Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Iranian Alert -- February 6, 2004 -- IRAN LIVE THREAD --Americans for Regime Change in Iran
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 2.6.2004 | DoctorZin

Posted on 02/06/2004 12:03:43 AM PST by DoctorZIn

The US media almost entirely ignores news regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran. As Tony Snow of the Fox News Network has put it, “this is probably the most under-reported news story of the year.” But most American’s are unaware that the Islamic Republic of Iran is NOT supported by the masses of Iranians today. Modern Iranians are among the most pro-American in the Middle East.

There is a popular revolt against the Iranian regime brewing in Iran today. Starting June 10th of this year, Iranians have begun taking to the streets to express their desire for a regime change. Most want to replace the regime with a secular democracy. Many even want the US to over throw their government.

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movement in Iran from being reported. Unfortunately, the regime has successfully prohibited western news reporters from covering the demonstrations. The voices of discontent within Iran are sometime murdered, more often imprisoned. Still the people continue to take to the streets to demonstrate against the regime.

In support of this revolt, Iranians in America have been broadcasting news stories by satellite into Iran. This 21st century news link has greatly encouraged these protests. The regime has been attempting to jam the signals, and locate the satellite dishes. Still the people violate the law and listen to these broadcasts. Iranians also use the Internet and the regime attempts to block their access to news against the regime. In spite of this, many Iranians inside of Iran read these posts daily to keep informed of the events in their own country.

This daily thread contains nearly all of the English news reports on Iran. It is thorough. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary. The news stories and commentary will from time to time include material from the regime itself. But if you read the post you will discover for yourself, the real story of what is occurring in Iran and its effects on the war on terror.

I am not of Iranian heritage. I am an American committed to supporting the efforts of those in Iran seeking to replace their government with a secular democracy. I am in contact with leaders of the Iranian community here in the United States and in Iran itself.

If you read the daily posts you will gain a better understanding of the US war on terrorism, the Middle East and why we need to support a change of regime in Iran. Feel free to ask your questions and post news stories you discover in the weeks to come.

If all goes well Iran will be free soon and I am convinced become a major ally in the war on terrorism. The regime will fall. Iran will be free. It is just a matter of time.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iaea; iran; iranianalert; iranquake; protests; southasia; studentmovement; studentprotest
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

1 posted on 02/06/2004 12:03:44 AM PST by DoctorZIn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

2 posted on 02/06/2004 12:06:09 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Reformists in Iran Yield to Ban

February 06, 2004
The Star-Ledger
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

TEHRAN, Iran -- Leaders of Iran's reformist parliament conceded defeat to the country's ruling clerics yesterday and predicted that this month's elections would go forward with a sweeping ban on liberal candidates in place.

The ban clears the way for conservative clerics to retake the parliament and end legislative efforts to secularize the Islamic republic.

The reformers' admission of defeat came on the final day of a sit-in by incumbents to protest the mass blacklisting of candidates for the elections Feb. 20.

"It has gotten to the point where it is impossible to accomplish political reform within the system," said Fatemeh Hagighatjou, who represents Tehran in parliament. "The fate of the country will be either dictatorship or collapse, although they (the clerics) should remember that the outcome of a dictatorship is also collapse."

The unelected Guardian Council rejected a last-minute deal brokered by President Mohammad Khatami that would have reinstated a quarter of the banned candidates despite the apparent approval of the deal by Iran's most powerful ruling cleric. The council agreed to reinstate only 51 of the 600 names that Khatami's Intelligence Ministry had forwarded for vetting.

While the council usually follows Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's lead, it can ignore a decree meant only as "guidance," the lawmakers said. The outcome suggests that Khamenei's support for the compromise deal was halfhearted at best.

In defeating the reformers, the hard-liners are likely to lose any hope of gaining widespread public support for the elections or acceptance of the next parliament. Iranians elected a reform-minded president twice and voted in a majority of reformers in the last parliamentary elections.

Turnout this month is likely to be extremely low, as the head of Iran's largest reformist party said its members wouldn't take part, nor would the 127 members of parliament who resigned in protest over the ban.

"We know elections are needed in a democracy, but that does not mean we have to participate in every election," said Mohammad Reza Khatami, the president's younger brother, who heads the party called the Islamic Iran Participation Front.

The Guardian Council argued that Iran's 46 million eligible voters still would have an average of 19 candidates to choose from for each parliament seat. But reformers say the ban prevents them from running for more than half of the seats, making victory impossible.

Many reformers are angry with President Khatami for not backing them more forcibly in the acrimonious political dispute, one of the worst in the Islamic republic's 25-year history.

"The president swore to respect the constitution," said Hossein Ansarirad, a reformist cleric and banned incumbent whose colleagues yesterday responded with fervent applause. "He doesn't have the right to hold the elections."

Blame lies with parliament itself for not standing up to the hard-liners all along, said Baha'oddin Adab, who represents the northwestern city of Sanandaj in Iranian Kurdistan. "We should have done this two years ago," he said, gesturing to the dozens of parliament members staging the sit-in outside the main chamber.

Even now, few reform politicians advocate changing Iran's political system, in which unelected clerics hold supreme power and can overrule the president and parliament. The reformers have virtually ignored demands for a referendum on the constitution by many younger Iranians, for fear of altogether eliminating an Islamic republic established by revolution 25 years ago.

That hesitancy played into the hands of the hard-liners, who used public disillusionment with the reformers as an opportunity to silence their movement.

Khamenei's speech Dec. 16 on the U.S. capture of Saddam Hussein set the tone. In an apparent reference to Khatami's government, he alluded to a need to remove people from power who were thinking about improving relations with the United States.

With parliamentary elections then only two months away, the reformist parliament became the first target. Disillusioned reform voters had stayed away from last spring's municipal elections and left local governments in the hands of hard-liners. That suggested to ruling clerics that the time might be ripe to take back control of the parliament.

Four weeks after Khamenei's speech, some 83 incumbents and more than 3,500 other candidates received letters from the Guardian Council saying they were banned from running because they had violated tenets of Islam and Iran's constitution, charges they vehemently deny. The council eventually reinstated 1,160 lower-profile candidates, but raised the number of banned incumbents to 87.

http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-13/1076051719113320.xml
3 posted on 02/06/2004 12:08:16 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Over 46 million Iranians eligible to vote

Payvand's Iran News ...
2/5/04

The latest statistics released by the Ministry of Interior shows that some 46,351,032 individuals of the entire population are eligible to vote at the seventh parliamentary elections slated for February 20, IRNA reported from Tehran.

