Science (General/Chat)

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Tyrrhenian Sea and Solstice Sky

    12/21/2014 1:43:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | December 21, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Today the solstice occurs at 23:03 Universal Time, the Sun reaching its southernmost declination in planet Earth's sky. Of course, the December solstice marks the beginning of winter in the northern hemisphere and summer in the south. When viewed from northern latitudes, and as shown in the above horizontally compressed image, the Sun will make its lowest arc through the sky along the southern horizon. So in the north, the solstice day has the shortest length of time between sunrise and sunset and fewest hours of daylight. This striking composite image follows the Sun's path through the December solstice...
  • Tonight will be the longest night in Earth's history

    12/21/2014 10:48:25 AM PST · by LucyT · 70 replies
    msn news ^ | Decembe 21, 2014 | Joseph Stromberg
    Today, you might already know, is the winter solstice. That means for people living in the Northern Hemisphere, it's the longest night of the year. However, as science blogger Colin Schultz points out, tonight will also be the longest night ever. At any location in the Northern Hemisphere, in other words, tonight's period of darkness will be slightly longer than any other, ever — at least, since the planet started spinning right around the time it was first formed some 4.5 billion years ago. The reason is that the rotation of the Earth is slowing over time. Every year, scientists...
  • Active Sun Unleashes Massive Solar Flare

    12/21/2014 8:53:31 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    space.com ^ | December 20, 2014 11:49am ET | Tariq Mailq
    The huge solar flare registered as an X1.8-class event, one of the most powerful types of flares possible, and was captured on camera by NASA's powerful Solar Dynamics Observatory. The flare triggered a strong radio blackout for parts of Earth as it peaked Friday at 7:28 p.m. EST (0028 Dec. 20 GMT), according to an alert from the U.S. Space Weather Prediction Center overseen by NOAA.
  • The Hallelujah Chorus--All Parts Performed by 2 Singers in an Abandoned Bunker (YouTube vid, 4m22s)

    NASA and Handel hook up.
  • What Does “Happy New Year” Even Really Mean? (Physics: is time real?)

    12/20/2014 7:58:27 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 23 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | January 2015 | Sean M. Carroll
    When Albert Einstein’s good friend Michele Besso died in 1955, just a few weeks before Einstein’s own death, Einstein wrote a letter to Besso’s family in which he put forward a scientist’s consolation: “This is not important. For us who are convinced physicists, the distinction between past, present, and future is only an illusion, however persistent.” The idea that time is an illusion is an old one, predating any Times Square ball drop or champagne celebrations. It reaches back to the days of Heraclitus and Parmenides, pre-Socratic thinkers who are staples of introductory philosophy courses. Heraclitus argued that the primary...
  • Former Egyptian antiquities minister faces questions over theft from pyramid

    12/20/2014 1:04:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday 12 November 2014 | Patrick Kingsley
    In April 2013, the three Germans -- two amateur archaeologists and a film-making accomplice -- crept inside the inner sanctum of the Great Pyramid at Giza, the last the seven wonders of the ancient world to remain relatively intact. The trio, conspiracy theorists Dominique Gorlitz, Stefan Erdmann and Peter Hoefer, wanted to show that the pyramid was not the final resting place of the pharaoh Khufu, as has long been accepted, but was in fact a relic of an even older empire. In an attempt to prove this, they scraped off part of the pyramid's cartouche -- the insignia that...
  • Stonehenge dig finds 6,000-year-old encampment

    12/20/2014 11:21:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    BBC ^ | December19, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists working on a site near Stonehenge say they have found an untouched 6,000-year-old encampment which "could rewrite British history". David Jacques, from the University of Buckingham, made the discovery at Blick Mead in October, and said the carbon dating results had just been confirmed. But he also raised concerns about possible damage to the site over plans to build a road tunnel past Stonehenge. The Department of Transport said it would "consult before any building". The Blick Mead site is about 1.5 miles (2.4km) from Stonehenge and archaeologists said "scientifically tested charcoal" dug up from the site had "revealed...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Apollo 11 Landing Site Panorama

