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Lessons of Snowstorm 2014
1-29-14 | ealgeone

Posted on 01/29/2014 10:28:10 AM PST by ealgeone

What can we learn from the snowstorm that has hit the south?

I'm watching and reading responses to the snowstorm in the ATL and its utterly amazing the reaction of the media and the sheeple.

1) government resources become overwhelmed quickly 2) you cannot quickly evacuate a major urban area 3) the media will quickly move to place blame to keep the narrative going 4) if traveling by car have appropriate provisions on hand 5) YOU are ultimately responsible for yourself


TOPICS: Outdoors; Weather
KEYWORDS: prep; shtf; snow

1 posted on 01/29/2014 10:28:10 AM PST by ealgeone
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To: ealgeone

6) Government employees do not know how to read a weather forecast. Prepare accordingly.


2 posted on 01/29/2014 10:35:00 AM PST by red-dawg (<<< click.)
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To: ealgeone

Yes - and the further the responsibility is away from local government, the worse the response


3 posted on 01/29/2014 10:35:42 AM PST by PGR88
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To: ealgeone

People in the south need to stay home in these situations. If it doesn’t happen more than once every decade or so its worth the lost revenue for a day.


4 posted on 01/29/2014 10:35:59 AM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: ealgeone

I was feeling sorry for them at first because they really don’t know how to deal with snow. Now, it’s getting downright funny.


5 posted on 01/29/2014 10:36:38 AM PST by colorado tanker
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To: cripplecreek

I second that. Leave winter to Us professionals up north.

CC


6 posted on 01/29/2014 10:38:22 AM PST by Celtic Conservative (tease not the dragon for thou art crunchy when roasted and taste good with ketchup)
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To: cripplecreek

I second that. Leave winter to Us professionals up north.

CC


7 posted on 01/29/2014 10:38:34 AM PST by Celtic Conservative (tease not the dragon for thou art crunchy when roasted and taste good with ketchup)
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To: ealgeone

“YOU are ultimately responsible for yourself”

No offense to our Southern brothers and sisters, who I hope are coping as best they can, but this is one reason many of us appreciate the rigors of a four-season climate. We are tested every winter, and we know that consequences of not being prepared and heads-up can be life-threatening. It’s like anything else, the more you practice, the better you get at a thing, and here in the midwest, we practice once a year!


8 posted on 01/29/2014 10:39:35 AM PST by bigbob (The best way to get a bad law repealed is to enforce it strictly. Abraham Lincoln)
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To: colorado tanker
We go fishing in this crap.


9 posted on 01/29/2014 10:39:43 AM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: ealgeone

I’ve watched this mess for hours and hours. My biggest take away from all this besides late action by powers that be is that all these cars on the interstates are being blocked or hindered by semis that get stuck and cross-laned.

I think that next time, the surrounding Atlanta county police on every one of the interstates should FORCE all semis to the side of the road there for 12 hours or so. This would have allowed more cars to get home.

My 2 cents.


10 posted on 01/29/2014 10:41:19 AM PST by Gaffer
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To: Celtic Conservative

I can deal with the snow, ice and even the cold but this wind is getting old.


11 posted on 01/29/2014 10:42:10 AM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

The wind is supposed to stop later tonight.. Just before the snow starts.

CC


12 posted on 01/29/2014 10:47:17 AM PST by Celtic Conservative (tease not the dragon for thou art crunchy when roasted and taste good with ketchup)
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To: cripplecreek

LOL! That picture reminds me of the Frasier ice fishing episode where they drop the car keys into the lake.


13 posted on 01/29/2014 10:51:06 AM PST by colorado tanker
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To: ealgeone

14 posted on 01/29/2014 10:51:22 AM PST by Obadiah (I Like Ted.)
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To: ealgeone

Standard rule I learned in Alaska back in 1968. If driving, keep TWO cans of STERNO in the car, matches, and a sterno stove. Blankets, hard candy and other dry food, Add a good sleeping bag.


