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Iranian Alert -- January 4, 2004 -- IRAN LIVE THREAD --Americans for Regime Change in Iran
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 1.4.2004 | DoctorZin

Posted on 01/04/2004 12:01:15 AM PST by DoctorZIn

The US media almost entirely ignores news regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran. As Tony Snow of the Fox News Network has put it, “this is probably the most under-reported news story of the year.” But most American’s are unaware that the Islamic Republic of Iran is NOT supported by the masses of Iranians today. Modern Iranians are among the most pro-American in the Middle East.

There is a popular revolt against the Iranian regime brewing in Iran today. Starting June 10th of this year, Iranians have begun taking to the streets to express their desire for a regime change. Most want to replace the regime with a secular democracy. Many even want the US to over throw their government.

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movement in Iran from being reported. Unfortunately, the regime has successfully prohibited western news reporters from covering the demonstrations. The voices of discontent within Iran are sometime murdered, more often imprisoned. Still the people continue to take to the streets to demonstrate against the regime.

In support of this revolt, Iranians in America have been broadcasting news stories by satellite into Iran. This 21st century news link has greatly encouraged these protests. The regime has been attempting to jam the signals, and locate the satellite dishes. Still the people violate the law and listen to these broadcasts. Iranians also use the Internet and the regime attempts to block their access to news against the regime. In spite of this, many Iranians inside of Iran read these posts daily to keep informed of the events in their own country.

This daily thread contains nearly all of the English news reports on Iran. It is thorough. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary. The news stories and commentary will from time to time include material from the regime itself. But if you read the post you will discover for yourself, the real story of what is occurring in Iran and its effects on the war on terror.

I am not of Iranian heritage. I am an American committed to supporting the efforts of those in Iran seeking to replace their government with a secular democracy. I am in contact with leaders of the Iranian community here in the United States and in Iran itself.

If you read the daily posts you will gain a better understanding of the US war on terrorism, the Middle East and why we need to support a change of regime in Iran. Feel free to ask your questions and post news stories you discover in the weeks to come.

If all goes well Iran will be free soon and I am convinced become a major ally in the war on terrorism. The regime will fall. Iran will be free. It is just a matter of time.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iaea; iran; iranianalert; iranquake; protests; southasia; studentmovement; studentprotest
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

1 posted on 01/04/2004 12:01:16 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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2 posted on 01/04/2004 12:02:41 AM PST by Support Free Republic (I'd rather be sleeping. Let's get this over with so I can go back to sleep!)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

3 posted on 01/04/2004 12:04:37 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
U.S. Should Forgo Animosity Toward Iran: Intelligence Minister

January 03, 2004
Mehr News Agency
mehrnews.com

TEHRAN -- In response to the recent remarks of U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell and Washington's temporary lifting of certain sanctions on Iran, Intelligence Minister Ali Yunesi said that Iran's problem with the United States is a security matter rather than a political or economic matter.

Yunesi added that the U.S. government has still not accepted the reality of the Islamic Republic of Iran.

He stressed that the current U.S. administration has been making relentless efforts to weaken and destroy the Islamic Republic, adding that the U.S. has established a fund for counterrevolutionary groups, started a radio service to destabilize the Islamic Republic, and formally announced that Iran is part of an "axis of evil".

"Therefore it has become obvious that U.S. officials have security problems with Iran, and so long as this viewpoint exists, no problem will be solved," Yunesi said.

He stated that Washington's recent measures are politicized, adding that the U.S. is attempting to appease Iranian nationals residing in the United States.

He added that an influential group of people in the U.S. who are allies of Iran began calling for the U.S. to provide assistance to the country after the disastrous earthquake struck the southeastern city of Bam.

Yunesi said that the Iranian government recognizes these people as its citizens.

"However, the government of President George W. Bush needs their votes and has taken the recent measures in order to obtain them," he added.

Yunesi said that Iran has accepted humanitarian aid for the quake-stricken city of Bam from all countries except Israel, adding that Iran-U.S. relations can only be improved if Washington forgoes its animosity toward Iran.

He went on to say that if the U.S. proves in practice that it is not the enemy of Iran, that would pave the way for Iran to accept its other claims.

Yunesi stated that Washington's animosity toward Iran is clearly illustrated by its efforts to continue its support of the Mujahedeen Khalq Organization (MKO) as well as the fact that it has arrested and kidnapped Iranian citizens in Iraq.

"The U.S. takes an antagonistic stance wherever Iran's interests are at stake. This shows that the country, or at least its current officials, is against the Islamic Republic of Iran," Yunesi said.

The minister referred to the decision made by the Iraqi Governing Council to expel members of the MKO, adding that Washington is attempting to find them somewhere to relocate to.

Yunesi stressed that any country that receives members of the MKO has openly announced its blatant animosity toward the Iranian nation and government.

Yunesi also spoke to reporters about the latest discussions between the Intelligence Ministry and the executive and supervisory electoral boards on the primary and secondary tasks of the Intelligence Ministry and said that the ministry is preparing for close cooperation with electoral institutions.

Yunesi stated that one of the most important responsibilities of the Intelligence Ministry in the upcoming elections is responding to various institutions' inquiries about the candidates.

He said that the Intelligence Ministry is tasked with responding to inquiries about candidates because it possesses documents from the pre-revolution era and that clarification of some issues is within the legal mandate of the ministry.

He said that in response to inquiries about candidates, the Intelligence Ministry has provided some information on their background, but has not attempted to disqualify them, adding that the electoral boards are the bodies authorized to either confirm or reject candidates' qualifications.

http://www.mehrnews.com/wfNewsDetails_en.aspx?NewsID=49297&t=Political
4 posted on 01/04/2004 12:06:24 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn

5 posted on 01/04/2004 12:07:00 AM PST by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn
Groups Raise $1M for Iran Quake Victims

January 03, 2004
The Associated Press
Laura Wides

LOS ANGELES - Iranian-American groups have raised more than $1 million to help victims of last week's deadly earthquake in Iran, money that some hope will improve relations between the countries.

"I am hoping out of this to have a new relationship going on between the United States and the Iranian government," said Reza Dehbozorgi, head of the Iranian Professionals Association of South Florida.

The 6.6-magnitude earthquake, which killed at least 30,000 people, prompted a nationwide effort by both Iranians and Muslims in general to send relief.

President Bush, who has said Iran is part of an international "axis of evil," lifted sanctions for 90 days to allow aid to reach victims. Washington and Tehran have had no diplomatic relations since militants seized the U.S. embassy in the Iranian capital in 1979.

The Southfield, Mich.-based Muslim charity Life for Relief and Redevelopment sent seven tons of food and children's clothing immediately after the quake and plans to send medical supplies.

In Los Angeles, home to a third of the nation's 277,000 Iranian immigrants, the Iranian Muslim Association of North America raised more than $800,000 in pledges during a telethon. The association said it expected about 1,000 people to attend a memorial service Sunday.

"When you see those pictures, it doesn't matter if it's your relatives or your family. Everyone wants to help," said the association's president, Sadegh Namazikhah.

Still, an indication that U.S.-Iran relations remain strained came Friday when Iran rejected a U.S. proposal to send a humanitarian aid delegation led by Sen. Elizabeth Dole, the former head of the Red Cross.

Iran said it prefers that the delegation be "held in abeyance" because of the current situation on the ground; the U.S. government said it didn't consider the rejection political.

But some in the U.S. Iranian community don't believe there should be rapprochement until Iran's Muslim fundamentalist government is replaced by a different leadership.

"There's a mixed reaction to the Bush proposal to lift the embargo because people who are political opponents think this will help Bush and the regime get together, and this will stabilize the regime more," said Los Angeles-based journalist Homa Sarshar.

She also said some Iranian immigrants are concerned that money sent by smaller groups may end up with the government.

"They don't know if it will reach the people," Sarshar said. "Everybody is waiting to see what is going to happen."

Namazikhah, the president of the Iranian Muslim Association, said his group's first objective is to build a hospital in Iran to replace the ones that were destroyed. But he acknowledged it would be difficult to complete a hospital in the three months the federal government has allowed.

Aid organizations say some groups could run into problems because they are not accustomed to working with governments.

"This typically happens with overseas communities that come from countries that are not in favor with Washington," said Richard Walden, head of Operation USA, a Los Angeles-based international relief agency. "They are used to sending money to their families, but they don't realize they have less leeway with the Iranian government or the U.S. government in terms of aid for things like schools or hospitals."

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=540&ncid=736&e=7&u=/ap/20040103/ap_on_re_mi_ea/iran_earthquake_donations
6 posted on 01/04/2004 12:07:30 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
In Iran's Disaster, an Opening for the Opposition

December 31, 2003
The Washington Post
Nora Boustany

Azar Nafisi, a lecturer at Johns Hopkins University who left Iran in 1997, says it took a natural disaster such as the devastating earthquake at Bam to cast the harshest light yet on the failings of the Iranian government.