According to the report, the figure excludes the population of the quake-hit Bam city.

A closer look at the statistics revealed that Tehran province with 8,261,061 voters accounting for 17.82 percent of the total nationwide balloters has the highest rank.

The report said that Khorassan and Isfahan provinces with 4,542,980 and 3,116,665 eligible voters respectively rank second and third.

"Fars province with 2,933,764 individuals ranks forth and Kohkilouyeh-Boyer Ahmad province scores fifth with 398,067.

"The statistical reports available at the sixth Majlis show a total of 38,726,431 eligible voters at the sixth term parliamentary elections," it added.

The report said that in accordance with the election law, having Iranian nationality, being 15 years of age and sanity are among the qualifications of the voters.

"According to the law, those born on February 20 1988 will vote in the upcoming elections for the first time in their lifetime," it concluded.

http://www.payvand.com/news/04/feb/1040.html
4 posted on 02/06/2004 12:17:09 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn; nuconvert; Pan_Yans Wife; freedom44; AdmSmith; McGavin999; Pro-Bush; windchime; MEG33; ..
Iran's judiciary chief: Resignations 'criminal act'

IranMania News
February 06, 2004

TEHRAN, Feb 6 (AFP) -- Iran's hardline judiciary chief Ayatollah Mahmud Hashemi Shahrudi has warned that officials who resign with the aim of impeding parliamentary elections in protest at the barring of reformist candidates face prosecution, state news agency IRNA reported.

"If any of the government bodies impedes the Majlis elections process in violation of legal and religious boundaries, then it would be considered a criminal act and would be prosecuted," Shahrudi was quoted as saying late Thursday.

It was the latest warning to pro-reformist officials, including dozens of members of parliament, from hardliners following the disqualification by a conservative vetting body of hundreds of mainly reformist candidates for the February 20 elections.

Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said on Wednesday, "It is the duty of the government to organize the elections and nobody can, in dispute, fail to carry out their legal duty and dispense with their responsibilities."

Such an act would be against the law and prohibited by Islam, he said.

Khamenei also ruled it was the pro-reform government's duty to hold parliamentary polls on schedule despite the crisis sparked by the disqualifications ordered by the Guardians Council vetting body.

Reformists had called for a delay in polling after the conservative Guardians Council vetting body ruled out some 2,500 candidates out of 8,000, most of them reformists and including some 80 sitting MPs.

Several resignations have been announced among ministers, deputy ministers and all 27 provincial governors, while 125 MPs confirmed Saturday that they were quitting, depriving the Majlis of a quorum.

"Those current MPs whose qualifications have been rejected by the Guardians Council are US spies and were implementing US rules instead of Islamic rules," the chief editor of the hardline Resalaat paper, Mohamad Kazem Anbarloui, told the congregation in a mosque in Iran's clerical capital of Qom Friday, IRNA said.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=22346&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
5 posted on 02/06/2004 4:56:40 AM PST by F14 Pilot ("Terrorists declared war on U.S. and War is what they Got!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn; freedom44
http://www.iranian.ws/iran_news/publish/article_1635.shtml

A link to an article titled Iranian Underground Cinema by Jason Silverman. I found the descriptions interesting.
6 posted on 02/06/2004 4:58:56 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.'--- Kahlil Gibran)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
"It has gotten to the point where it is impossible to accomplish political reform within the system," said Fatemeh Hagighatjou, who represents Tehran in parliament. "The fate of the country will be either dictatorship or collapse, although they (the clerics) should remember that the outcome of a dictatorship is also collapse."

That scary part of this is that if we changed the word 'clerics' to 'liberal/socialists'; this very statement could be applied in some ways to the U.S.

7 posted on 02/06/2004 5:02:38 AM PST by Paul C. Jesup (Voting for a lesser evil is still an evil act and therefore evil...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
"Those current MPs whose qualifications have been rejected by the Guardians Council are US spies and were implementing US rules instead of Islamic rules," the chief editor of the hardline Resalaat paper, Mohamad Kazem Anbarloui, told the congregation in a mosque in Iran's clerical capital of Qom Friday, IRNA said.

I don't know whether to laugh or cry. If Anbarloui knew that the average American living in Iowa never even THINKS about Iran, would he blinded by impotent rage? Or, does he think that the average Iranian believes that America is that powerful, that our government would be in the position to place operatives within the parliament? IF we were, why wouldn't we just use our powers to assassinate the leadership in Iran?! Amazing. I know that propaganda is the source of Anbarloui's argument, but couldn't he come up with a scenario that reads as being plausible?

8 posted on 02/06/2004 5:10:02 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.'--- Kahlil Gibran)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Paul C. Jesup
I think you are somewhat right but remember that there are huge differences between the system in the US and their system.
The US government can tolerate the critics but theirs kills, tortures and jail the critics.
9 posted on 02/06/2004 5:10:23 AM PST by F14 Pilot ("Terrorists declared war on U.S. and War is what they Got!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
I think you are somewhat right but remember that there are huge differences between the system in the US and their system.

Yes there is, there they make no bones about being a one party, while here we pretend there are two parties, and bash those who try to create a third option.

The US government can tolerate the critics but theirs kills, tortures and jail the critics.

You must have missed the Clinton years when the Clintons used the media, the IRS, the EPA, the ATF and there criminal connections to bankrupt, demonize, destroy and/or kill their critices.

10 posted on 02/06/2004 5:15:40 AM PST by Paul C. Jesup (Voting for a lesser evil is still an evil act and therefore evil...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Paul C. Jesup
Ah, Forgot to tell you then that the situation inside the US during the clintons' were much better than theirs in the past 25 years.
11 posted on 02/06/2004 5:18:40 AM PST by F14 Pilot ("Terrorists declared war on U.S. and War is what they Got!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Ah, Forgot to tell you then that the situation inside the US during the clintons' were much better than theirs in the past 25 years.

That depends on where you live, for example, I am sure those who live in or near U.S./Mexican border towns would disagree with you.

