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Urban growth: bio-bricks offer a whiff of the future
newscientist.com ^ | 18:00 25 July 2014 by , | Brendan Byrne

Posted on 07/28/2014 8:44:31 AM PDT by BenLurkin

A sweeping tower made from over 10,000 bio-waste bricks bound with fungal fibre has been growing in the courtyard of MoMA PS1, an offshoot of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York. Looking like something between a three-headed grain silo, Zhang Huan's Three Legged Buddha and a Berlin flak tower, Hy-Fi is the winner of this year's MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP), and its organic aesthetic clashes hard with the museum's red-brick frontage and the green-glass Citicorp building behind.

This is appropriate. As the brainchild of environmentally conscious architects The Living, Hy-Fi is no corporate monolith or repurposed temple of high culture. Principal architect David Benjamin calls it a "prototype for the architecture of the future". Grown from local agricultural waste with almost no carbon emissions, Hy-Fi is designed to be composted, save for a few beams made of reclaimed wood and steel. (A side exhibit shows the distinct stages of the bricks' decomposition.) Hy-Fi isn't meant to blend with its human surroundings, so much as with the urban ecosystem.

...

Right now, Hy-Fi is an environmentally friendly chill-tent for urban partygoers. But it is possible, as you wander through this loamy, shady space, to catch the scent of a much bigger opportunity.

(Excerpt) Read more at newscientist.com ...


TOPICS: Weird Stuff
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 07/28/2014 8:44:31 AM PDT by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin
I laid a bio-waste brick this morning ...
2 posted on 07/28/2014 8:46:53 AM PDT by ConservingFreedom (A goverrnment strong enough to impose your standards is strong enough to ban them.)
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To: BenLurkin

“bio-waste brick”

What do they scoop them out of the john?


3 posted on 07/28/2014 8:47:06 AM PDT by ETL 2
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To: BenLurkin

I hadn’t hear there was a brick clay shortage.


4 posted on 07/28/2014 8:48:06 AM PDT by DManA
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To: BenLurkin

This is what we have come to?

From building the Empire State Building to piling up wads of garbage.


5 posted on 07/28/2014 8:48:07 AM PDT by dsc (Any attempt to move a government to the left is a crime against humanity.)
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To: ConservingFreedom

Mine was more like an Obama.


6 posted on 07/28/2014 8:48:40 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: BenLurkin
agricultural waste

These are environmentalists? There is no such thing as agricultural waste. All vegetable matter can be composted and used to enrich the soil.

7 posted on 07/28/2014 8:49:39 AM PDT by DManA
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To: Gaffer

“Mine was more like an Obama.”

Hence the new Oxford Dictionary term, “Taking a bodacious Obama.”


8 posted on 07/28/2014 8:51:05 AM PDT by Da Coyote
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To: BenLurkin
. . . bound with fungal fibre . . .

I have to ask just how good the fungal fibre is going to hold up after the first drenching rain. I'm guessing it is not going to smell so good either.

9 posted on 07/28/2014 8:54:10 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: BenLurkin
Right now, Hy-Fi is an environmentally friendly chill-tent for urban partygoers.

I wonder if the author realizes that he's come up with a metaphor to describe the entire environmental movement - a chill-tent for urban partygoers.
10 posted on 07/28/2014 8:56:40 AM PDT by chrisser (Senseless legislation does nothing to solve senseless violence.)
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To: BenLurkin

lots of hype, few specifics. my guess is that this wont’ work in the real world...just sayin’


11 posted on 07/28/2014 8:58:52 AM PDT by camle (keep an open mind and someone will fill it full of something for you)
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To: chrisser

Excellent!


12 posted on 07/28/2014 9:05:26 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: BenLurkin

How long before they discover that bio-bricks are toxic and cause cancer?


13 posted on 07/28/2014 9:05:52 AM PDT by Dr. Thorne ("Don't be afraid. Just believe." - Mark 5:36)
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To: BenLurkin

14 posted on 07/28/2014 9:07:04 AM PDT by Dallas59
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To: BenLurkin

So, would a sh!^-brick house be more cost effective and environmentally friendly than adobe?


15 posted on 07/28/2014 9:10:00 AM PDT by Mike Darancette (Do The Math)
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To: BenLurkin

His building looks like a big ginger root.


16 posted on 07/28/2014 9:24:53 AM PDT by Avid Coug
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To: BenLurkin

” Ecovative, the sustainable bio-materials firm partnering with The Living, can grow the bricks in approximately five days from agricultural by-products such as corn stalks held together with mycelium – the vegetative matter of mushrooms. “

These bricks are not made from waste products, but from stuff grown from agricultural by-products. The waste stream discussion is off base.

But the idea of creating bricks from garbage is not a new one. Back in the early 1970s there was a contestant on What’s My Line who had invented a brick product made from super compressing garbage into brick like blocks.

I have always taken my conservatism form the concept of conservation. As an early teenage, I was intrigued by ideas like this. I do not support government funding development of products like this, but I do encourage capitalist to work on these types of innovations.

I suspect they came across the toxicity issue with garbage very quickly.


17 posted on 07/28/2014 9:28:15 AM PDT by Steven Scharf
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To: BenLurkin


18 posted on 07/28/2014 9:31:00 AM PDT by TangoLimaSierra (To win the country back, we need to be as mean as the libs say we are.)
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To: Da Coyote

A favorite saying once was, “If the truth were known, we’d zit a brick”. Never thought they’d be used in construction, must be the Obama library.


19 posted on 07/28/2014 9:52:07 AM PDT by BTCM (Death and destruction is the only treaty Muslims comprehend.)
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To: BenLurkin

“Honey, what’s that smell?”


20 posted on 07/28/2014 10:10:01 AM PDT by moovova
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To: TangoLimaSierra

The only good thing in that picture — is wearing green shorts.


21 posted on 07/28/2014 11:43:16 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: ConservingFreedom

“I laid a bio-waste brick this morning...”

TMI, TMI! LOL!


22 posted on 07/28/2014 11:58:03 AM PDT by MplsSteve
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To: Steven Scharf

“I do not support government funding development of products like this, but I do encourage capitalist to work on these types of innovations.”

Same here.

I appreciate any person who develops a product (yes, even bio-bricks) that helps fill a nice, employs people to produce it and can make a profit off of it.


23 posted on 07/28/2014 12:00:43 PM PDT by MplsSteve
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To: Steven Scharf

The issue is that grain stubble is not garbage. If you remove it from the field, you will have to replace the nutrients that you remove with it. Farmers learned that long ago. So instead of making bricks from topsoil, why not stick with making bricks from clay?

Its not like we are running out of clay.


24 posted on 07/28/2014 12:50:54 PM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: SampleMan

I was merley pointing out two things, one the bricks the article discusses are not made from bio-waste as intimated by posters and two, that the idea of bricks made from waste products, ie. trash has been around for 40 years.


25 posted on 07/28/2014 8:23:43 PM PDT by Steven Scharf
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