Science (General/Chat)

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  • Using sound waves to put out fires.

    03/26/2015 9:49:37 AM PDT · by wyowolf · 28 replies
    Two engineering students at George Mason University have found a way to use sound waves to quash fires and have built a type of extinguisher using what they have learned that they hope will revolutionize fire fighting technology. Viet Tran a computer engineering major and Seth Robertson, an electrical engineering major, chose to investigate the possibility of using sound to put out fires as a senior research project and now believe they have found something that might really work. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-03-students.html#jCp
  • Nice Fireball in NW sky in Eastern AZ @ 5:45 AM

    03/26/2015 6:16:48 AM PDT · by Migraine · 11 replies
    self | 3/26/2015 | self
    Wife and I, in hot tub this morning, just before dawn, caught sight of a long-duration, glorious meteor/fireball with a long tail. For us (in Eastern Arizona, White Mountains), it began at about 10 o'clock high in the NW sky and arced toward the western horizon. Lasted a good 15 seconds, very bright. Anyone else see it?
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Orion Spring

    03/26/2015 3:55:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | March 26, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: As spring comes to planet Earth's northern hemisphere, familiar winter constellation Orion sets in early evening skies and budding trees frame the Hunter's stars. The yellowish hue of cool red supergiant Alpha Orionis, the great star Betelgeuse, mingles with the branches at the top of this colorful skyscape. Orion's alpha star is joined on the far right by Alpha Tauri. Also known as Aldebaran and also a giant star cooler than the Sun, it shines with a yellow light at the head of Taurus, the Bull. Contrasting blue supergiant Rigel, Beta Orionis, is Orion's other dominant star though, and...
  • Why Is Denver a Mile High

    03/25/2015 7:05:19 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 82 replies
    University of Colorado Boulder researchers propose a novel mechanism to explain the region’s high elevation No one really knows how the High Plains got so high. About 70 million years ago, eastern Colorado, southeastern Wyoming, western Kansas, and western Nebraska were near sea level. Since then, the region rose about 2 kilometers, leading to some head scratching at geology conferences. Now researchers at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder have proposed a new way to explain the uplift: water trapped deep below Earth’s crust may...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Naked Eye Nova Sagittarii 2015 No. 2

    03/25/2015 3:30:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | March 24, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It quickly went from obscurity to one of the brighter stars in Sagittarius -- but it's fading. Named Nova Sagittarii 2015 No. 2, the stellar explosion is the brightest nova visible from Earth in over a year. The featured image was captured four days ago from Ranikhet in the Indian Himalayas. Several stars in western Sagittarius make an asterism known as the Teapot, and the nova, indicated by the arrow, now appears like a new emblem on the side of the pot. As of last night, Nova Sag has faded from brighter than visual magnitude 5 to the edge...
  • 'Dr. George' Fischbeck dies at 92; popular weatherman at KABC-TV

    03/25/2015 3:12:54 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 28 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | March 25, 2015 | Valerie J. Nelson
    George Fischbeck, a science teacher turned weatherman who joined KABC-TV in 1972 and spent nearly two decades exuberantly delivering the local forecast, has died. He was 92. Fischbeck, who was known as "Dr. George," died of natural causes early Wednesday morning at the Motion Picture & Television Fund retirement home in Woodland Hills, his daughter, Nancy Fischbeck, said. A trained meteorologist, George Fischbeck was so enthusiastic about his subject that he sometimes forgot to talk about the next day's weather.
  • Maya Mural Reveals Ancient 'Photobomb' [no it doesn't]

    03/25/2015 2:24:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    LiveScience ^ | February 20, 2015 | Laura Geggel
    The murals also provide information about a man buried beneath them. During an excavation, the archaeologists found the skeleton of a man dressed like the sages in the mural. It's possible the man once lived in the room, which later became his final resting place, Saturno said. Archaeologists discovered the approximately 1,250-year-old mural in the ancient city of Xultun, located in the northeastern part of present-day Guatemala. During an archaeological study of Xultun, an undergraduate student inspecting an old looters' trail noticed traces of paint on an ancient wall covered by dirt... the elements had been kind to the building...
  • Ancient Receipt Proves Egyptian Taxes Were Worse Than Yours