12 posted on 02/06/2004 5:20:48 AM PST by Paul C. Jesup (Voting for a lesser evil is still an evil act and therefore evil...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Please note, I am not saying we are as bad off as the Iranians, but we are must closer to their situation (dealing with tyranny) than what most people would like to admit.
13 posted on 02/06/2004 5:22:36 AM PST by Paul C. Jesup (Voting for a lesser evil is still an evil act and therefore evil...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Paul C. Jesup
Yes, not as bad as their government.
14 posted on 02/06/2004 5:23:57 AM PST by F14 Pilot ("Terrorists declared war on U.S. and War is what they Got!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Pan_Yans Wife
My Name is Iran
Series Chronicles Personal Journey, Struggle for Change in Iran

Feb. 2, 2004 -- Her great-grandfather -- Ali Akbar Davar -- created Iran's legal code in the late 1920s. NPR's Davar Ardalan has lived in Iran under both the Shah's reign and that of the Ayatollahs. In a three-part Morning Edition series produced with American RadioWorks, she traces her personal journey and Iran's struggle for a lawful society, 25 years after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

A century ago, Iran became the first country in the Middle East to bring together secular and religious law. In 1979, an Islamic revolution made Iran a theocracy and enshrined religious law as supreme. The changes were dramatic: women were stoned for adultery, children could be tortured, and the age of marriage for girls reduced to nine. Now, a movement is growing within Iran to create a society that ensures human rights.

Inside Iran's courtrooms, Nobel Peace Prize winner Shirin Ebadi and other lawyers are fighting for change. They've been successful in raising the age of marriage for girls from nine to 13 and divorced women now can have custody of male children up to the age of seven. But they are confronting hard-line clerics who are adamant that the legal system remain based on their interpretation of the word of God.

Ardalan and co-producer Rasool Nafisi explore the ferment in today's Iran at a time when other nations in the Islamic world are debating how to balance secular and sacred law in a modern society.

http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=1626512

(From this link, you will find multiple embedded links to access for more information.- PYW)

15 posted on 02/06/2004 5:52:24 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.'--- Kahlil Gibran)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Pan_Yans Wife
Thanks
16 posted on 02/06/2004 6:53:00 AM PST by nuconvert ("Why do you have to be a nonconformist like everybody else?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Nasrallah, the Pawn

February 02, 2004
Jaffee Center for Strategic Studies
Yoram Schweitzer

The recent Israel-Hizbullah prisoner exchange appears to be Act I of an ongoing drama. The next chapter, if it is played out, will also star Hizbullah chief Hassan Nasrallah, acting on behalf of the Government of Iran and with the backing of the Syrian and Lebanese Governments.

But Act II will shine the spotlight on the symbiotic relationship between several state sponsors of terrorism and the Hizbullah organization that serves as their proxy. And it will also highlight the West's continued willingness to tolerate the ongoing exploitation of that relationship by the state sponsors, especially Iran.

In light of previous experience, the declared intention of Nasrallah and his Iranian patrons to seek a solution to the riddle of the missing Israeli navigator, Ron Arad, must still be treated with caution. But even if Nasrallah does come up with new information about Arad's fate in exchange for what he hopes will be a bigger payoff than he received in Act I of the exchange, it is clear that Nasrallah is only a pawn, however slick, in a typically crafty Iranian game.

Iran's role in all this is reflected in the arrival in Beirut of a delegation headed by Ali Akbar Muhtashampur, one of the founders of Hizbullah, and Hadi Khamenei, the younger brother of Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei. Their presence at the lavish ceremonies marking the return of Lebanese prisoners symbolized Iran's honored status and the image it wants to project to the world as the party that worked diligently behind the scenes to make the deal possible. The high-level delegation was also meant to communicate the seriousness of Iran's intention to play a constructive role (along with Hizbullah and Syria) in the joint mechanism set up by German mediators to find a humanitarian solution to the problem of MIAs in Lebanon.

The public commitment and cautious optimism voiced by German mediator Ernst Uhrlau about the chances of sustaining the process and succeeding where his predecessor had failed raised hopes that this time, in contrast to their performance in the mid-1990s, the Iranians will honor their promises to end the suffering of the families of Arad and the four Iranian diplomats missing in Lebanon since 1982. But if that is the case, it is still unclear what brought about a change in Iranian policy on this matter. The answer may lie in the realm of strategy and geo-politics, that is, in Euro-American pressure on the matter of Iran's nuclear program and the presence of American forces around Iran's borders. It may also lie in domestic pressure to get this troublesome issue off Iran's international agenda.

Whatever the case, the protracted negotiations about the question of Ron Arad, many of whose details have already been made public, clearly indicate that the Iranians and their central partner in Lebanon, Nasrallah, have known about Arad's fate for a long time. Consequently, the effort they will ostensibly make now in order to justify the unreasonable payoff they are demanding is a fraud. For the brief period of time given to the "Humanitarian Search Mechanism" can only be an elegant "escape hatch" from the charge that they have deliberately concealed the Israeli airman for 16 years (since he was transferred to the Iranians by Amal dissidents in 1988); otherwise, there is no reason to expect that it will suffice after so many similar "efforts" have failed in the past.

The Iran-Hizbullah terrorism conglomerate has a long record of successfully hiding hostages, managing embellished crises, and waging psychological warfare aimed at maximizing Iran's political dividends. This game, in which Hizbullah functions as the operational arm for Iran's policy of extortion and serves as its fig-leaf, was first played out in 1984-1991. During that period, about a hundred hostages were kidnapped in Lebanon, most of them from Western countries. Some were held in Lebanon for several years in inhuman conditions, paid a heavy psychological cost, and were released when their countries paid a huge ransom; some died in captivity. The kidnapping chapter in Lebanon ended only when Iran forced Hizbullah to desist in return for Western support for a UN Security Council resolution condemning Iraq as the aggressor in the Iran-Iraq War. An attempt to include the release of Ron Arad in that package deal failed, and his fate has remained a mystery ever since.