    12/20/2014 6:54:38 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    NASA ^ | December 20, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you seen a panorama from another world lately? Assembled from high-resolution scans of the original film frames, this one sweeps across the magnificent desolation of the Apollo 11 landing site on the Moon's Sea of Tranquility. Taken by Neil Armstrong looking out his window of the Eagle Lunar Module, the frame at the far left (AS11-37-5449) is the first picture taken by a person on another world. Toward the south, thruster nozzles can be seen in the foreground on the left, while at the right, the shadow of the Eagle is visible toward the west. For scale, the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Reflections on the 1970s

    12/20/2014 6:50:51 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    NASA ^ | December 19, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The 1970s are sometimes ignored by astronomers, like this beautiful grouping of reflection nebulae in Orion - NGC 1977, NGC 1975, and NGC 1973 - usually overlooked in favor of the substantial glow from the nearby stellar nursery better known as the Orion Nebula. Found along Orion's sword just north of the bright Orion Nebula complex, these reflection nebulae are also associated with Orion's giant molecular cloud about 1,500 light-years away, but are dominated by the characteristic blue color of interstellar dust reflecting light from hot young stars. In this sharp color image a portion of the Orion Nebula...
  • Polish family treasure an archaeological sensation in Sweden

    12/19/2014 11:36:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland ^ | May 12, 2014 | Daniel Zysk
    A small gold plate belonging to Polish family Sielscy from the Swedish Malmoe turned out to be an archaeological sensation. According to the researchers, it is probably a souvenir from the funeral of the Danish King Harald Bluetooth on the island of Wolin, dated to c. 986 AD. The discovery was made by 11 years old Maja Sielska, who diligently did her school homework about the Middle Ages. While looking through pictures of coins from this period in the textbook and on the Internet, the girl saw a plate with mysterious inscriptions similar to the one she had received from...
  • Unique 7th century silver bowl found in South Holland

    12/19/2014 11:29:59 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | July 2, 2014 | Source: Leiden University
    On an excavation site in Oegstgeest (South Holland), Leiden University archaeologists discovered a silver bowl dating to the first half of the seventh century. The bowl is decorated with gold-plated representations of animals and plants and inlaid with semi-precious stones. The discovery suggests the existence of an Oegstgeest elite with a wide international network. Researchers believe that the bowl, which is 21 centimetres wide and 11 centimetres high, was buried as part of a ritual sacrifice. Such gilded discoveries are extremely rare. This one is exceptional because such bowls were usually made of bronze and were not, as a rule,...
  • Dental plaque reveals key plant in prehistoric Easter Island diet

    12/19/2014 11:22:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Tuesday, 16 December 2014 | Ms Monica Tromp
    Known to its Polynesian inhabitants as Rapa Nui, Easter Island is thought to have been colonised around the 13th Century and is famed for its mysterious large stone statues or moai. Otago Anatomy PhD student Monica Tromp and Idaho State University’s Dr John Dudgeon have just published new research clearing up their previous puzzling finding that suggested palm may have been a staple plant food for Rapa Nui’s population over several centuries. However, no other line of archaeological or ethnohistoric evidence supports palm having a dietary role on Easter Island; in fact evidence points to the palm becoming extinct soon...
  • Stone tools discovery prompts re-think of African theory

    12/19/2014 11:14:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | September 26, 2014 | unattributed
    The belief that a type of technology known as Levallois – where the flakes and blades of stones were used to make useful products such as hunting weapons was invented in Africa and then spread to other continents as the human population expanded can now be discounted say the researchers. At an archaeological site in Armenia called Nor Geghi 1, the researchers discovered that these types of tools already existed there between 325,000 and 335,000 years ago, suggesting that local populations developed them out of a more basic type of technology, known as biface, which was also found at the...
  • Earth May Have Created Its Own Water Deep Within; And There's Still Enough There To Fill The Pacific

    12/19/2014 7:32:52 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 46 replies
    hngn.com/ ^ | Dec 19, 2014 06:57 PM EST | Rebekah Marcarelli
    A team of researchers revealed evidence of an unknown geochemical pathway used by the Earth to sequester water deep within, releasing small amounts through plate tectonics in a process that feeds our oceans "from within," Ohio State University reported.
  • ISS astronaut needs a wrench, NASA successfully 'emails' him one