    03/25/2015 11:53:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | March 14, 2015 | Owen Jarus
    A recently translated ancient Egyptian tax receipt shows a bill that is (literally) heavier than any American taxpayer will pay this year — more than 220 lbs. (100 kilograms) of coins. Written in Greek on a piece of pottery, the receipt states that a person (the name is unreadable) and his friends paid a land-transfer tax that came to 75 "talents" (a unit of currency), with a 15-talent charge added on. The tax was paid in coins and was delivered to a public bank in a city called Diospolis Magna (also known as Luxor or Thebes). But just how much...
  • Coral Pyramids in Micronesia Date Back to Middle Ages

    03/25/2015 11:41:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | March 13, 2015 | Megan Gannon
    On a remote Pacific island not much bigger than Manhattan, there are ancient pyramids built out of living coral. New evidence reveals that these tombs could be up to 700 years old — much older than experts had previously thought. The royal tombs are tucked away in an artificially built ancient city called Leluh just off the mainland of Kosrae, a Micronesian island. Leluh was home to Kosraean high chiefs (as well as some lower chiefs and commoners, too) from about 1250 until the mid-1800s, when foreign whalers, traders and missionaries started to arrive on the island. With impressive canals...
  • Magnets Can Control Heat And Sound? Shocking New Research Suggests They Can

    03/24/2015 9:10:14 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    The study is the first ever to prove that acoustic phonons (particles responsible for the transmission of both sound and heat) contain magnetic properties, The Ohio State University reported. The team of researchers demonstrated that a magnetic field about the size of an MRI was able to reduce the amount of heating flowing through a semiconductor by about 12 percent. "This adds a new dimension to our understanding of acoustic waves," said Joseph Heremans, Ohio Eminent Scholar in Nanotechnology and professor of mechanical engineering at Ohio State. "We've shown that we can steer heat magnetically. With a strong enough magnetic...
  • Climate Denial is Immoral, Says Head of US Episcopal Church

    03/24/2015 4:13:09 PM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 72 replies
    The Guardian ^ | March 24, 2015 22:29 GMT | Suzanne Goldenberg
    The highest ranking woman in the Anglican communion has said climate denial is a “blind” and immoral position which rejects God’s gift of knowledge. Katharine Jefferts Schori, presiding bishop of the Episcopal church and one of the most powerful women in Christianity, said that climate change was a moral imperative akin to that of the civil rights movement. She said it was already a threat to the livelihoods and survival of people in the developing world.
  • Privileged Species with Geneticist Michael Denton Gets Its Online Premiere; See It Now!

    03/24/2015 2:06:17 PM PDT · by Heartlander · 3 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | March 24, 2015 | News
    Privileged Species with Geneticist Michael Denton Gets Its Online Premiere; See It Now! Evolution News & Views March 24, 2015 3:43 AM | Permalink Finally, the stirring and profound documentary with geneticist Michael Denton, Privileged Species, is available to see now, free online. Dr. Denton extends the argument for intelligent design to the ultra-, ultra-fine-tuning of the cosmos for carbon-based life forms like ourselves. You cannot watch these 33 minutes without coming away with the very powerful conclusion that the universe was designed with us very specifically in mind.The documentary investigates the special properties of carbon, water, and oxygen that...
  • Did a volcanic cataclysm 40,000 years ago trigger the final demise of the Neanderthals?

    03/24/2015 7:28:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 20, 2015 | Geological Society of America
    In their climate simulations, Black and colleagues found that the largest temperature decreases after the eruption occurred in Eastern Europe and Asia and sidestepped the areas where the final Neanderthal populations were living (Western Europe). Therefore, the authors conclude that the eruption was probably insufficient to trigger Neanderthal extinction. However, the abrupt cold spell that followed the eruption would still have significantly impacted day-to-day life for Neanderthals and early humans in Europe. Black and colleagues point out that temperatures in Western Europe would have decreased by an average of 2 to 4 degrees Celsius during the year following the eruption....
  • The most complete ancient crossbow unearthed with terracotta army

    03/24/2015 7:21:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    chinadaily ^ | March 20, 2015 | Web Editor: Si Huan
    Archaeologists have recently discovered the most complete ancient crossbow to date in the terracotta army pit one in Xi'an, Shaanxi province. Among hundreds of pieces of crossbows unearthed in the past, this one is said to be the best-preserved in general, with a 145cm arch and a 130cm bow string. The bow string has a smooth surface which experts believe to be made from animal tendon instead of fabric and the trigger mechanism is made of bronze, according to Shen Maosheng, head of the archaeological team. Shen also points out that this new discovery sheds light on how Qing, two...
  • Forgotten monuments of Northern Sweden