In this theater of the absurd, the current effort to resolve the puzzle of Ron Arad is presented as a new play, though it stars precisely the same actors. Nasrallah is willingly cast in the lead role, but Iran is feeding him his lines. Iran itself, as is its wont, insists on projecting a fair and neutral demeanor even as it extracts the full price in return for undoing what were its own actions. Iran expects to get a hefty commission from Germany and France for its effort and good will in resolving the issue and through them will demand the release of terrorists it, itself, dispatched. The payoff most highly prized by Iran and Hizbullah is Kazem Darbi. According to the findings of a German court, Darbi was an Iranian studying in Germany who, on the orders of Iranian intelligence, recruited a group of Hizbullahis living there to murder Iranian Kurdish dissidents in the Mykonos Restaurant in Berlin in 1992. Other targets for release include one of the hijackers of TWA flight 847 in June 1985 who murdered US Navy diver Robert Stethem and was jailed by Germany, some of those involved in the murder of former Iranian Prime Minister Shahpour Bakhtiar, and five members of the Hizbullah cell active in a wave of murders carried out in France in the late 1980s on behalf of Iran.

If French and German leaders have to respond to demands to release terrorists convicted and jailed in their own countries, they will be helping Iran to reap its own profit from another Israel-Hizbullah exchange and to avoid punishment for its past actions. In return, they would do well to demand a drastic change in Iran's support of terrorism and to make it clear that if Iran refuses to comply, they will follow the precedent set in the confrontation over Iranian nuclear activities and push the European Union to join in American-led sanctions through the Security Council.

______________________________________________________________
Published by TEL AVIV UNIVERSITY
The Jaffee Center for Strategic Studies
& The Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies
through the generosity of Sari and Israel Roizman, Philadelphia

http://www.accessmiddleeast.org/index.aspx?source=Google&keyword=Iran%20attacks
17 posted on 02/06/2004 7:21:27 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn; nuconvert; Pan_Yans Wife; PGalt; Paul C. Jesup; ThatsAllFolks2; Quix; windchime; ...
Iran Guardians Council ends review; reformist hopes dashed for election

6 February 2004
Channel News Asia

TEHRAN : Iran's conservative Guardians Council has completed its review of the thousands of candidates it barred from standing in February 20 elections, clearing only another 200 to stand and dashing reformist hopes.

"The work of the review of the cases finished last night and we reported our work to the office of the supreme leader and today we will report it to the ministry of the interior," Ayatollah Ahmad Janati, head of the Guardians Council, was quoted by the student news agency ISNA as saying Friday.

"A number of the disqualified candidates have been reinstated, due to the reasons that the supreme leader (Ayatollah Ali Khamenei) deemed fit," Janati said, adding: "I do not see the necessity to give out the figures of those who have been reinstated."

The agency quoted Ali Mohammad Hazeri, coordinator of the 2nd of Khordad Front -- the body encompassing all the reformist groups loyal to President Mohammad Khatami -- as saying 200 more candidates had been cleared to contest the parliamentary poll. They joined the 51 given approval on Thursday.

"Based on the information we got today, the Guardians Council reinstated another 200 of the candidates presented from a list by the intelligence ministry to them, and we have heard that some prominent names are among them," said Hazeri.

He did not say who the "prominent names" were.

On Thursday the main reformist party announced it would boycott the election and some 130 deputies, who have been holding a sit-in at parliament since January 11, said they would now make good their threat to resign their seats.

"It's the worst possible outcome," said Islamic Iran Participation Front leader Mohammad Reza Khatami, brother of the president, as he announced his party's decision to boycott the parliamentary elections.

The Guardians Council, a conservative-controlled vetting body, precipitated the crisis with the news on January 11 it had rejected some 3,500 candidates for the election. It subsequently reinstated around 1,000 but was then instructed by supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to review the remaining 2,500 cases.

Most of those rejected were reformists, including more than 80 sitting members of parliament seeking re-election, on the grounds that they did not respect Islam or the constitution.

The crisis is seen by many as the most serious faced by the Islamic Republic since it was founded in 1979.

The reformists now control both government and parliament but believe they could lose out to the conservatives if the poll goes ahead on February 20. They have been seeking a postponement.

But earlier this week, Khamenei ordered that the government must go ahead with the organisation of the elections. He also warned that resignations by officials in protest at the barring of candidates were "against the law and prohibited by Islam" and could incur heavy penalties.

Iran's hardline judiciary chief Ayatollah Mahmud Hashemi Shahrudi backed up the warning, saying late Thursday that those who resigned with the aim of impeding the elections faced prosecution, state news agency IRNA reported.

Several resignations have been announced among ministers, deputy ministers and all 27 provincial governors, as well as the MPs.

"Those current MPs whose qualifications have been rejected by the Guardians Council are US spies and were implementing US rules instead of Islamic rules," the chief editor of the hardline Resalaat paper, Mohamad Kazem Anbarloui, told the congregation in a mosque in Iran's clerical capital of Qom Friday, IRNA said.

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/afp_world/view/69898/1/.html
18 posted on 02/06/2004 7:24:44 AM PST by F14 Pilot ("Terrorists declared war on U.S. and War is what they Got!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Their game which was a set up is over now and they don't know how to start another game to get the people's vote.
19 posted on 02/06/2004 7:30:19 AM PST by F14 Pilot ("Terrorists declared war on U.S. and War is what they Got!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Menashri Analyzes Israeli-Iran Relationship

February 06, 2004
The Hoya
Cynthia Osueke

Dr. David Menashri, a distinguished professor at Tel Aviv University, analyzed the progression of the Israeli-Iran relationship since the Iranian Revolution in 1979, in ICC on Wednesday.

Menashri said he hoped that “one day adults will learn from the youth … to cooperate and work with other groups.”

In Biblical times, Jews had friendly ties to the Persian State, he said, but today both states consider the other a main threat.

In the 25 years since the Iranian Revolution in 1979, relationships between both states have deteriorated, and Menashri said he hoped to “evaluate the success of the revolution … two main aims, first to hold power, institutionalize the Islamic Regime and perpetuate its rule elsewhere.”

But he said that the revolution had failed on many of its promises. It had succeeded in bringing a particular interpretation of Islam from the minority, to the center and then to power.

Describing a number of cases where Iran had abandoned its ideology for more pragmatic state needs, Menashri turned to the current hostility between Israel and Iran.

