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Jimi Hendrix - The Wind Cries Mary - with Edward Hopper art
YouTube ^ | March 10, 2010 | Hendix, Hopper, BarryLyndon63

Posted on 02/09/2014 2:00:06 AM PST by deks

VIDEO: Jimi Hendrix sings "The Wind Cries Mary" in a montage with Edward Hopper paintings.

Taking a great song with poetic lyrics by Hendrix and combining it with great art by Hopper seems right, and I haven't found anything like it before.

The third Hopper painting shown is called "Nighthawks" and has been featured in past Freepathon threads. It looks like the paintings in the video have been processed with a photo effect that, while not unpleasant, is not the same as the original paintings.


TOPICS: Arts/Photography; Music/Entertainment; Poetry
KEYWORDS: edwardhopper; jimihendrix; music; poetry; youtube
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First thing when I look for a favorite song on YouTube...it has to be good audio quality. Then there is the visual aspect. Some just show a still photo of the album cover. Some show the label on the vinyl record and place it on a turntable, setting down the needle as the record spins. Some people gather various photos of the musicians.

But I think the effect here is that the mood of the Hopper paintings goes well with this song and the poetry of the lyrics. It's one of my favorite Hendrix songs, along with "Little Wing", "Hey Joe", "May This Be Love", "3rd Stone From The Sun", "Castles Made Of Sand", "Up From The Skies", and "Angel".

I like Hendrix's creativity as a songwriter with melody and lyric and his effective vocal delivery, as well as his artistry on the guitar.

1 posted on 02/09/2014 2:00:07 AM PST by deks
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From my dictionary:

Hendrix, Jimi (1942–70)
U.S. rock musician; full name James Marshall Hendrix. Remembered for the flamboyance and originality of his improvisations, he greatly widened the scope of the electric guitar. Notable songs: “Purple Haze” (1967) and “All Along the Watchtower” (1968).

Hopper, Edward (1882–1967)
U.S. realist painter. He is best known for his mature works, such as Early Sunday Morning (1930) and Nighthawks (1942), often depicting isolated figures in bleak scenes from everyday urban life.

2 posted on 02/09/2014 2:05:11 AM PST by deks (Sic Semper Tyrannis)
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The video link again (click at lower right to skip ad — it seems to default to its highest quality which is 480p). . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LK69zlAA4K0


3 posted on 02/09/2014 2:13:49 AM PST by deks (Sic Semper Tyrannis)
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Earth in Search of a Sun...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9DCGBMCajE


4 posted on 02/09/2014 2:17:27 AM PST by Gene Eric (Don't be a statist!)
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To: Windflier

ping


5 posted on 02/09/2014 2:17:48 AM PST by Gene Eric (Don't be a statist!)
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To: onyx

Freepathon reference bump :)


6 posted on 02/09/2014 2:31:46 AM PST by deks (Sic Semper Tyrannis)
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To: Gene Eric

Interesting you would link that. I still have Jan Hammer’s “The First Seven Days” album from 1975. Do I detect some Hendrix influence on Jeff Beck’s playing in this live performance?


7 posted on 02/09/2014 2:46:37 AM PST by deks (Sic Semper Tyrannis)
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To: deks; Windflier

>> Hendrix influence

Hey, maybe we should break out some Trower/Dewar from their the Chrysalis years...

Check out the NASA link I posted. It’s really cool.


8 posted on 02/09/2014 2:52:23 AM PST by Gene Eric (Don't be a statist!)
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To: Gene Eric

Yes, the very effective video montage of NASA clips and photos at #4. It works with the music. . .processed like a ‘light show’ effect in parts.


9 posted on 02/09/2014 3:02:28 AM PST by deks
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To: deks

I guess I never got it. My generation, yes but Jimi, Joplan, an Morrison
were the kind of drug cool people I didn’t care for then and don’t
now. The Doors had some good tunes but to hell with the “self
indulgent, misunderstood” artists who helped to point the way to
the drug culture of the 70s. I’m simple minded I guess but Motown,
Surf music, ballads, and “sober” Stones music worked well.


10 posted on 02/09/2014 3:04:18 AM PST by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: deks

I liked some of the music from Hendrix, although I could seldom understand any words. I totally dumped him when he trashed the National Anthem with that horrible guitar noise.

I also trash all others who violate the music of the Anthem when opening a sports event, in their vain attempts to make it “their” songs.

Would real musicians significantly alter Bach, Chopin, Beehtoven, Schubert, Clementi, etc., like whacked out druggies have done to the National Anthem and America the Beautiful at sports venues for 50 years?

Yeah... I know I’ll probably get flack from younger Freepers, who likely think the Beatles were innovative, even though the B’s, like that dolt Elvis, got their music from the Rythym and Blues musicians of the ‘40s-and ‘50s who were the greatest!


11 posted on 02/09/2014 3:07:22 AM PST by octex
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To: octex; Sivad

I like all that stuff y’all mentioned. I have an eclectic taste in music but I am selective, in that I look for quality whatever the style of music.