    03/24/2015 7:15:46 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 22, 2015 | Carl L. Thunberg
    The vast majority of the cairns appear to have been built as monuments to the dead, mainly during the southern Scandinavian Bronze Age; circa 1800-500 BC. They occupy prominent positions overlooking the surrounding area, and some researchers speculate that they had a function as tribal markers for family group territories... Unlike the cairns from the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age which appear to contain cremation burials, the Early Bronze Age examples like one of the Spir Mountain cairns (RAÄ Grundsunda 109:1), have internal burial chambers with cists containing skeletal remains, accompanied by various grave goods. In some cases...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Powers of Ten

    03/24/2015 6:17:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | March 24, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How different does the universe look on small, medium, and large scales? The most famous short science film of its generation gives breathtaking comparisons. That film, Powers of Ten, originally created in the 1960s, has now been officially posted to YouTube and embedded above. Please click the above arrow to see the nine minute movie for yourself. From a picnic blanket near Chicago out past the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies, every ten seconds the film zooms out to show a square a factor of ten times larger on each side. The video then reverses, zooming back in a factor...
  • World's largest asteroid impacts found in central Australia

    03/23/2015 5:53:18 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 23 replies
    Australian National University News Online ^ | 23 March 2015 | Australian National University
    A 400 kilometre-wide impact zone from a huge meteorite that broke in two moments before it slammed into the Earth has been found in Central Australia. The crater from the impact millions of years ago has long disappeared. But a team of geophysicists has found the twin scars of the impacts – the largest impact zone ever found on Earth – hidden deep in the earth’s crust. Lead researcher Dr Andrew Glikson from the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology said the impact zone was discovered during drilling as part of geothermal research, in an area near the borders of...
  • Young Jupiter wiped out solar system's early inner planets, study says

    03/23/2015 5:01:44 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    The more planetary systems astronomers discovered, the more our own solar system looked like an oddball. Exoplanets – at least the ones big enough for us to see – tended to be bigger than Earth, with tight orbits that took them much closer to their host stars. In multi-planet systems, these orbits tended to be much closer together than they are in our solar system. For instance, the star known as Kepler-11 has six planets closer to it than Venus is to the sun. Why does our solar system look so different? Astrophysicists Konstantin Batygin of Caltech and Greg Laughlin...
  • Boeing patents 'Star Wars'-style force fields

    03/23/2015 9:38:12 AM PDT · by Kartographer · 21 replies
    CNet ^ | 3/22/15 | Michelle Starr
    A new patent granted to aircraft, defense and security company Boeing is taking its cues from science fiction. Just like the glowing energy shields seen protecting troops, machines and even spacecraft in Star Wars and Star Trek, the design -- named "Method and system for shockwave attenuation via electromagnetic arc" -- uses energy to deflect potential damage.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Atlas V Launches MMS

    03/23/2015 4:17:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | March 23, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Birds don't fly this high. Airplanes don't go this fast. The Statue of Liberty weighs less. No species other than human can even comprehend what is going on, nor could any human just a millennium ago. The launch of a rocket bound for space is an event that inspires awe and challenges description. Pictured above, an Atlas V rocket lifts off carrying NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission into Earth orbit 10 days ago to study the workings of the magnetosphere that surrounds and protects the Earth. From a standing start, the 300,000 kilogram rocket ship left to circle the Earth...
  • Why ancient myths about volcanoes are often true

    03/22/2015 6:17:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    BBC ^ | March 18, 2015 | Jane Palmer
    Story has it that many hundreds of years ago, Tanovo, chief of the Fijian island Ono, was very partial to a late afternoon stroll. Each day he would walk along the beach, watch the sun go down and undoubtedly contemplate this paradise on Earth. But one day Tanovo's rival, chief of the volcano Nabukelevu, pushed his mountain up and blocked Tanovo's view of the sunset. Enraged at this, and robbed of the pacifying effects of his daily meditation, Tanovo wove giant coconut-fibre baskets and began to remove earth from the mountain. His rival, however, caught Tanovo and chased him away....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Double Eclipse of the Sun

