Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

President Ronald Reagan Memorial Thread
Various | 6-10-04

Posted on 06/10/2004 2:06:03 PM PDT by Indy Pendance


I have wondered at times what the Ten Commandments would have looked like if Moses had run them through the U.S. congress
- Ronald Reagan

I have left orders to be awakened at any time in case of national emergency, even if I'm in a cabinet meeting.
- Ronald Reagan

Politics is not a bad profession. If you succeed there are many rewards, if you disgrace yourself you can always write a book.
- Ronald Reagan

Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first.
- Ronald Reagan

You can tell a lot about a fellow's character by his way of eating jellybeans.
- Ronald Reagan

My fellow Americans, I am pleased to tell you I just signed legislation which outlaws Russia forever. The bombing begins in five minutes. (Said during a radio microphone test in 1984.)
- Ronald Reagan


TOPICS: Extended News; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: ronaldreagan
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-55 next last
Add your pictures, quotes or stories. This should be fun!
1 posted on 06/10/2004 2:06:04 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

bump


2 posted on 06/10/2004 2:11:05 PM PDT by pgkdan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
'ere you go -

My all time favourite Reagan moment, the one that won my love forever -


MR. GORBACHEV, OPEN THIS GATE! MR. GORBACHEV, TEAR DOWN THIS WALL!

And of course, there's the beautiful relationship with Nancy...this was a rare public photo from 1998:

Look at her eyes. Amazing love.

Then of course, President Reagan and Our Maggie!

And the Great Man saying farewell as only he can...

Regards, Ivan

3 posted on 06/10/2004 2:13:29 PM PDT by MadIvan (Ronald Reagan - proof positive that one man can indeed change the world.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MadIvan

Excellent! Thanks for posting these!


4 posted on 06/10/2004 2:14:14 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
I thought of Ronald Reagan when I went to Berlin, which was right after the wall came down. I thought of him when I borrowed a pickaxe and attacked that awful thing. To live that dream of liberty, amazing...and all due to President Reagan and Mrs. Thatcher.

Regards, Ivan

5 posted on 06/10/2004 2:16:00 PM PDT by MadIvan (Ronald Reagan - proof positive that one man can indeed change the world.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

Thanks indy. Would love to add a picture of maggie by the coffin to this thread. But being a technological idiot, I don't know how to do it... Could you do the honours?


6 posted on 06/10/2004 2:21:43 PM PDT by propertius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: propertius

7 posted on 06/10/2004 2:25:41 PM PDT by Vermonter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

I read this at "The Corner" and thought I'd pass it on:

WATCHING THE GIPPER GO BY [KJL]

Dear ...,

I was fortunate enough to be able to attend President Reagan’s funeral procession yesterday as well.
I won't tell you about all the pomp and circumstance, or the sad beauty of a state funeral procession for the death of a beloved president, other than to say that it was like the death of a king. I’ll leave the sweeping descriptions to the media though. The things you won't read about are the many beautiful little moments that took place.

Grown men weeping openly, and young children standing in awe, not quite able to understand whom this President Reagan was, but fully aware of the solemnity of the moment and that something very important was happening.

So many small things happened that I will never forget. Like the ten year old with the too large glasses looking up at the big Marine Corps photographer saying, "You're a reporter? I'm a reporter too. I write for my school newspaper. We're not as big as your paper is though. And I'm not so much a writer as a cartoonist really."

Overhearing the old men who didn't know each other figure out that they’d stayed at the same hotel at the '76 convention when Reagan challenged the incumbent President Ford, and where they heard the concession speech that ignited a movement. The father and his two sons who'd driven straight through the night from Missouri, who simply said, "We had to be here." Or the five year old that instinctively took his baseball cap off as the caisson passed by who looked up at has father and whispered, "Daddy, take your hat off", and his father nodding and smiling at his son through his tears, having been so completely overcome with emotion that he had forgotten to remove it.

The fighter jets buzzing the crowd in the missing man formation. Seeing the first flight group, then the second, then the third, and finally the fourth. And just as they reached Constitution Avenue seeing one of them take off at a 90-degree angle straight up until it was forever gone from sight, a beautiful symbol of Reagan’s entrance into Heaven.

What a beautiful day.

Sincerely,

Jordan Gehrke

http://www.nationalreview.com/thecorner/04_06_06_corner-archive.asp#033586


8 posted on 06/10/2004 2:26:31 PM PDT by Weimdog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: propertius

I'll do it. Just provide me a link to where I can find it.


9 posted on 06/10/2004 2:27:39 PM PDT by WinOne4TheGipper (Pres. Reagan was greeted at the Pearly Gates by his old college buddy, Moses.:-))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

Its not verbatim but my favorite Reagan quote goes something like:


Its suprising how much you can get done when you dont care who gets the credit.


10 posted on 06/10/2004 2:28:13 PM PDT by Delta 21 (MKC USCG -ret)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

Ronnie once compared Government to a baby: "It is an alimentary canal with an appetite at one end and no sense of responsibility at the other."