Nafisi, who has been a consistent critic of the Iranian government, is the author of "Reading Lolita in Tehran," a memoir about repression and limits on freedom of expression in the wake of the 1979 Iranian revolution.

She said that the depth of the Bam tragedy was whipping up anger about the lack of preventive measures by the government, laxity in issuing construction permits and the leaders' general hypocrisy. The quake struck Bam, a city of 80,000 in southeastern Iran, last Friday; as many as 50,000 people may be dead.

Nafisi has been monitoring Iranian Web sites and other reaction following the quake. She says that opposition to the government is becoming more evident. "People, even officials, are talking about accountability," she said in an interview yesterday.

As an example, she said, a member of parliament from Sanandaj province complained publicly that officials had ignored a bill that focused on measures to limit damage and loss of life from earthquakes. The measure was proposed after a quake in his region in 1990 killed an estimated 40,000 people.

One Web site, www.iftribune.com(Iran Feminist Tribune), Nafisi said, reported that the Red Crescent, the equivalent of the Red Cross in Islamic countries, banned female doctors and volunteers who tried to go to Bam. Only 30 to 40 women were allowed to go to the stricken area, according to a female doctor who spoke with a Red Crescent official. Those women were performing "mainly counseling services or psychological reinforcement work, and the group includes two reporters, one photographer and 16 from the Ministry of Islamic Guidance," wrote the doctor, identifying herself as Sahar, and quoting the official.

On Sunday, after being turned away the first time, Sahar said, she went to the University of Tehran to meet with a physician who was organizing volunteers. She was rejected again, Nafisi said, and then confronted the man, saying that 70 percent of all students enrolling in medical school were women. The organizer replied: "We are powerless. This order is coming from above."

In a later posting on the Web site, Sahar said that she finally headed to the airport in Tehran after hearing that volunteers were getting onto flights headed for Bam. She said she was not allowed to make the trip.

Marmar, a female photographer, reported on the Web site that a bearded man had approached her as she was taking a picture of a corpse pinned under debris in Bam. The man cautioned her that her bangs were showing from beneath her veil. He admonished her that she was "committing a sin," Nafisi said. "They don't realize how absurd this all is, the extent to which they consider the visibility of women a threat, when thousands of people have died."

Nafisi's book describes the secret weekly meetings she held with seven female university students at her house in Tehran to discuss literary works by Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Joseph Conrad and F. Scott Fitzgerald. The meetings, avoiding the scrutiny of religious zealots, offered a glimpse of Iranian resistance in the 1980s. "When we had this secret class in Tehran, we felt utterly helpless," she said. "Spaces are not given to you. You have to play a role in creating them."

In response to the earthquake, Nafisi said, "new alternative spaces are emerging instinctively." Participation by men and women in non-governmental organizations is increasing, she said. There are also new, though unofficial, avenues for economic aid. Shirin Ebadi, winner of the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize, has established a bank account to collect relief funds from non-governmental organizations and from Iranians outside the country. Charity and welfare programs, long monopolized by the government, are now also being handled by nonprofit organizations, and are coming to the rescue of the grief-stricken, the homeless and destitute.

"Like everything in Iran, this tragedy and its consequences will become symbolic," Nafisi said. "People in Iran are constantly trying to create alternative spaces which the regime is trying to take away from them. We are not talking about a minority here, but something much more elemental, more central to people's lives," she said.

Ebadi, noting that two hospitals and other buildings constructed recently in the quake zone were destroyed by Friday's earthquake, has charged that corruption led to inadequate building standards. "Ebadi has a very important role to play, despite tremendous government pressure on her," Nafisi said.

One representative of an independent relief organization said in her latest missive posted on the Web site: "We have finally been able to get permission to go."

"They are persistent," Nafisi said. "This is bigger than politics. These women just refuse to give up. They are aware they have to be part of this, they have to participate and they need to let everybody know that they won't go home." She added: "It is at times like this that natural leaders are born. This is a wake-up call and people feel compelled to take matters into their own hands."

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2004&m=01&d=03&a=10
7 posted on 01/04/2004 12:09:44 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
The "Big Mo" is on! Will Jimmy Carter be pissed...
8 posted on 01/04/2004 12:09:47 AM PST by ChiMark
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To: DoctorZIn
Iranian immigrants concerned money sent by smaller groups may end up with government

AP - World News
Jan 3, 2004

LOS ANGELES - Iranian-American groups have raised more than $1 million to help victims of last week's deadly earthquake in Iran, money that some hope will improve relations between the countries.

"I am hoping out of this to have a new relationship going on between the United States and the Iranian government," said Reza Dehbozorgi, head of the Iranian Professionals Association of South Florida.

The 6.6-magnitude earthquake, which killed at least 30,000 people, prompted a nationwide effort by both Iranians and Muslims in general to send relief.

President Bush, who has said Iran is part of an international "axis of evil," lifted sanctions for 90 days to allow aid to reach victims. Washington and Tehran have had no diplomatic relations since militants seized the U.S. embassy in the Iranian capital in 1979.

The Southfield, Mich.-based Muslim charity Life for Relief and Redevelopment sent seven tons of food and children's clothing immediately after the quake and plans to send medical supplies.

In Los Angeles, home to a third of the nation's 277,000 Iranian immigrants, the Iranian Muslim Association of North America raised more than $800,000 in pledges during a telethon. The association said it expected about 1,000 people to attend a memorial service Sunday.

"When you see those pictures, it doesn't matter if it's your relatives or your family. Everyone wants to help," said the association's president, Sadegh Namazikhah.

Still, an indication that U.S.-Iran relations remain strained came Friday when Iran rejected a U.S. proposal to send a humanitarian aid delegation led by Sen. Elizabeth Dole, the former head of the Red Cross.

Iran said it prefers that the delegation be "held in abeyance" because of the current situation on the ground; the U.S. government said it didn't consider the rejection political.

But some in the U.S. Iranian community don't believe there should be rapprochement until Iran's Muslim fundamentalist government is replaced by a different leadership.

"There's a mixed reaction to the Bush proposal to lift the embargo because people who are political opponents think this will help Bush and the regime get together, and this will stabilize the regime more," said Los Angeles-based journalist Homa Sarshar.

She also said some Iranian immigrants are concerned that money sent by smaller groups may end up with the government.

"They don't know if it will reach the people," Sarshar said. "Everybody is waiting to see what is going to happen."

Namazikhah, the president of the Iranian Muslim Association, said his group's first objective is to build a hospital in Iran to replace the ones that were destroyed. But he acknowledged it would be difficult to complete a hospital in the three months the federal government has allowed.

Aid organizations say some groups could run into problems because they are not accustomed to working with governments.

"This typically happens with overseas communities that come from countries that are not in favor with Washington," said Richard Walden, head of Operation USA, a Los Angeles-based international relief agency. "They are used to sending money to their families, but they don't realize they have less leeway with the Iranian government or the U.S. government in terms of aid for things like schools or hospitals."

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_4395.shtml
9 posted on 01/04/2004 12:11:10 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Official Death Toll From Iran Quake Rises To 35,000

AP - World News
Jan 3, 2004

BAM -The death toll from the Dec. 26 earthquake near Bam, Iran, has risen to about 35,000, Brig. Gen. Hoseyn Fat'ahi of the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps told Iran's official news agency Saturday. He said the injured numbered 17,000.

Figures for the overall dead have varied according to differing estimates of the number of bodies still under the rubble and thousands of unregistered burials.

A situation report by the U.N. Disaster Assessment Coordination Team warned that many survivors were suffering from psychological disorders after the deaths of their loved ones and the destruction of their homes.

"Post-traumatic stress disorder is highly prevalent," the U.N. report said. On Friday the U.S. field hospital operated on a young Iranian soldier who tried to commit suicide by shooting himself after discovering the quake had wiped out his family.

"If we don't pay the best attention to this, it will lead to more cases of depression, suicide and other mental health problems," said Dr. Mohammad Farojpour, the head of Kerman province's mental health department.

But amid the wreckage and chaos, there was a reason to celebrate Saturday.

For nearly nine days after the earthquake, 97-year-old Sharbanou Mazandarani lay trapped under furniture and crumbled masonry, passing fear-filled days and cold nights with death all around.

On Saturday, amazed rescuers pulled her out of the rubble alive - and amazingly, unhurt.

"God kept me alive," the petite, wrinkled Mazandarani said as she lay on a bed in a makeshift hospital in Bam, covered to her chin with a blue blanket and a brown print scarf tied around her head.

Rescuers said she asked for a cup of tea soon after her rescue - and then complained it was too hot to drink.

Normally people can survive up to three days in the rubble of an earthquake. It was unclear whether Mazandarani had food or water while she lay trapped under the ruins.

Search dogs located Mazandarani under a collapsed building and it took three hours of digging to recover her.

"No one expected her to be alive. It's a miracle," provincial government spokesman Asadollah Iranmanesh said.