    03/22/2015 6:59:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | March 22, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Can the Sun be eclipsed twice at the same time? Last Friday was noteworthy because part of the Earth was treated to a rare total eclipse of the Sun. But also on Friday, from a part of the Earth that only saw part of the Sun eclipsed, a second object appeared simultaneously in front of the Sun: the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Although space station eclipses are very quick -- in this case only 0.6 seconds, they are not so rare. Capturing this composite image took a lot of planning and a little luck, as the photographer had to...
  • Medieval Ages and The Roots of Modern Science

    03/21/2015 11:41:27 PM PDT · by walkinginthedesert · 29 replies
    How the Medieval Ages paved the way for modern scienceScientific Development in the Medieval AgesNow we get into the medieval foundation of modern scientific thought. Contrary to common opinion, science was not “suppressed” as is the common understanding of this time period. Modern scholarship has brought about the reality that contrary to the common opinion, the Middle Ages actually is actually the root of modern scientific thought.Some of the most compelling arguments came from the medieval times. For example prior to the start of Christianity, and definitely from the time of the Middle Ages, there was a popular scientific consensus...
  • MAVEN uncovers Two Mysteries in Martian Atmosphere

    03/21/2015 10:30:37 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN Mission (MAVEN) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has uncovered two new mysteries in the atmosphere of Mars. The probe, which has been orbiting the Red Planet since last year has noticed a weird high-altitude dust cloud and an aurora show in the atmosphere of the planet. According to reports, the dazzling aurora light show was much lower in the Martian atmosphere than scientists anticipated. In addition, scientists do not know about the origin of the dust cloud. According to the space agency, the dust cloud had extended from about 150 kilometers to...
  • Prehistoric stone tools bear 500,000-year-old animal residue

    03/21/2015 6:02:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | March 19, 2015 | American Friends of Tel Aviv University
    Tel Aviv University discovers first direct evidence early flint tools were used to butcher animal carcasses. Some 2.5 million years ago, early humans survived on a paltry diet of plants. As the human brain expanded, however, it required more substantial nourishment - namely fat and meat - to sustain it. This drove prehistoric man, who lacked the requisite claws and sharp teeth of carnivores, to develop the skills and tools necessary to hunt animals and butcher fat and meat from large carcasses. Among elephant remains some 500,000 years old at a Lower Paleolithic site in Revadim, Israel, Prof. Ran Barkai...
  • Biologists call for restraint on human gene-editing technique

    03/21/2015 5:35:32 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 6 replies
    The biologists fear the new technique is so effective and easy to use that some physicians may push ahead with it before its safety can be assessed. They also want the public to understand the ethical issues surrounding the technique, which could be used to cure genetic diseases, but also to enhance qualities such as beauty or intelligence. The latter is a path that many ethicists believe should never be taken. “You could exert control over human heredity with this technique, and that is why we are raising the issue,” said David Baltimore, a former president of the California Institute...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Northern Equinox Eclipse

    03/21/2015 3:39:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | March 21, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Snowy and cold is weather you might expect at the start of spring for Longyearbyen on the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, Norway. But that turned out to be good weather for watching the Moon's umbral shadow race across northern planet Earth. The region was plunged into darkness for 3 minutes during the March 20 total solar eclipse while insulated eclipse chasers witnessed the dark Sun in the cold clear sky. In this well-timed snapshot captured near the end of totality, the Moon's shadow sweeps away from the horizon and the solar corona fades as the lunar disk just begins...
  • Thousands gather along English Channel to witness 'tide of the century'

    03/21/2015 8:19:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | Patrick Sawer, and David Chazan in Paris,
    The most dramatic effects of the day’s supertide were witnessed at the picturesque island of Mont Saint-Michel, off the coast of Normandy, where a wall of water as high as a four-storey building momentarily cut it off from the mainland. For a few minutes, Mont Saint-Michel was completely encircled by the sea by a ‘supertide’ caused by the Moon’s extra-strong gravitational pull on the sea. The phenomenon is linked to the alignment of the Moon, Sun and Earth following Friday’s solar eclipse. Spotlights illuminated the island’s medieval walled town and gothic abbey during the high tide, with visitors jostling to...
  • 10,000-Year-Old Stone Tool Site Discovered in Suburban Seattle