12 posted on 02/09/2014 3:25:41 AM PST by deks
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To: octex; deks
When Clapton met Hendrix - YouTube
13 posted on 02/09/2014 3:29:03 AM PST by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus sum -- "The Taliban is inside the building")
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To: deks

Great song and artwork in your Youtube link. You can tell the artist (ahem) admires the female form.


14 posted on 02/09/2014 5:19:32 AM PST by SkyPilot
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To: deks
When Eric Clapton met Jimi Hendrix


15 posted on 02/09/2014 5:27:44 AM PST by SkyPilot
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To: Tainan

Ha - we think alike! (see #15)


16 posted on 02/09/2014 5:28:17 AM PST by SkyPilot
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To: deks

bttt


17 posted on 02/09/2014 5:30:00 AM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: deks

I saw Hendrix do this live either in 68 or 69, (long time ago) when he had just come off the Monkee’s tour. I had to be dragged to the concert by my guitar player. It was mind-blowing. I had never seen a TRIO sound like a five-piece band. Hendrix was at his peak. A year later, I saw him again, and he was quite drugged out, could never tune his guitar, walked through the motions. But the first concert was a once-in-a-lifetime event. And yes, he played “Wind Cries Mary.”


18 posted on 02/09/2014 5:55:50 AM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: deks
BTW, if you want more on Hendrix, you might want to look at the book I did with Vanilla Fudge keyboardist Mark Stein, who toured with him. Hendrix was a paratrooper. He left the service, but there are at least three different and conflicting stories as to why he left. The most believable is the combination of two---that he (true) broke his ankle and that he (likely) just wanted to play his guitar.

Interestingly, just before his death he gave two interviews to Euro mags, about six months apart. Conservatives remember the second, which was pretty anti-war in general, but just a short time earlier he had chewed out the Euros over Vietnam, saying in essence we saved their butts, but they didn't want us helping the yellow man? It was brutal on the Euros. The consensus of both liberal and conservative music historians is that his mgt. got to him to tailor his story to Europe and Britain, but no one knows what happened. He generally had favorable things to say of his military service, and overall (a few exceptions) fond memories.

PS, the book is called "You Keep me Hangin' On."

19 posted on 02/09/2014 6:00:25 AM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: Sivad

Then you’ll like this story: I interviewed Tony Bongiovi (yes, Jon’s cousin) who owns/runs the Power Station recording studios in NY and FL. He was a teenage kid who was a genius mixer and wanted to be an engineer in the early 1960s, but in NY you had to have a college degree in electrical engineering to get a job at a studio. So somehow, he got hooked up with Motown, and he took a train every week to work at Motown-—the only white employee. Although young, he worked on almost all the great Motown hits of the Supremes, Temptations, Miracles, etc.


20 posted on 02/09/2014 6:02:51 AM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: octex
"Would real musicians significantly alter Bach, Chopin, Beehtoven, Schubert, Clementi, etc., like whacked out druggies have done to the National Anthem and America the Beautiful at sports venues for 50 years?"

Yes, and they have done so for years, sometimes to great effect. I love Hendrix's anthem.

BTW, my co author on Patriot's History of the US, Mike Allen, has interesting research that that "blues" music actually originated in the Mississippi Celtic folk songs as well as slave music---but was not all black, and certainly wasn't new. And, yah, the Beatles were incredibly innovative.

I have interviewed perhaps 100 musicians from the 60s/70s, including people who can play jazz like crazy (David Paich of Toto, for example) and with only two exceptions (Billy Joel and Keith Emerson) they ALL cited the Beatles as their most important influence. Most of them specifically stated they took up music when they heard "I want to hold your hand."

Music is a matter of taste, but I don't think anyone can deny that the Beatles were THE most important musical influence of the second half of the 20th century.

21 posted on 02/09/2014 6:07:20 AM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: SkyPilot
Hendrix was asked once who was better, him or Clapton. He said

"I'll play a lick, then Eric will play a lick, but Jeff Beck beats us both."

22 posted on 02/09/2014 6:08:12 AM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: LS; octex
The Beatles were one of THE significant negative influences on the American mind.

Taste, you say? Have you been suckered? Media was the handmaiden holding the hand. Where to? Their talents packaged estranged views. They churned love from saccharine to cynical. The were unbelievers in love,looking for a lost peace.

23 posted on 02/09/2014 6:30:01 AM PST by cornelis
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To: octex

Improvising on classical music was a very common practice up until the 1920s or so, Hendrix’ interpretation was part of a long standing tradition.


24 posted on 02/09/2014 6:31:57 AM PST by Borges
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To: octex

“got their music from the Rythym and Blues musicians of the ‘40s-and ‘50s who were the greatest!”

Totally agree. In my late 60’s now, born in NYC; but never abandoned my first love of DOOWOP. It wasn’t called that back in the day, the name was ‘coined’ by a mid-70’s DJ.


25 posted on 02/09/2014 6:33:07 AM PST by duckman (I'm part of the group pulling the wagon!)
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To: LS

This is getting interesting now. Thanks for the great stuff you added. I had wondered about your tagline before :)


26 posted on 02/09/2014 6:46:56 AM PST by deks
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To: duckman

What was it called back then :)


27 posted on 02/09/2014 6:48:21 AM PST by deks
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Comment #28 Removed by Moderator

To: cornelis

His organ?