Her rescue wasn't the only bright spot in the aftermath of the Dec. 26 quake: On Saturday U.S. doctors said they had delivered four babies at a makeshift hospital.

The 6.6-magnitue quake damaged beyond repair as much as 85 percent of Bam's houses and buildings, the report said. Camps of tents with heating are being erected around the city, U.N. officials said. Up to now, the homeless have been living in unheated tents set up amid the ruins.

Farojpour said that among the many things disrupted by the quake was the supply of opium to the city's addicts. Before the trembler, an estimated 20 percent of people over the age of 15 in a population of 80,000 were believed to be addicted.

Methadone, codeine and sterile syringes were being given to drug addicts, Farojpour said.

The U.N. plans to complete within four days an assessment of the city's needs for water, sanitation, food and shelter. The facts are to be presented in an appeal to international donors.

At least five or six countries, including the U.S., are working on the review with the U.N.

Bill Garvelink, head of the U.S. relief team in Bam, has said the destruction was worse than any quake-zone he had ever seen.

"It's incredible," Garvelink said. "Bam is literally a rubble pile. I haven't seen any business functioning and you don't see anybody living in their homes."

On Friday, Iran's state radio, which is controlled by conservatives, accused President Bush of interference in Iran. Bush had said he was glad Iran accepted U.S. assistance, but said its government must embrace democratic reforms and turn over its detainees from the al-Qaida terror group. Iran says its handling of the al-Qaida detainees is an internal matter.

The U.S. team in Bam has been generally well received by local doctors and citizens. Washington and Tehran have had no diplomatic relations since militants seized the U.S. Embassy in the Iranian capital in 1979.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_4400.shtml
10 posted on 01/04/2004 12:12:23 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
From Iran to California to 'House of Sand and Fog'

New York Times - By Nicole LaPorte
Jan 4, 2004

IN "House of Sand and Fog," the new film based on Andre Dubus III's novel about an Iranian family struggling to re-establish itself in northern California, Shohreh Aghdashloo plays Nadi, the wife of a former colonel in the Shah's military (Ben Kingsley). Like Nadi, Ms. Aghdashloo, 51, fled Iran during the revolution and ended up in California. Yet while Nadi is more seen than heard in the movie — bowing her head in deference to her husband, scuttling out of the room — Ms. Aghdashloo is an outspoken feminist and political commentator, who for 10 years was host of an opinion show on the Los Angeles-based Iranian television station, Jaam-e-Jam. Although she has a long history in Iranian theater and film, "House of Sand and Fog" is her first major American feature. Last month she spoke with Nicole LaPorte, a film reporter for Variety, over coffee in Los Angeles, where Ms. Aghdashloo has lived since 1987.

Bruce Birmelin/DreamWorks: Shohreh Aghdashloo, at right, with Jennifer Connelly in "House of Sand and Fog."

NICOLE LaPORTE What was it like during the 1970's in the Tehran Drama Workshop, where you got your start?

SHOHREH AGHDASHLOO We were a pretty provocative crew. We did Jean Genêt's "The Maids" with the women wearing bodysuits. The audience could not believe we were wearing leotards with short skirts — you can imagine the atmosphere we were working in. It took the West 400 years to get from Shakespeare to Pinter. We didn't have Shakespeare. We jumped into Pinter.

LaPORTE What happened to the workshop during the Islamic revolution?

AGHDASHLOO Something you see in "House of Sand and Fog" is a trait of all Middle Easterners: saving face. So we tried to save our face. We tried not to listen to the people shouting in the streets, burning the shah's picture, and kept going to the drama workshop every morning. We had a routine: dancing first, working on our bodies and then rehearsing the play of the day. One morning I went to the workshop, and I saw the door was blocked with cement. That was in 1978. They had put bricks into the cement. Right at that moment I decided to leave Iran. I knew that if they had closed this door on me with cement it meant forever.

LaPORTE Where did you go?

AGHDASHLOO There were rumors that the Ayatollah was going to come to Iran, so the prime minister had closed the airport. We drove from Iran to Turkey, Turkey to Yugoslavia, Yugoslavia to Venice, Venice to Calais, Calais to London. I knew London. My mother used to take me to London and leave me with these old ladies who taught me how to say pleasantries in English. "How are you?" "I'm fine, thank you."

LaPORTE What did you take with you?

AGHDASHLOO We couldn't take too much, otherwise they would have thought, "Hey, you have a suitcase, where are you going?" I brought a few pictures, the first dress I wore on stage as Strindberg's Madame X, some jumpers — it was cold, February — and my jewelry. The jewelry was my bride's savings. It had been given to me by the members of my family on my birthdays and at the time of my first marriage. The minute I arrived in London I went to a pawn shop and traded it for a good price — £13,000. About $20,000.

LaPORTE That must have been painful.

AGHDASHLOO Honest to God, no. It saved my life. It made me a different person.

LaPORTE In England you got your degree in international relations and gave up theater. What brought you back to the stage?

AGHDASHLOO I wanted to become a journalist in order to become more educated and find out what was really going on. But after three years what I learned was that I knew nothing. When I graduated we had a big party and a friend of mine from Iran, a playwright, said he'd written a new play with a lead in it for me. It was about an Iranian man who is accused of being a member of the shah's elite circle and therefore his life is in danger. I found it really moving and thought that maybe through acting I could be more useful and make the media pay more attention to what was going on in Iran.

LaPORTE What brought you from London to Los Angeles?

AGHDASHLOO We took the play on tour, and one night in L.A. we went to see another play by someone else who had worked at the drama workshop. I fell in love with the play and the playwright, my husband Houshang Touzie. I was a bit afraid to get myself involved in marriage, family. I wanted to fight, for women's rights, human rights. But I realized he was like me. When I arrived back in London, his postcard was waiting for me by the door. It said "bia" ("come") about 500 times. I still have it. I immediately returned to L.A. That was in 1987.

LaPORTE Before leaving Iran you played the lead in Abbas Kiarostami's film "The Report," and you've appeared in a number of Iranian plays and films since. But until "House of Sand and Fog" your American work has been limited to roles like playing the foreigner working at a dry cleaner on "Matlock" or in little-seen indie movies. Has that been frustrating?

AGHDASHLOO No, I'll tell you why. In Iran we have a spiritual path. The Sufi path is a journey you need to travel through, but at the same time you know that you are always going through phases and that those phases are not forever. You have to focus on doing the right thing and realize that you're just going through a phase. Therefore I never felt offended.

LaPORTE Are there roles you refuse to play?

AGHDASHLOO A terrorist. I think all these TV series and movies which are being made by people in the United States who are sophisticated and educated, they're teaching terrorists how to make a bomb. My agent says, "Well, Shohreh, usually cinema imitates life." I'm still against it. I still say better not made.

LaPORTE Had you read the book "House of Sand and Fog" before you got involved with the movie?

AGHDASHLOO I used to watch Oprah at 2 p.m. On her book club, two, three years ago, she mentioned this book and said: "Buy two copies. One for yourself and one for your friend." I bought one for myself and one for my friend Zha Zha. We've been friends for 30 years. When I read it, I was in awe of this non-Iranian author and how well he had absorbed the culture. I told my husband that it would be really unfair if one day they made a movie out of the book and did not give me the role of Nadi. My husband said, "Stop dreaming, Shohreh, they're not going to make a movie."

LaPORTE As an educated, outspoken Iranian expatriate, how do you relate to the role of a subservient, traditional wife in "House of Sand and Fog"?

AGHDASHLOO Although I have not lived the same way, unfortunately, I have witnessed, I still am witnessing, women like Nadi — not only in Iran, but in England and the United States — traditional wives who have been brought up to marry as soon as possible, to obey their husbands, dedicate themselves to family life. In other words, to have no life of their own. I am pretty familiar with the portrait.

LaPORTE Censorship laws have loosened somewhat since President Mohammad Khatami's election in 1997, which has affected how women are portrayed in movies there. Negin Nabavi, who teaches Iranian film at Princeton, recently said that Iranian cinema has become one of the most important outlets for challenging the status of Iranian women. Do you agree?

AGHDASHLOO I praise Iranian filmmakers for what they do today. Making movies under heavy censorship is not an easy task. But I'm afraid I'm not satisfied with these shallow changes on the surface. I am seeing more and more women in the film industry in Iran, but the truth of the matter is that a woman who is bound to wear the veil and wear gloves — let me put it this way: when you wear a scarf, your hearing is worse than when you are not wearing a scarf. And when you are worried about your scarf, and it not showing your body, how can you possibly concentrate 100 percent on what you're doing?

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_4398.shtml
11 posted on 01/04/2004 12:13:51 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
AP never ceases to amaze me... They managed to interview the only group in LA besides AIC calling for engagement with the Mullahs 'reformists'.

Who the hell is the Florida Group? There are 15 opposition satellite tv channels, 4 worked together to raise over a million the other day, why did they have to interview some small unknown group in Florida?