    03/21/2015 2:29:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Western Digs ^ | March 18, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    The find includes thousands of stone flakes, an array of bifaces, scrapers, and hammerstones, plus several projectile points, some of which were fashioned in a style that experts describe as “completely new” for this region and period in its history... And in the layer with the artifacts were burned bits of willow, poplar, and pine, which were themselves dated between 10,000 and 12,500 years ago... While other sites in Washington’s lowlands have produced animal remains from the end of the last Ice Age, this is the first discovery of stone tools that date back more than 10,000 years, according to...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sunshine, Earthshine

    03/20/2015 12:28:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | March 20, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Today's date marks an Equinox and a New Moon. Remarkably, while the exact timing of both geocentric events occur within a span of only 13 hours, the moon also reaches its new phase only 14 hours after perigee, the closest point in its orbit. That makes the Equinox New Moon the largest New Moon of 2015, though hard to see since that lunar phase presents the Moon's dark, night side to planet Earth. Still, in this well composed image of a young lunar phase from late January you can glimpse both night and day on the lunar surface, the...
  • Nova in Sagittarius Brightens! (To Naked Eye Magnitude)

    03/20/2015 12:20:02 PM PDT · by messierhunter · 19 replies
    Sky & Telescope ^ | March 20, 2015 | Alan MacRobert
    The nova that erupted in the Sagittarius Teapot on March 15th has continued to brighten. It's now about magnitude 4.9, in easy binocular view before dawn. Anyone see it naked-eye yet? Update Friday March 20: It's still brightening — to about magnitude 4.9 as of last night! That's a magnitude brighter than at the nova's discovery five days earlier. No telling when it will stop. And, Sagittarius is getting a little higher before dawn every day.
  • School bans pupils from watching the eclipse for 'cultural and religious' reasons

    03/20/2015 10:39:54 AM PDT · by Teotwawki · 43 replies
    Daily Mail Online ^ | March 20, 2015 | Jenny Awford
    Pupils at a primary school were banned from watching today's once-in-a-generation eclipse because of 'religious and cultural reasons', it has emerged. Parents of children at North Primary School in Southall, London, said they were 'outraged' by the decision and claimed it showed a triumph of 'religious superstition' over scientific education. Phil Belman, whose seven-year-old daughter goes to the school, met with headteacher Ivor Johnstone who said he was unable to elaborate on the decision because of 'confidentiality'. [snip] The headteacher said: 'The school made this decision when we became aware of religious and cultural concerns associated with observing an eclipse...
  • Researchers develop revolutionary 3D printing technology

    03/20/2015 10:13:33 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    PHYS.Org ^ | 03-17-2015 | Provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    A 3D printing technology developed by Silicon Valley startup, Carbon3D Inc., enables objects to rise from a liquid media continuously rather than being built layer by layer as they have been for the past 25 years, representing a fundamentally new approach to 3D printing. The technology, to appear as the cover article in the March 20 print issue of Science, allows ready-to-use products to be made 25 to 100 times faster than other methods and creates previously unachievable geometries that open opportunities for innovation not only in health care and medicine, but also in other major industries such as automotive...
  • Photographer captures weasel's woodpecker ride [IUPI Photos]

    LONDON, March 3 A photographer in London captured a rare photo showing a small weasel appearing to ride on a woodpecker, but he said the mammal was actually attacking the bird. Martin Le-May of Essex said he and his wife, Ann, were walking Monday in Hornchurch Country Park when they came across the unusual sight. "I heard a distressed squawking noise and feared the worst," Le-May told the BBC. "I soon realized it was a woodpecker with some kind of small mammal on its back." Le-May said the woodpecker was in a struggle for its life with the unwanted passenger,...
  • Volcano Monitors Proposed For Mount Hood, A "Very High Threat" Volcano

    03/19/2015 12:20:01 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 33 replies
    The Oregonian ^ | 3/17/2015 | Staff
    PORTLAND -- The U.S. Geological Survey and the Cascades Volcano Observatory hope to install four volcano monitoring stations on the upper flanks of Mount Hood.
  • Harvard-Smithsonian Physicist: Computer Models Used by U.N. Overstate Global Warming

    03/19/2015 11:46:44 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 16 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | March 18, 2015 - 1:13 PM | Barbara Hollingsworth
    A scholarly paper explaining why predictions made by climate computer models used by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) tend to exaggerate global warming has ignited a political firestorm. Dr. Wei-Hock “Willie” Soon, a solar physicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, came under attack by environmentalists after co-authoring a peer-reviewed paper explaining “the widening discrepancy between prediction and observation” in climate change models, and members of Congress soon took sides. The scientific paper, entitled “Why Models Run Hot,” concludes that the computer models overstated the impact of CO2 on the climate: “The impact of anthropogenic global...
  • Denver company's tests on wine triggers lawsuit (Arsenic in CA wines)

