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Texas Treasures 2: He's 6' tall, wingspread 7 1/2', 'Ghost cat', Unchanged for 200M yrs
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department ^ | 2/16/14 | Patriot08

Posted on 02/16/2014 10:44:36 AM PST by patriot08

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Texas Treasures 2: The magnificent Whooping Crane


Reaching a height of 5 feet with a wingspread of 7 1/2 feet, it is one of the most majestic, magnificant and rare creatures on earth.

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Fantastic video:

Texas Country Reporter: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2C81bXu29I





Sadly, primarily through hunting and loss of habitat, the population of the magnificent whooping crane has gone from an estimated 10,000+ birds before the settling of Europeans on the continent to 1,300-1,400 birds by 1870- and down to to 15 adults by 1938.

However; thanks to conservation efforts of the Texas Parks and Wildlife, the Aransas National Wildlife Refuse (Tx) and a few others throughout the U.S, there are now an estimated 437 birds in the wild and more than 165 in captivity.

The tallest bird in North America, the whooping crane breeds in the wetlands of Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Canada. Here the cranes perform elaborate running, leaping, wing-flapping dances where mates are chosen for life. Both male and female share nesting duties. One of them is always on the nest. Frequently only one chick survives. Although the chick can leave the nest while still quite young, it is always protected and fed by its parents. Chicks are rust-colored when they hatch. At about four months, chick's feathers begin turning white. By the end of their first migration, they are brown and white, and as they enter their first spring, their plumage is white with black wing tips.

When summer ends, these migratory birds set out for the Gulf Coast of Texas, where they winter in the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.

Although whooping cranes mate for life, they will accept a new mate if one dies.

These birds are very long-lived. They can live up to 24 years in the wild.

The cranes live in family groups made up of the parents and 1 or 2 offspring.

Their diet consists of blue crabs, clams, frogs, minnows, rodents, and berries.

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/species/whooper

Get involved. Help these magnificent birds survive:

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/wildlife_diversity/texas_nature_trackers/whooper-watch/

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/species/whooper/



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Texas' very own 'lil fantom ketteh:

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Ocelot kittens

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This beautiful little cat once ranged as far east as Arkansas and Louisiana, throughout Texas and in Mexico. Today ocelots are currently found only in extreme southern Texas and northeastern Mexico.

The remnant U.S. ocelot population in south Texas has declined from 80-120 individuals in 1995 to less than 50 in recent years, with about half of ocelot deaths resulting from being hit by automobiles. Most surviving Texas ocelots are in the shrub lands remaining at or near the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge near Brownsville, where only 30-35 animals remain.

The ocelot is similar in appearance to a domestic cat although somewhat larger.

The ocelot ranges from 27 to 39 inches in length, plus 10 to 18 inches in tail length, and typically weighs 18 to 40 pounds.

Its fur resembles that of a clouded leopard or jaguar and was once regarded as very valuable. As a result, hundreds of thousands of ocelots were once killed for their fur. Hunting and loss of habitat have reduced these beautiful little cat's numbers to near extinction in North America. The Ocelot also usually gives birth to only one kitten although litters of two or three kittens also occur, but are not common. The small litter size and relative infrequency of breeding make the ocelot particularly vulnerable to extreme reduction in population.

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/pwdpubs/media/pwd_bk_w7000_0013_ocelot.pdf.

http://wn.com/ocelot_survival__texas_parks_and_wildlife_[official]

What's being done to save the 'lil Texas ketteh:

http://vetmed.tamu.edu/research/highlights/janecka%E2%80%99s-efforts-to-save-the-ocelot-population-in-texas#.UwA5c_ldWSo

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/wildlife_diversity/texas_rare_species/listed_species/mammals.phtml



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Texas Tortoise

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Texas Box Turtle


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Most of us Texans used to catch and play with these docile little creatures when we were kids, but when was the last time you saw a Texas box turtle or a Texas tortoise? They used to be found everywhere it seems-backyards, ranches, along roadways but now they are now getting hard to find. Sadly, they are rapidly going the way of our beloved horned lizard- headed eventually for extinction unless we help them.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife request reports of any sightings:

http://www.gctts.org/BTPT/wild-sighting.html.

These animals are a unique tie to a period of Earth's history all but lost in the living world. Turtles are some of the oldest reptilian species on the earth, virtually unchanged in in 200 million years or more. These slow moving, toothless, egg-laying creatures date back to the dinosaurs, and still retain traits they used to survive then.

Their low reproductive rate, exploitation by pet suppliers, loss of habitation and overuse of pesticides and other things have lead to a severe drop in population of these creatures. They have been put on a threatened list, affording them protection from being taken, possessed, transported, exported, sold, or offered for sale.