What's funny is that even the most pro-Regime group doesn't support the current ruling mafia in Iran.
12 posted on 01/04/2004 12:13:59 AM PST by freedom44
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To: freedom44
I couldn't agree more...
13 posted on 01/04/2004 12:15:32 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
TEHRAN, Jan 4, (AFP) -- In the aftermath of the earthquake which devastated the southeastern Iranian city of Bam, residents of the capital Tehran are now only too aware of the massive disaster that could befall them were their city to be hit by a quake.

The Bam temblor, which registered at least 6.3 on the Richter scale, killed some 30,000 of the town's 100,000 population, according to latest projections. Some experts estimate that a quake measuring 6.0 on the scale could leave as many as a million of Tehran's 12 million inhabitants dead.

That explains why the city's mayor, Mahmoud Ahmadi-Nejad, has launched the slogan: "Pray there is no earthquake in Tehran."

Maziar Hosseini, the town hall crisis centre manager, explained: "Tehran and the surrounding region is situated over four major fault lines, running from east to west in the north, the two Ray faults to the south and the north-south fault which cuts from the eastern suburbs of Tehran to the Caspian Sea."

In the face of the fears of the population, the authorities are reluctant to discuss which areas might be most at risk.

But with the exception of the northern fault, which runs under the wealthier and less-populated areas of Tehran, the faults all run beneath densely populated poorer quarters, packed with rundown old houses, the bustling city market and even out to the satellite town of Shahr-e Ray.

"About 40% of all Tehran's housing is in a dilapidated state. The buildings have no metal structure and do not conform to any anti-earthquake regulations. They should all be razed to the ground and rebuilt," Hosseini said.

"It would require two billion dollars to modernise all the old rundown houses in the capital."

As well as the 40% of old housing, many new buildings have been put up without any regard to the threat of an earthquake. In many cases, buildings of more than 10 storeys have been erected directly over the faults.

"We have a 10-year plan, worked out with the help of Japanese specialists, which aims to reduce the number of old rundown buildings and those which do not comply with earthquake regulations to about 10% of the total," he added.

Ahmadi-Nejad also announced a plan to be put into action in case of emergency.

"We need to reinforce the hospitals, the fire stations, bridges, reservoirs, bakeries and electric pylons in order to deal with an emergency situation," he said.

In a city which is a motorist's nightmare and becomes worse by the day, the authorities also want to build a network of roads for use by the emergency services.

The Bam earthquake has reawakened the fears of the population.

"You really need a house in the country well outside the city to take refuge in in case of an earthquake," said Leyla, a housewife in her 50s.

A town hall official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said: "With the four fault lines and many smaller onces, we believe that in case of a powerful earthquake nowhere is entirely safe and even the town of Karaj, with a population of more than one million, more than 40 kilometres (25 miles) to the west of Tehran, could be hit."


http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=21265&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
14 posted on 01/04/2004 12:17:15 AM PST by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn
Earthquake reveals seismic shift in Iranian view of US

From Dan de Luce in Tehran

The American doctors and aid workers were welcomed with bouquets of roses, boxes of chocolates and pistachios. They had not expected such warmth from a country labelled by President Bush as a member of the “axis of evil”.
But the tragic earthquake in Bam has shown that the official rhetoric coming out of Iran and the US bears little resemblance to reality.

The first US delegation to set foot on Iranian soil in 25 years has learned that ordinary Iranians are actually some of the most pro-Western, pro-American Muslims in the world. And as physicians from Boston wiped away tears while treating quake victims in a makeshift hospital, the theocratic regime’s paranoid portrayal of the Great Satan seemed particularly ridiculous.

http://www.sundayherald.com/39085
15 posted on 01/04/2004 12:30:07 AM PST by freedom44
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To: freedom44
the theocratic regime’s paranoid portrayal of the Great Satan seemed particularly ridiculous.

It is ridiculous. :)

16 posted on 01/04/2004 7:34:51 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Submitting approval for the CAIR COROLLARY to GODWIN'S LAW.)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife
The regime's reason for being is to stand against "the great satan." If the regime gives up its stand against the USA it will lose its ability to motivate its followers to sacrifice for the regime.

It would be roughly equivalent to the pope or leading Christian pastors saying that Christians need to stop opposing the devil.
17 posted on 01/04/2004 7:58:15 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Regime's Parliament Speaker Receives Cold and Angry Welcome

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Jan 3, 2004

Mehdi Karoubi, the Islamic Parliament's Speaker, received a cold and hostile welcome as he advantured into to devastated City of Bam.

His "delayed" visit, following the passage of a week after the quake, was supposed to play in favor of the so-called reformists seeking to boost their position in prospect of the future elections; But the Bam's residents showed their anger and rejection of the regime's official's demagogy by offering a show of anger and cold reception of Karoubi.

Many residents preferred to stay affar from the official group which walked in some of the secured streets while few approached the Speaker and showed their anger by accusing openly the regime of having caused the deaths of many residents due to the lack of management and providing rescue in crucial moments.

Even the governmental TV showed footages during which some of the female residents were speaking angrily with the Speaker.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_4404.shtml
18 posted on 01/04/2004 7:59:47 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
I understand.

I think that is why it is so very important that ordinary people of Iran learn to cut through the regime's propaganda and see the true face of America.

I believe the people have been watching events in Iraq very closely.
19 posted on 01/04/2004 8:03:02 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Submitting approval for the CAIR COROLLARY to GODWIN'S LAW.)
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To: DoctorZIn
Post Interview With Secretary of State Colin Powell

January 03, 2004
The Washington Post
Robin Wright

Following is an edited transcript of a Dec. 29 telephone interview with Secretary of State Colin L. Powell. The interview was conducted by Washington Post staff writer Robin Wright and transcribed by the State Department.

On the "Road Map" Peace Plan

THE POST: In two days we mark the date specified by the "road map" for creating a temporary Palestinian state. That date is clearly going to pass without having achieved that goal. What is the United States going to do, tangibly, to get the roadmap back on the road again? And I'm talking about the United States, not what the Palestinians and the Israelis need to do, but what the U.S. is going to do to show the leadership you mentioned in earlier interviews.

POWELL: Well, we regret that we weren't able to get that state with interim provisions to it by the end of 2003. It still remains the president's vision and his goal to achieve a Palestinian state living side by side so, with Israel, with the state of Israel. So we remain totally committed to the vision that the president laid out on 24 June of 2002 and totally committed to the road map as the way to get to that vision.

Now, with respect to what we now have to do is after we lost the Abu Mazen government [the government of former Palestinian prime minister Mahmoud Abbas, also known as Abu Mazen, who resigned in September], we have been waiting for the Abu Ala [Ahmed Qureia, the current prime minister] to take definitive steps with respect to condemnation of terror; with respect to what plans they have to go after terrorist organizations.

We will be reviewing the bidding in the early part of the year as to whether or not it would be appropriate for Ambassador [John S.] Wolf [the Bush administration's Middle East envoy] to go back in, but he has to have two people ready to talk to one another. We will be encouraging, and I will be talking -- I talked to [Israeli Prime Minister Ariel] Sharon and [Foreign Minister Silvan] Shalom last week -- I will be talking to Palestinians later this week, encouraging the conversations to begin between the two sides.

Until there is a beginning conversation between the two sides, I think it's difficult to do much more right now and we're anxious to see that conversation begin, and we're in touch with both sides to encourage that conversation. . . .

THE POST: Are you confident that the United States can still meet the deadline set out by the road map of a solution by 2005, which would mean crunching a three-year process into two years, or is there likely, now, to be slippage?

POWELL: I think it's possible, but it's hard to say. I mean, a year and a half has gone by since those goals were set out, and so that's a year and a half where we didn't achieve the interim state we were looking for, or a state with interim provisions, as I like to say. But it is not unachievable if both sides will now come to the table, get serious, if we see the kind of crackdown against terrorism that we have to see or it'll all be a false start, and if you also take a look at the debate that's taking place in Israel now as to the way forward, I think that there are certain dynamics at work that still make it possible to achieve that vision by 2005.

But time is passing and we need to see the kind of aggressive action on the part of the Palestinian Authority that will allow us to once again engage as fully as the president wants us to. He stands ready to engage. We all do. The road map is there. We are staying in touch with our "quartet" partners [the United States, Russia, the European Union and the United Nations] and they are ready to engage. And we're also staying in touch with our Arab colleagues, as well.

On Iraq

THE POST: On Iraq, the Russians have pledged to forgive 65 percent of the Iraqi debt. Is that the goal the United States is seeking from all countries, both in the Club of Paris [an informal group of 19 developed creditor nations], and otherwise?

POWELL: We would like to see maximum debt forgiveness, and I wouldn't put an arbitrary number on it at this point. I would hope to see a much higher number, but I don't want to assign any of the countries that [former secretary of state and treasury secretary] Jim Baker is working with now and [Treasury] Secretary [John W.] Snow is working with now a number, but we want to get maximum debt forgiveness, Paris Club and otherwise. And I think we're off to a good start. And I had good conversations with Jim Baker after he got back from the European leg and before he went on the Asian leg. And I also know that he's been in touch with John Snow.