11 posted on 06/10/2004 2:31:34 PM PDT by tame (Are you willing to do for the truth what leftists are willing to do for a lie?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: propertius
It's easy.

Here's the generic code: <img src="">

<img src="add html link between the quotes">

<img src="http://images.thisislondon.co.uk/v2/news/reaganthatcherR100604_450x350.jpg">

And here it is...


12 posted on 06/10/2004 2:31:47 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Weimdog

Excellent, thanks for sharing it!


13 posted on 06/10/2004 2:32:41 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: WinOne4TheGipper; Vermonter; Indy Pendance

thanks guys


14 posted on 06/10/2004 2:32:55 PM PDT by propertius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

Without a doubt, the absolute best was during the debate when he said "I will not exploit my opponent's youth and inexperience for personal political gain".


15 posted on 06/10/2004 2:33:34 PM PDT by WinOne4TheGipper (Pres. Reagan was greeted at the Pearly Gates by his old college buddy, Moses.:-))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: propertius

You're welcome. Find a photo and give it a shot!


16 posted on 06/10/2004 2:33:55 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
From Dinesh D'Souza's book Ronald Reagan: How an ordinary man became an extraordinary leader:

"When a California state senator who supported prescribing birth control devices for teenage girls without parental consent charged that 'illegitimate births to teenage mothers have increased alarmingly while Reagan has been in office,' Reagan wrote back, 'Thanks very much...I have never felt so young and virile.'"

17 posted on 06/10/2004 2:37:20 PM PDT by tame (Are you willing to do for the truth what leftists are willing to do for a lie?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tame

HAH! I never heard that one!


18 posted on 06/10/2004 2:38:07 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

Ronnie said that the purpose of welfare "should be to eliminate...the need for it's own existence."


19 posted on 06/10/2004 2:40:03 PM PDT by tame (Are you willing to do for the truth what leftists are willing to do for a lie?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
One of my most memorable quotes by Reagan was: "There is nothing more permanent than a temporary government program."
20 posted on 06/10/2004 2:43:40 PM PDT by dirtbiker (Solution for Terrorism: Nuke 'em 'till they glow, then shoot 'em in the dark!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Delta 21; My2Cents

Stolen from another thread, with credit to My2Cents

I'm reminded of Reagan's quip, back in his first term, about why he hadn't met with any Soviet leader: "They keep dying on me."


21 posted on 06/10/2004 2:44:44 PM PDT by Vermonter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Delta 21
I used that quote at the beginning of my acknowledgments for my dissertation. It is "There is no limit to what you can accomplish if you don't care who gets the credit."
22 posted on 06/10/2004 2:45:12 PM PDT by ned13
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

A few more:

« A government agency is the nearest thing we’ll ever see on this earth »
Ronald Reagan

“The difference between them (the Democrats) and us (the Republicans) is that we want to check government spending and they want to spend government checks.”
Ronald Reagan

"The nine most terrifying words in the English language are: 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.'"
Ronald Reagan

"I've noticed that everyone who is for abortion has already been born."
Ronald Reagan



23 posted on 06/10/2004 2:46:03 PM PDT by propertius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: propertius

Sorry that first one should read:

« A government agency is the nearest thing we’ll ever see to eternity on this earth »
Ronald Reagan


24 posted on 06/10/2004 2:48:58 PM PDT by propertius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
According to D'Souza's book, here are some things Reagan said about or to the hippie protesters when he was governor of California:

"Their signs say make love, not war...but they don't look like they could do much of either."

Reagan said about one demonstrater that he "had a haircut like Tarzan, walked like Jane, and smelled like Cheetah."

While Reagan was riding in his limo, a student held up a sign that said "We are the future" to which Ronnie wrote and held against the window his own sign which said, "I'll sell my bonds."

Some militants promised Ronnie a "bloodbath". He told them to take a bath.

25 posted on 06/10/2004 2:50:08 PM PDT by tame (Are you willing to do for the truth what leftists are willing to do for a lie?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: tame

LOL! He sure had a great sense of humor.


26 posted on 06/10/2004 2:54:25 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

And a few more:

Honey, I forgot to duck." -to his wife, Nancy, after surviving a 1981 assassination attempt

"I hope you're all Republicans." -speaking to surgeons as he entered the operating room following his assassination attempt

"I want you to know that also I will not make age an issue of this campaign. I am not going to exploit, for political purposes, my opponent's youth and inexperience." -during a 1984 presidential debate with Walter Mondale


"Recession is when your neighbor loses his job. Depression is when you lose yours. And recovery is when Jimmy Carter loses his."


"I'm afraid I can't use a mule. I have several hundred up on Capitol Hill." –refusing a gift of a mule


27 posted on 06/10/2004 2:56:16 PM PDT by propertius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MadIvan

"I am not worried about the deficit, its big enough to take care of itself".