Without a common border and no experience of war between the two states, Iran has nothing to lose opposing Israel, he said, adding that the anti-Israel policy is also quite practical. “It’s the only issue the Islamic regime can claim success [on],” he said. “The country has many problems. It’s good to have an enemy from the border.”

Additionally, Iran has equally, if not more hostile views toward America, he said, calling America “the great Satan” and Israel a “lesser Satan.” It has found the prospect of Jews ruling over Muslims “impossible to digest,” when historically the reverse has happened.

Still, Menashri noted there are “impressive signs of openness.”

The women and youth groups of Iran engage in active civil society, including the recent awarding of the Nobel Prize to advocate for reform in Iran. And the nation produces what Menashri called a “diversity of views, and published books critical of the government.” Very daring leading intellectuals debate over fundamental questions of their society and question the rule of clerics and produce liberal newspapers, Menashri said.

“Don’t make the mistake, in Iran there is a great deal of freedom of expression, there is no freedom after expression,” he said. “Free speech has a price. Critics speak out, go to jail, come back and speak out again. At the end of their life, most leaders are in jail.”

The flow of ideas is not limited to the elite, Menashri said.

“Iran’s usage of the Internet is more than any nation in the Middle East, except Israel. On Sept. 11 young Iranians lit candles to identify with the U.S.,” he said.

Iran’s nuclear weapons program and its support of terrorists have embittered Israel, he said. Moreover, Menashri said that signs of openness do not necessary mean milder views toward Israel.

Despite supplying the Iranians with arms in the Iran-Iraq war, Israel highlights Iran’s radical political ideology and weapons programs as key offenses, he said, concluding that only a change in the Iranian power structure and resolving the Palestinian issue will change relations between the states.

The Hoya george Town's University's Newspaper of Record Since 1920

http://www.thehoya.com/news/020604/news15.cfm
20 posted on 02/06/2004 7:47:32 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nuconvert
“Don’t make the mistake, in Iran there is a great deal of freedom of expression, there is no freedom after expression,” he said. “Free speech has a price. Critics speak out, go to jail, come back and speak out again. At the end of their life, most leaders are in jail.”

The good professor says it better than I could. :)

21 posted on 02/06/2004 8:25:09 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.'--- Kahlil Gibran)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Pan_Yans Wife
Iran reformers lose battle of the lists

Gareth Smyth Tehran
February 6 2004

Iran's student news agency, ISNA, reported on Friday that the Guardian Council had finished its review of candidates barred from this month's parliamentary elections and would reinstate only another 200.

This would leave well over 2,000 candidates disqualified and confirm the fears of Iran's reformers that the Guardian Council, a constitutional watchdog, was seeking to hand victory in the February 20 poll to the conservatives even before the election campaign began.

"The work of the review of the cases finished last night and we reported our work to the office of the supreme leader [Ali Khamenei] and today we will report it to the ministry of the interior," Ayatollah Ahmad Janati, head of the Guardian Council, told ISNA.

Since the council announced the banning of 3,600 candidates over three weeks ago, the reformers have discussed various options for resisting but have failed to present a clear strategy to a largely disinterested public.

President Mohammad Khatami has argued consistently that the matter could be resolved through discussions with the Guardian Council and the supreme leader, Ali Khamenei.

More radical figures, including leading members of Mosharekate (Participation Front), the main reformist party, originally argued that the interior ministry, which is controlled by reformers, should include the names of "illegally" barred candidates on voting lists.

The country's 28 provincial governors, responsible for administering the poll, have also discussed resignation.

Both strategies, said their proponents, would require the support of Mr Khatami, which appears not to have been forthcoming.

As 80 deputies ended a three-week sit-in on Wednesday, some criticised the reformist president for hesitancy.

The supreme leader, by contrast, proved decisive. On Wednesday Mr Khamenei made it clear that the poll would go ahead as planned and that anyone who attempted to "withdraw" from the political process would be acting against both Iran's law and the Shariah, the canonical law of Islam.

http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1075982354659
22 posted on 02/06/2004 9:09:28 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.'--- Kahlil Gibran)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
"Those current MPs whose qualifications have been rejected by the Guardians Council are US spies and were implementing US rules instead of Islamic rules," the chief editor of the hardline Resalaat paper, Mohamad Kazem Anbarloui, told the congregation in a mosque in Iran's clerical capital of Qom Friday, IRNA said.

"Those current MPs whose qualifications have been rejected by the Guardians Council are US spies ...." LoL!

If only that were true!
23 posted on 02/06/2004 10:45:30 AM PST by nuconvert ("Why do you have to be a nonconformist like everybody else?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
"...they don't know how to start another game to get the people's vote."

They're running out of time.........only 2 weeks left.

They've tried musical chairs, how about Twister?
24 posted on 02/06/2004 10:50:58 AM PST by nuconvert ("Why do you have to be a nonconformist like everybody else?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Mesbah-Yazdi: "Outgoing Majlis a disgrace"

Friday, February 06, 2004 - ©2003 IranMania.com

QOM, Feb 4 (Iran Daily) -- A senior conservative cleric said that the outgoing parliament is "a disgrace to the Islamic establishment". Ayatollah Mohammad Taqi Mesbah-Yazdi added that clerics must guide the people in order to save the Seventh Parliament from the same incidents that took place in this parliament.

"Honest and just people must enter the parliament and defend the rights of the people and the Islamic system," he added.

The conservative cleric also said "when the enemy is standing next to our house with a sword in his hands, we must prioritize fighting him over what we do at theological schools". Mesbah-Yazdi noted that religion should be studied precisely and acted upon.

He stressed that "no one should enter theological schools for the sake of taking up high posts".

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=22348&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
25 posted on 02/06/2004 11:40:03 AM PST by freedom44
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Pan_Yans Wife
Quake Opens Door to Gospel
How Christians are trying to ease tensions in the Islamic Republic.

By John W. Kennedy 02/06/2004


Christian ministries are walking through a door thrown open by the deadly December 26 earthquake. They are working on improving relationships with Iranians, and taking advantage of opportunities to demonstrate the Christian faith to them.

The December 26 temblor in Bam, 630 miles southeast of the Iranian capital Tehran, killed an estimated 34,000 people and injured 30,000 others. The Iranian government waived visa restrictions, allowing aid from Christian agencies and elsewhere.