These are commitments-in-principle. What we have to do now is nail them down in the course of 2004 as the Paris Club meetings unfold.

THE POST: Have the discussions between Ayatollah [Ali] Sistani [Iraq's leading Shiite cleric] and Jerry Bremer [the U.S. civil administrator of Iraq] led, or are they heading toward a compromise on the issue of elections?

POWELL: We are in touch with the Ayatollah. I don't know that Jerry has spoken to him directly, but we have a number of people who have spoken to him.

THE POST: But there are letters between them?

POWELL: There may well be letters between them.

All I can say is that the contacts are continuing and what I have been following, as you can well imagine, is from the 15th of November on, when we put down the latest plan, what has been the reaction of the various parties.

The Governing Council has expressed its complete support for the 15 November plan. It has been presented to the UN. We're certainly fully behind it, and the Ayatollah has raised issues with respect to how you do the caucus elections and I think it's safe to say that we are in a dialogue with him and with others who have an interest in how one actually goes about selecting a transitional assembly and a transitional government. . . .

But the news, the news is that he has not dismissed the 15 November plan, which some people were afraid he might. So I think we're having a productive conversation, and it's an ongoing conversation.

THE POST: But do you see one further round of compromises being introduced in the November plan; in other words, accepting the November 15th, but introducing some kind of compromise that would address the issue of elections?

POWELL: At the moment, I'm not aware of the need for a compromise. Everybody is firmly behind the 15 November plan, but I think we're all also listening because what we want is a successful process next spring that gives us a transitional assembly and a transitional government, and puts us on the way to a full constitution as well as a fully representative government thereafter, probably in 2005.

So I think we are open to ideas, but there is no compromise that I'm aware of at the moment that is needed. It's a good plan. It's a solid plan. It enjoys the support of the Governing Council and certainly us.

THE POST: Well, maybe we're talking about semantics here. Maybe it's a refinement or something that, that adds to the plan.

POWELL: There -- and I think that's what I was saying, Robin. The plan is good. If people come up with refinements that make the plan better and it's agreeable to all parties, then that is a refinement to a good plan as opposed to changing or compromising on a plan that is good for a plan that is less good. And I think what Ambassador Bremer and all of us have been doing in our conversations is listening and hearing and [asking], "Are there better ideas that would make the plan more refined, better and more acceptable to a broader group of individuals and leaders within Iraq?"

THE POST: Do you expect that soon?

POWELL: Well, I didn't say that I was expecting there to be a compromise or that refinements would be made. I'm just saying that we're open to refinements and we're waiting to hear what people have suggested, or will suggest.

On Iran

THE POST: Let me shift to Iran. I gather there is an inter-agency debate or high-level, anyway, debate on whether to resume the dialogue with Iran. Iran has taken steps recently. There is this current effort to provide humanitarian aid. Do you foresee, you know, movement in a specific way toward resuming that debate with Iran soon?

POWELL: We are not really having a high-level debate in the sense of major disagreement. I think you have heard me say previously that we have always left open the option of engaging in dialogue with Iran. And a number of things have happened in recent months, which, I think, are encouraging.

Let's start from where we began this administration three years ago, when we made the case that Iran was undertaking activities with respect to nuclear weapons that were unacceptable and inconsistent with its obligations. We pressed the Russians. Everybody pushed back on us for a while and then the Russians finally came to the conclusion that there was something there. We started to create understandings with the Russians on the Bushehr power plant, as you're well familiar. And then more information became available that made it clear to the IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] that Iran wasn't fully complying. And I think we started to get the better of the argument.

And we were pressing the IAEA to take note of all of this and act, and then my European Union colleagues in the person of the EU 3 engaged directly. I stayed in very close touch with [French Foreign Minister Dominique] de Villepin, [German Foreign Minister Joschka] Fischer and [British Foreign Secretary Jack] Straw as they did their work. They never did anything I wasn't aware of and we hadn't discussed beforehand. And we've now reached the point where we've got a unanimous IAEA resolution, which said Iran has not been fully complying and also put in there that if there was further lack of compliance, it would be dealt with in accordance with current regulations and obligations that they have.

And at the same time, Iran has signed the additional protocol and we are waiting for them, now, to meet the commitments they made to the EU 3. All of those things taken together show, it seems to me, a new attitude in Iran in dealing with these issues -- not one of total, open generosity, but they realize that the world is watching and the world is prepared to take action.

And then, recently, when this terrible catastrophe hit Iran and -- and this just pushed politics aside. This was a humanitarian issue. And the president has always made it clear that when it comes to humanitarian issues, we'll do what is right for humankind. And in this case, to show them that we were serious and that we were seeing it as a humanitarian issue, had [Deputy Secretary of State] Rich Armitage call the Iranian Perm Rep directly, so he knew it was not just a routine, diplomatic exchange.

What was surprising here, Robin, is that within a half an hour to an hour, Rich got an answer back from the Permanent Representative, who was in Tehran at that time, and within hours, we had started to assemble relief supplies, planes and rescue workers.

Now all those things taken together show that there are things happening, and therefore we should keep open the possibility of dialogue at an appropriate point in the future. We still have concerns about terrorist activities, of course, and there are other issues with respect to al Qaeda and other matters that we'll have to keep in mind. . . .

On Pakistan

THE POST: How concerned are you about the stability of Pakistan in the aftermath of two assassination attempts on President [Pervez] Musharraf?

POWELL: I'm still confident that President Musharraf enjoys broad support within the country. These are extremists and we were deeply concerned at both of those attacks, and the president has spoken to President Musharraf and I have spoken to him a couple of times. I spoke to him over the weekend. And it just shows that there are those who will resort to terror to try to impose their ill will on their own people.

And so we still have confidence in President Musharraf and we're standing behind him.

On Libya and North Korea

THE POST: Does the Libya strategy apply to Iran, and potentially, to North Korea?

POWELL: Well, I would hope that the Iranians, and especially North Korea would lean back and take a look at what Libya did. And Libya essentially came to the conclusion that being isolated on the world stage, being held up to ridicule by the international community with the condemnation that came from the international community, all for the purpose of trying to develop an unconventional warfare capability, that at the end brought you no economic benefit, in fact, cost you economically, and frankly, brought you no political benefit, and frankly, put you in greater danger than the danger that it might have been keeping you out of.

I think the Libyans took a look at a determined President Bush and a determined Bush administration that was going to deal with these kinds of weapons, but we were not going to be terrified by them. I think [Libyan leader Moammar] Gaddafi could see that we were prepared to take action in Iraq, we were prepared to press the case with Iran, even though people were waving us off for the first year of the administration, and we're also prepared to seek a diplomatic solution with North Korea and not be cowed or blackmailed or pushed into some deal with North Korea where we're paying them for their misbehavior. And I would hope that North Korea and Iran and for that matter, Syria, to the extent that they have such weapons, realize that these weapons serve no political, economic or security purpose. And to that extent I think, perhaps, Gaddafi is giving a good object lesson to these other countries.

We, however, understand the nature of Mr. Gaddafi and his regime, and we will approach this carefully with full verification, and my State Department team is putting together a rather thorough verification system; and also with political engagement to make sure that before we provide any kind of relief that we really do have a changed, a changed leader. But we're very pleased with this development.

On 2004 Priorities

THE POST: For 2004, what, as you see it, are the four on your "A-list," four on your "B-list" issues and what is the United States going to do in specific terms about each one, not just what the problems are . . . ?

POWELL: Well, first and foremost has to be the global war on terrorism. It's not going away. We've made a great deal of progress over the last couple of years. Cells are being rolled up. We have a better idea of whom we're fighting, but they're still out there and they're still coming after us. We have to protect the homeland and we have to go out and get them where they are. And we've got to continue to build our international coalition with law enforcement, intelligence exchange, drying up their sources of finance and support, and direct action when necessary. So that will remain number one. And of course, homeland security fits in that.

The next one on my hit parade, of course, is Iraq -- returning sovereignty to the people. I, as, you know, Secretary of State, increasingly will be working with [Defense Secretary] Don Rumsfeld to manage the transition to an embassy situation from the Coalition Provisional Authority when it has completed its mission some time next year. Hopefully at a time that's coincident with the returning of sovereignty, and so that's going to be a major effort on our part, and as I build up that large embassy, I've got to also generate more international support, U.N. presence -- get the U.N. back in there in force, both humanitarian and to play a political role; the contracting issue; the role of NATO, and I think NATO is more and more willing to play a role in Iraq; and debt relief -- continuing to work with Secretary Snow, who has the real lead within the administration, and with my good buddy Jim Baker.

And then once that is under way, the real challenge for the new embassy, so to speak, or the new presence will be helping the Iraqi people get ready for their full elections and full constitution the following year.