15 posted on 01/29/2014 10:53:54 AM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Sometimes you need 7+ more ammo. LOTS MORE.)
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To: Gaffer

If the semis hadn’t closed the road, the death toll would have been enormous. I doubt many of the commuters had Blizzaks, they would have slid and left the roads just as the trucks did, but there would have been more crashes given the extra space. People in the northern climes with poor equipment leave the road in icy conditions, some of them with experience driving in the conditions.


16 posted on 01/29/2014 10:58:23 AM PST by xone
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To: Gaffer
When NV authorities and CALTRANS implement chain controls in the Sierras that is one of the first things they do. They stop all the trucks.

I always have chains in my car, but have never used them. If the state says chains are mandatory I figure it is code for "smart people stay home."

17 posted on 01/29/2014 10:59:14 AM PST by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: ealgeone
I remember in my younger days that everybody had emergency supplies in their trunks when travelling. I'm talking flares, blankets, gloves, the works. Even if you were on a short trip, you had to be prepared to be stranded in winter weather because we had no GPS, no cellphones, or any other technology that could bail us out of a bad situation quickly.

Furthermore, when the weather got particularly nasty, we just stayed home. I see some "back in my day" posters in these threads yapping about how school never closed and they had to walk six miles blah, blah, blah.

There were more "snow days" when I was growing up in the 1960s and 1970s. People stayed home from work too unless they had a critical job function like working in a hospital or being a police officer. If they had a typical office job, they stayed home and they didn't have to wait for their boss to call them. It was a common sense thing.

I think technology has worked against us in some ways. People now see nothing wrong with going to school in flip-flops or to work with just a light jacket and no gloves or hat on a sub-zero day. If they get in a jam, they only have to make a cellphone call and help is on the way. We are too complacent and we assume that we can now disregard all weather conditions because we'll never be in danger.

I'm a seasoned New England driver and our roads can handle a few inches of snow - it's routine. But I was on a business trip in Nashville, TN once when it snowed and I knew better to just stay in the hotel because I know the chaos that would result down there with just an inch or two of snow. Sure enough, one of my co-workers who was also down there insisted on taking his rental car out and promptly got in a fender bender and was stuck out on I-40 for hours. Never made it to the branch office.

People in the Deep South should just stay home when it snows. In almost all cases, it will be melted within 24 hours. Not worth the risk to be out there endangering yourself and others.

18 posted on 01/29/2014 11:01:04 AM PST by SamAdams76
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To: Gaffer
...all these cars on the interstates are being blocked or hindered by semis that get stuck and cross-laned.

Exactly! They talk about "professional drivers", blah, blah. but that may accurately describe only a small portion of current big truck drivers.

There were several tv shots from traffic copters showing 18 wheelers blocking all of the lanes on major freeways. There well may have been emergencies in passenger autos stacked up behind them trying to get by.

In my opinion, one of the top recommendations out of this current mess in Atlanta ought to be that big rig drivers who even travel in the last open lane of a traffic jam, let along block it, ought to immediately lose their license.

My son spent a couple of hours going a few miles in the mess on the surface streets in the 400N/285 area before returning to his office for the night (he had two female co-workers with him and he knew there was food and warmth there). He said watching the panicked actions of some of the ordinary drivers (ignoring functioning street lights, driving on the wrong side of the road for no reason, etc.) was a bit like watching civilization disintegrate. The last thing we need is big rig drivers balling it up even worse.

19 posted on 01/29/2014 11:19:20 AM PST by frog in a pot (We are all "frogs in a pot" now. How and when will we real Americans jump out?)
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To: colorado tanker

To all you Northerners who think this is “funny,” this just reminds me how happy I am that God led me to the South where people still feel empathy for one another. There were 25,000 school children stuck in buses, mothers with babies and elderly people without water or medicine stuck on the side of the freeway overnight. You think that is funny? I spent years living way north of Colorado, and I guarantee you that if the northern states didn’t use sand, gravel, salt and snowplows you would all be sliding around too.


20 posted on 01/29/2014 11:31:28 AM PST by binreadin
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To: cripplecreek
If it doesn’t happen more than once every decade or so its worth the lost revenue for a day.

The problem is it happens to Atlanta two out of every three or four years.

The second problem is we have multiple days each year where 'possible snow' is predicted, and they don't pan out, so businesses and workers can't take each possible snow alert seriously.