Please do what you can to help save our Texas treasures.


http://www.texasturtles.org/Turtles.pdf




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TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Education; Science
KEYWORDS: canada; endangered; kittyping; ocelot; texas; texasicons; whoopingcranes
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1 posted on 02/16/2014 10:44:36 AM PST by patriot08
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To: patriot08

A few Whooping cranes have been showing up here in Michigan over the last few years.


2 posted on 02/16/2014 10:47:22 AM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: All

.
Sorry I couldn’t make most of my links ‘live’.
Afraid you’ll need to copy and paste.
I’m not all that good with HTML. :)

.


3 posted on 02/16/2014 10:48:01 AM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

I wish we still had horny toads. Must be from Climate Change.


4 posted on 02/16/2014 10:53:40 AM PST by crusty old prospector
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To: patriot08
Sadly I read that 3 whooping cranes had been found shot recently.

If I could afford it I would add to that reward and throw in an old fashioned Oklahoma stomping for free.

5 posted on 02/16/2014 10:56:09 AM PST by fella ("As it was before Noah so shall it be again,")
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To: patriot08

They left out the Texas Horny Toad.
Wiped out by fire ants and the chemical pushers....


6 posted on 02/16/2014 10:56:21 AM PST by 9422WMR (: " Tolerance is the virtue of a man who has no convictions".)
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To: crusty old prospector
I wish we still had horny toads. Must be from Climate Change.

More likely it's the human introduced fire ants killing off their food source the old red ants.

7 posted on 02/16/2014 10:59:43 AM PST by fella ("As it was before Noah so shall it be again,")
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To: patriot08


8 posted on 02/16/2014 11:03:41 AM PST by JoeProBono (SOME IMAGES MAY BE DISTURBING VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED;-{)
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To: MeekOneGOP; Conspiracy Guy; DocRock; King Prout; Darksheare; OSHA; martin_fierro; NYC GOP Chick; ...

Ping to cat lovers..read about Texas’ beautiful little endangered wild cat.


9 posted on 02/16/2014 11:04:06 AM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

I’ve seen pink flamingos (I think that’s what they are) flying about down here in Texas. Also big vultures that swoop down for my dog. At least I think it was a vulture. Twas a huge thing, huge wing-span, middle of the night. Just came down and almost got my dog. Was gone after it failed.


10 posted on 02/16/2014 11:06:03 AM PST by Greetings_Puny_Humans (I mostly come out at night... mostly.)
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To: 9422WMR

My first ‘Texas Treasures’ was about the Texas horned lizard:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/3118606/posts

Thanks


11 posted on 02/16/2014 11:14:42 AM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08; Slings and Arrows; Glenn; republicangel; Beaker; BADROTOFINGER; etabeta; asgardshill; ...

12 posted on 02/16/2014 11:16:29 AM PST by Slings and Arrows (You can't have Ingsoc without an Emmanuel Goldstein.)
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To: Greetings_Puny_Humans

Sounds more like a barn owl.


13 posted on 02/16/2014 11:25:48 AM PST by gundog (Help us, Nairobi-Wan Kenobi...you're our only hope.)
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To: patriot08

Snad Hill Cranes (Sandys) were used here in Florida as substitute parents to Whooping Cranes. Cranes will lay another egg if the first is taken soon after laying. This makes possible using the first egg to double the annual reproductive rate but twice the number of parents are needed - enter the Sandys.

It works. In Brandon, Fl a pair of Sandys was raising a Whooper when the Gubment AgencyPersons had to intervene. Seems the Sandy parents were taking their Whooper juvenile to construction sites AT LUNCHTIME!

Mr & Mrs Birdbrain were smart enough to realize when the equipment stopped moving and the featherless bipeds got off, all they had to do was walk up and part of construction worker lunches was offered.

If one wants lots of any critter like birds, put the issue up for bids. Hatchery owners can raise any number of birds the market will pay for, and will also condition the birds for a fee. Better, faster, and cheaper than AgencyPersons, too.

Sand Hill Cranes were once numerous, were shot down to very low levels, and have rebounded to the extent there is(and should be) a hunting season.

Same could be for Whoopers.

What does America want, AgencyPersons or Whoopers?


14 posted on 02/16/2014 11:26:53 AM PST by GladesGuru (Islam Delenda Est - because of what Islam is and because of what Muslims do.)
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To: patriot08

Bump


15 posted on 02/16/2014 11:27:28 AM PST by Jet Jaguar
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To: crusty old prospector
I wish we still had horny toads. Must be from Climate Change.

We still have lots of them in New Mexico. Maybe the Texas kind were just not horny enough.

Incidentally for you city folk, they are not toads, they are actually lizards.

16 posted on 02/16/2014 11:33:59 AM PST by ProudFossil (" I never did give anyone hell. I just told the truth and they thought it was hell." Harry Truman)
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To: JoeProBono

LOL!

I SAW that documentary! It was pretty clever, the way they raised the crane babies without “human interaction.”


17 posted on 02/16/2014 11:40:57 AM PST by Monkey Face (Absinthe makes the heart grow fondue. ~~ Darksheare and NoCmpromiz)
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To: crusty old prospector; fella; All


Please see my first 'Texas Treasures' post which was on horned lizards (or 'horned frogs') as most of us call them- a little creature that is very close to my heart:

Texas Icons; The horned lizard

Katy




18 posted on 02/16/2014 11:41:10 AM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: cripplecreek

A few Whooping cranes have been showing up here in Michigan over the last few years

___________________________

That’s great. Thanks


19 posted on 02/16/2014 11:42:47 AM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: fella

Sadly I read that 3 whooping cranes had been found shot recently.

If I could afford it I would add to that reward and throw in an old fashioned Oklahoma stomping for free.
_____________________________________________

How sad that anyone would want to kill such a beautiful majestic creature.
Hope they find out who did it and throw the book at them.
Fines for killing them are pretty heavy.

.


20 posted on 02/16/2014 11:45:14 AM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: 9422WMR

The quail got wiped out by fire ants too.
Saw a gaggle of “Prairie chickens”? last summer


21 posted on 02/16/2014 11:47:12 AM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law and does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: Monkey Face

22 posted on 02/16/2014 11:53:04 AM PST by JoeProBono (SOME IMAGES MAY BE DISTURBING VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED;-{)
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To: Greetings_Puny_Humans
"I’ve seen pink flamingos (I think that’s what they are) flying about down here in Texas. Also big vultures that swoop down for my dog. At least I think it was a vulture. Twas a huge thing, huge wing-span, middle of the night. Just came down and almost got my dog. Was gone after it failed."

______________________

The pink birds were Roseate Spoonbills.. There's a lot of them around here:

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The bird that was after your dog was probably some kind of bird of prey like a huge hawk. Glad your dog's ok. Scary

23 posted on 02/16/2014 11:55:34 AM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: JoeProBono

Cool..seen those efforts to teach them to migrate.


24 posted on 02/16/2014 11:58:14 AM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: JoeProBono

:o])


25 posted on 02/16/2014 11:58:32 AM PST by Monkey Face (Absinthe makes the heart grow fondue. ~~ Darksheare and NoCmpromiz)
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To: cripplecreek
Several years ago I was hunting up in the thumb area when I saw a small flock of about 8 cranes flying south. Until then I had never seen or heard of cranes being in Michigan so I naturally thought they were geese at first.

But the more I watched them they were too long and their wings too long and narrow to be geese. Plus, they didn't sound like geese either.

So as soon as I got home, I checked the internet and sure enough they were cranes. I don't know which cranes they were tho......

26 posted on 02/16/2014 11:59:49 AM PST by Hot Tabasco (Was Occam's razor made by Gillette?)
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To: GladesGuru

Thanks for the input. Interesting.


27 posted on 02/16/2014 12:01:13 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: cripplecreek
A few Whooping cranes have been showing up here in Michigan over the last few years.

Evidently there's a large sanctuary over by Jackson where cranes congregate......

28 posted on 02/16/2014 12:02:04 PM PST by Hot Tabasco (Was Occam's razor made by Gillette?)
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To: patriot08
He's 6' tall, wingspread 7 1/2'

My first thought was a small NBA point guard....LOL!

29 posted on 02/16/2014 12:04:48 PM PST by Hot Tabasco (Was Occam's razor made by Gillette?)
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To: ProudFossil

And they do spit blood from their eyes. I picked one up once and it scared me to death.


30 posted on 02/16/2014 12:09:25 PM PST by Mercat
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To: ProudFossil; crusty old prospector

.
Tx horned lizards are different from Arizona horned lizards.
There’s a good discussion about that (and some very funny stuff and pics) on my first ‘Texas Treasures’ post:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/3118606/posts

.


31 posted on 02/16/2014 12:09:35 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: mylife

The quail got wiped out by fire ants too.

_______________________________

Wish they could eradicate those &*%#@ ants.
Are they all over Texas now?


32 posted on 02/16/2014 12:13:35 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08; Slings and Arrows

Thanks, y’all.

That’s a beautiful little cat. I like that little tortoise, too.


33 posted on 02/16/2014 12:17:29 PM PST by CatherineofAragon ((Support Christian white males----the architects of the jewel known as Western Civilization.))
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To: patriot08

Ah! That’s the bird! I really need to get educated about Texas wild-life!


34 posted on 02/16/2014 12:19:39 PM PST by Greetings_Puny_Humans (I mostly come out at night... mostly.)
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To: Hot Tabasco
Sandhill Cranes are everywhere around here.


35 posted on 02/16/2014 12:20:46 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Mercat

.

“And they do spit blood from their eyes. I picked one up once and it scared me to death”
______________________________

Yeah, they really do. I’ve seen it aimed at one of our dogs.
They only use this defense to confuse and frighten a predator as a last resort.
The blood is harmless but it’s mixed with some kind of chemical to taste very bad to anything that tries to eat it.

My mother always told us if they spit blood in your eyes that you’d go blind. (shades of A Christmas Story and the BB gun- LOL) She just told us that ‘cause she didn’t want us messing with them.

We’d pick them up and hold them away from us for a bit to let it relax.

They’re really quite docile. If you turn them over in your hand and rub their tummy, they’ll go to sleep. They get used to you quite rapidly.

.

.


36 posted on 02/16/2014 12:23:15 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: CatherineofAragon

They’re both cuties.


37 posted on 02/16/2014 12:25:05 PM PST by Slings and Arrows (You can't have Ingsoc without an Emmanuel Goldstein.)
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To: CatherineofAragon

“That’s a beautiful little cat. I like that little tortoise, too.”

_________________________

Aren’t they beautiful? Salvadore Dali had one as a pet. (Ocelot)


38 posted on 02/16/2014 12:26:14 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: Greetings_Puny_Humans

Ah! That’s the bird! I really need to get educated about Texas wild-life!

___________________________

They’re beautiful birds. ..especially in a group flying over. How pink they are depends on what they eat. :)


39 posted on 02/16/2014 12:28:11 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08

I read a book written by some exotic hunter that hunted with his pet cheetah and ocelot. I wish I could figure out the title or author. He also hunted with a blowgun in Africa. Cool stories.


40 posted on 02/16/2014 12:29:38 PM PST by Tailback
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To: fella
Human introduced fire ants?

I thought they were spread by the rising water and the floating debris pushed by a flooded river.

41 posted on 02/16/2014 12:30:47 PM PST by Ditter
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To: Tailback

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWPLMVcTozU


42 posted on 02/16/2014 12:33:16 PM PST by JoeProBono (SOME IMAGES MAY BE DISTURBING VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED;-{)
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To: cripplecreek

Sandhill Cranes are everywhere around here.

__________________________________________

Big, beautiful birds, too. They were almost wiped out by
idiot hunters, too- weren’t they?

I guess they slaughtered the cranes just for the fun of it.
You can’t eat one.
I know a lot of birds were slaughtered for their feathers for idiot women’s fashions.

.


43 posted on 02/16/2014 12:34:32 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: patriot08
We've been tickled to death to have a flock of 7 Whoopers spending time on our farm in southern Middle TN the past week. It's only the 2nd time I'm aware of they've been seen on the ground in our county, the other time being 3 or 4 years ago. They were only here a day or 2 that time. I've notified the FWS so they'd have the info for their records.

Our camera tends to blur things a little on 'zoom' but we've taken several pix of these magnificent birds each day. I snapped this one yesterday.....


44 posted on 02/16/2014 12:37:50 PM PST by radu (May God watch over our troops and keep them safe)
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To: patriot08

I’ve always lived here in their summer grounds so they seem fairly common to me. I like to listen to them in the mornings. Their trumpeting sounds kind of prehistoric echoing through the fog.


45 posted on 02/16/2014 12:40:12 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Slings and Arrows

.

Aren’t the Ocelots gorgeous?

To think that they were slaughtered by the thousands for their fur!

They are building ‘animal passages’ (large tunnels under the roads) in the small corner of Texas where these precious little creatures are still hanging on.
Many of them have been killed by cars.

.


46 posted on 02/16/2014 12:42:14 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: crusty old prospector

Toads are still horney here.


47 posted on 02/16/2014 12:43:06 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (Did the ancients know they were ancients? Or did they see themselves as presents?)
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To: Tailback

cool..if you think of it, let us know.


48 posted on 02/16/2014 12:44:48 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: JoeProBono

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWPLMVcTozU

_________________________________________

Wow. Amazing!


49 posted on 02/16/2014 12:48:32 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: radu

We’ve been tickled to death to have a flock of 7 Whoopers spending time on our farm in southern Middle TN the past week.
______________________________

Wonderful! Keep a watch on them.
Good you notified the proper authorities. :)


50 posted on 02/16/2014 12:51:07 PM PST by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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