I'm going to keep a close eye on Afghanistan as an area where we've made a great deal of progress, but we've got to beware of the remaining dangers -- defeat the Taliban in the south and southeast and make sure that the elections go well next year and that we have put in place a central government that can control the whole country.

And then the Middle East will be a priority. We stand ready with the road map, stand ready to engage, and I hope that we will see the kind of movement that we need to see, particularly on the Palestinian side, that will give us a basis to engage more fully.

There are lots of second tier ones, Robin, and this year is not over. I'm still working the phones on the Sudan -- a comprehensive peace agreement I hope that we might get yet, before the end of the year or shortly thereafter. They've made good progress in the last couple of months since I visited with the negotiators in Kenya.

And so many other issues are like that. Liberia -- consolidate the success we had earlier in the year. I'm going to be pushing hard on the president's democracy initiative and all of its pieces in the Middle East -- the Free Trade Area of the Middle East as well as the Middle East Partnership Initiative.

And I'm going to work very hard, Robin, in making it clear to our friends in Europe and elsewhere in the world that America is a partner -- spend more time with them; spend more time listening to them and finding ways that we can cooperate together. And I think there are many such areas: Iraq, Afghanistan -- we had great success in Afghanistan pulling that coalition together.

On Afghanistan

THE POST: On Afghanistan, do you believe that the situation has reached the point that the two halves of the election -- for parliament and the . . . presidency -- may have to be separated so you do the presidency next year and maybe defer the parliament until . . . next year?

POWELL: That's certainly a possibility. I haven't been in conversation with President [Hamid] Karzai lately, but I know that when last I did speak to him about it, it's a question that's open. . . . I think that's still an open question and I think the presidential election is the one that is key and that has to come first, in any event, whether it's together or separated.

More on the Middle East

THE POST: And what will happen if, within the next period of time -- six months, whatever -- in the Middle East, you do not see the Palestinians take the action on, that you've outlined?

POWELL: Well, I hope they will. And if they do, then they'll see us fully engaged. If they don't, then I think the situation will just continue to -- drift and not improve. And as you know, Israel is considering steps it might take. I think it would be unfortunate if we started to see unilateral steps that are not the result of negotiations between the parties.

And so I'm hopeful that we will see the kind of progress that will get us closer to the president's vision.

On Osama bin Laden

THE POST: And one last question that only requires a yes or no. . . . Will we have Osama bin Laden by the end of next year?

POWELL: Robin, I don't know. I don't know if he is alive or dead and I can't answer that question. I just don't know. I do know that he will, if he is alive, he will continue to be on the run, he will continue to be pressed on all sides, and we will keep sweeping up whatever vestigial remains of the al Qaeda network are out there.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2004&m=01&d=04&a=1
20 posted on 01/04/2004 8:13:19 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn; freedom44; nuconvert; Pan_Yans Wife; Eala; McGavin999; Cindy; Pro-Bush; blackie; ...
Yunesi added that the U.S. government has still not accepted the reality of the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Mr. Yunesii, Would you please let us know what realities you are talking about?

21 posted on 01/04/2004 8:14:46 AM PST by F14 Pilot ( "Either you are with us or you are with the terrorists. ")
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To: F14 Pilot
If the realities are not obvious, I submit that they are a figment of Yunesii's imagination, and that he is obfuscating.
22 posted on 01/04/2004 8:17:47 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Submitting approval for the CAIR COROLLARY to GODWIN'S LAW.)
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To: DoctorZIn
A Cry from Iran: "Hug Me"

January 04, 2004
New York Daily News
Leo Standora

They hide their tiny faces under blankets. Most refuse to talk. Some won't eat. Many weep through the night. They are the orphans of disaster, an estimated 2,000 kids whose parents were taken by Iran's horrifying earthquake on Dec. 26.

Just over a week after the killer quake ripped apart the ancient city of Bam, children continue to fill Iran's orphanages as rescue workers pluck more young survivors from amid the dead in the rubble.

The pain, confusion and loss suffered by the children wrenches the heart.

A visitor at the Kermanian Nursery Center stopped in his tracks, brought nearly to tears by a 2-year-old's simple request. "Mister, please hug me," the child asked.

"Hold me," begs another, as knots of kids stretch out their arms or grab at passing adults for a moment of comfort or a feeling - however illusory - that everything will be all right.

But for most it never will.

Officials at the Kermanian Orphanage, 75 miles north of Bam, said one 3-year-old named Vida couldn't sleep for days after the quake and refuses even to leave her nurse's arms.

"I want my mother," she cries over and over. But both of her parents, like those of so many around her, are gone.

Psychologists and psychiatric workers came to the province last week to help the children deal with suffering that is unfathomable.

Part of their job is to tell the awful truth to kids like 6-year-old Atefeh Razmi, who plays with a puzzle at a children's center waiting for her parents to pick her up.

"They will come to see me soon," she smiles sweetly at nurses who turn away with eyes glistening.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/story/151657p-133576c.html
23 posted on 01/04/2004 8:18:06 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
A horrible story, A sad post! :-((
24 posted on 01/04/2004 8:21:13 AM PST by F14 Pilot ( "Either you are with us or you are with the terrorists. ")
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; DoctorZIn; AdmSmith; freedom44; nuconvert; McGavin999; Eala; Pro-Bush; windchime; ...
The realities are "Torturing opposition forces in jails", "attacking on students' dorms", killing writers and thinkers", "sending nearly 5 milions of Iranians into forced exile" and so on.
25 posted on 01/04/2004 8:25:16 AM PST by F14 Pilot ( "Either you are with us or you are with the terrorists. ")
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To: F14 Pilot
Yes. But, the regime isn't going to air this for the American audience. They want our aid, at the moment, not our condemnation.
26 posted on 01/04/2004 8:27:03 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Submitting approval for the CAIR COROLLARY to GODWIN'S LAW.)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife
Air what?
27 posted on 01/04/2004 8:45:46 AM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it.")
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To: F14 Pilot
Freedom for Iran ~ Now!
28 posted on 01/04/2004 8:52:10 AM PST by blackie
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To: DoctorZIn
What a bunch of Hooey!

"Iran's problem with the United States is a security matter rather than a political or economic matter"

Yeah, that's what the Soviets and E. Germans said, too.

"U.S. officials have security problems with Iran, and so long as this viewpoint exists, no problem will be solved," Yunesi said."

Well, why doesn't the regime FIX that problem? Abandon their nuc facilities? Hmmmm?

"However, the government of President George W. Bush needs their votes and has taken the recent measures in order to obtain them,"

Oh, I see. The U.S. doesn't help other countries at times of disaster unless the current adminsitration can get votes out of it???? Yeah, people are gonna believe That One!!

"if the U.S. proves in practice that it is not the enemy of Iran, that would pave the way for Iran to accept its other claims."

Really? What other claims? That the regime inprisons and tortures it's citizens for speaking out against it? That it supports terrorism? That it arrests and inprisons it's journalists and shuts down newspapers it doesn't agree with? That it still hasn't outlawed the practice of stoning? Shall we go on.....???!

"U.S. takes an antagonistic stance wherever Iran's interests are at stake. This shows that the country, or at least its current officials, is against the Islamic Republic of Iran," Yunesi said."

NO....against the Iranian regime!!!!!



29 posted on 01/04/2004 9:02:32 AM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it.")
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot
OMG Doctor, 2,000 orphans. This is something that the Iranian people can help with. They should get people down there as soon as possible to hold those children. Even if they can't adopt them, they can volunteer to hold them and comfort them.
30 posted on 01/04/2004 9:36:21 AM PST by McGavin999
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To: DoctorZIn
After Iran Rebuff, U.S. May Try Quieter Diplomacy

January 04, 2004
Reuters
Caren Bohan

WASHINGTON -- America's interest in public overtures toward Tehran may cool after Iran last week rebuffed an offer of a senior humanitarian mission but experts say the gesture may pay off as efforts shift to quieter diplomacy.

After a catastrophic earthquake in the Iranian city of Bam, Washington sent a series of clear signals of possible interest in renewing a dialogue with Iran -- which President Bush has branded as part of an "axis of evil."

The White House offer of relief workers and medical supplies for the Iranian quake survivors was followed by an easing of some U.S. sanctions to speed the aid through.

Both U.S. and Iranian officials insisted there were no political overtones to their cooperation on helping victims of the quake, which killed at least 30,000 people.

But the quake "kind of brought to a head" discussion that had been going on earlier about possibly engaging Iran on specific issues of interest to Washington, according to an administration official, who asked not to be named.

Secretary of State Colin Powell explicitly raised the possibility of a dialogue with Tehran in a Washington Post interview as he cited "encouraging" signs from Tehran.

Then, analysts said, there was no mistaking that Washington was reaching out when, late last week, the Bush administration offered to send a humanitarian delegation to Tehran led by Sen. Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina, an influential Republican. The United States cut diplomatic ties with Iran more than two decades ago.

The overture was declined by Iran. But James Dobbins, a veteran U.S. diplomat who was most recently U.S. special envoy for Afghanistan, said it sent a message that Tehran will mull in the coming months and may even act upon.

