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Iranian Alert -- January 12, 2004 -- IRAN LIVE THREAD --Americans for Regime Change in Iran
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 1.12.2004 | DoctorZin

Posted on 01/12/2004 12:01:31 AM PST by DoctorZIn

The US media almost entirely ignores news regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran. As Tony Snow of the Fox News Network has put it, “this is probably the most under-reported news story of the year.” But most American’s are unaware that the Islamic Republic of Iran is NOT supported by the masses of Iranians today. Modern Iranians are among the most pro-American in the Middle East.

There is a popular revolt against the Iranian regime brewing in Iran today. Starting June 10th of this year, Iranians have begun taking to the streets to express their desire for a regime change. Most want to replace the regime with a secular democracy. Many even want the US to over throw their government.

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movement in Iran from being reported. Unfortunately, the regime has successfully prohibited western news reporters from covering the demonstrations. The voices of discontent within Iran are sometime murdered, more often imprisoned. Still the people continue to take to the streets to demonstrate against the regime.

In support of this revolt, Iranians in America have been broadcasting news stories by satellite into Iran. This 21st century news link has greatly encouraged these protests. The regime has been attempting to jam the signals, and locate the satellite dishes. Still the people violate the law and listen to these broadcasts. Iranians also use the Internet and the regime attempts to block their access to news against the regime. In spite of this, many Iranians inside of Iran read these posts daily to keep informed of the events in their own country.

This daily thread contains nearly all of the English news reports on Iran. It is thorough. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary. The news stories and commentary will from time to time include material from the regime itself. But if you read the post you will discover for yourself, the real story of what is occurring in Iran and its effects on the war on terror.

I am not of Iranian heritage. I am an American committed to supporting the efforts of those in Iran seeking to replace their government with a secular democracy. I am in contact with leaders of the Iranian community here in the United States and in Iran itself.

If you read the daily posts you will gain a better understanding of the US war on terrorism, the Middle East and why we need to support a change of regime in Iran. Feel free to ask your questions and post news stories you discover in the weeks to come.

If all goes well Iran will be free soon and I am convinced become a major ally in the war on terrorism. The regime will fall. Iran will be free. It is just a matter of time.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iaea; iran; iranianalert; iranquake; protests; southasia; studentmovement; studentprotest
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

1 posted on 01/12/2004 12:01:32 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: All
If you don't make a donation to Free Republic, then that's one more thing you have in common with Patrick Leahy.

2 posted on 01/12/2004 12:02:58 AM PST by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

3 posted on 01/12/2004 12:03:51 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Iran in Crisis -- An Iranian Student's Live Thread (from inside Iran)

Freerepublic ^ | Jan 12, 04 | khashayar
Posted on 01/11/2004 11:55:51 PM PST by Khashayar

The upcoming election will be an important point for both Iranians and their regime.

Most Iranians are against their suppressive regime. In the past few hours, around 80% of the so-called reformists have been banned from taking part in these elections as candidates.

These reformists are children of the Islamic Revolution and the people of Iran no longer support them. I would like to say that I believe this crisis is a fake...

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1056104/posts?page=1
4 posted on 01/12/2004 12:05:40 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Reformist legislators in Iran hold protests

Karl Vick, Washington Post
Published January 12, 2004 IRAN12

Reformist legislators in Iran held angry protests Sunday after a conservative oversight body barred more than 80 of them from seeking reelection next month.

The legislators first walked out of parliament, then dozens staged a sit-in to protest the sweeping decision by the hard-line Guardian Council, which screens all candidates for national office. The council is appointed by Iran's supreme religious leader.

"It's meaningless that qualification of prominent figures who have worked for the nation for years is not approved," said President Muhammad Khatami, who was voted into office in 1997 on a reform platform.

In addition to the incumbents, thousands of other candidates were barred from running for the 290-seat parliament, according to the official Islamic Republic News Agency. In Tehran alone, parliament members said, about 900 of the 1,700 candidates for seats had been disqualified.

The disqualifications represent a new frustration for Iran's reform movement, which despite overwhelming public support has failed to wrest decisive political power from unelected conservative clerics. Last year, the Guardian Council vetoed two bills that would have broadened Khatami's powers and removed the council's authority to screen candidates.

The candidate disqualifications -- more than three times the number four years ago -- amounted to an aggressive reassertion of authority by the conservatives, who have ruled Iran since the 1979 revolution. Half of the council's 12 members are clerics; all 12 are appointed either directly or indirectly by Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who succeeded the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini as Iran's supreme leader.

The disqualified legislators include Muhammad Reza Khatami, the younger brother of Iran's president who leads the Islamic Iran Participation Front, the largest reformist party.

"The sit-in today is the beginning of a movement which will have more ramifications," he said.

Another prominent reformist, Mohsen Mirdamadi, called the Guardian Council's action "a civilian coup d'état." He charged that the council "barred certain individuals in every electoral constituency in order to clear the way for their favorite candidates."

Conservatives have recently spoken of mobilizing their supporters to regain control of parliament in elections set for Feb. 20.

President Khatami appealed for calm, saying he would ask Khamenei to review the disqualifications. The president's spokesman suggested that the Cabinet office charged with carrying out elections might ignore the disqualifications when publishing ballots.

http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/4313339.html
5 posted on 01/12/2004 12:08:45 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
US "big problems" with Syria & Iran

January 12, 2004
IranMania News

WASHINGTON, Jan 11 (AFP) -- An advisor to Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said Sunday that the United States had "big problems" with Syria which allowed terrorists to enter Iraq via its territory.

"One of the things they're (the Syrians) doing is facilitating the entry into Iraq of terrorists who are there to kill Americans," Richard Perle told

"They're holding on to money that belongs to the people of Iraq. And they're building chemical weapons, at least. So we have big problems with the Syrians."

On January 5, Syrian Foreign Minister Faruq al-Shara said he wanted to see improved relations between Washington and Syria following the US adoption of legislation paving the way for unilateral sanctions against his government.

Syrian media on Saturday called for Washington to wield its influence and help revive peace talks with Israel that collapsed in acrimony four years ago.

But, said Perle, the Syrians "from time to time, will throw us a crumb, a piece of intelligence here, or they'll take a minor step there. And they hope, and in the past they've sometimes been right, that that that will deflect us from what ought to be our course, which is a real change in their policy."

Perle also warned against US moves to stretch out its hands to the Iranian regime.
"The problem is the moderates in Iran are not in power. The mullahs who are in power are not moderate. I don't think a preemptive strike is called for," he said.

And of Saudi Arabia, Perle said: "The Saudis qualify for their own membership in the axis of evil."

Perle, who accuses the Saudis in a book he has just published of qualifying "for their own membership in the axis of evil,"

"I hope that those who believe that we are now getting full cooperation are right. I have yet to see the evidence."

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=21548&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
6 posted on 01/12/2004 12:11:34 AM PST by F14 Pilot (Either you are with us or you are with the terrorists.)
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To: DoctorZIn
A TRUE Democracy is Iran's primary need!
7 posted on 01/12/2004 12:42:11 AM PST by Khashayar
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To: DoctorZIn
Solana applauds Iran nuclear cooperation

Mon 12 January, 2004
Reuters

TEHRAN (Reuters) - European Foreign Policy chief Javier Solana has applauded Iran's efforts to dispel international concerns it may be developing nuclear weapons.

Tehran insists its nuclear programme is solely geared to producing electricity from atomic power and last month signed an international protocol which permits U.N. inspectors to carry out snap checks of its nuclear facilities.

In a deal hammered out with the foreign ministers of Britain, Germany and France in October, Iran has also suspended its uranium enrichment activities and admitted to an 18-year cover-up of sensitive nuclear research.

"The Iranian authorities have undertaken commitments and we'd like to see continuous cooperation," Solana told a news conference at the start of a two-day visit to Iran.

"We still have to clarify some things but we're in a very good and constructive mood of cooperation," he said after a meeting with Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi.

Iran's President Mohammad Khatami on Sunday called on Washington to recognise Iran's right to develop nuclear technology for civilian purposes.

U.S. officials, while welcoming increased signs of Iran's cooperation with the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency, continue to raise concerns that Iran's nuclear programme may be a front for building atomic weapons.

http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsPackageArticle.jhtml?type=worldNews&storyID=437208&section=news
-----
Comment: When will EU leave Iran alone?
8 posted on 01/12/2004 1:51:24 AM PST by F14 Pilot (Either you are with us or you are with the terrorists.)
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot; nuconvert; Persia; Cyrus the Great; faludeh_shirazi; democracy; ...
"Iran elections will have bearing on ties with EU"

Monday, January 12, 2004 - ©2003 IranMania.com

TEHRAN, Jan 12 (AFP) -- The European Union's foreign policy chief Javier Solana told Iran's clerical leaders Monday that the holding of free and fair elections here next month would have a bearing on their relations with the European bloc.