John Schenk, communications manager for World Vision, says working side by side with Iranians in the relief effort will ease tensions between Muslims and Christians.

"Ideologies and politics have not been part of the discussions," Schenk said. "It's been about the shock they've suffered and what motivates us to help."

Clive Calver, president of World Relief, said the opening is unprecedented. "The church has something to offer that is more valuable than food or blankets," Calver said from Bam. "We can pray in the name of Jesus."

Still, Ken Isaacs, director of projects for Samaritan's Purse, said opportunities for evangelism must wait. "The heart of our ministry is sharing the mandates of Christ," Isaacs said. "But this is an Islamic society. We're not preaching."

Evangelical Protestants in Iran number around 30,000, a majority of them Muslim converts. Muslims who convert can face intimidation, jailing, and even death. Iranian Christians International in Colorado Springs reported that there are around 200,000 ethnic Armenian or Assyrian Christians. They include communities of Presbyterians, Anglicans, Orthodox, Catholics, and Pentecostals.

Calver said Iranian evangelicals across the country have been at the forefront of the relief effort, because there has been no organized church in Bam.

Evangelicals "moved out of their safety zones" after the earthquakes, Calver said. "With people of this spiritual caliber, nothing will stand in the way of their being faithful to the Lord Jesus."

An Iranian pastor in exile who has regular contact with Christians in the country said 28 recent converts lived in Bam, but 25 died in the quake; the other three suffered injuries. Most became Christians as a result of radio ministry. They had been meeting in a home.

A minister in Tehran told Christianity Today that Iranians are very open to the gospel. Iranian Christians International guesses as many as 100,000 people have become Christians as a result of radio, satellite television, or Internet evangelism. Yet those commitments sometimes fade.

Only 3,000 evangelicals lived in the country in 1979. Missionaries were expelled after the Islamic revolution, and as many as 90 percent of the churches were closed. The exiled pastor told CT that weekly church services now are held in fewer than 20 church buildings in the country. While there are an estimated 150 house churches in Iran, security concerns often curtail gatherings. Several Christian leaders have disappeared or been murdered, including four Assemblies of God pastors in the 1990s.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2004/003/10.19.html
26 posted on 02/06/2004 1:00:08 PM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.'--- Kahlil Gibran)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Pan_Yans Wife
I should add that if you go to the link provided above, that there are r links to the websites of ministries that are operating in Bam.
27 posted on 02/06/2004 1:07:06 PM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.'--- Kahlil Gibran)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Iran Reformers Lose the Battle

February 06, 2004
The Financial Times
Smyth Tehran

Iran's student news agency, ISNA, reported on Friday that the Guardian Council had finished its review of candidates barred from this month's parliamentary elections and would reinstate only another 200.

This would leave well over 2,000 candidates disqualified and confirm the fears of Iran's reformers that the Guardian Council, a constitutional watchdog, was seeking to hand victory in the February 20 poll to the conservatives even before the election campaign began.

"The work of the review of the cases finished last night and we reported our work to the office of the supreme leader [Ali Khamenei] and today we will report it to the ministry of the interior," Ayatollah Ahmad Janati, head of the Guardian Council, told ISNA.

Since the council announced the banning of 3,600 candidates over three weeks ago, the reformers have discussed various options for resisting but have failed to present a clear strategy to a largely disinterested public.

President Mohammad Khatami has argued consistently that the matter could be resolved through discussions with the Guardian Council and the supreme leader, Ali Khamenei.

More radical figures, including leading members of Mosharekate (Participation Front), the main reformist party, originally argued that the interior ministry, which is controlled by reformers, should include the names of "illegally" barred candidates on voting lists.

The country's 28 provincial governors, responsible for administering the poll, have also discussed resignation.

Both strategies, said their proponents, would require the support of Mr Khatami, which appears not to have been forthcoming.

As 80 deputies ended a three-week sit-in on Wednesday, some criticised the reformist president for hesitancy.

The supreme leader, by contrast, proved decisive. On Wednesday Mr Khamenei made it clear that the poll would go ahead as planned and that anyone who attempted to "withdraw" from the political process would be acting against both Iran's law and the Shariah, the canonical law of Islam.

http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1075982354659&p=1012571727172
28 posted on 02/06/2004 1:40:34 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Iran 'Has Secret Atomic Bomb Project'

Telegraph - By Anton La Guardia
Feb 6, 2004

America has convincing new evidence that Iran is hiding an atomic bomb project despite Teheran's promise to open up all of its nuclear facilities to international inspectors, a senior US official has told The Telegraph.

He said the Teheran regime was secretly trying to build a second and more advanced uranium enrichment plant in parallel to the large facilities in the town of Natanz revealed to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) last year.

"There is no doubt in our mind that the Iranians have a lot that the IAEA does not know about," said the official. "The Iranians have a military programme that the IAEA has never set eyes on."

Another western source confirmed that the nuclear technology smuggling network headed by Abdul Qadeer Khan, Pakistan's top nuclear weapons scientist, had sold much more equipment to Iran than Teheran has so far admitted to.

The latest intelligence on Iran, if corroborated, will ignite an intense international crisis with the Iranian regime.

The US seems, for the moment, to be seeking to strangle Iran's nuclear programme through inspections and diplomatic agreements brokered by Europe.

But the presence of US troops either side of Iran - in Iraq and Afghanistan - is a reminder to the regime that Washington retains the declared option of "pre-emptive" military action. Clear-cut proof of a secret nuclear weapons programme in Iran would be an acute embarrassment for Jack Straw, the Foreign Secretary, who has invested heavily in "engagement" with the clerical regime.

Last October three European countries - Britain, France and Germany - brokered a deal whereby Teheran supposedly came clean about its nuclear programme and in return was spared action by the United Nations Security Council.

Iran also agreed "temporarily" to suspend uranium enrichment at the Natanz plant. But western diplomats said it had continued to buy components, assemble centrifuges and test the equipment.

Senior diplomats from the big three European countries this week met Iranian officials in Vienna to demand that Teheran halt these subsidiary enrichment-related activities, but reached no agreement. It was not clear whether they discussed US suspicions that Teheran had a second secret enrichment plant.

Iran claims it has only sought to make low-enriched uranium as fuel for a planned civil nuclear reactor to generate electricity.