"I think that what the United States is doing by sending assistance in such an overt and generous manner will make a significant impression," he said.

Patrick Clawson of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy agreed. "These kinds of trial balloons are worthwhile," he said.

Clawson said Iran's conservative Islamic rulers might have felt embarrassed at the idea of accepting high-level visitors from a country Tehran deems the "Great Satan."

A STEP TOO FAR?

Washington's move might have gone a step too far in a delicate diplomatic dance between two arch-foes, Clawson said.

But he said it was not necessarily a bad thing to try to kick-start a process that will be "painfully slow."

"The administration should go one step further than the Iranians are prepared to accept," he said.

Dobbins called it disappointing but "not surprising" that Tehran turned down the proposed U.S. delegation. "There is a high level of sensitivity on both sides," he said.

Now would be a good time for the two sides -- if they are still interested in steps toward better ties -- to move the effort out of the public glare, he said.

The tension between the two countries has deep roots. Washington broke off formal ties in 1980, months after the seizure of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in which 52 Americans were held hostage for 444 days.

Washington accuses Iran of harboring al Qaeda militants and secretly trying to develop nuclear weapons.

Tehran, which denies the allegations, is highly wary of Washington's influence in its region, with U.S. troops now in two of its neighboring countries -- Iraq and Afghanistan.

Even as Bush, like Powell, highlighted Tehran's willingness to accept earthquake aid as a good sign, he reiterated his list of grievances with the Islamic republic when speaking to reporters in southern Texas last week.

"The Iranian government must listen to the voices of those who long for freedom, must turn over al Qaeda (members) that are in their custody and must abandon their nuclear weapons program," Bush said.

In a nod to members of his administration who would like to keep pressure on Tehran by encouraging pro-democracy forces there, Bush said, "we stand strongly with those (in Iran) who demand freedom."

Daniel Benjamin, who served as a foreign policy adviser to former President Bill Clinton, said he was pleased to see the Bush administration try a diplomatic angle with Iran though he expressed skepticism about where it would lead.

"They took a gamble," he said. "I don't fault them for trying. It's a far better signal than calling them an axis of evil."

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=politicsNews&storyID=4069878
31 posted on 01/04/2004 10:32:49 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Iranian People Cheer U.S. Warming After Bam Quake

January 04, 2004
Reuters
Erik Kirschbaum

TEHRAN -- Ordinary Iranians are cheering a warming of diplomatic ties between Tehran and the United States brought on by the Bam quake, and hope an end is in sight to a quarter century of isolation from a country many openly admire.

Even though conservative Tehran newspapers may rail at "earthquake diplomacy" by George W. Bush, many average Iranians on the capital's streets Sunday said they welcomed the American president's overtures that may rebuild severed ties. "I was overjoyed when I first heard America planes were going to fly in to help Bam," said Hassan Tayebi, 51, a retired civil servant, referring to the Dec. 26 earthquake that destroyed the southeastern city.

"I really like Americans. They are really kind people and I hope the aid offer leads to better relations."

Many Iranians show a more favorable attitude to the United States than their own government does.

Bush relaxed U.S. banking restrictions on the Islamic Republic -- which he accuses of being part of an "axis of evil" backing terrorists -- to help speed relief efforts.

Iran rebuffed one particular U.S. offer of a senior humanitarian mission, but appreciative Iranian leaders have hinted the friendly U.S. steps may prompt reciprocal gestures.

Washington cut ties with Iran in 1980 after the 1979 Islamic revolution ushered in an anti-American government, which let radical students storm the U.S. embassy and hold 52 Americans hostage for 444 days until 1981.

The embassy was confiscated by Iran and houses a museum critical of the United States.

"I hope the earthquake policy can serve as a starting point for Iran and the United States," said Anita, 27.

"I don't think Iranians harbour bad feelings toward Americans. On the contrary. And I don't think Americans hold grudges against us. The problem is, Iran closed its door to America years ago and Americans wrongly think we hate them."

TUNED INTO UNITED STATES

Many Iranians are well tuned into the United States, which is now home to about two million of their kin, most of whom left in waves after the pro-Western shah was ousted.

It sometimes seems almost everyone in Tehran has at least one relative or friend living there.

"I really hope the two countries forget the past conflicts and concentrate on how much we have in common," said Kianoush Mirrezai, 34, a doctor. "I'm so grateful for the support from America at our moment of grief and despair."

Moderate President Mohammad Khatami's government has been trying to promote democracy in Iran and improve relations with the West, but his efforts have been largely stymied by religious hard-liners who control the army, courts and other levers of power.

American flags are burned at official protests against what hard-line clerics call the "Great Satan."

Though Iran and the United States deny political overtones to the aid effort, there has been an unmistakable thaw since the earthquake that killed at least 30,000 people.

Many Iranians said they were surprised the government accepted U.S. help and delighted by the astonishing sight of elite Revolutionary Guards protecting tents in Bam where American medics were saving Iranian lives.

"I was really touched by such humanity," said Ahmad Gholami, 45, a grocer. "It is unbelievable Americans offered aid. I will never forget their support."

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=4069974
32 posted on 01/04/2004 10:34:07 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
"They took a gamble," he said. "I don't fault them for trying. It's a far better signal than calling them an axis of evil."

Why doesn't he give credit where credit is due? What good things did Clinton do to stand up to the regime, or to help the people of Iran?

33 posted on 01/04/2004 3:20:30 PM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Freedom is a package deal - with it comes responsibilities and consequences.)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife
"...calling them an axis of evil."

They ARE evil.
34 posted on 01/04/2004 6:39:59 PM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it.")
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To: nuconvert
I remember when I first learned that the Axis of Evil wasn't just a name, but when I figured out that the world of terrorism and nuclear weapons revolve around Iraq, Iran and Korea. That moment made everything clear.

Bush has a vision. He isn't trying to build a legacy. He is building a secure future for America.
35 posted on 01/04/2004 7:00:44 PM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Freedom is a package deal - with it comes responsibilities and consequences.)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife
"Bush has a vision. He isn't trying to build a legacy. He is building a secure future for America."

You mean unlike his predecessor ?
36 posted on 01/04/2004 7:19:39 PM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it.")
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To: nuconvert
YES
37 posted on 01/04/2004 7:20:26 PM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Freedom is a package deal - with it comes responsibilities and consequences.)
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To: DoctorZIn
Isolation Helps Iranian Regime, Says Reza Pahlavi

January 04, 2004
Voice of America
Michael Bowman

Listen to Reza Pahlavi's live interview with Fox News Sunday (Chris Wallace)
http://www.rezapahlavi.org/audiovideo/fox10404.html

Listen to Michael Bowman's report (RealAudio)
http://www.voanews.com/mediastore/bowman_iran_4jan04.ram

The exiled son of the late Shah of Iran says the United States should continue to try to engage the nation of his birth, but do so in such a way that does not prop up the government in Tehran.

Friday, Iran rejected a U.S. proposal to dispatch a high-level humanitarian delegation to the earthquake-ravaged nation, citing logistical difficulties. The United States and Iran have had no diplomatic relations since 1980.

Reza Pahlavi, whose father ruled Iran prior to the country's 1979 Islamic revolution, says the cause of democratic reform in Iran could be furthered, if relations were to thaw between Washington and Tehran. Mr. Pahlavi spoke on the U.S. television program "Fox News Sunday."

"Engagement and dialogue is much better than containment and isolation," said Mr. Pahlavi. "What is important for the people of Iran, however, is, after so many years of suffering, they would love to see the international community, for a change, shift their focus on them [their aspirations], rather than trying to cut a deal with the current regime."

The Iranian government has not ruled out the possibility of a visit by U.S. officials in the future. Nevertheless, Iran's state-controlled news media have expressed suspicions about U.S. motives, accusing the Bush administration of seizing upon the earthquake tragedy in the southeastern city of Bam as an opportunity to create a rift between the Iranian government and its citizens.

Reza Pahlavi said the government has already lost its legitimacy with the Iranian people. "This rift was created a long time ago by the regime's own doing," he said. "It has nothing to do with the U.S. government or any other foreign government."

Mr. Pahlavi said President Bush has always taken care to distinguish between his criticism of Iran's leaders and his feelings toward the country as a whole. He said that has not gone unnoticed by the people of Iran.

http://www.benadorassociates.com/article/963
38 posted on 01/04/2004 7:30:36 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Reza Pahlavi: US Overtures Should Not Appease the Clerical Regime

January 04, 2004
AFP
IranMania

Listen to Reza Pahlavi's live interview with Fox News Sunday (Chris Wallace)

WASHINGTON -- Reza Pahlavi, son of the late shah of Iran, said Sunday that any US diplomatic overtures to Iran should not seek to appease "the clerical regime" ruling the country.

Pahlavi spoke with Fox News in the wake of Iran's decision to turn down a US offer to send a high-level humanitarian delegation to the site of last month's massive earthquake in the city of Bam.