Solana's two-day visit to Iran, described by diplomats as an effort to keep up momentum in the two sides' warming relations, has been overshadowed by a major political crisis here following the large-scale barring of reformists from the February 20 parliamentary elections.

Although Solana referred to the issue as an "internal matter" for Iran, he was clear in spelling out the potentially dire consequences for Iran-EU relations if the vote is perceived as being rigged by religious hardliners.

"The fairness of an election is not only on the day of the election, the process should be fair," he told reporters in a joint press conference with Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi.

"But it's very difficult for me to explain to the Europeans how MPs who are representatives of the people could not participate again in the election," he added.

"What is important is that the elections are fair," Solana emphasised, although he did acknowledged the political wrangling ahead of the crucial vote was far from over.

In contrast to the United States, which has labelled Tehran part of an "axis of evil," the EU is pressing ahead with a policy of constructive engagement with Iran, pressing human rights issues while at the same time seeking to negotiate a bilateral trade agreement.

The policy has scored in some areas, notably with the foreign ministers of Britain, France and Germany succeeding late last year in convincing Iran to come clean on its nuclear programme and sign up to tougher inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the UN's nuclear watchdog.

But EU diplomats say the dialogue has largely been with Iranian reformists -- whose control over parliament and therefore the government is now under threat from powerful religious conservatives controlling the Guardians' Council, the political watchdog seeking to blacklist large numbers of reformist candidates.

"A very important component of our engagement with Iran is democracy and human rights, and Mr. Solana will certainly be looking at what is happening in the run up to the elections next month," a senior EU diplomat close to Solana told AFP.

"It would be hard to envisage our dialogue continuing with the same intensity if hardliners are in power and had taken power in such questionable circumstances," said the diplomat, adding that a conservative victory could put EU-Iran dialogue "back to square one".

In addition to human rights and the nuclear issue, the EU has also been pressing Iran on two other matters -- cooperating in the fight against terrorism and lending its support to Middle East peace efforts.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=21556&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs

EU making some sense?
9 posted on 01/12/2004 8:55:34 AM PST by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn
Further Egypt Ties Need More Time

January 12, 2004
Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting
IRIB News

Tehran -- President Mohammad Khatami said that given the current favorable Iran-Egypt relations, further measures towards its improvement should be taken step by step and hoped that the issues of bilateral concern will be settled while the inter ests of both sides are protected.

In response to a reporter's question, at the end of today's cabinet meeting, about the US administrators remarks about Iran, the president said that the Americans are still threatening Iran.

Turning to the humanitarian aid of the foreign states including the US provided on the occasion of the killer earthquake in Bam city which claimed thousands of lives and levelled the area, he expressed appreciation for all relief and rescue measures no matter by whom they were taken.

The chief executive hoped that the recent developments will bring about major changes in the US faulty policies and that it would stop its charges against Iran.

Pointing to the US accusation that Iran attempts to access nuclear weapons, the president said, "We have signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) additional protocol and if the US has a good will, it should dismiss its charges against Iran."

"Besides it should confirm Iran's legal rights to access nuclear technology towards peaceful applications under the supervision of the International Atomic Energy Organization (IAEA)."

http://www.iribnews.com/Full_en.asp?news_id=196293
10 posted on 01/12/2004 8:56:06 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Iranian Council Bars Thousands from Vote

January 11, 2004
The New York Times
Nazila Fathi

TEHRAN -- A new power struggle engulfed Iran's government on Sunday when a hard-line Islamic religious authority disqualified half the 8,200 candidates in parliamentary elections next month, provoking outrage among reformers who accused their conservative rivals of trying to steal the vote.

Rejected candidates included a brother of the reform-minded president, Mohammad Khatami. More than 80 current members of the 290-seat Parliament were rejected, including two prominent feminists, two deputy speakers and six leaders of important parliamentary commissions. Many had been outspoken critics of Iran's strict Islamic religious political system and its treatment of dissenters and diverse views.

The religious authority, the 12-member Guardian Council, had disqualified some candidates in previous elections and had blocked many reform bills passed by Parliament in recent years. But the number of disqualifications for the Feb. 20 elections represented the most drastic action the council has taken against reformers in the country's parliamentary history.

Nearly 60 reformist members of Parliament held a sit-in at Parliament on Sunday to protest the action. Ali Shakourirad, a lawmaker on the disqualified list, told reporters that the group intended to continue the sit-in until the disqualifications were reversed. If not, he said, "we will take further steps in our protest."

The Iranian Student News Agency reported that governors general around the country had said in a letter to President Khatami that they would resign if the disqualification of candidates was not reversed. "Clearly if there are no results within a week, governor generals see no reason to continue their jobs in conditions in which they cannot provide free elections, which is one of the fundamental rights of citizens," the news agency quoted them as saying.

President Khatami urged supporters to react calmly, but he was clearly angered by what outside political analysts called a brazen effort by religious conservatives to neutralize Iran's reform movement.

"There are legal means to react to this problem, and I hope these legal means will solve the problem," President Khatami told reporters after a cabinet meeting.

"We must not do anything to cause tension but we have the right to say what we have to say and to protest," he said. "One political faction must not consider its right more than what it deserves, and it should not eliminate another faction in order to win in elections."

Mohsen Mirdamadi, head of Parliament's National Security and Foreign Policy Committee, who was among those disqualified, told the Islamic Republic News Agency that the Guardian Council's move was a "bloodless coup." He said President Khatami's younger brother, Mohammad Reza Khatami, and some others were disqualified because the council had concluded they did not support the rule of the supreme religious leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

The ayatollah has the power to change the Guardian Council's decision. It remained unclear late Sunday whether President Khatami would appeal directly to him or take some intermediate action first.

Other rejected candidates included six from the ethnic Kurdish region of Iranian Kurdistan. Jalal Jalali, a parliamentarian from Sanandaj, in the center of that region, was quoted by the Etemad newspaper as saying Kurds would boycott the elections if their candidates could not run.

The six clerics of the Guardian Council are picked by Ayatollah Khamenei. The council is responsible for vetting election candidates and approving Parliament's laws to make sure they are compatible with Islamic law and the Constitution.

There was no public explanation by the council for its decisions on each of the disqualified candidates. But Iranian newspapers reported Sunday that a majority of disqualifications were made because the candidates opposed Iran's religious government or were members of illegal opposition groups. The newspapers said some were disqualified because they had criminal records.

The election had been seen as a test of the public's attitude toward the reform movement in Iran. The council's disqualification actions could lead to voter apathy, some political commentators said.

"We must not forget the fact that the Islamic Republic has received its legitimacy in the past 25 years from voters' turnout in elections, and if people refrain from voting this time the system's 25-year-old legitimacy would be questioned," wrote a journalist, Badrolsadat Mofidi, in the Shargh newspaper on Sunday.

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/12/international/middleeast/12IRAN.html
11 posted on 01/12/2004 8:57:27 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
An End to Evil, How to Win the War on Terror

January 09, 2004
The American Enterprise Institute
AEI

AEI fellows David Frum and Richard Perle lay out a plan for victory in the war on terror that includes...overthrowing terror-supporting regimes; waging a global campaign against the terrorist ideology by promoting democracy, open trade, and the rights of Muslim women...

To view a video presentaion of David Frum, Richard Perle to the American Enterprise Institute click on the link below.

How to Win the War on Terror

Since the fall of Baghdad, both supporters and opponents of the George W. Bush administration have asked what should and could come next in the terror war. In An End to Evil (Random House, December 2003), AEI fellows David Frum and Richard Perle lay out a plan for victory in the war on terror that includes reinvigorating homeland security with a new security agency, better border controls, and national identity cards; overthrowing terror-supporting regimes; waging a global campaign against the terrorist ideology by promoting democracy, open trade, and the rights of Muslim women; and transforming the U.S. government to ensure that all its agencies and parts dedicate themselves to fighting and defeating terror.

About the book:

How to Win the War on Terror

By David Frum, Richard Perle

An End to Evil charts the agenda for what's next in the war on terrorism, as articulated by David Frum, former presidential speechwriter and bestselling author of The Right Man, and Richard Perle, former assistant secretary of defense and one of the most influential foreign-policy leaders in Washington.

This world is an unsafe place for Americans--and the U.S. government remains unready to defend its people. In An End to Evil, David Frum and Richard Perle sound the alert about the dangers around us: the continuing threat from terrorism, the crisis with North Korea, the aggressive ambitions of China. Frum and Perle provide a detailed, candid account of America's vulnerabilities: a military whose leaders resist change, intelligence agencies mired in bureaucracy, diplomats who put friendly relations with their foreign colleagues ahead of the nation's interests. Perle and Frum lay out a bold program to defend America--and to win the war on terror. Among the topics this book addresses:



why the United States risks its security if it submits to the authority of the United Nations

why France and Saudi Arabia have to be treated as adversaries, not allies, in the war on terror

why the United States must take decisive action against Iran--now

what to do in North Korea if negotiations fail

why everything you read in the newspapers about the Israeli-Arab dispute is wrong

how our government must be changed if we are to fight the war on terror to victory--not just stalemate

where the next great terror threat is coming from--and what we can do to protect ourselves

An End to Evil will define the conservative point of view on foreign policy for a new generation--and shape the agenda for the 2004 presidential-election year and beyond. With a keen insiders' perspective on how our leaders are confronting--or not confronting--the war on terrorism, David Frum and Richard Perle make a convincing argument for why the toughest line is the safest line.