But it admitted to lying to the IAEA for 18 years, saying it had made a small quantity of highly-enriched uranium and also separated a few grams of plutonium - both weapons-grade fissile material. According to US and other western sources, it is now clear that Iran has been hiding much more. In particular, they believe Teheran has been trying to build a G2 centrifuge with high-speed rotors made of maraging steel, a light but high-strength form of the metal.

This is a more efficient model than the aluminium-based G1 design that is under IAEA inspection in Natanz.

Both versions are based on Dutch designs stolen in the 1970s by Mr Khan when he was working as a metallurgist in the Netherlands for Urenco, the British-German-Dutch nuclear fuel consortium. Libya bought both the G1 aluminium and G2 maraging steel versions from Khan's network. Moreover, a shipment of maraging steel centrifuge tubes destined for North Korea was seized by Japan last year.

Western intelligence agencies are trying to find out whether Iran and other countries have bought a design for a nuclear bomb that was sold to Libya by Pakistani scientists.

Officials will not say precisely how they have established that Iran is still working on an atomic bomb. But a wealth of information is emerging from the unravelling of the "nuclear supermarket" supplied by Mr Khan. Western intelligence services were already acting against the nuclear black market before Pakistani authorities began to "debrief" Mr Khan.

It is possible that along with the seizure of maraging steel shipments bound for Libya and North Korea, the intelligence agencies found a similar trail leading to Iran.

Nevertheless, officials admit that their information is still "sketchy".

It is unclear whether Iran has assembled a secret "G2" centrifuge plant, or even whether it has all the necessary components.

Diplomats in Vienna say, for instance, that Libya still had large "holes" in its centrifuge programme before abandoning the project.

"There is much that we don't know," said the senior US source. "We don't know how far the Iranians have gone, but they are making progress. "They are developing a completely indigenous capability. At some point cutting off the external support will not be enough to stop it."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=%2Fnews%2F2004%2F02%2F06%2Fwiran06.xml&secureRefresh=true&_requestid=4694
29 posted on 02/06/2004 1:42:55 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Iran 'Has Secret Atomic Bomb Project'

Telegraph - By Anton La Guardia
Feb 6, 2004

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1072564/posts?page=29#29
30 posted on 02/06/2004 1:43:49 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Super Bowl, Iranian style
Dad sweeps, mom cooks, brother surfs

By Lilly Ghahremani
February 4, 2004
iranian.com

2:30 pm.
I enter my parents' house. They are not home, having left town to celebrate my father's birthday with -- what else? -- a weekend at a Palm Springs casino. I can hear my brother tapping away on his computer at the other end of the house, and direct myself into the TV room. There, I eye the two couches to assess which will offer a better perspective and choose the one closer to the door. Sweeping my brother's dirty socks from before me, I fall back onto my throne.

Pregame Show
A guy named Josh Groban comes and serenades the next NASA flight team. In the tradition of all things American, before we cut to 4 hours of what we can anticipate will be a merciless flood of the results of ridiculous advertising budgets, the government apparently felt it necessary to plug federal spending. He sings with sincerity, taking his part in the evening more serious than the teams themselves do. I try to drown out his warbling and note to myself that he didn't think twice about donning a wool scarf... in Houston. When a chorus of awkward children join in, I know I am ready for the next musical exercise.

The Anthem
I listen to the anthem belted out by Beyonce Knowles and marvel at not only her incredibly powerful voice, but her impeccable hair. Is that suit Chanel?

First Quarter
My brother has not retreated from his cave to say hello, but my parents have called to let me know that they are still on the road. They're sorry to be late and look forward to watching the game together, mom says, but there was another casino on the way back and they had to go "investigate". No matter. The game is 0-0 and I have yet to see a commercial that really makes me laugh.

Second Quarter
Things are starting to pick up. In our household, I mean. The garage door has flown open and mom and dad are home. Mom rushes into the tv room with a bag of goodies from a far-flung designer outlet mall. Christmas is about to revisit the Ghahremani household. As she begins to ruffle the tissue paper in the bag, my American blood curdles.

"Mooooooom, it's the Super Bowl. Ugh. LATER! Sheesh!"

I roll my eyes but don't want to miss any more of the game. She looks at the television and waits for a commercial break, only to be greeted with more of my screaming.

"NOT DURING THE COMMERCIALS! NEVER DURING THE COMMERCIALS! DON'T YOU KNOW ANYTHING?"

The glow of gift-giving washes from her face and she shuffles from the room. A month ago, I would have heard the anxious clicking of a lighter echo from the kitchen, but her New Year's resolution was to quit smoking. I quickly reflect upon my snappiness and assess that: 1) I am a bitch, and 2) only on Super Bowl Sunday would this make me a very good American.

Before these thoughts can sink in, mom has returned from the kitchen with a diet coke and the resolve that she will watch the Halftime show with me.

Halftime
Enter Janet Jackson. Before the first verse is out of her mouth, my mom begins what I fear will become a running commentary. "She looks just like Michael, but natural. She dances like him too." I am proud of my mom for recognizing who Janet is but for some reason feel the need to pick a fight.

I keep one eye on the television and decide that this is an important time to fill her in on the "Jesus juice" gossip (and Muslims get a bad rap on TV?) she has missed while out hitting 21 in the desert.

When P.Diddy comes out, I feel the need to point out the useless trivia that he is not "just" a rapper, but a well-educated graduate and entrepreneur.

As the show continues, I feel an increasing obligation to be a cultural ambassador. As the performers change places, I'm not sure how to explain Nelly, the next rapper, to her. As soon as he's begun, we're back to the Shamed King of Pop.

She points out that "Everyone does that now-ever since Michael Jackson." (What, mom?) "The grabbing thing. They all grab themselves now!" She is right, and I wish for the show, and this awkward cultural tour, to end. How can I sit and listen with any self-respect to Nelly holler "Ass is bodacious" in such direct proximity to a true poet who reveres Hafez?

I feel some sort of relief when the camera pans. That is, until I realize that we are being greeted by the disturbing sight of Kid Rock in an American flag poncho. (And this is the same nation that refuses to let you burn it?)

Before we can "enjoy" his performance, Janet is back, and this time she's joined by Justin Timberlake. I am now genuinely excited, explaining to mom how he's filling in the very shoes of Michael Jackson (see "Jesus juice", above).