"As long as such overtures (are) consistent with the distinction that is made between the people of Iran on the one hand and the clerical regime, I believe the right impression will be left with the Iranian people," Pahlavi said.

He said any US approach should seek to engage the Iranian people rather than be seen as an effort to "appease" the country's government.

Pahlavi said he would like to see an open referendum occur in Iran "so that the people of Iran can democratically decide for themselves what they want."

US President George W. Bush has referred to Iran as a member of the "axis of evil" along with North Korea and the former dictatorship of Iraq's Saddam Hussein.

Despite reservations, Pahlavi said engagement with Tehran was necessary.

"Isolation helps such regimes survive much longer. It is only when they're exposed to democratic societies and the democratic world where they begin to crumble from within."

He said evidence also suggests that al-Qaeda had been active in Iran, and that the terror network had received training and finance in the country.

Asked if he thought al-Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden was hiding out in the country, Pahlavi replied: "That, I don't know for a fact. I've heard some rumors about it. I can not tell you right now I have a yes or no answer to that question. There are speculations."

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=21290&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
39 posted on 01/04/2004 7:31:38 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Transcript: Reza Pahlavi on 'FOX News Sunday'

Sunday, January 04, 2004

The following is an excerpt from FOX News Sunday, Jan. 4, 2004.

CHRIS WALLACE, HOST, FOX NEWS SUNDAY: Late this week, Iran turned down a U.S. offer to send a high-level humanitarian delegation to the site of last month's deadly earthquake in the ancient city of Bam.

Despite the rejection, the Bush administration, which had been calling Iran part of the axis of evil, is now clearly trying to reach out to the regime there. Is there a bridge to build between Washington and Tehran?

For answers, we turn to Reza Pahlavi, son of the late shah of Iran, who's been working for years to promote democracy and a constitutional monarchy for his homeland.

And, Mr. Pahlavi, welcome. Good to have you with us this morning.

REZA PAHLAVI, SON OF THE SHAH OF IRAN: Thank you, Chris. Good to be here.

WALLACE: What do you think of the Bush administration's overture to Iran to send this delegation, including Senator Elizabeth Dole and a member of his own family?

PAHLAVI: Sure, Chris, first and foremost, let me join in offering my thanks on behalf of my compatriots and myself to the entire world and particularly Americans who have shown so much compassion toward my compatriots in view of this earthquake. This is deeply appreciated.

Look, it's very simple. As long as such overtures is consistent with the distinction that is made between the people of Iran on the one hand and the clerical regime, I believe the right impression will be left with the Iranian people. I've always been a supporter of honest and transparent dialogue.

The distinction here is that if any kind of approach is meant in a way to seem to appease the current regime, as opposed to critically engage the Iranian people in support for their freedoms, then it will set the wrong impression, as far as my compatriots are concerned.

WALLACE: Well, that raises, obviously, a delicate question. If you were to send a delegation over -- and this is not just a humanitarian delegation if it has Elizabeth Dole, although she used to be head of the Red Cross, and a member of the family. One assumes that they would meet with Iranian officials. So is that being sent to the Iranian people? Or does that, in some sense, as I know you worry, does that in some sense prop up the ruling regime?

PAHLAVI: Well, again, it depends on what has been asked and what has been said. As Iranians, we have been waiting for many years to see the international community, and particularly foreign governments, to take notice of the fact, based on the regime's track record and domestic behavior and the way it's been suppressing the Iranian people ever since its inception, we are demanding some specific reactions by the regime consistent with what we all hope will be a reversal of what we see.

The freedom of political prisoners, we would like to see a reversal on the ban on the media, we would like to see the freedom of political parties to be able to organize and assemble. And, ultimately, what is our ultimate wish is to be able to conduct a free and fair, all-inclusive referendum in Iran, so that the people of Iran can democratically decide for themselves what they want.

Now, any position from the outside world engaging in dialogue with the current regime ought to expect some specific milestone being reached by the regime that has so far been completely oblivious to such domestic as well as international demands.

WALLACE: But just the fact of sending this kind of a delegation, then, you would have no problem with that, especially if it was clear what the U.S. position was?

PAHLAVI: Of course. Listen, I always believe that engagement and dialogue is much better than containment and isolation. First of all, isolation helps such regimes survive much longer. We saw that in the case of other totalitarian regimes. It is only when they're exposed to democratic societies and the democratic world where they begin to crumble from within. That has been historically the case. It will not be an exception in the case of the current regime.

What's important for the people of Iran, however, is after so many years of suffering, so many years of being denied an opportunity, they would love to see the international community, for a change, shift their focus on them rather than trying to cut a deal with the current regime or appease such a regime for purposes of, you know, diplomatic overtures.

If there is today such an earthquake diplomacy, let me put it this way, it ought to be focusing again in engaging the Iranian people, and that will certainly create much more goodwill, as opposed to Iranians seeing that once again governments may be falling into the trappings that the regime has always tried to set them up.

WALLACE: All right. Here was the response Friday from Iran state radio. Here's what they said: "The Americans, by publicizing their aid to Iran, have ineptly tried to implement their duplicitous policy of creating a rift between the Iranian nation and government."

Why do you think the leadership of Iran, the ruling clerics, turned down the U.S. offer?

PAHLAVI: I think it's beyond that. This simply shows how much some elements within the regime are in denial of the reality that they have long lost their legitimacy with the Iranian people.

This rift has been created a long time ago by the regime's own doing. It has nothing to do with the U.S. government, or any other foreign government, for that matter.

The fact, however, is that the current U.S. administration, for one thing, has made the recognition between the difference that exists between the Iranian people and the regime. And that happened shortly after September 11th, when President Bush, in his State of the Union address, made that clear distinction, which was warmly received in Iran as, finally somebody is making the difference between us and the regime.

WALLACE: Well, let me ask you about that, because there were reports this weekend that, in the Iranian parliament, the reform movement, some people wanted to reconsider accepting this delegation. Do you think there's a possibility that there might be a change, and the delegation might be accepted?

PAHLAVI: Look, the more we go in time, as a result of both domestic as well as international pressure, this regime has nowhere else to go but retreat. They know that. It's just a matter of time.

However, how it's been played by them is one thing. How the world should look at it, and how we as Iranians should take advantage of the situation, is another.

The regime will try to gain some pretense to legitimacy by, for instance, claiming that people are participating in their elections or claiming that we have been engaging in dialogue with foreign government, therefore telling the people, you know, we are here to stay. That kind of stuff.

It's important not to fall into those trapping. This is why it's so critical at this juncture that any government engaging with the Iranian government, whether it's the U.S. government or any other government, recognize that from the point of view of the Iranian people, how they treat the regime, what they say to its leadership and how they present themselves to the people in Iran at large, is going to be the difference between a feeling of attention, as opposed to dealing over the head and appeasement towards the regime.

WALLACE: All right. Let's deal with some facts now, not some diplomacy. You are in contact with many people in Iran. Do you believe that there are senior members of Al Qaeda, either in custody or at large?

PAHLAVI: I think there has been tremendous amount of evidence gathered over the years that points to the direction that Al Qaeda members have been operating and active on Iranian soil, either been trained there or been financed by them or at least assisted directly or indirectly. It's been long established.

It doesn't stop at that, unfortunately. Al Qaeda has become a big issue since September 11th. The problem has been that the clerical regime, for years now, has been supporting terrorist networks both inside and outside the country. And it has been the case in the Middle East and all the way of the four corners of the world...

WALLACE: Do you believe that -- we hear reports that Osama bin Laden himself might be in Iran.

PAHLAVI: That I don't know for a fact. I've heard some rumors about it. I cannot tell you right now that I have a yes-or-no answer to that question. There are speculations.

But whether Osama bin Laden is in Iran or not is not the question. The question is the nature of the regime at the end. This regime has created an environment of instability. It has survived on the basis of promoting and fomenting radicalism and extremism and violence all these years for the sole purpose of its own survival.

And what it has cost our nation and our immediate area and the rest of the world is today something that we all see.

WALLACE: And very briefly, if I might, sir, how close do you believe Iran is to getting a nuclear bomb?

PAHLAVI: I think that there is a lot of prediction that points to the direction that Iran is not too far from it, in terms of the level of approaching it.

And again, since you raised the subject, let me be very clear on one point. It's not the technology that is the problem. It's the hand on the trigger. It's the terrorist nature of this regime that is alarming the world today.

Clearly, a democratic Iran is going to resolve not only the problem of concern we have today with WMDs, but also every other issue remaining to regional stability and, of course, stability that we are all hoping for. And this is what we are all striving for in Iran today.

WALLACE: Mr. Pahlavi, thank you. Thank you so much for joining us.

PAHLAVI: Thank you, Chris.

WALLACE: Appreciate it.

PAHLAVI: Thank you very much.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,107327,00.html
40 posted on 01/04/2004 11:01:20 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

41 posted on 01/05/2004 12:04:12 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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