    12/19/2014 2:44:12 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    cnet.com ^ | 19 December 2014 9:46 pm GMT | Anthony Domanico
    An astronaut aboard the International Space Station needed a socket wrench, so NASA engineers emailed him designs for 3D-printing one.
  • Back to future with Roman architectural concrete

    12/19/2014 2:10:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | December 15, 2014 | Lynn Yarris
    No visit to Rome is complete without a visit to the Pantheon, Trajan's Markets, the Colosseum, or the other spectacular examples of ancient Roman concrete monuments that have stood the test of time and the elements for nearly two thousand years... Working at ALS beamline 12.3.2, a superconducting bending magnet X-ray micro-diffraction beamline, the research team studied a reproduction of Roman volcanic ash-lime mortar that had been previously subjected to fracture testing experiments at Cornell University. In the concrete walls of Trajan's Markets, constructed around 110 CE, this mortar binds cobble-sized fragments of tuff and brick. Through observing the mineralogical...
  • Unique entry complex discovered at Herodian Hilltop Palace

    12/19/2014 2:03:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Hebrew University of Jerusalem ^ | December 18, 2014 | dovs
    Archaeologists from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute of Archaeology have discovered a monumental entryway to the Herodian Hilltop Palace at the Herodium National Park. The unique complex was uncovered during excavations by The Herodium Expedition in Memory of Ehud Netzer over the past year, as part of a project to develop the site for tourism. The main feature of the entryway is an impressive corridor with a complex system of arches spanning its width on three separate levels. These arches buttressed the corridor's massive side-walls, allowing the King and his entourage direct passage into the Palace Courtyard. Thanks to...
  • Remains of 8,000-year-old olive oil found in Lower Galilee

    12/19/2014 1:59:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | December 17, 2014 | Daniel K. Eisenbud
    The earliest evidence of the use of olive oil in the country, and possibly the entire Middle East, was unearthed at an excavation site in the Lower Galilee, the Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday. The discovery was made after Dr. Ianir Milevski and Nimrod Getzov directed an archeological salvage excavation at Ein Tzipori between 2011 and 2013. The excavation led to research that indicated that olive oil was already being used in the country 8,000 years ago, during the 6th millennium BCE... These tests revealed that the pottery, dating to the Early Chalcolithic period, contained olive oil, the researchers concluded... Of...
  • Massive 2,800-year-old farmhouse found in central Israel

    12/19/2014 1:52:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | December 15, 2014 | Lazar Berman
    Structure in modern Rosh Ha'ayin was used during Assyrian, Persian and Hellenistic periods. Israeli archaeologists uncovered an ancient farmhouse in the area of modern day Rosh Ha'ayin, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Monday. The structure is believed to be 2,800 years old, and consists of 23 rooms. "The farm, which is extraordinarily well-preserved, extends across an area of 30 meters by 40 meters and was built in the eighth century BCE, the time of the Assyrian conquest," IAA excavation director Amit Shadman said. "Farm houses during this period served as small settlements of sorts whose inhabitants participated in processing agricultural produce....
  • Quantum physics just got less complicated

    12/19/2014 11:34:49 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 71 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 12/19/14
    Here's a nice surprise: quantum physics is less complicated than we thought. An international team of researchers has proved that two peculiar features of the quantum world previously considered distinct are different manifestations of the same thing. The result is published 19 December in Nature Communications. Patrick Coles, Jedrzej Kaniewski, and Stephanie Wehner made the breakthrough while at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore. They found that 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum 'uncertainty principle' in disguise, reducing two mysteries to one."The connection between uncertainty and wave-particle duality comes out very naturally when you...
  • Get Ready for The Next Wave of Tech Disruptions

    12/19/2014 10:36:08 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    33rd Square ^ | 12/17/2014
    According to technology expert Vivek Wadhwa, "One of the things that has begun to worry me is the fact that I'm seeing change happening at a scale which is unimaginable before and that it's impacting industry after industry after industry." "Every industry I've looked at I've seen a trend of major disruption happening," says Wadhwa in a new piece for Big Think. Wadhwa is a fellow at Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University, director of research at Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization at Duke, and Distinguished Fellow at Singularity University.  Wadhwa tells how manufacturing will be dramatically...
  • The massive supernova that could annihilate life on Earth (but don't panic- experts say luckily