    03/19/2015 9:18:05 AM PDT · by CedarDave · 23 replies
    Denver Business Journal ^ | March 19, 2015 | Staff, DBJ
    A lawsuit is expected to be filed in California today over the amount of arsenic in some of the best-selling wines in the country. CBS News reports laboratory testing by Denver's BeverageGrades found some wines have as much as time times the maximum level of arsenic the Environmental Protection Agency allows for drinking water. The EPA doesn't regulate wine as it does water, and there are no federal labeling requirements to disclose what's in wine.
  • Genetic study reveals 30% of white British DNA has German ancestry

    03/19/2015 8:18:37 AM PDT · by C19fan · 53 replies
    The Guardian ^ | March 18, 2015 | Hannah Devlin
    The Romans, Vikings and Normans may have ruled or invaded the British for hundreds of years, but they left barely a trace on our DNA, the first detailed study of the genetics of British people has revealed. The analysis shows that the Anglo-Saxons were the only conquering force, around 400-500 AD, to substantially alter the country’s genetic makeup, with most white British people now owing almost 30% of their DNA to the ancestors of modern-day Germans.
  • Nevada Bill Would Allow Sick Pets to Use Medical Marijuana

    03/18/2015 10:16:42 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 44 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | March 17, 2015 | MICHELLE RINDELS
    <p>CARSON CITY, Nev. — Pets might soon be able to use pot under a bill introduced Tuesday in the Nevada Legislature.</p>
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Aurora in the Backyard

    03/19/2015 4:32:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | March 19, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On the night of March 17/18 this umbrella of northern lights unfolded over backyards in Vallentuna, Sweden about 30 kilometers north of Stockholm. A result of the strongest geomagnetic storm of this solar cycle, auroral displays were captured on that night from back and front yards at even lower latitudes, including sightings in the midwestern United States. A boon for aurora hunting skywatchers, the space storm began building when a coronal mass ejection, launched by solar activity some two days earlier, struck planet Earth's magnetosphere. So what's the name of the backyard observatory on the right of the wide...
  • The Scientist Who Wanted To Bring A Death Row Inmate Back From The Dead

    03/18/2015 9:53:29 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 12 replies
    IO9 ^ | March 18, 2015 | Lauren Davis
    The Scientist Who Wanted To Bring A Death Row Inmate Back From The Dead Dr. Robert E. Cornish is probably best known for his 1930s revivification experiments with dogs, in which he claimed to bring dogs back from clinical death. He wanted to try a similar procedure on humans — and when a death row inmate volunteered, Cornish petitioned the state of California to let him play re-animator. Cornish's dog experiments would make most dog lovers cringe. Cornish would suffocate the dogs until they were clinically dead, and then he would place the bodies on a teeter board, rocking the...
  • Gem Engraved with Goddess' Image Found Near King Herod's Mausoleum

    03/18/2015 4:18:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    LiveScience ^ | March 17, 2015 | Owen Jarus
    A translucent orange gem engraved with an image of a goddess of hunting has been found near a mausoleum built by Herod the Great, the king of Judea who ruled not long before the time of Jesus. The carnelian gem shows the goddess Diana (or her Greek equivalent, Artemis) with a sumptuously detailed hairstyle and wearing a sleeveless dress, with a quiver behind her left shoulder and the end of a bow protruding from her right shoulder. Both Diana and Artemis were goddesses of hunting and childbirth. An iron ring that may have held the gem was found nearby. Researchers...
  • THE YEAR WITHOUT A SUMMER 1816 IN MAINE

    03/18/2015 2:42:50 PM PDT · by daniel1212 · 27 replies
    http://www.milbridgehistoricalsociety.org/ ^ | Tuesday, March 17, 2015 | Lee-Lee Schlegel
    THE YEAR WITHOUT A SUMMER 1816, IN MAINE By Lee-Lee Schlegel MONTHS THAT SHOULD BE SUMMER’S PRIME SLEET AND SNOW AND FROST AND RIME AIR SO COLD YOU SEE YOUR BREATH EIGHTEEN HUNDRED AND FROZE TO DEATH (An old rhyme) -------------------------------------------------------------1771 REUBEN WHITTEN 1847 SON OF A REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER, A PIONEER OF THIS TOWN, COLD SEASON OF 1816 RAISED 40 BUSHELS OF WHEAT ON THIS LAND WHITCH KEPT HIS FAMILY AND NEIGHBOURS FROM STARVATION ( Tombstone in an Ashland, N.H. cemetery) Imagine! It’s June. Or July. Or perhaps August in Down East Maine. In Milbridge. That’s easy enough to do,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Earth During a Total Eclipse of the Sun

