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New Meteor Shower from Comet Could Dazzle Stargazers Next Week
Space.com ^ | May 12, 2014 06:50am ET | Nola Taylor Redd,

Posted on 05/12/2014 10:02:22 PM PDT by BenLurkin

A new meteor shower spawned by a comet is due to light up the sky next week, with some forecasters predicting up to 200 "shooting stars" per hour — a potentially spectacular opening act for the meteor display.

If it performs as expected, the never-before-seen Camelopardalid meteor shower is due to peak overnight on May 23 and 24 as the Earth passes through a debris stream left by the Comet 209P/LINEAR nearly 200 years ago. The new meteor display could rival the brilliance of the annual Perseid meteor shower that graces the night sky each August.

(Excerpt) Read more at space.com ...


TOPICS: Astronomy
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 05/12/2014 10:02:22 PM PDT by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin
Camelopardalid

It's going to be fun watching the news reporters try to pronounce that one.

2 posted on 05/12/2014 10:09:00 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

3 posted on 05/12/2014 10:11:56 PM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (Resist We Much)
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To: BenLurkin

That will be only a down payment in reparations for comet Ison.


4 posted on 05/12/2014 10:19:07 PM PDT by Telepathic Intruder (The only thing the Left has learned from the failures of socialism is not to call it that)
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To: BenLurkin

Exciting! Thanks for posting.


5 posted on 05/12/2014 10:45:04 PM PDT by 1035rep
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To: RegulatorCountry

Let’s see how Al Sharpton does with it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhw5MgCBwf8


6 posted on 05/12/2014 11:02:03 PM PDT by F15Eagle (1Jn4:15;5:4-5,11-13;Mt27:50-54;Mk15:33-34;Jn3:17-18,6:69,11:25,14:6,20:31;Ro10:8-11;1Tm2:5-6;Ti3:4-7)
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To: BenLurkin

Viewing satisfaction is inversely proportional to media hyped expectations. Hoping this pans out, but not holding my breath.

I’ve seen (barely, or almost) too many fizzled “possible” comets of the century/lifetime to get excited about a hypothetical new meteor shower of “possible” storm proportions.

I’ve also seen some fantastic displays, especially of Leonids, and Perseids; and 3 or 4 truely stunning comets; and a couple of daytime/twilight fireballs: it isn’t the sky that disappoints, but the failure to come anywhere near what the hype leads one to expect to see.

Going out and laying in a field in the summer, and seeing a dozen nice meteors in a 90 or so minute period is awesome...unless all the sites and articles kept insisting there “should be” 40-60 per hour.

Oh, wait! There WERE 40-60 per hour, but the hypers failed to mention that most wouldn’t be visible to the naked eye; but if you listened in on the meteor radar broadcast, you could definitely hear their ‘piiiiings!’ Watching a meteor shower on the radio is really pretty disappointing to the average viewer.


7 posted on 05/13/2014 1:24:06 AM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: BenLurkin

I’ll be vacationing in the desert next week. I plan to see this one.


8 posted on 05/13/2014 2:18:50 AM PDT by grimalkin (We are a nation under God. If we ever forget this, we are a nation gone under. -Ronald Reagan)
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To: ApplegateRanch

About a trillion radio meteors enter the atmosphere daily. A bane for HF OTH radar, btw.

I don’t know if they mentioned it, but this shower will peak about 07:00 UTC, or about 03:00 ET. It will be best seen in the northeastern US and Southern Canada.

The radiant is about 10 degrees (a fists width) away from Polaris (the north star). If you think of the radiant as the hour hand of a clock moving around Polaris, it moves from about the 8:30 to the 6:30 position between 02:00 and 04:00 ET.

Wishing all clear skies and good views.


9 posted on 05/13/2014 3:59:09 AM PDT by Lonesome in Massachussets (This is known as "bad luck". - Robert A. Heinlein)
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To: BenLurkin

Cool. Thanks.


10 posted on 05/13/2014 4:57:30 AM PDT by Bigg Red (1 Pt 1: As he who called you is holy, be holy yourselves in every aspect of your conduct.)
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To: ApplegateRanch

The best meteor show I’ve seen was the Perseids, from high in the Wind River Mountains back in 1998. I saw one tremendous flaming fireball at dusk. Spectacular.


11 posted on 05/13/2014 10:37:50 AM PDT by Professional Engineer (No $#@t there I was...)
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To: Professional Engineer

We watched the 1998 Leonids from a dark location here in the Black Hills. They were spectacular, even though relatively low on our horizon. Exploding fireball after exploding fireball, lighting up the interior of the truck (it was cold!), casting distinct shadows, and sounding like distant artillery.

Never seen or heard anything like it, before or since.


12 posted on 05/13/2014 3:34:33 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: ApplegateRanch

How does one listen to meteors?


13 posted on 05/13/2014 3:40:56 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: Lurker

http://www.amsmeteors.org/ams-programs/radio-observing/

http://www.imo.net/radio

http://www.popastro.com/meteor/observingmeteors/radioobserving/index.php


14 posted on 05/13/2014 4:01:06 PM PDT by Lonesome in Massachussets (This is known as "bad luck". - Robert A. Heinlein)
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To: Lonesome in Massachussets

Thank you very much.


15 posted on 05/13/2014 4:26:12 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: Lurker
On the Web, you can "tune in" to meteor radar broadcasts to listen to the pings.

This is one of them: Listen to radar echoes from satellites and meteors, live on listener-supported Space Weather Radio.

I believe there are other equally exciting and informative sites on the Web, where one can watch wall paper dry or grass grow.

16 posted on 05/14/2014 12:10:13 AM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: ApplegateRanch

Thank you.


17 posted on 05/14/2014 5:23:32 AM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: grimalkin

Sounds like the perfect place to star gaze and watch a meteor shower. God blessed you with a great opportunity to see the heavens declare His glory!


18 posted on 05/14/2014 5:27:55 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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