    12/19/2014 7:00:13 AM PST · by C19fan · 28 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 19, 2014 | Mark Prigg
    It contains one of the biggest and brightest stars in our galaxy, weighing at least 90 times the mass of the sun. The Eta Carinae star system, however, also has a dark side - it could bring the end of life on Earth. However, the good news is that experts say this is 'extremely' unlikely - but cannot rule it out.
  • World's deepest fish found: Ghostly snailfish is found lurking 27,000ft below at the bottom

    12/19/2014 6:36:49 AM PST · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 19, 2014 | Jonathan O'Callaghan
    A new record has been set for the deepest fish ever seen in the world, at an incredible depth of 26,722 feet (8,145 metres). The snailfish was found at the bottom of the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean, and breaks the previous record by almost 1,640 feet (500 metres). The finding was part of an international expedition that also found many other new species at the extreme depths.
  • NASA's Kepler spacecraft finds first alien planet of new mission

    12/19/2014 6:12:01 AM PST · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    www.foxnews.com ^ | Published December 19, 2014 | By Mike Wall
    NASA's Kepler space telescope is discovering alien planets again. The prolific spacecraft has spotted its first new alien planet since being hobbled by a malfunction in May 2013, researchers announced Dec. 18. The newly discovered world, called HIP 116454b, is a "super Earth" about 2.5 times larger than our home planet. It lies 180 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Pisces — close enough to be studied by other instruments, scientists said. "Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, Kepler has been reborn and is continuing to make discoveries," study lead author Andrew Vanderburg, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics...
  • Shrinking ship bubbles ‘could counteract climate change’

    12/19/2014 6:05:52 AM PST · by moose07 · 57 replies
    BBC ^ | 19 December 2014 | Rebecca Morelle
    Getting ships to generate smaller bubbles as they sail across the oceans could counteract the impact of climate change, a study suggests. Scientists from University of Leeds, UK, say this would create a brighter wake behind a vessel and reflect more sunlight back into space. However, it could also increase rainfall in some areas. The findings were presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in San Francisco. This is the latest idea from the hotly debated field of geoengineering - manmade global fixes to climate change. Suggestions for reducing the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the Earth range...
  • Birds 'heard tornadoes coming' and fled one day ahead

    12/19/2014 2:32:01 AM PST · by moose07 · 35 replies
    BBC ^ | 19 December 2014 | Jonathan Webb
    US scientists say tracking data shows that five golden-winged warblers "evacuated" their nesting site one day before the April 2014 tornado outbreak. Geolocators showed the birds left the Appalachians and flew 700km (400 miles) south to the Gulf of Mexico. The next day, devastating storms swept across the south and central US. Writing in the journal Current Biology, ecologists suggest these birds - and others - may sense such extreme events with their keen low-frequency hearing. Remarkably, the warblers had completed their seasonal migration just days earlier, settling down to nest after a 5,000km (3,100 mile) journey from Colombia. Dr...
  • Fun with Vortex Rings in the Pool

    12/19/2014 12:56:52 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    YouTube ^ | 12/1714 | PhysicsGirl
    Video here.
  • Comet discovery closes door to theory of origin of Earth's oceans

    12/18/2014 3:24:20 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    newsworks.org ^ | December 18, 2014 |
    "We were looking to measure a certain particle called dueterium," said Alexander. It is this element that would confirm or scuttle the theory of comets hydrating Earth. And, as it turned out, Rosetta's data cast a strong doubt that comets were our aquatic benefactors.
  • An iPad app can land your plane if the engine quits

    12/18/2014 2:33:38 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 39 replies
    EndGadget ^ | 12/18/2014 | Steve Dent
    If the engine quits in a small plane, it's not the end of the world -- just glide to the nearest airport and make a dead-stick landing. Simple, right? Sure, if the pilot makes perfect, lightning-quick decisions. Since we're only human, there's now an iPad app called Xavion that can connect with a small-plane's autopilot, find the nearest airport and, if possible, fly you to the runway's threshold by itself. It'll even tell you if you can't make it, so that you can find a nearby farmer's field instead. According to Popular Science, the autopilot update will arrive in a...
  • Tesla Drivers Don't Be Too Smug: Electric Cars Are Not So Green, Says Study

    12/18/2014 1:03:43 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    Reason ^ | 12/18/2014 | Ronald Bailey
    In a new study in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences University of Minnesota researchers report in various scenarios that vehicles using alternative fuels are often more harmful to human health than are conventional gasoline-powered automobiles. From the abstract: We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. PNAS The AP reported: "It's kind of hard to beat gasoline" for public and environmental health, said study co-author Julian Marshall, an engineering professor at the University of Minnesota. "A...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 7331 and Beyond

    12/18/2014 9:13:33 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    NASA ^ | December 18, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Big, beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 7331 is often touted as an analog to our own Milky Way. About 50 million light-years distant in the northern constellation Pegasus, NGC 7331 was recognized early on as a spiral nebula and is actually one of the brighter galaxies not included in Charles Messier's famous 18th century catalog. Since the galaxy's disk is inclined to our line-of-sight, long telescopic exposures often result in an image that evokes a strong sense of depth. The effect is further enhanced in this sharp image from a small telescope by galaxies that lie beyond the gorgeous island...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Geminid Fireball over Mount Balang

    12/18/2014 9:08:45 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | December 17, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This was a sky to remember. While viewing the Geminids meteor shower a few days ago, a bright fireball was captured over Mt. Balang, China with particularly picturesque surroundings. In the foreground, a sea of light clouds slowly floated between dark mountain peaks. In the background, the constellation of Orion shone brightly, with the familiar three stars of Orion's belt visible near the image top right. Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, is visible near the image center. The bright fireball flashed for only a fraction of second on the lower right. The source of the fireball...
  • Volume of world's oldest water estimated

    12/18/2014 1:33:29 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 51 replies
    BBC ^ | 17 December 2014 Last updated at 20:25 ET | Rebecca, BBC
    The world's oldest water, which is locked deep within the Earth's crust, is present at a far greater volume than was thought, scientists report. The liquid, some of which is billions of years old, is found many kilometres beneath the ground. Researchers estimate there is about 11m cubic kilometres (2.5m cu miles) of it - more water than all the world's rivers, swamps and lakes put together. The study was presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. It has also been published in the journal Nature. The team found that the water was reacting with the rock to release...
  • Strange rock containing 30,000 diamonds baffles scientists

    12/17/2014 8:01:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    "The exciting thing for me is there are 30,000 itty-bitty, perfect octahedrons, and not one big diamond," said Larry Taylor, a geologist at the University of Tennessee, who presented the findings at the American Geophysical Union's annual meeting. "It's like they formed instantaneously. This rock is a strange one indeed."
  • Stanford to host 100-year study on artificial intelligence

    12/17/2014 6:33:19 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 28 replies
    Stanford University ^ | December 16, 2014 | Chris Cesare
    Stanford to host 100-year study on artificial intelligence Stanford University will lead a 100-year effort to study the long-term implications of artificial intelligence in all aspects of life. By Chris Cesare Russ Altman, a professor of bioengineering and of computer science at Stanford, will serve as faculty director of the One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence. Stanford University has invited leading thinkers from several institutions to begin a 100-year effort to study and anticipate how the effects of artificial intelligence will ripple through every aspect of how people work, live and play. This effort, called the One Hundred Year...
  • Voyager 1 Rides 'Tsunami Wave' in Interstellar Space

    12/17/2014 1:48:27 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    space.com ^ | December 16, 2014 04:22pm ET | Megan Gannon,
    "Most people would have thought the interstellar medium would have been smooth and quiet," study researcher Don Gurnett, professor of physics at the University of Iowa, and the principal investigator of Voyager 1's plasma wave instrument, said in a statement from NASA. "But these shock waves seem to be more common than we thought."
  • 111 Years Ago Today: Man’s First Powered Flight.

    12/17/2014 11:49:14 AM PST · by EveningStar · 46 replies
    Alert 5 ^ | December 17, 2014 | Tom Demerly
    It is equipped with side stick controls like an F-16 Fighting Falcon. It uses an advanced, “mission adaptive” wing that has no seams at the control surfaces. The wing is so unique its design is protected under U.S. patent 821,393. The entire wing changes shape to control the roll axis of the aircraft ... And it is the first successful powered aircraft ever, the Wright Flyer. 111 years ago today Orville Wright became the first man to achieve powered flight. His first 12-second flight, covering only 120 feet, changed the course of mankind. 10:35 Local, Thursday, 17 December, 1903; Kill...
  • Climate change: Beavers boost emissions with 800 million kg of methane every year

    12/17/2014 10:27:19 AM PST · by Abathar · 38 replies
    International Business Times ^ | December 16, 2014 | Hannah Osborne
    Beavers are contributing to climate change, adding an estimated 800 million kg of methane to the atmosphere every year, scientists have found. Over the last century, there has been a worldwide conservation effort to save beavers from extinction. The fur trade between the 16th and 19th century almost led to the annihilation of beavers across the globe. After trapping was limited and the creatures were reintroduced to their natural ranges, their numbers grew significantly, with scientists now estimating their population to have reached over 10 million worldwide. Beavers build dams in rivers to create standing ponds,However, the consequence of this...
  • International Emissions Idiocy

    12/17/2014 9:27:16 AM PST · by rktman
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 12/17/2014 | Alan Caruba
    Most of the people of the world have concluded that the decades of warnings about “global warming” and its successor, “climate change”, is just idiotic nonsense. Few believe that humans ever had or ever will have any role in what the weather will be tomorrow or a thousand years from now. They are right. One of the most distinguishing factors about the Anthropogenic Global Warming theory has been the way its advocates have always predicted major changes decades into the future. When the future arrived, as it has since the first doomsday predictions were made in the late 1980s, they...
  • When you lose weight, where does the fat go? It turns into carbon dioxide.

    12/17/2014 8:43:25 AM PST · by Pining_4_TX · 48 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 12/16/2014 | University of New South Wales
    The most common misconception among doctors, dieticians and personal trainers is that the missing mass has been converted into energy or heat. "There is surprising ignorance and confusion about the metabolic process of weight loss," says Professor Andrew Brown, head of the UNSW School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences. "The correct answer is that most of the mass is breathed out as carbon dioxide. It goes into thin air," says the study's lead author, Ruben Meerman, a physicist and Australian TV science presenter. ------------------- The second most frequently asked question is whether weight loss can cause global warming.
  • Climate change: Beavers boost emissions ith 800 million kg of methane per year

    12/17/2014 8:01:26 AM PST · by EQAndyBuzz · 44 replies
    IB Times Uk edition ^ | 12/16/2015 | Hannah Osborn
    Beavers are contributing to climate change, adding an estimated 800 million kg of methane to the atmosphere every year, scientists have found. Over the last century, there has been a worldwide conservation effort to save beavers from extinction. The fur trade between the 16th and 19th century almost led to the annihilation of beavers across the globe.
  • Evidence of Viking/Norse metalworking in Arctic Canada

    12/17/2014 7:39:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | December 15, 2014 | Dawn Peters
    A small stone container found by archaeologists a half-century ago has now been recognized as further evidence of a Viking or Medieval Norse presence in Arctic Canada during the centuries around 1000 A.D. Researchers reporting in the journal Geoarchaeology discovered that the interior of the container, which was found at an archaeological site on southern Baffin Island, contains fragments of bronze as well as small spherules of glass that form when rock is heated to high temperatures. The object is a crucible for melting bronze, likely in order to cast it into small tools or ornaments. Indigenous peoples of northern...
  • The Josh-WUWT 2015 Climate Skeptics Calendar is now available

    12/16/2014 11:29:35 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 9 replies
    Wattsupwiththat.com ^ | December 12, 2014 | Anthony Watts
    Here is your chance again to join “Josh of the Month Club”. Samples follow.After the great response we had the last two years, Josh has sent his artwork across the pond to provide a special WUWT calendar for USA and Canadian readers again this year. It contains artwork more centric to issues here on this side of the pond, along with some cartoons never before published on WUWT.These make great Christmas gifts for yourself, your friends, or some of those special people like Mike Mann that need some cheer and enlightenment. Recall that Dr. Mann turned our simple gift...
  • Hot New Book: Climate Change: The Facts 2014 ($AUD)*

    12/16/2014 10:49:44 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 18 replies
    Jjoannenova.com.au ^ | December 16th, 2014 | Joanne
    Hot New Book: Steyn, Delingpole, Bolt, Carter, Plimer, Lindzen, Lawson, Watts, Nova Too many big names too list, and all in one book, edited by Alan Moran and published by the IPA. I’m am just tickled, delighted to be one of the authors.The proper headline should include Ross McKitrick, Willie Soon, Pat Michaels, Garth Paltridge, Kesten Green, Stewart Franks, Christopher Essex, Jennifer Marohasy and John Abbott. Not to forget the great writers Rupert Darwall, and Donna LaFramboise.– JoAn excerpt:Shh, don’t mention the water To state the bleeding obvious, Earth is a Water Planet. Water dominates everything and it’s infernally complicated. Water...
  • NASA Rover Finds Active and Ancient Organic Chemistry on Mars

    12/16/2014 4:22:20 PM PST · by Islander7 · 22 replies
    JPL ^ | Dec 16, 2014 | Staff
    NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has measured a tenfold spike in methane, an organic chemical, in the atmosphere around it and detected other organic molecules in a rock-powder sample collected by the robotic laboratory's drill. "This temporary increase in methane -- sharply up and then back down -- tells us there must be some relatively localized source," said Sushil Atreya of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, a member of the Curiosity rover science team. "There are many possible sources, biological or non-biological, such as interaction of water and rock."
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- W5: Pillars of Star Formation

    12/16/2014 2:05:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | December 16, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How do stars form? Images of the star forming region W5 like those in the infrared by NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite provide clear clues with indications that massive stars near the center of empty cavities are older than stars near the edges. A likely reason for this is that the older stars in the center are actually triggering the formation of the younger edge stars. The triggered star formation occurs when hot outflowing gas compresses cooler gas into knots dense enough to gravitationally contract into stars. In the featured scientifically-colored infrared image, spectacular pillars, left...
  • Do we finally have proof of life on Mars?

    12/16/2014 11:00:01 AM PST · by Red Badger · 60 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 13:36 EST, 16 December 2014 | By Jonathan O'Callaghan
    Unexplained methane spikes suggest bacteria is living on the red planet Nasa scientists in California have revealed evidence for life on Mars They say methane spikes on the planet could be produced by bacteria And, at the moment, there is no better explanation for the spikes The signs were spotted briefly occurring by one of Curiosity's instruments Life is the chief producer of methane on Earth, although there are many non-biological processes that can also generate the gas But no such process could be ruled out during tests - suggesting there may be bacteria living on or under the surface...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Potsdam Gravity Potato

    12/15/2014 3:22:41 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    NASA ^ | December 15, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why do some places on Earth have higher gravity than others? Sometimes the reason is unknown. To help better understand the Earth's surface, sensitive measurments by the orbiting satellites GRACE and CHAMP were used to create a map of Earth's gravitational field. Since a center for studying this data is in Potsdam, Germany, and since the result makes the Earth look somewhat like a potato, the resulting geoid has been referred to as the Potsdam Gravity Potato. High areas on this map, colored red, indicate areas where gravity is slightly stronger than usual, while in blue areas gravity is...
  • At UN climate talks, a crack in rich-poor barrier

    12/14/2014 6:17:28 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 3 replies
    myway.com AP ^ | Dec 14, 5:08 PM (ET) | KARL RITTER
    LIMA, Peru (AP) — A last-minute deal that salvaged U.N. climate talks from collapse early Sunday sends a signal the rich-poor divide that long held up progress can be overcome with a year to go before a landmark pact is supposed to be adopted in Paris.
  • 10 Mysterious Underwater Cities You Haven't Heard Of

    12/14/2014 3:38:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Listverse ^ | August 5, 2013 | Andrew Handley