    03/18/2015 2:42:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | March 18, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What does the Earth look like during a total solar eclipse? It appears dark in the region where people see the eclipse, because that's where the shadow of the Moon falls. The shadow spot actually shoots across the Earth at nearly 2,000 kilometers per hour, darkening locations in its path for only a few minutes before moving on. The featured image shows the Earth during the total solar eclipse of 2006 March, as seen from the International Space Station. On Friday the Moon will move in front of the Sun once again, casting another distorted circular shadow that, this...
  • Green Energy Causes Record Spike In Electricity Prices

    03/17/2015 10:22:19 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 14 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 3-16-2015 | MICHAEL BASTASCH
    In 2014, American households saw the largest electricity price increases in 6 years, according to government data, as utilities are forced to use more green energy and invest in energy efficiency and grid improvements. Energy Information Administration data shows that U.S. residential electricity prices “experienced large increases in retail electricity prices during 2014, with the average U.S. residential price increasing 3.1% over the previous year.” Last year’s price increase was the highest of any year since 2008 when prices rose 5.7 percent. “Residential electricity rate increases during 2014 ranged from 1.3% in the Pacific Coast states to 9.9% in New...
  • Think You Can Draw The Apple Logo From Memory? You Sure?

    03/17/2015 7:53:11 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 35 replies
    Forbes ^ | March 17, 2015 | Davd DiSalvo
    Pick any ranking of publicly traded companies, and year after year you’ll find Apple AAPL +1.73% in the top three worldwide. To say that its famous logo is ubiquitous is an understatement. It’s everywhere and then some. There’s a decent chance you’re holding it in your hand as you read this article. This is all true – but right now, without any help, do you think you could draw the Apple logo from memory? If you’re like participants in a recent study on memory, you probably feel confident you could pull it off without peeking. But you may find, as...
  • The Science of Near-Death Experiences

    03/17/2015 7:41:45 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 14 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 03/17/2015 | Gideon Lichfield
    Near-death experiences have gotten a lot of attention lately. The 2014 movie "Heaven Is for Real", about a young boy who told his parents he had visited heaven while he was having emergency surgery, grossed a respectable $91 million in the United States. The book it was based on, published in 2010, has sold some 10 million copies and spent 206 weeks on the New York Times best-seller list. Two recent books by doctors—Proof of Heaven, by Eben Alexander, who writes about a near-death experience he had while in a week-long coma brought on by meningitis, and To Heaven and...
  • ST. PATRICK'S DAY GEOMAGNETIC STORM

    03/17/2015 7:01:55 PM PDT · by CtBigPat · 2 replies
    The strongest geomagnetic storm of the current solar cycle is underway now. High-latitude sky watchers should be alert for auroras after nightfall. Tip: Local midnight is often the best time to spot Northern and Southern Lights.
  • Dremel 3D Printer - Get One?

    03/17/2015 11:56:10 AM PDT · by GRRRRR · 35 replies
    Dremel and Home Depot ^ | 03/17/15 | GRRRRR
    Is this 3D printer worth it? Seems like a good entry level, home hobbiest and tinkering tool. Anyone have one already and can you tell us about your learning curve? G
  • Scientists Take DNA Sample From Woolly Mammoth Leg for Cloning Project

    03/17/2015 10:56:20 AM PDT · by C19fan · 66 replies
    NBC News ^ | March 16, 2015 | Devin Coldewey
    A group of Russian and South Korean researchers has begun their attempt to clone a woolly mammoth, starting by extracting DNA from a spectacularly well-preserved specimen discovered in the Siberian permafrot in 2013. The project is led by Hwang Woo-Suk, a Korean cloning scientist who was the focus of a scandal in 2006 involving fraudulent research on human stem cells. Hwang has had success with animals, however, reportedly creating the world's first cloned dog and several cloned coyotes.