center's gamma rays unlikely to originate from dark matter, evidence shows

    02/05/2016 1:08:03 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 15 replies
    Princeton University ^ | 4 Feb, 2016 | Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
    Bursts of gamma rays from the center of our galaxy are not likely to be signals of dark matter but rather other astrophysical phenomena such as fast-rotating stars called millisecond pulsars, according to two new studies, one from a team based at Princeton University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and another based in the Netherlands. Previous studies suggested that gamma rays coming from the dense region of space in the inner Milky Way galaxy could be caused when invisible dark matter particles collide. But using new statistical analysis methods, the two research teams independently found that the gamma ray...
  • First Macroscopic Quantum Entanglement Performed At Room Temperature

    02/05/2016 11:32:15 AM PST · by Reeses · 43 replies
    Futurism.com ^ | Feb 5 2016 | Futurism
    In a breakthrough in quantum physics, scientists were able to create the phenomenon of quantum entanglement macroscopically using large magnets at room temperature. ... scientists working at the University of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory revealed that they were able to create quantum entanglement at a macroscopic level at room temperature on a semiconductor chip, using atomic nuclei and the application of relatively small magnetic fields. Their breakthrough, which is published in Science Advances, is not only significant in what they accomplished but also how they accomplished it. In quantum physics, the creation of entanglement in particles larger and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Massive Stars in NGC 6357

    02/05/2016 4:32:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | February 05, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Massive stars lie within NGC 6357, an expansive emission nebula complex some 6,500 light-years away toward the tail of the constellation Scorpius. In fact, positioned near center in this ground-based close-up of NGC 6357, star cluster Pismis 24 includes some of the most massive stars known in the galaxy, stars with nearly 100 times the mass of the Sun. The nebula's bright central region also contains dusty pillars of molecular gas, likely hiding massive protostars from the prying eyes of optical instruments. Intricate shapes in the nebula are carved as interstellar winds and energetic radiation from the young and...
  • NASA's Mars Rover Found Mysterious Growths On Mars That Could Be The Biggest Discovery In Science

    02/05/2016 12:46:49 AM PST · by blam · 42 replies
    BI ^ | 2-5-2016
    NASA's Spirit Mars Rover Found Mysterious Growths On Mars That Could Be The Biggest Discovery In Science Jennifer Deal February 5, 2016 Four billion years ago, Mars looked a lot like Earth does today. So it's not surprising that a team of scientists believe that they may have discovered the first signs of ancient alien life on the planet.(click to the site to see the video)