It is thankfully before I can confess to her that I've paid to see him in concert that he begins running around after Janet and -- spanking her. Not once, but every single chance she gets within grabbing distance.

As I watch a man spank a woman on television with my mother, I am acutely aware that I want to fall into the cracks of the couch and join the legions of tokhmeh that therein reside. The camera pans out for the infamous baring of Miss-Jackson-If-You're-Nasty's breasts, and I sense that we are all somewhat relieved that the game is back on.

Third Quarter
My father peeks around the corner and asks what we're watching. For someone who religiously monitors world events, I search my mind for ways this event could have escaped him.

As he surveys the room, his eyes zoom like lasers, focusing on the dog hair that has coated the carpet in his 48 hour absence. He promptly decides that RIGHT NOW is the time to clean. He disappears for a moment, returning with a broom. He then sweeps up and down the hallway, stopping to alternately comment that my dog is disgusting, and my brother needs to shave.

Halfway down the pike, he stops his sweeping, looks in and asks, "How long is this going to go on?" My mom excuses herself to go prepare dinner and, if I know her, to occupy him so that I may watch the conclusion of the game in peace.

But he will not be budged. Arm on the broom, he watches one team score (We're Iranian. Does it really matter which?). But dad is too smart for this game. "Tsk. See, now the other team will get it and score. Uh oh. Watch."

I hear the distant clicking of my brother on the computer, and know that I will never again wonder why he is not an athlete. They adjourn for dinner.

Fourth Quarter
The game is heating up. In the last 3 minutes of the game, Mom has returned with a plate of steaming food for me. Hearing our furor over the fact that "Muhammad scored!"

My father's curiosity has gotten the best of him and he sneaks back into the TV room. My brother soon joins us at the couch for the grande finale. My parents cheer in unison "kick it straight", and Vinatieri hears them.

As the Patriots win, we all cheer and show our commitment to American pastimes by watching the blah ceremony crowning Tom Brady MVP. When my mom mentions that Brady is a pro-Bush Republican, I sense that Dad may have just become more interested in football.

Without further ado, the players retreat to their locker rooms, Mom goes to brew a round of chai and we change the channel.

God bless America.

http://www.iranian.com/Diaspora/2004/February/Lilly/index.html
31 posted on 02/06/2004 3:22:15 PM PST by freedom44 ("When my mom mentions that Brady is a pro-Bush Republican, Dad become more interested in football")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Iran council clears 200 more candidates

Last Update: Saturday, February 7, 2004. 9:16am (AEDT)
ABC.co/au

Iran's conservative Guardians Council has cleared 200 reformist candidates to stand in this month's parliamentary elections however more than 2,000 others are still barred from contesting the poll.

The banning of the mostly reformist candidates is being described as the most serious political crisis to strike the Islamic Republic since its founding 25 years ago.

A number of government ministers and provincial governors have tendered their resignations in protest.

In response, Iran's Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei ordered a review of the bans, and after vetting the 2,500 barred candidates, the conservative guardians council has reinstated about 10 per cent.

However reformers say it is not enough and one leading party says it will boycott the elections scheduled for 13 days time.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/s1040019.htm
32 posted on 02/06/2004 4:14:16 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Friday, February 06, 2004

Iran Acquires Cruise Missile

February 06, 2004
DEBKAfile
DEBKA-Net-Weekly

Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary regime last month marked the 25th anniversary of its victory over the Shah by launching a sophisticated missile dubbed Raad and its accompanying advanced radar system designated DM-3b. Minister of defense Rear Admiral Ali Shamkhani led the ceremony in full naval dress uniform.

The official handout described the radar system as navigating and guiding the combatant missile in its final stage. The medium-range Raad missile is equipped with a self-guidance device. Shamkhani enthused: the two systems manufactured in Iran’s state aviation industry further enhance the capabilities of Iranian armed forces.

What the handout did not reveal was that Raad is no ordinary coastal or shipboard projectile but a cruise missile, capable of halting Personal Gulf shipping by blockading the Hormuz Strait. It can also choke off incoming and outgoing sea traffic via the Shatt al-Arb, Iraq’s only exit point for its oil exports and entrance for its vital imports.

DEBKA-Net-Weekly ’s Gulf sources report launching bases for the new missiles are going up at four places on Iran’s Gulf coast: the northern end at Bandar a-Khomeini opposite the mouth of the Shatt al Arb and facing Kuwait and Bahrain, at Bushehr, site of its nuclear reactor, at the big Bandar Abbas naval base and Revolutionary Guards headquarters, and at Bandar e-Lengeh west of Qeshm Island.

From these installations, Iranian missiles will cover the tanker and merchant ship lanes leading into the Persian Gulf from the Indian Ocean through the Gulf of Aden.

A fifth launching base will be located on the small highly-strategic island of Great Tumb situated just north of the Hormuz Strait at the mouth of the Gulf.

According to our military experts, the locations of the new Raad missile bases betray both aggressive intent and determination to defend Iran’s Gulf shore from assault by warships or hostile marine landings. Iran’s military command appears to be preparing the country’s national defenses for an anticipated American attack in the course of 2004 or early 2005.

http://www.debka.com/article.php?aid=782
33 posted on 02/06/2004 4:16:26 PM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Bump!
34 posted on 02/06/2004 5:06:42 PM PST by windchime (Podesta about Bush: "He's got four years to try to undo all the stuff we've done." (TIME-1/22/01))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Bump!
35 posted on 02/06/2004 5:20:57 PM PST by windchime (Podesta about Bush: "He's got four years to try to undo all the stuff we've done." (TIME-1/22/01))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Note the threats of the Islamofascists against democratic protestors.

Not since the Third Reich has so much tyranny cloaked itself in so much legality.

Reform is futile; revolution is imperative.

36 posted on 02/06/2004 7:41:42 PM PST by PhilDragoo (Hitlery: das Butch von Buchenvald)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot

The Guardians Council; oh, now they're looking out for the people.

37 posted on 02/06/2004 7:45:10 PM PST by PhilDragoo (Hitlery: das Butch von Buchenvald)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

38 posted on 02/07/2004 12:08:27 AM PST by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson