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Vidalia Onions: The Best Thing to Buy, The Best Ways to Eat It—Now!
Yahoo ^ | 4-8-14 | Julia Bainbridge

Posted on 04/10/2014 12:31:09 AM PDT by kingattax

The sweet little Vidalia onion is causing quite a stir in Georgia, where some growers tried to ship the product earlier than the legal April 21 start date. “[T]here is trouble in the onion fields,” reported the New York Times, thus creating our favorite sentence that was ever written anywhere.

But we digress. Vidalias are a sure sign of spring—they’re available from late April through mid September—and because they’re sweet, delicate, and low on tear-causing pyruvic acid, they don’t need to be cooked to death. They shine when they’re coaxed with a light touch; a quick pickle, say, or a few-minute char on the grill.

(Excerpt) Read more at yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Food
KEYWORDS:
doggone good onyuns
1 posted on 04/10/2014 12:31:09 AM PDT by kingattax
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To: kingattax

There were what looked like Vidalia onions at a local store near Pittsburgh today. I could swear they were Vidalias.


2 posted on 04/10/2014 1:51:28 AM PDT by prisoner6 (I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered! I AM A FREE MAN!)
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To: kingattax

Who the hell comes up with a fixed delivery date for an item dependent on nature to mature ? Must be a democrat on Obama’s orders.


3 posted on 04/10/2014 2:36:37 AM PDT by mosesdapoet (Serious contribution pause.Please continue onto meaningless venting no one reads.)
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To: kingattax

One of my favorite camping recipes: Take a Vidalia onion, core it, but leave the bottom where the root was attached in tact. You’re trying to make a pocket in the center of the onion. Pour in some soy sauce, a little salt and pepper to taste, then triple wrap it with foil. Toss it in the campfire coals and cover it good. You can also triple wrap ‘taters and cook them in the coals, too. By the time your main course is ready the onion will be cooked to perfection. If you use real Vidalias it’ll be so sweet you won’t need desert.


4 posted on 04/10/2014 4:42:14 AM PDT by Thermalseeker (If ignorance is bliss how come there aren't more happy people?)
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To: Thermalseeker

More sugar in a good onion than an apple!


5 posted on 04/10/2014 4:46:48 AM PDT by djf (OK. Well, now, lemme try to make this clear: If you LIKE your lasagna, you can KEEP your lasagna!)
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To: kingattax

Noonday onions are the best

http://www.noondaysweetonions.com/

1


6 posted on 04/10/2014 4:55:35 AM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: kingattax

I always thought Texas sweet onions were better and that’s all we buy.


7 posted on 04/10/2014 4:59:55 AM PDT by MomwithHope (Let's make Mark Levin's The Liberty Amendments a reality!)
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To: MomwithHope

Walla Walla Sweets are the best.


8 posted on 04/10/2014 5:05:32 AM PDT by SeaHawkFan
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To: SeaHawkFan

I’d try them but we don’t see them here in west Michigan.


9 posted on 04/10/2014 5:08:39 AM PDT by MomwithHope (Let's make Mark Levin's The Liberty Amendments a reality!)
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To: kingattax

Always look forward to Vidalia season. Best onion of the planet. IMO.


10 posted on 04/10/2014 5:15:13 AM PDT by Ray54
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To: kingattax
"Vidalia onions are the best, Jerry, the best!"


11 posted on 04/10/2014 5:36:45 AM PDT by Flick Lives ("I can't believe it's not Fascism!")
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To: MomwithHope

The Texas 1015 used to be called the Texas Vidalia, but they had to change it because I think the Vidalia is trademarked.


12 posted on 04/10/2014 5:58:16 AM PDT by AirForce-TechSgt ("The American Indians found out what happens when you don't control immigration.")
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To: MomwithHope

Still a little early for them to be in the stores. They should be in the stores by mid-June.


13 posted on 04/10/2014 6:15:37 AM PDT by SeaHawkFan
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To: mosesdapoet
Who the hell comes up with a fixed delivery date for an item dependent on nature to mature?

The federal Vidalia Onion Committee and the State of Georgia.

I'm not kidding.

As Vidalia onions became more popular and valuable, farmers further and further away from Vidalia began to market their onions as Vidalia onions. Farmers close to Vidalia wanted to limit the region that could legally market onions as Vidalia onions. Farmers further removed from Vidalia wanted to cash in on the Vidalia onion market.

In 1986, the Georgia legislature compromised, giving the Vidalia onion legal status and defining a 20-county production area.

In 1989, Vidalia onion producers established Federal Marketing Order No. 955 for the crop. This USDA program created the Vidalia Onion Committee and extended the definition of a Vidalia onion to the federal level.

14 posted on 04/10/2014 6:24:05 AM PDT by Scoutmaster (Is it solipsistic in here, or is it just me?)
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To: prisoner6

Texas sells the same variety under the name ‘Texas Sweets’ or something like that. Hubby bought a bunch the other day and we’ve been face down in them since.


15 posted on 04/10/2014 6:25:40 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Thermalseeker

I’ll sometimes do pretty much the same onion recipe in the oven, but I use Dale’s steak marinade and a little butter instead of soy sauce. (Dale’s is soy sauce-based, if you haven’t tried it before)

The onions go great with a grilled steak. Now I’ve made myself very hungry... lol

BTW, if you marinade steak or chicken in a mixture of Dale’s sauce and pineapple juice, you end up with a great teriyaki marinade. I don’t marinade any meat in straight Dale’s for more than 4 hours or so because it is too strong.


16 posted on 04/10/2014 7:39:48 AM PDT by Fletcher J
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To: kingattax

If they aren’t from Bland Farms in Glennville, Ga, you aren’t getting the best. Glennville is in the “VIdalia” range. (That’s VIdalia with a capital “VI”)

The best way to get them is have them delivered by UPS as soon as they can be got.


17 posted on 04/10/2014 8:30:31 AM PDT by Conan the Librarian (The Best in Life is to crush my enemies, see them driven before me, and the Dewey Decimal System)
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To: kingattax

I’ve seen Vandalia onions in the market. An obvious attempt to cash in on the popularity of Vidalia onions.

I live in Illinois, Vandalia is a small town in southern Illinois.


18 posted on 04/10/2014 2:32:12 PM PDT by Graybeard58 (God is not the author of confusion. 1 Cor 13: 33)
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To: Black Agnes

It’s not so much the variety of onion that makes a Vidalia mild and sweet, it’s the soil conditions. You could plant the very same onion in different soil and have it come out tasting much stronger. Sort of like planting hydrangeas in acidic soil versus alkaline soil results in the plant blooming blue, pink or purple. Some people enjoy putting lime on one side of the plant to have a multicolored hydrangea.


19 posted on 04/10/2014 2:37:06 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

True. But supposedly there are part of TX with similar soil content that can grow equally sweet onions. The Texas Sweets we buy seem to be just about as sweet as the Vidalias. Any sulfur content in the soil seems to be the bad thing WRT sweet onions.


20 posted on 04/10/2014 2:40:39 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Thermalseeker; ken5050; miss marmelstein
Thanks for the recipe. A Vidalia thread w/ no recipes is like a morning w/out coffee. Here's my recipe.

HONEY GLAZED VIDALIAS / food.com / grower's recipe
Place 4 large peeled onion halves, cut sides down, in square baking dish, drizzle with tbl water. Cover with foil; bake 350 deg 30 minutes. Turn onions over. Brush w/ 1/2 of the Honey Glaze. Bake tender, uncovered, til tender, basting with rest of Glaze after 15 minutes.

HONEY GLAZE Mix 1/4 cup honey, tablespoon melted butter, teaspoon paprika, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon curry powder, 1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper flakes.

21 posted on 04/11/2014 5:11:01 AM PDT by Liz
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To: Black Agnes

1015 > Vidalia (Homer alert)


22 posted on 04/11/2014 5:18:36 AM PDT by catfish1957 (Face it!!!! The government in DC is full of treasonous bastards)
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To: RegulatorCountry
It’s not so much the variety of onion that makes a Vidalia mild and sweet, it’s the soil conditions. You could plant the very same onion in different soil and have it come out tasting much stronger.

Correct the soil does make a difference not only in the onions but in watermelons , if ever in Louisiana and you see a Water Town melon ,its the sweetest you'll ever have.

23 posted on 04/11/2014 5:29:22 AM PDT by piroque ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act")
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