The ice storm warnings are taken rather seriously, because that's when Atlanta gets its real damage.

21 posted on 01/29/2014 11:35:19 AM PST by Scoutmaster (I'd rather be at Philmont)
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To: SamAdams76

Being a veteran driver from the Northeast, I would drive wherever I needed to go. I was just careful. The idiots were the ones in the big 4 wheel drive vehicles who thought just because they drove a tank, they could do 60MPH. Wrong!

Friday there was ice on the ground in San Antonio. Went outside, car was iced over, driveway was slippery, I went upstairs and back to bed. There are 10 times as many 4 wheelers than in the NE.

Bottom line is the South will never be able to prepare for this. Stay home where you are safe. If you feel the need to drive, go to your local school, go in the parking lot where there are no cars and knock yourself out.


22 posted on 01/29/2014 11:50:10 AM PST by EQAndyBuzz ("The GOP fights its own base with far more vigor than it employs in fighting the Dims.")
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To: binreadin

Thank you.

I am now comfortably sitting in downtown ATL (inside my hotel) waiting for the streets to be salted so I can return to my family Thursday.

Most schools outside of town cancelled classes. However, Atlanta Public Schools remained open. At 1 the schools, businesses and government employees all tried to escape the city before the roads had been prepped. Traffic in ATL is terrible under normal circumstances. The snow has turned to sheets of ice across the streets.

I watched as a food delivery truck driver attempted to climb a hill with very little slope.

I helped push a BMW across the street sideways to open traffic back up.

I saw people sweeping off sidewalks to keep the ice from forming.

I am thankful for the employees that spent the night and were back at work this morning.

People are helping each other.

The news may be reporting this as a catastrophe (which in some ways it is) but when I went walking around downtown and most people just relaxing and accepted the situation.

Most that I have seen seems to be people that are safe and patient. No one is crying for government service to save us.


23 posted on 01/29/2014 12:00:33 PM PST by vg0va3
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To: ealgeone
What can we learn from the snowstorm that has hit the south?
That people are stupid. But I guess that isn't new.
I live near Rochester NY and we know winter. We can get from 1"-8" of snow overnight just from lake effect. No big deal.
Do I expect the same from southern cities like Atlanta? Of course not. But this "storm" was predicted days before it happened and then dropped a few inches of snow.
Had the mayor declared an emergency a day before hand, most of this idiocy could have been avoided.
24 posted on 01/29/2014 12:17:59 PM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: binreadin

25 posted on 01/29/2014 12:20:07 PM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: ealgeone

As this is written, Atlanta is still in the throes of another winter weather situation. The TV is filled with images of major highways littered with abandoned vehicles. Many of their owners are stranded in make-shift shelters until warmer weather makes the roads passable again.

The governor and other officials just concluded a news conference to explain how the mess unfolded and that they’ve learned much from this experience.

One of the lessons they “learned” is that, once the potential severity of this event became obvious, dismissing public and private employees all at once to try to get home was a really bad idea as it is many of their abandoned vehicles now clogging the roads, making it impossible for the salt and sand trucks to do their thing.

How unfortunate that so many of these state officials and private business management folks seem to be slow learners. We’ve had a number of these events in years past and the result is the same: Hundreds of thousands of gallons of expensive fuel burned, multiple thousands of people stranded, some folks even dying in accidents or from exposure, etc.

There IS a sensible solution for at least SOME of these folks and the problems they faced, a solution that could also seriously curtail the massive and growing year round Atlanta traffic rush hour gridlock and, just incidentally, conserve that precious fuel and reduce the CO2 and other emissions the Algore and the other “climate change” charlatans insist causes “global warming” (despite growing evidence that they’re nuts).

In the 60s and 70s, Tom Peters, an American writer on business management practices, wrote and spoke extensively on what he called the “Electronic Cottage.” It was a very sensible proposal made possible by the coming of age of the electronic revolution.

In a nutshell, his proposal, even MORE sensible now that the electronic revolution has had 50 years to mature, is that, unless a worker’s occupation absolutely required that he leave his home each day to drive to where he performs his duties, the need for him to do so was becoming unnecessary. If he or she was one of the growing number of INFORMATION workers from whom an employer needed mainly or only an INFORMATION WORK PRODUCT, that product could just as easily be created in an “electronic cottage” in some small portion of his or her home.