David Frum and Richard Perle are resident fellows at AEI. \

http://www.aei.org/events/eventID.704,filter.,type.past/event_detail.asp
12 posted on 01/12/2004 9:04:23 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Reformists have been quick to mobilise and challenge the conservative bid to remove them from power, leaving the two rival camps in political deadlock.

Iran's interior ministry, responsible for organising elections, has branded the disqualifications "illegal" and warned that they would not be enforced, therefore throwing the whole electoral process into chaos.

The government was also risking collapse, with up to eight cabinet ministers reportedly preparing to resign and all of Iran's 27 provincial governors saying they will also quit unless the crisis was resolved within a week.

Khatami has also made an impassioned appeal for calm. Students, one of the driving forces behind reforms who might have been expected to protest, have so far kept quiet.

Amid widespread frustrations with the reform movement, analysts had already been pointing to a possible all-time low voter turnout next month and the handing of power to conservatives who can rely on a hardcore support base -- exactly what occurred during municipal elections in February 2003.

Such an outcome would effectively leave Khatami as the sole reformist within the regime until his term ends in mid-2005.

Iranian reforms hang in balance as conservatives bid for absolute power 2 hours, 21 minutes ago

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=1504&ncid=1504&e=2&u=/afp/20040112/ts_afp/iran_vote_040112143754



Conservative ex-MP Mohammad Mohammadi-Far (C) fights with reformist MPs during a sit-in. The future of reforms in Iran was hanging in the balance as embattled reformists loyal to the president fought a dramatic bid by conservatives to wrest absolute power over the Islamic republic.(AFP)

Note: It's not surprising that Students aren't protestings. Student groups have long parted with the reformist movement and started the Third Force someone needs to keep AFP up to date because they seem years behind.
13 posted on 01/12/2004 9:05:38 AM PST by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn
MKs Eldad and Erden Invite Iran to Open Negotiations

January 12, 2004
Arutz Sheva
Israel National News

MK Aryeh Eldad (National Union) and MK Gilad Erdan (Likud) are calling upon Iran’s President Khatami to enter into political negotiations with Israel without any pre-conditions. The tongue-in-cheek call comes after President Katzav invited Syria’s Bashar Assad to visit Jerusalem and amidst rumors of increased relations with Libya.

The MKs say they hope to discuss with the Islamic republic of Iran its pursuit of nuclear weapons, which have the potential to reach Israel through use of Iran’s ‘Shihab-3’ missiles. The MKs also said that if a true peace were to engulf the entire region, then it would be possible to consider the dismantling of nuclear weapons in the region.

Eldar and Erden expressed their frustration to Arutz-7s Haggai Seri Levi, saying that the proposals inviting Israel’s enemies to Israel are purely for purposes of public relations.

Prime Minister Sharon pointed out in a Sunday press conference that Syria’s Bashar Assad was simply using Israel to deflect criticism from the US, while continuing to facilitate terrorism.

http://www.israelnn.com/news.php3?id=56036
14 posted on 01/12/2004 9:05:58 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Iranian Leader Shuns Intervention

January 12, 2004
BBC News
BBCi

Iran's supreme leader has said the controversy over next month's parliamentary elections must be resolved through legal channels. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said he would only intervene after legal procedures had been exhausted.

The row began after the Guardian Council - a hardline body made up of clerics and Islamic lawyers - barred 2,000-plus reformists from standing.

The decision provoked a storm of protests from reformers.

The provincial governors in charge of administering the elections say they will resign unless the ban is reversed, and 80 reformist deputies are continuing a sit-in inside the Iranian parliament.

Reformist President Mohammad Khatami has appealed for calm.

'Judgment and duty'

Most of those disqualified are believed to have appealed, and their cases will be examined by the Guardian Council over the next two weeks.

They include include Mohammad Reza Khatami, the younger brother of the president, and Behzad Nabavi - who are both deputy speakers of parliament.

Ayatollah Khamenei said that if there were a large number of questionable disqualifications, he would use his constitutional powers to try to redress the situation.

"At this stage we have legal channels and everyone should act based on law," he said in comments carried by state radio.

"If it gets to the point that it becomes sensitive and requires a decision... there is no doubt that I will step in and act in accordance with my judgment and duty, as has been the case in the past."

The 12-member Council of Guardians is empowered to ensure parliament's actions comply with Islamic principles.

Council spokesman Mohammad Jahromi said 2,033 of the 8,200 candidates had been barred but MPs said the figure was higher.

MP Reza Yousefian said more than 80 of 290 MPs had been banned from re-election.

Iran's parliament is dominated by the reformists, who have won all major national elections since 1997.

European Union foreign policy chief Javier Solana, who is currently visiting Tehran, has said that a clear and transparent electoral process was very important to the EU.

"It's very difficult for me to explain [to the European Parliament] how MPs who are representatives of the people could not participate again in the election," he said.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3389285.stm
15 posted on 01/12/2004 9:06:56 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
An End to Evil, How to Win the War on Terror

January 09, 2004
The American Enterprise Institute
AEI

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1056107/posts?page=12#12
16 posted on 01/12/2004 9:08:05 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Iranian leader shuns intervention

Iran's supreme leader has said the controversy over next month's parliamentary elections must be resolved through legal channels.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said he would only intervene after legal procedures had been exhausted.

The row began after the Guardian Council - a hardline body made up of clerics and Islamic lawyers - barred 2,000-plus reformists from standing.

The decision provoked a storm of protests from reformers.

The provincial governors in charge of administering the elections say they will resign unless the ban is reversed, and 80 reformist deputies are continuing a sit-in inside the Iranian parliament.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/3389285.stm

Note: My guess is that Khamenei is going to intervene during coming weeks and allow certain hand picked group of reformists to run. It looks like it's becoming a show.


17 posted on 01/12/2004 9:10:47 AM PST by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn
BARRED FROM STANDING
More than 80 reformist MPs
Majority of candidates from the reformist Islamic Iran Participation Front
Two female legislators who have fought for women's rights
Hundreds of other reformist candidates
18 posted on 01/12/2004 9:11:38 AM PST by freedom44
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To: freedom44
Freedom, Azizam!
There is no difference between these moderate people and their hardline counterparts. Remember that they are loyal to the regime and supreme leader.
A big boycott on election will be a bigger NO to the whole regime.
19 posted on 01/12/2004 9:22:21 AM PST by Khashayar
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To: freedom44
..."But it's very difficult for me to explain to the Europeans how MPs who are representatives of the people could not participate again in the election," he added....

The Europeans need the Iranian regime to "look" democratic. Otherwise Europe will be forced to cut business ties to Iran.

I expect the reformists to call on the people to join them in this "crisis" with the hardliners. Then if the people return to the reformists, the hardliners will back down. The result being that the people who now despise both the hardliners and reformists may vote in the reformists again. This will provide Europe with the excuse that it can continue to do business with Iran.

The people of Iran must not fall into this trap.
20 posted on 01/12/2004 9:22:49 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: freedom44
I think the AFP is up to date, but does not want to keep its readers informed.

Remember the press in France that only printed quagmire news about Iraq? They didn't want to admit to their readers that America is winning the war in France.

The power of the press should never be overlooked.
21 posted on 01/12/2004 9:30:38 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Freedom is a package deal - with it comes responsibilities and consequences.)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife
ROTFL... well, I meant to say winning the war in Iraq, but in a way, this also proves that we can win the war in France, too. :)

I apologize for my error.
22 posted on 01/12/2004 9:33:06 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Freedom is a package deal - with it comes responsibilities and consequences.)
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To: DoctorZIn
The people aren't going to join the reformists. As you see there have been no student demonstrations in support of them.

23 posted on 01/12/2004 11:35:07 AM PST by freedom44
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To: freedom44
I just hope that the rest of the Iranian people feel the same way.
24 posted on 01/12/2004 12:07:05 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
EU's Solana Urges Transparent Electoral Process In Iran

January 12, 2004
Dow Jones Newswires
The Associated Press

TEHRAN -- The European Union's foreign policy chief on Monday called for a clear electoral process in Iran after hard-liners disqualified hundreds of liberal candidates, including more than 80 sitting lawmakers allied with the reformist president.

Javier Solana, on a two-day visit to Iran, criticized the disqualifications, saying it was "difficult to explain (to the European parliament) how a lawmaker can't be a candidate."

"The electoral process is very important for democracy and will be very important to us," he told reporters. "We want very much the electoral process to be clear and transparent."

For a second consecutive day, reformist parliament members staged a sit-in at the legislature to protest the disqualifications.

The 12-member Guardian Council, which comprises conservatives picked by Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, has barred more than 80 incumbent lawmakers, all reformists, from seeking another term in Feb. 20 parliamentary elections.

About 900 of the 1,700 people who wanted to contest seats in Tehran have been disqualified, members of parliament said.

The disqualified hopefuls still have the option to appeal the decision.

President Mohammad Khatami vowed Sunday to challenge the disqualifications, saying there would be a "harsh reaction" if legal channels failed to overturn the council's decision.

Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi said elections were an internal issue and that the government was consulting over what action to take.

"The top leaders are thinking of a solution so that, God willing, the rights of no body will be ignored and a crisis does not develop," Kharrazi said.

Reformist leaders have threatened a boycott of the election if their candidates are disqualified.

The disqualified legislators include Mohammad Reza Khatami, the younger brother of the president, and Behzad Nabavi - both deputy speakers of parliament. Mohammad Reza Khatami leads the Islamic Iran Participation Front, the largest reformist party.

The Guardian Council also disqualified Fatemeh Haqiqatjou and Elaheh Koulaee, two female legislators who have fought for women's rights.

Some 8,200 prospective candidates registered last month to run in the elections for 290 legislative seats. Their qualifications must be approved by local trustees and then the Guardian Council.

Government spokesman Abdollah Ramezanzadeh said the government "will not consider illegal decisions by any body as binding."

That means the Interior Ministry, which is controlled by reformists, may ignore the Guardian Council's rulings and put the disqualified names on the ballots.

The Guardian Council had warned earlier that it would disqualify candidates whom they deemed to oppose Khamenei's absolute rule.

Hard-liners consider Khamenei above the law and answerable only to God. Reformists want Khamenei's powers to be curbed so that he becomes answerable to the nation.

In the February 2000 elections, the conservatives lost control of the parliament for the first time since the 1979 Islamic revolution. They won less than a third of the legislature.

Next month's polls will be a crucial test for Iran's reform movement, which has frequently been thwarted by hard-line organs of government and has lost popularity because of a perceived failure to deliver on its promises of liberalization.

http://framehosting.dowjonesnews.com/sample/samplestory.asp?StoryID=2004011210350008&Take=1
25 posted on 01/12/2004 12:12:46 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
"Iran Elections will have Bearing on Ties with EU"

January 12, 2004
AFP
IranMania

TEHRAN -- The European Union's foreign policy chief Javier Solana told Iran's clerical leaders Monday that the holding of free and fair elections here next month would have a bearing on their relations with the European bloc.

Solana's two-day visit to Iran, described by diplomats as an effort to keep up momentum in the two sides' warming relations, has been overshadowed by a major political crisis here following the large-scale barring of reformists from the February 20 parliamentary elections.

Although Solana referred to the issue as an "internal matter" for Iran, he was clear in spelling out the potentially dire consequences for Iran-EU relations if the vote is perceived as being rigged by religious hardliners.

"The fairness of an election is not only on the day of the election, the process should be fair," he told reporters in a joint press conference with Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi.

"But it's very difficult for me to explain to the Europeans how MPs who are representatives of the people could not participate again in the election," he added.

"What is important is that the elections are fair," Solana emphasised, although he did acknowledged the political wrangling ahead of the crucial vote was far from over.

In contrast to the United States, which has labelled Tehran part of an "axis of evil," the EU is pressing ahead with a policy of constructive engagement with Iran, pressing human rights issues while at the same time seeking to negotiate a bilateral trade agreement.

The policy has scored in some areas, notably with the foreign ministers of Britain, France and Germany succeeding late last year in convincing Iran to come clean on its nuclear programme and sign up to tougher inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the UN's nuclear watchdog.

But EU diplomats say the dialogue has largely been with Iranian reformists -- whose control over parliament and therefore the government is now under threat from powerful religious conservatives controlling the Guardians' Council, the political watchdog seeking to blacklist large numbers of reformist candidates.

"A very important component of our engagement with Iran is democracy and human rights, and Mr. Solana will certainly be looking at what is happening in the run up to the elections next month," a senior EU diplomat close to Solana told AFP.

"It would be hard to envisage our dialogue continuing with the same intensity if hardliners are in power and had taken power in such questionable circumstances," said the diplomat, adding that a conservative victory could put EU-Iran dialogue "back to square one".

In addition to human rights and the nuclear issue, the EU has also been pressing Iran on two other matters -- cooperating in the fight against terrorism and lending its support to Middle East peace efforts.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=21556&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
26 posted on 01/12/2004 12:13:20 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Out of Misery, Hope

January 12, 2004
National Review Online
Koorosh Afshar

An open letter to President George W. Bush.

Dear Mr. President,

I sincerely hope that you have enjoyed a merry Christmas and a happy New Year. And while the year has gotten off to an unfortunate start for my fellow Iranians, I remain hopeful that this will be, at last, a year of peace and freedom for all the nations of the world.

So far, my freedom-loving peers and I have, in our struggle to be heard, skipped over statesmen and governments and appealed directly to the people. We have done everything in our power to convince the world's ordinary citizens — people like us — to lend a hand in freeing our homeland from the reign of a small and corrupt, but armed, mob. Yet we have finally decided to make one exception: We have decided to write to you.

I write on behalf of my beloved friends — the ones abducted months ago who are still missing; the ones shackled in the theocratic regime's torture cells; the girls raped and tortured on the nights before their executions by Islamic thugs; the ones buried in mass graves. Yet I write most of all on behalf of all of us who aspire to a free and democratic Iran.

Mr. President, we appreciate the generosity of your resolve in helping the Iranian nation heal one of its many wounds. We treasure this kindness, which we consider an example of America's compassionate attitude toward the Iranian people.

Thank you very much, Mr. President; and thank you, all the American people! You have soothed and calmed the pain of this most recent suffering, and we drew strength as we saw that you were, once again, there to support us.

But amid all the scenes of misery, you may have missed something. You may not have noticed that the disaster in Bam was like a final shot in the skull of a moribund people, for whom life (as most in the West know it) ceased decades before the earthquake. Like millions of other Iranians, they never had the chance to experience that sacred trio of rights: to life, to liberty, and to the pursuit of happiness. Most knew nothing but misery, and liberty was the stuff of dreams. Now, thanks to the earthquake, they can no longer claim even life.

Mr. President, we may be able to rebuild the ancient citadel of Bam. But how can we ever hope to rebuild the devastated minds and spirits of those children who have lost their parents, or their siblings, to the darkness of bloodthirsty tyrants? How can we buy back the totally ruined lives of the Iranian teenage girls sold to neighboring countries? Please understand our anguish, and our frustration: Iranian lives matter little to some of your European counterparts, and even to some of your opponents in America.

Sir, please remind Secretary Powell that even the thought of negotiating with the mullahs is absolutely futile. Khatami and Khomeini are both against the Iranian people. And consider another example of political corruption that might be useful to your administration — look at what happened in Bam. President Rafsanjani had constructed a gigantic complex there called Arg-e-Jadid-e-Bam, meaning "The Modern Citadel of Bam," for the workers and foreign staff of one of his many factories in Iran. Of course, the "Modern Citadel" was not destroyed in the earthquake; not one person was injured there. It's too bad Mr. Rafsanjani couldn't be bothered to ensure such modern, rigorous building codes for the rest of Bam: Tens of thousands of died; one out of every two people in the city was killed in the quake.

As if that wasn't treachery enough, the mullahs showed their true vicious colors when it came to the earthquake-relief money, according to some Iranian sources. Fully aware of the horrible conditions in Bam, the mullahs still didn't hesitate to seize hefty portions of the international humanitarian aid, only to use it as campaign funding for the upcoming elections for the Islamic parliament. Mr. President, how can Secretary Powell even speak of negotiations with people this evil?

Lastly, Mr. President, please do not forget that what you and your allied forces have begun in Iraq and Afghanistan can only bear fruit if the Iranian problem is solved. We can do it: Trust us, not the mullahs. Invest in the real Iran, not the Islamic occupying regime. Allow us to make this plague the last to afflict the Iranians; allow us to make 2004 the year of Iran's liberation.

And please allow us write to you again — next time, about our free and peaceful homeland.

With gratitude,
Koorosh Afshar

— Koorosh Afshar is a pseudonym for a student at the Iranian University in Tehran.

http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/afshar200401120907.asp
27 posted on 01/12/2004 12:14:02 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
The Vision Thing

January 12, 2004
Center for Security Policy
Decision Brief

In this political year, George W. Bush is said to have felt the need to demonstrate that he has a quality his father once derided as "the vision thing." So he has reportedly embraced an ambitious, long-term and stupefyingly costly (some estimates run as high as a trillion-dollars over the next few decades) program for manned exploration of the Moon and Mars.

Real Vision

As it happens, there is far more immediate, clear and, frankly, credible proof of this President's 20-20 vision: His determination to liberate Iraq and his courageous, steadfast and effective realization of that strategically critical initiative.

Just how visionary was this presidential undertaking can be measured in two ways. First, Mr. Bush recognized – apparently from the very outset of his administration – that the removal of Saddam Hussein from power would not only be of immense benefit to the long-suffering people of Iraq and to their long-threatened neighbors. It had the potential to catalyze long-needed changes among other terrorist-sponsoring and weapons of mass destruction-wielding regimes in the region and beyond.

Changing the Mideast – and Beyond

Today, there can be no doubt that the forcible toppling of the Butcher of Baghdad -- and the demonstration it entailed of American power and, no less importantly, will – has "concentrated the minds" of his counterparts elsewhere in the Mideast and Central and East Asia. With characteristic lucidness and verve, syndicated columnist William Safire enumerated in a column published Monday in the New York Times how enemies of freedom in Libya, Afghanistan, Syria, the West Bank, Iran and North Korea have all trimmed sail of late.

As Safire observes of the sudden renunciation last month of Libya's WMD programs by its despotic ruler Moammar Qadhafi, "the notion that this terror-supporting dictator's epiphany was not the direct result of our military action, but of decade-long diplomatic pleas for goodness and mercy, is laughable."

The Vision-Challenged

The second measure of just how visionary was President Bush's decision to liberate Iraq can be found in the lack of vision exhibited by so many of his critics. Some, like Joseph Cirincione of the Carnegie Endowment writing in Sunday's Washington Post, insist on making the "laughable" case that "It is unclear whether these breakthroughs [in Libya, Iran and North Korea]...are the result of the American success in Iraq or of our failures there."

Now, Cirincione – like the left-wing think-tank for which he works – has a powerful interest in diminishing the far-reaching and beneficial effects of George Bush's surgical application of American military power. He and the Carnegie Endowment have long promoted the idea that arms control, international treaties and regimes, supranational government bodies, multilateral inspections and, in extremis, UN-approved sanctions can be safely relied upon to resolve basically all threats to our security.

Just last week, Cirincione and two Carnegie co-authors published a much ballyhooed critique of the Bush Administration's perceptions of, representations about and efforts to eliminate the threat posed by Saddam Hussein. Few of those in the press who uncritically touted the report's conclusions took note of their self-serving nature. For example, Cirincione et.al. concluded that, "Considering all the costs and benefits, there were at least two options clearly preferable to a war undertaken without international support: allowing [UN] inspections to continue until obstructed or completed, or imposing a tougher program of ‘coercive inspections' backed by a specially designed force."

If you start from the perspective that U.S. military action is essentially illegitimate unless authorized by the UN and that inspections ("coercive" or otherwise) are always useful – even in the face of systematic deception and concealment operations by the inspectees and of international inspectors who don't want to give offense to their hosts, it almost always follows that there are "clearly preferable" alternatives to war. An analysis that flows from such premises is so predictably skewed as to amount to "garbage-in, garbage-out."

Disqualified for the Role of Visionary Commander-in-Chief

More importantly, many of President Bush's would-be-successors are displaying a similar, stunning lack of vision. Two of the most prominent Democratic candidates, former Vermont Governor Howard Dean and retired General Wesley Clark, have endlessly described Iraq as a "diversion" from the war on terror. (Last week, Gen. Clark further disqualified himself for the job of Commander-in-Chief when he made the preposterous and dangerously misleading pledge that, "If I'm president of the United States, I'm going to take care of the American people. We are not going to have one of these incidents [like 9/11].")

The Bottom Line

The reality is, as Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz said long ago, to win the war on terror we must not only kill individual terrorist "mosquitoes" but "drain the swamps." One need not believe that the various tactical changes the rogue state regimes have adopted represent real changes of heart to recognize that none of them – not one – would likely have occurred at this point in time without President Bush's vision and the actions that flowed from it.

We are unlikely to see the world really made a safer place for the long run unless and until the regimes that have lied to us in the past – notably, those running Libya, Iran, North Korea, the Palestinian Authority, Sudan and Syria – are replaced with ones that respect their people, the rule of law and their word. As long as President George W. Bush does not lose sight of that reality, he will be remembered for his transforming vision long before any American takes up residence on the Moon or steps foot on Mars.

http://www.centerforsecuritypolicy.org/index.jsp?section=papers&code=04-D_02
28 posted on 01/12/2004 12:17:35 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: F14 Pilot
Perle said: "The Saudis qualify for their own membership in the axis of evil."

They've managed to pull the wool over people's eyes for some time....... Not any more.
29 posted on 01/12/2004 12:33:37 PM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it. ")
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To: DoctorZIn
These columns of Koorosh Afshar are always great. He should seriously think of putting them in a book as a collection.
30 posted on 01/12/2004 12:52:49 PM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it. ")
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To: DoctorZIn
Let My Father Go

January 12, 2004
National Review Online
Banafsheh Zand-Bonazzi

The U.N. human-rights committee proves to be worse than impotent: dangerous.

Ever since November 2001 when the Iran's hard-line goon squad, the Motalefeh, abducted my father, Siamak Pourzand, a 74-year-old Iranian journalist and film historian, the United Nations High Commission on Human Rights (headed by the boisterous Mary Robinson, 1997-2002 and now, Guyana diplomat Bertrand Ramcharan) has treated my family with nothing but contempt and willful disregard. We have been completely stonewalled at every turn. From November 2001 until now I have placed 23 phone calls (each time leaving a message), written five e-mails, and sent several faxes to human-rights commission offices in Geneva, Paris, and New York, desperately hoping to connect with at least one of their sanctimonious rapporteurs. Thus far, we have been given nothing but the proverbial cold shoulder.

Nine weeks ago, the U.N. rapporteur on freedom of speech, a Kenyan man by the name of Ambeyi Ligabo, visited Iran. His visit was made out to be a critical maneuver on the part of the United Nations. His mission was to personally interview twelve of the most highly publicized political prisoners, my father among them. In spite of all the information and indications given to these authorities by Iranian activists and families of political prisoners over the last few years (when the U.N, after years of persistent appeals, finally accepted that the Islamic Republic might just be the confederacy of assassins it is said to be), these people continue to disregard the gut-wrenching truth about what those prisoners are put through. They arrogantly think that a couple of five-minute visits to Iran and their perusal of a few dossiers written by Western compassionistas (mostly Europeans) enlightens them to the putrid reality that is Iran today.

Mr. Ligabo and the United Nations brass knew full well what the outcome of this stunt would be for those political prisoners. The day after his interview (November 9) with Ligabo, Ahmad Batebi, a 25-year-old student activist who had been on a one-week medical furlough from prison, simply vanished from his family home in Tehran and is still being detained in an undisclosed location, undoubtedly under severe torture. (Batebi was arrested and incarcerated in July 1999 due to an irresponsible cover photo of this young hero published in the British magazine The Economist, taken during a student demonstration that year.) Indeed Ligabohimself had conveniently warned these prisoners, before departing from Tehran, that they should take care of themselves as they may very well have to deal with the consequences of their discussion with him. Now, does that not beg the question, how could someone who knows all that, bring himself to risk the lives of innocent people?

Back in February, when another delegate from the U.N. blew into Tehran to conduct yet another one of these meretricious investigations, my poor old Dad, who was at the time (like Batebi was during Ligabo's visit) on medical furlough, had been called in to be interviewed — but he had categorically refused to meet with the investigator. He, like the rest of the innocent men and women held unfairly and inhumanely by the mullahs, has no faith in anything claimed by the feckless human-rights representatives on New York City's East River.

The United Nations has become nothing more than a tool for the festering European coterie of imperialists who fancy themselves to be the arbiters of propriety. But what propriety? The Europeans may pride themselves on their intellectual heritage, but a continent whose citizens often loathe each other from country to country and who does not practice what it preaches is nothing more than duplicitous.

As the people of Iran jam the streets of Tehran and other Iranian cities month after month, year after year in defiance of the rogue regime of mullahs, as they boycott more and more "elections" and persistently demonstrate their pure hatred for the thieves of the Persian heritage and their painted gophers, the European Union's refusal to cease all business dealings with a regime which essentially abhors all Westerners is perfectly certifiable. Europeans cannot accept that their multi-zillion-dollar contracts with the Islamic Republic do not guarantee their safety against acts of terrorism on their soil and against their own citizens.

Finally, Europeans have been forewarned time and time again, by Iranian activists both inside and outside Iran, that their continued support of the rogue regime of terrorist clerics now will only lead to further Iranian contempt and animosity toward them in the future. If the European Community does not respectfully comply with the will of the Iranian people in their struggle for freedom from religious tyranny — now — they will have been the cause of their own descendants' fallout with the people of Iran, upon the inevitable departure of the mullahs. This, too, has fallen on deaf ears.

At this juncture the mortally fatuous game of "chicken" — whose object it is to push the envelope to test the limits of possible disaster — seems to be the game that the United Nations and their European overlords have chosen to play with the equity of the world in these very critical times.

— Banafsheh Zand-Bonazzi, a native of Iran, is currently and activist and writer based in New York.

http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/zand-bonazzi200401120840.asp
31 posted on 01/12/2004 1:58:37 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn; AdmSmith; Pan_Yans Wife; freedom44; seamole; Eala; Valin; PhilDragoo
[This is from almost 1 1/2 yrs ago.]

Via TV and the Net, Iran's Youth Plot Social Revolution

Tim Judah reports from Tehran, where rising hemlines and access to technology point to the erosion of the mullahs' power

Sunday August 25, 2002
The Observer

It is Friday prayers at Tehran University. A wizened, elderly mullah is preaching to thousands about the need for Muslim unity. Beside him is a Kalashnikov rifle and in front, in Farsi and English, are the slogans of the revolution. 'America is Extremely Nothy [sic]!' screams one. 'The President of America is Bloodthirsty!' proclaims another. Then in unison the faithful begin to chant: 'Death to America! Death to America!'
But these are the slogans of a bygone age, of an ossified revolution that is almost a quarter of a century old. Now, almost unnoticed by the rest of the world, Iran has lurched into the throes of a new revolution - although where it will lead nobody knows.

Seven years ago 69 per cent of Iranians elected Ayatollah Mohammad Khatami as president, a man who pledged to reform the Islamic Republic in order to save it. Now his reforms have stalled, blocked by powerful hardliners such as Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme religious leader and successor to Ayatollah Khomeini.

The Islamic hardliners believe Khatami must be stopped. They compare him to Mikhail Gorbachev and say unless his reforms are stopped the Islamic Republic will drift towards collapse - in the same way that reform killed the Soviet Union. And they may be right.

Take a look at the faces at Friday prayers and one thing is clear. Few here are students at Tehran University. They are middle-aged men who made the revolution, alongside blocks of young soldiers, policemen and other members of the security services who had been bused in. The look of boredom as they raise limp fists to chant 'Death to America!' says it all.

Iran's new revolution is not one that is spilling on to the streets - or at least not yet. Although there are increasing numbers of demonstrations by students and angry, unpaid workers, this is not where the real force for change lies.

For the moment it is a social revolution. It is a revolution that is transforming this country from the bottom up, whether the politicians like it or not. Two-thirds of Iran's population is under 30 and it is clear they have little in common with the ageing mullahs who are trying to control their lives.

Behind closed doors, young Iranians are simply getting on with it, especially in the cities. Across Tehran, underground rock bands are thriving, just waiting for the day they can come out into the open. And every month thousands more Iranians are going online.

Today there are 1.75 million Iranians with access to the internet, and in five years that figure is expected to be five million. While the internet is a window on the world, it is also Iran's leap into free speech. Recently newspapers which the government has closed have continued to publish online.

Close to the centre of Tehran is an office which helps coordinate the burgeoning non-governmental sector. Activists say there are now 30,000 NGOs in Iran, dedicated to everything from women's rights to the environment.

And opinion polls consistently show that the vast majority of Iranians want reform - and they want it now. One reformist academic, who asked not to be named, believes the longer hardliners block reforms and fail to ease the social restrictions of the Islamic state, the more problems they are storing up.

He warns that unless change is allowed to develop peacefully, it will still take place 'but the process could be different'. Asked whether that meant there could be violence, he replied: 'There might be such a possibility.'

In the meantime, signs that the social revolution is proceeding apace are everywhere. Across Tehran, ever more girls taunt the hardliners by wearing their obligatory headscarves way back over their head, to reveal as much for bidden hair as possible. Compulsory 'manteau' gowns are getting shorter - and tighter.

One area where the authorities have already lost control is television. Increasingly uninterested by the staple fare of prayers, domestic dramas and news about the Palestinian uprising millions are tuned into satellite television, which is, of course, strictly illegal.

Climb a high building and the evidence is stunning. Mushroom-like clusters of satellite dishes have sprouted across Tehran. If Iranians were simply watching BBC, CNN or MTV that would be bad enough, but what really worries the authorities is that many are tuning in to exile stations broadcasting from the United States. And the star of the satellite show is Reza Pahlavi, son of the last shah.

Until a few years ago hardly any Iranians had seen or heard him. Now satellite television beams the heir to the Peacock Throne into millions of living rooms every week. Although few people think that a restoration of the monarchy is a viable option, the young shah is the only Iranian politician who talks about a secular democracy. That would be well beyond the pale within Iran - but many are intrigued by Pahlavi, especially those too young to remember the bad times under his father. With reforms blocked and an economy under strain, the frustration is palpable. A few weeks ago the remains of 570 Iranians who died during the Iran-Iraq war were returned amid much fanfare. The government arranged well-organised shows of grief, some of which was undoubtedly genuine. But, as the coffins were trundled around Tehran on the backs of lorries, many residents were unimpressed.

'They have been dead for 20 years and now they give us a hard time for some dried-up old bones and close off the streets,' snarled a taxi driver. 'They are idiots!'

Even the powerful merchants of Tehran's bazaar, long regarded as a staunch bastion of the Islamic revolution, are showing signs of exasperation. Like other Iranians, many are too scared to speak, but one man told me how people here were enraged by a decision to let ideology ride roughshod over business.

He said: 'Last year in international rug exhibitions there was talk about sending an invitation to Iranian-Jewish rug merchants who now live abroad, but the government did not allow the Jewish dealers to come and now there is even less business than before.' A colleague added: 'If we could talk freely you could fill that notebook.'

Something has to give. Reformists threaten to abandon parliament, but no one knows what this would mean. Indeed, reformists are split. Omid Memarian, a 27-year-old who helps coordinate Iranian NGOs, says the country has no choice but to continue the path of slow reform. 'Things can't happen in a rush,' he says, arguing that Iranians, who have already experienced a revolution, don't want a return to the past.

Others are not so sure. A human rights activist, who talked on condition of anonymity, says there are 'more than a thousand' political prisoners in Iran. In the provinces unknown rebels will simply disappear, without anyone to raise the alarm for them.

He is scathing about Iran's 'passive' human rights organisations. He believes that, with reforms stalled, activists must go on the offensive and even take their protests on to the streets. 'The time is ripe,' he says. Iran is lurching into the unknown.

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/international/story/0%2c6903%2c780339%2c00.html

32 posted on 01/12/2004 2:24:20 PM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it. ")
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To: nuconvert
The United States has added its criticism to the decision by Iran's conservative religious authority, the Guardian Council, to disqualify many reformist politicians from parliamentary elections next month. The State Department said the United State supports elections that are free, fair and open to all.

The United States has joined the European Union in criticizing the move by the Iranian Guardian Council to disqualify half of the more than 8,000 candidates for the country's February 20 parliamentary vote.

The council, an appointed body dominated by hard-line Islamic clerics, had disqualified some candidates from previous elections and blocked reform legislation from parliament, but its action Sunday was by far the most sweeping action taken against reform elements.

At a news briefing, State Department spokesman Adam Ereli said the United States opposes limiting voters' choices as a matter of principle and he urged that the Iranian government to invalidate the Guardian Council's decision:

"We, as a matter of course, support free and fair elections in Iran, and we are therefore opposed to interference in the electoral process," he said. "We call upon the Iranian government to disavow attempts by the Guardian Council to shape the outcome of the February 20th parliamentary elections. And we would note that a government's handling of the electoral process is one of the fundamental measurements of its credibility."

Mr. Ereli said decisions about who should govern a country are best made by the citizens of that country through an open and transparent process, and said the options of a people should not be limited by other institutions so as to prejudge the outcome of an election.

The spokesman rejected a suggestion that the U.S. position amounted to interference in an Iranian internal matter and said the Bush administration has made clear on numerous occasions that it is important that the voice of the people in Iran be heard.

He said there are measures within the Iranian constitutional system for the Guardian Council decision to be overturned and he said it is important that the political process in the country be transparent, fair and open to all.

The council action would disqualify more than 80 reformist lawmakers from the February 20 vote. European Union chief diplomat Javier Solana, on a visit to Iran, said it would be hard to explain to EU lawmakers how a sitting member of a parliament can be barred from seeking re-election.

http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=85B92DA9-471D-46C5-9ED68D64D01C2DB9
33 posted on 01/12/2004 2:34:22 PM PST by AdmSmith (follow the money)
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To: nuconvert

TEHRAN, 12 January 2004 Iran was plunged into a major political crisis yesterday after powerful conservatives moved to disqualify massive numbers of reformists from standing in next month's crucial parliamentary elections, a move one MP branded a coup d'etat.

There was uproar in Parliament, held for the past four years by moderates loyal to President Mohammad Khatami, as it emerged that the Guardians Council had also barred leading pillars of the reform movement, including a brother of the president. I consider this rejection of candidates to be an illegal coup d?etat and an act of regime change by non-military means, fumed Mohsen Mirdamadi, head of the Parliament's foreign policy and national security commission.

Mirdamadi was one of over 80 incumbent reformist MPs who have been barred from standing in the Feb. 20 election by the 12-member Guardians Council, an unelected political supervisory body and bastion of the religious right.

He said the bulk of disqualified MPs were found to have been in violation of an article in the electoral law that stipulates candidates must show their commitment to Islam and respect the position of Ayatollah Ali Khamenei as supreme leader.

Mohammad Reza Khatami, the president's brother and head of the Islamic Iran Participation Front (IIPF) the Islamic republic's largest pro-reform party said the move was a mockery of democracy.

If the situation continues, the conditions for voting will not exist, people will not be prepared to vote and naturally we are heading in the direction of a national election boycott, he said. We demand the president and the government... not be responsible for organizing undemocratic elections, he told AFP, while warning of dire consequences for Iran's international image.

The Majlis building, where reformist MPs gathered for an all-night sit-in, would be transformed into a center of resistance against this illegal action, he said. As one senior politician revealed a group of up to eight Cabinet ministers had prepared their letters of resignation, the president himself issued an impassioned appeal for calm.

Violence must be averted. Insha allah (God willing), with calm we can solve this problem. We should not do anything to stoke tensions,Khatami said, alluding to fears the latest explosion of reformist-conservative tensions could again bring out pro-reform students already frustrated with the slow pace of reforms onto the streets.

And speaking during a stormy Majlis session carried live on state radio, Parliament Speaker Mehdi Karoubi said he and the president were in contact with the Guardians Council and Ayatollah Khamenei. Calling on those rejected to lodge a formal complaint, Karoubi said reformers had several channels and time to reverse the decision before a definitive list is published 10 days before the vote.




http://www.aljazeerah.info/News%20archives/2004/Jan/12%20n/Iran%20Plunged%20Into%20Major%20Political%20Crisis.htm
34 posted on 01/12/2004 2:43:01 PM PST by AdmSmith (it seems that they are afraid of the students)
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To: AdmSmith
Note: a stormy Majlis session carried live on state radio
35 posted on 01/12/2004 2:44:52 PM PST by AdmSmith (it seems that they are afraid of the students)
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To: All

36 posted on 01/12/2004 3:16:30 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: AdmSmith
"Bush administration has made clear on numerous occasions that it is important that the voice of the people in Iran be heard."

37 posted on 01/12/2004 4:01:53 PM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it. ")
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To: nuconvert
Commentary > The Monitor's View
from the January 13, 2004 edition

Pending Regime Change in Iran

As much as American conservatives want the US to push for a regime change in Iran, they should relax. Political turmoil in Tehran is heading that way anyway.
Iranian hard-liners' grip tight as reformists regroup

In Iran's awkward mix of democracy and theocracy, the Muslim clerics on the powerful Council of Guardians overplayed their hand this week in a losing battle with elected reformers. The council barred one-third of the current members of parliament from running in the Feb. 20 elections and eliminated more than half of the candidates registered to run.

This was a desperate act, and a clear sign that the self-appointed heirs to the 1979 Islamic Revolution are willing to risk a popular revolt over their clumsy power play.

The head of parliament's security committee, Mohsen Miradamadi, who was one of those barred from running, says the clerics are trying a "coup."

What's really behind this "coup"? The 12-member Council of Guardians, led by Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati, doesn't like the way things are headed in Iran. They want to keep more clerics, especially supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, from jumping over to the reform side.

But the slide toward democracy now seems unstoppable. After Mohammad Khatami was elected president as a reformer in a surprise win in 1997, reformers then won control in parliament in the 2000 elections. The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, helped the reformers, allowing the United States to open back-channel talks with the Khatami government over Iran's holding of Al Qaeda members.

Meanwhile the US keeps 130,000 troops in post-Hussein Iraq next door. The government has also come clean with international nuclear inspectors about Iran's secretive nuclear program.

Most of all, the hard-line clerics also face the resentments of jobless youth - more than two-thirds of Iranians are under 30.

If the Council doesn't back down on its aggressive vetting of candidates, the normally moderate Mr. Khatami warns of a "harsh reaction."

This is the biggest political showdown in Tehran in the quarter century since the revolution. While both sides may compromise, that will be difficult: The stakes are high in determining who holds the upper hand in negotiating with a US eager to solve a number of issues. The generous US response to the recent massive earthquake in Bam shows just how eager.

Iran's real battle, however, is finding an interpretation of Islam that can coexist with Western-style democracy.

As Khatami stated last month: "Democracy is the only alternative. We can take it as Muslims."

The US need only wait for that to happen.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0113/p08s02-comv.html
38 posted on 01/12/2004 4:46:47 PM PST by AdmSmith
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To: DoctorZIn
"Ever since November 2001 when the Iran's hard-line goon squad, the Motalefeh, abducted my father, Siamak Pourzand, a 74-year-old Iranian journalist and film historian,..."

I knew her father was in jail, but
I didn't realize this was her father.

"U.N. rapporteur on freedom of speech, a Kenyan man by the name of Ambeyi Ligabo, visited Iran."

I've wondered myself, how Mr. Ligabo and/or the U.N. could remain silent, after hearing about Batebi's "disappearance". It's outrageous.
39 posted on 01/12/2004 5:12:26 PM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it. ")
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To: DoctorZIn
U.S. Bill Wants Firms to Disclose 'Rogue Nation' Contracts

January 12, 2004
Bloomberg News
The International Herald Tribune

General Electric has sold locomotives in Syria. Alcatel has installed telephone lines in Iran. Siemens is building a power plant in Sudan. While such deals are legal, they have rankled some members of the U.S. Congress.

Lawmakers say Americans unwittingly invest in some 375 U.S. and foreign companies that have tens of billions of dollars in contracts in the seven countries that the State Department says support terrorists. Representative Frank Wolf, Republican of Virginia, wants companies whose shares are traded in the United States to disclose those ties, so he inserted a provision in a $328 billion spending bill that is headed for approval as early as this month.

"You're going to see some pretty angry investors," said David Petersen, the state treasurer in Arizona. "This is a big enough risk that you should at least screen these companies, and for some companies it could well mean investors divest, and quickly."

The action has been criticized as unfair by the National Foreign Trade Council, which represents 400 exporters, including General Electric. The group says the requirement sought by Wolf may tar corporate reputations even though the companies are breaking no laws and are bringing jobs and Democratic ideals to what the State Department calls "rogue nations."

"All of this makes us nervous," said William Reinsch, the council president. "It would expose companies to intimidation and harassment."

A growing number of institutional investors, including municipal and state pension funds in New York City, Pennsylvania and Arizona, say they have been taking companies' overseas ties into account since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Montana's pension funds last year sold some of their shares in French companies after France opposed the war in Iraq. A General Electric spokesman, Gary Sheffer, said the company's transactions in those countries represented only a small percentage of its business, adding that GE did not report its financial information on a country-by-country basis.

William Donaldson, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, whose agency would have to enforce the new rule, wrote in a letter to Wolf that a blanket requirement for disclosure was not necessary. Nancy McLernon, deputy director of the Organization for International Investment, which represents U.S. units of companies such as Sony and Nokia, said the rule would make it harder for the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq to attract companies looking to list shares.

"A lot of countries are vying for global companies to list on their exchanges," McLernon said. "If the U.S. makes a list of so-called bad guys, that would put them at a disadvantage."

Wolf, who declined to comment, has voiced concern about such investments for years. He has traveled to Sudan, where a civil war has raged for two decades and children have been forced to become soldiers or sex slaves. He has said he would be repelled if he knew he was investing in companies that did business there.

"I'd literally want to just be so sick," he said at a hearing last March.

The U.S. has imposed sanctions against the seven countries: North Korea, Cuba, Libya, Iran, Sudan, Syria and Iraq, which has not yet been removed from the list.

While U.S. companies are prohibited from selling arms and transferring most technology to those countries, they can conduct other business through foreign subsidiaries that they do not directly manage.

Siemens, based in Munich, has provided power-plant parts and mobile phone equipment to projects in Sudan. The company has "comprehensive procedures" to ensure that its practices comply with U.S. and European Union laws as well as United Nations sanctions, said a spokesman, Bud Grebey.

General Electric sold and refurbished locomotives in Syria. GE and Paris-based Alcatel, the world's biggest maker of broadband Internet equipment, do business in Iran.

http://www.iht.com/articles/124640.html
40 posted on 01/12/2004 5:13:36 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
EU Diplomats: Political Crisis Dominating Iran Talks

January 13, 2004
Reuters
Ha'aretz

TEHRAN - A political crisis in Iran which broke on the eve of a visit by the EU's top diplomat has not derailed delicate talks with the bloc but has left Iranian government officials "ashamed", EU diplomats said on Monday.

Iran was thrown into turmoil on Sunday when the conservative Guardian Council, a constitutional watchdog, barred thousands of liberal candidates from standing in next month's parliamentary elections, including 80 who are members of the current assembly.

The European Union's foreign policy chief, Javier Solana, arrived in Tehran the same day to pursue long-running talks on four issues of particular concern to the EU - Iran's nuclear program, its role in the Middle East peace process, the fight against international terrorism, and human rights.

Solana also wanted to convey the EU's support to Iran, with which it is pursuing a policy of engagement in stark contrast to the U.S. line of isolation, following last month's devastating earthquake in Bam which killed at least 30,000.

Instead, his talks with top officials from the government - though not the Guardian Council, with whom he has not met - have been dominated by the political standoff which has led to threats to boycott the elections.

"The Iranians try to say that it's not so dramatic, that they'll try to find a compromise. They are so ashamed, they try to say it will be solved," said one EU diplomat.

Asked to elaborate on this shame, he replied: "No doubt about that. It's very tough for them that it's happened on the same day we're here. The centre of gravity that they wanted to transmit, Bam, has fallen off the map."

Solana told a news conference he did not want to interfere in Iran's internal affairs but said he would find it very difficult to explain in Europe how people elected to Iran's parliament would not now be able to stand as candidates.

Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi, following his meeting with Solana, said the crisis could be resolved.

"Certainly the authorities are aware of these issues, and I hope they will find a solution to this problem and we are not going to see rights violated or trampled on," he said.

But one top Iranian official said the Guardian Council's decision had come as a bombshell.

"We've had two earthquakes, one in Bam and one political," an EU official quoted him as saying.

The EU and Tehran have long been trying to improve ties, with Solana noting that this trip is his fourth in 20 months.

The two sides appeared to have been making progress on the nuclear question. Iran agreed last month to allow snap inspections of its nuclear facilities following suspicions that it had been developing a weapons program.

Solana had long talks on Monday with Hassan Rohani, head of the National Security Council and the chief nuclear negotiator, suggesting there were still plenty of issues open to discussion.

But the talks seem to have been overtaken by events.

"We have moved very rapidly from a situation where we had put the nuclear issue on track and now we are facing the reality of this country, which is how solid the electoral process is... going to be after the elections," an EU official said.

"In less than 24 hours we've gone from the shock of Bam to political shock."

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=382264&sw=Iran
41 posted on 01/12/2004 5:16:02 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: AdmSmith
"As much as American conservatives want the US to push for a regime change in Iran, they should relax."

I DON'T THINK SO.....

This article is really off the mark in so many ways.......
42 posted on 01/12/2004 5:17:05 PM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it. ")
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To: DoctorZIn
" European Union's foreign policy chief, Javier Solana, arrived in Tehran the same day to pursue long-running talks on four issues of particular concern to the EU - Iran's nuclear program, its role in the Middle East peace process, the fight against international terrorism, and human rights."

Kind of messed up Solana's plans.
But if he wanted to know if the regime has any intentions of changing their policies on any of the above issues, I think it's safe to say, their answer is "NO".
Next....?
43 posted on 01/12/2004 5:23:53 PM PST by nuconvert ("This wasn't just plain terrible, this was fancy terrible. This was terrible with raisins in it. ")
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To: DoctorZIn
"The people of Iran must not fall into this trap."

I agree. The people of Iran must stay focused on what they truely want and act accordingly. Falling for this and voting for the reformist will just get them right back to where they are right now. There will be no better future unless there is real change. God willing, that is forthcoming.
44 posted on 01/12/2004 5:50:48 PM PST by mjaneangels@aolcom
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To: DoctorZIn
REJECTED LAWMAKERS DETERMINED TO RESIST DISQUALIFICATIONS

TEHRAN 12 Jan (IPS)

As Iranian reformists, frustrated at the decision by the conservatives-controlled Council of the Guardians (CG) to disqualify tens of leading reformist candidates from running in the coming Legislative elections, threatened Monday to boycott the race on a nation scale, Ayatollah Ali Khameneh'i indicated his reluctance to intervene in the unprecedented showdown.

"I hope the problem will be resolved through legal channels. Of course, if the legal process failed to resolve and the problem requiring the leader’s intervention, I’ll do my job", he emphatically told a gathering of provincial governors expressing their grievances about the performance of the Supervisory Board in rejecting the credentials of more than eighty prominent reformist Members of Majles.

To the governors who observed that the law has not been respected in disqualifying the hopefuls, Mr. Khameneh'i, who, as the leader of the Islamic Republic, has the last word on every major issue recommended to "explore legal channels" to resolve their dispute with the Supervisory Board.

"The Supreme Leader advised those who think their rights have been violated by the Supervisory Board to observe calm and avoid tension to give the legal channels envisaged in election law the opportunity to examine the complaints", the official news agency IRNA reported from the meeting.

In a letter to President Mohammad Khatami, the governors gave him one week to stand up to the CG and overturn its controversial decision or they would resign, joining the rejected deputies who, led by Dr. Mohammad Reza Khatami, the younger brother of the President, have staged a protest sit in at the Majles.

"We will continue our sit-in until politically motivated disqualifications are reversed. If it is not reversed, there will be no elections. There is no reason to participate in so-called elections where hard-line thinkers run without any rivals", ", lawmaker Elaaheh Koola’i told "The Associated Press".

In response, Mr. Khatami appealed for calm and called on all parties to avoid tension while he was discussing the issue with the leader.

But as Mr. Khatami refused to brand his earlier threats of resignation, one of his aides, Mr. Mohammad Sattari-Far warned, "the Government would resign if it fails to carry out its duties and defending people’s right for clean, fair and democratic elections".

"The Government finds itself in a very difficult situation, for, in the one hand, it is responsible to the people to whom it has promised fair and clean elections, but on the other, if he can not offer the promised religious democracy, it doesn’t make difference if it resigns or not", he told the governors.

For its part, Interior Minister Hojjatoleslam Abdolvahed Mousavi Lari said that his ministry and the governors have done "what they could" to hold elections in the best manner, "but, the Supervisory Board have not considered the report of the Executive Board in confirming eligibility of the candidates".

The row between the powerful but un-elected ayatollahs who rule the Iranian system of theocracy and the elected, but powerless organs of the regime erupted last week after the 12-members, leader-appointed CG announced the disqualification of more than 2.033, among them 80 reformist MMs out of the 8.145 candidates who registered for the coming Majles elections, due on 20 February.

According to statistics released last week by the Supervisory Board, some 44.4 per cent of the candidates were rejected on the basis of lack of allegiance to the fundaments of Islam, the Islamic Republic and the Constitution.

"This is a civilian coup, a move to change the regime by no military means", Chairman of the Majles’ National Security and Foreign Affaires, Mr. Mohsen Mirdamadi said about the mass disqualifications.

Dr. Mohammad Reza Khatami, the younger brother of the beleaguered President who is both a first deputy-Speaker and leader of the Islamic Iran Participation Front that controls most of the parliament’s 292 seats, Mr. Behzad Nabavi, the second deputy-Speaker, Mohsen Mirdamadi, Naser Shirzad, Mohsen Loqmanian, Ali Akbar Kho’eini and Mrs. Elaaheh Koola’i, Fatemeh Haqiqatjoo and Shahrbanoo Amani are among outspoken and popular incumbent deputies who have been refused.

"When half of the 8.000 people running for the elections are disqualified, this means they are against the system", Mr. Sattari-Far noted, acknowledging that the Government "feels its incapacity". "The message is we shall stand firm not allowing illegality", he added.

IRAN DISQUALIFICATION 12104

http://www.iran-press-service.com/articles_2004/Jan_04/iran_disqualifications_12104.htm
45 posted on 01/12/2004 6:40:41 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot; Grampa Dave; Ragtime Cowgirl; MeeknMing; SAMWolf
Frum & Perle dare to win, rather than to appease with political correctness and diplomincing.

Terrorism is evil, and there is no coexisting or containment with or of evil.

The EU is complicit with the murdering mullah Tehranosaurs--just as it was complicit with Mass Grave Hussein of Iraq.

As for france,

Some enchanted evening
you may meet a stranger
you may meet a stranger
across a crowed reactor. . . .

sic semper tehranus

46 posted on 01/12/2004 6:48:48 PM PST by PhilDragoo (Hitlery: das Butch von Buchenvald)
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

47 posted on 01/13/2004 12:05:36 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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