He did have twenty children though, so maybe there weren’t any stops on it :)


29 posted on 02/09/2014 6:57:30 AM PST by deks
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To: deks
There are people today who do not want to talk about Obama’s negative influence on America because he's a handsome, successful, popular, black American.
30 posted on 02/09/2014 7:01:01 AM PST by cornelis
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To: deks

“What was it called back then :)”
Depends on how far you go back. In the 40’s it was called ‘sepia’ or ‘race’ music. It was written on the record label. In the 50s up to current days it is R’n’B. A NYC DJ, Gus Gossert had an ‘oldies’ radio program in the mid-70’s and called the music DOOWOP based upon back ground harmonies. Hope this helps.


31 posted on 02/09/2014 7:04:11 AM PST by duckman (I'm part of the group pulling the wagon!)
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To: cornelis

There are lots of articles about Obama here. Check this out. . .

http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/obama/index


32 posted on 02/09/2014 7:04:33 AM PST by deks
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To: deks

Manipulating something to the point of destruction—whether instruments or people—is a symptom of the very disease FR tries to resist.


33 posted on 02/09/2014 7:20:45 AM PST by cornelis
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To: duckman

Yes, that helps. And I’m thinking it would be Blues and Jazz before that. I’ve heard that Benny Goodman was the first white band leader to hire black musicians.


34 posted on 02/09/2014 7:37:01 AM PST by deks
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To: deks

Forgot to mention that many of the RnB artists of the 50s came from Gospel roots. One example that comes to mind is Sam Cooke.


35 posted on 02/09/2014 7:45:52 AM PST by duckman (I'm part of the group pulling the wagon!)
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To: onedoug

Ping


36 posted on 02/09/2014 7:52:05 AM PST by stylecouncilor
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To: stylecouncilor

“Scuse me while I kiss my a$$ goodbye....”


37 posted on 02/09/2014 8:23:39 AM PST by onedoug
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To: cornelis

Like I say, carp all you want. As a historian I’m telling you that the second half of the 20th century musically IS the Beatles. And if you go by who is “saved” or “lost,” I’m afraid you just cut out 90% of those classical musicians that you think are “good” music.


38 posted on 02/09/2014 8:48:57 AM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: LS

Saved, lost? What the hell are you talking about? I like good music, I don’t like destructive narcissists. Good grief LS.


39 posted on 02/09/2014 8:54:28 AM PST by cornelis
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To: Gene Eric
Hey, maybe we should break out some Trower/Dewar from their the Chrysalis years...

That music has really stood the test of time. I love every era of Trower's work, but that one era remains my favorite.



40 posted on 02/09/2014 9:16:09 AM PST by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: cornelis

Did you see this article just posted? I think your About page had a link to it...Ghent Altarpiece, by Jan van Eyck.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/3120988/posts?page=3#3


41 posted on 02/09/2014 9:36:19 AM PST by deks
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To: deks; JoeProBono; The Cajun
Freepathon reference bump :)

Thank you so much!

Joe Pro Bono and The Cajun have done marvelous things with the original, since I first posted it.

42 posted on 02/09/2014 10:14:44 AM PST by onyx (Please Support Free Republic - Donate Monthly! If you want on Sarah Palin's Ping List, Let Me know!)
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To: onyx


43 posted on 02/09/2014 11:05:11 AM PST by JoeProBono (SOME IMAGES MAY BE DISTURBING VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED;-{)
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To: y'all
If you like what Free Republic has to offer and want to help keep it running smoothly, then click this link and donate a few bucks.
Click To Donate!
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44 posted on 02/09/2014 11:24:23 AM PST by deks
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To: cornelis

Then you d hate Mozart and Beethoven.


45 posted on 02/09/2014 11:33:07 AM PST by Borges
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To: deks

Mainstream ain’t eclectic.


46 posted on 02/09/2014 11:41:00 AM PST by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious! We reserve the right to serve refuse to anyone!)
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To: deks
Sorry to see my post was deleted. If Hendrix is vulgar, perhaps pointing that out is vulgar.

At last Bach didn't simulate intercourse with his instruments and destroy them afterward.

47 posted on 02/09/2014 11:41:26 AM PST by cornelis
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To: Borges

Perhaps, and it would be my fault. But hatred is something else. Praise and blame are the traditional words.


48 posted on 02/09/2014 11:47:49 AM PST by cornelis
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To: cornelis

The culture has gone into the gutter in 100 years, when some pop group playing three chord disposable candy is considered the central monument of it. From Scott Joplin, and sheet music sold to people to played instruments at home, to mass produced silly tunes with kindergarten lyrics about holding hands.

At least, we still have the likes of Philip Glass, Steve Reich, and Yo Yo Ma (among others unknown to the Beatlemaniac “musicologists”) for the non-philistines.


49 posted on 02/09/2014 11:49:59 AM PST by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious! We reserve the right to serve refuse to anyone!)
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To: Gene Eric
Thanks for the ping, Gene.



50 posted on 02/09/2014 12:17:20 PM PST by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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