If I have to explain the societal benefits of that, please stop reading now as you may be one of Obama’s no/low information folks and wouldn’t grasp how it would save vast amounts of valuable energy resources and human time as folks no longer would need to sit in stop and go rush hours breathing noxious fumes for several hours each day. If you are one of those whose job requires you to navigate a rush hour twice a day, try to imagine how YOUR rush hour experience might improve with half or more of the vehicles removed from the highways?

Speaking of noxious fumes, I sincerely believe that these big city rush hours and those noxious fumes are damaging our brains, exacerbating the dumbing down begun in the government schools to the point where 47% or so of us actually believed the BS laid down my Obama and put an unvetted, unqualified, Marxist community organizer in office – TWICE – and still haven’t noticed that his every act is designed to destroy America.

(I’m tempted to raise the issue of school busing but that’s a topic for another rant.)

There is another reason why Peters’ common sense proposal has not gained more traction. That is the ego driven flaw that dictates that the corporate guy who makes it up the food chain to a corner office feels the need to be able to periodically stroll from that office and gaze around at a mass of cubicle enclosed fellow humans and know that they are “his” people. Their absence from his sight would cause him to feel less important and secure.

And, speaking of security, it COULD come to pass that those above him in that food chain might begin to question just why HE is in that corner office. Can’t have that sort of thing now, can we, lest it ripple up and down the entire food chain.

So, while I don’t hold out much hope that the electronic cottage with all its many benefits will get any serious consideration, it is possible that coming events here might force it upon us.


26 posted on 01/29/2014 12:30:59 PM PST by Dick Bachert (Ignorance is NOT BLISS. It is the ROAD TO SERFDOM! We're on a ROAD TRIP!!)
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To: binreadin

Spot on.


27 posted on 01/29/2014 12:33:01 PM PST by armydawg505
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To: ealgeone

Sometimes doo doo happens. Sometimes the going gets tough. Americans use to just deal with it.

Now we seem to have to micro analyze every damned thing.

btw, I lived in Atlanta in the 80’s. Got a wife and got us gone. The area did not comport with the life style we aspired to.


28 posted on 01/29/2014 12:41:54 PM PST by don-o (He will not share His glory and He will NOT be mocked! Blessed be the name of the Lord forever!)
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To: oh8eleven

It’s true. Southerners have no idea how to prepare for or drive in ice and snow.
As you Notherners laugh and make fun of us, remember this;
New York and New Jersey were devastated by a Category 1 hurricane. Down South, we don’t even close the windows for a Cat 1 and kids use beach towels for sails as they skateboard around.
Also, no one ever retires and moves up North!


29 posted on 01/29/2014 1:32:26 PM PST by CPONav
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To: CPONav
Also, no one ever retires and moves up North!
That's because A) After 150 years, you still hate Yankees; B) You can't afford it.
30 posted on 01/29/2014 1:54:02 PM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: oh8eleven

Once it becomes hard work to stay warm in winter, there’s gonna be a large migration of the entitlement army to the south.


31 posted on 01/29/2014 1:55:39 PM PST by nascarnation (I'm hiring Jack Palladino to investigate Baraq's golf scores.)
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To: oh8eleven

I lived in Maine for 10 years.
After I came to my senses and moved to Florida, I vowed to never go back there in the winter.

People retire down South because they are tired of winter and the high COL.


32 posted on 01/29/2014 2:02:12 PM PST by CPONav
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To: nascarnation
Once it becomes hard work to stay warm in winter, there’s gonna be a large migration of the entitlement army to the south.
That's where they all came from many moons ago.
Factory work in the north from WWI thru WWII (and after) attracted their ancestors.
Now, there's no jobs, but plenty of Øbama phone users ... all headed "home."
33 posted on 01/29/2014 3:10:36 PM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: binreadin
I guarantee you that if the northern states didn’t use sand, gravel, salt and snowplows you would all be sliding around too.

You put on the snow tires, makes the difference.

34 posted on 01/29/2014 7:11:30 PM PST by xone
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