28 posted on 06/10/2004 2:57:12 PM PDT by wjcsux ("Communists read Marx and Lenin, Anti-Communists understand Marx and Lenin" -R.Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
from D'Souza (I also heard Rush mention this story the other day):

"At one campus meeting, a student told Reagan that it was impossible for people of Reagan's generation to understand young people. [The student said] 'You grew up in a different world. Today we have television, jet planes, space travel, nuclear energy, computers.' Without missing a beat Reagan replied, 'Your right. It's true that we didn't have those things when we were young. We invented them.'"

29 posted on 06/10/2004 2:57:35 PM PDT by tame (Are you willing to do for the truth what leftists are willing to do for a lie?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
Well, there he goes again...


30 posted on 06/10/2004 2:58:18 PM PDT by My2Cents (Godspeed, President Reagan....And thank you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance


IMHO, this was one of the prettiest sites the world has ever seen!
31 posted on 06/10/2004 2:59:28 PM PDT by wjcsux ("Communists read Marx and Lenin, Anti-Communists understand Marx and Lenin" -R.Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
From my profile page --


32 posted on 06/10/2004 3:01:23 PM PDT by My2Cents (Godspeed, President Reagan....And thank you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MadIvan

Beautiful....I've said a couple times this week on FR that the fact that Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher governed their respective nations at the same critical moment in history is proof positive there is a God.


33 posted on 06/10/2004 3:02:41 PM PDT by My2Cents (Godspeed, President Reagan....And thank you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: propertius
I'm afraid I can't use a mule. I have several hundred up on Capitol Hill." –refusing a gift of a mule
Too funny!
34 posted on 06/10/2004 3:03:01 PM PDT by wjcsux ("Communists read Marx and Lenin, Anti-Communists understand Marx and Lenin" -R.Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
From D'Souza:

"On the morning of inauguration day, Reagan's aide Michael Deaver at Blair house shortly before 9 A.M. to help the Reagans prepare for the ceremonies. 'Where's the governor?' Deaver asked, and Nancy replied, 'I guess he's still in bed.' Astonished, Deaver walked into the bedroom, where the lights were out and the curtains were drawn.
'Governor?'
'Yeah?'
'It's nine o'clock.'
'Yeah?'
'You're going to be inaugurated in two hours.'
'Does that mean I have to get up?'"

35 posted on 06/10/2004 3:09:06 PM PDT by tame (Are you willing to do for the truth what leftists are willing to do for a lie?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

Reagan: "I know that hard work never killed anyone, but I figure, why take a chance?"


36 posted on 06/10/2004 3:11:58 PM PDT by tame (Are you willing to do for the truth what leftists are willing to do for a lie?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: propertius
Abortion is advocated only by persons who have themselves been born.
Ronald Reagan

Above all, we must realize that no arsenal, or no weapon in the arsenals of the world, is so formidable as the will and moral courage of free men and women. It is a weapon our adversaries in today's world do not have.
Ronald Reagan

Facts are stupid things.
Ronald Reagan

Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children's children what it was once like in the United States where men were free.
Ronald Reagan

Government's view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidise it.
Ronald Reagan

How do you tell a communist? Well, it's someone who reads Marx and Lenin. And how do you tell an anti-Communist? It's someone who understands Marx and Lenin.
Ronald Reagan

I call upon the scientific community in our country, those who gave us nuclear weapons, to turn their great talents now to the cause of mankind and world peace: to give us the means of rendering these nuclear weapons impotent and obsolete.
Ronald Reagan

People don't start wars, governments do.
Ronald Reagan
37 posted on 06/10/2004 3:12:15 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

Reagan: "There is no right to strike against the public safety by anybody, anywhere, anytime."


38 posted on 06/10/2004 3:16:16 PM PDT by tame (Lincoln was okay, but he was no Ronald Reagan.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

39 posted on 06/10/2004 3:23:38 PM PDT by tame (Lincoln was okay, but he was no Ronald Reagan.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
I was still a leftie in the early in the 80s but having seen the left from the inside I was open to offers. When Dukakis ran against Reagan I was proud that an American of Greek descent had attained such a position.

I asked my Mom (an immigrant from Greece) what she thought we should do about our votes. I asked her if we should vote for "blood".

Mom said that voting ideas and ideals as our ancestors had believed in doing was by far the better option.

We both voted for Reagan and I have never looked back since.

40 posted on 06/10/2004 3:28:46 PM PDT by eleni121 (Preempt and Prevent---then Destroy)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
/a>
41 posted on 06/10/2004 3:31:53 PM PDT by tame (Lincoln was okay, but he was no Ronald Reagan.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Vermonter

There is an excellent list of Reagan quotes in the last issue of The Federalist. It on my other machine or I would post them.


42 posted on 06/10/2004 3:37:38 PM PDT by Delta 21 (MKC USCG -ret)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Delta 21

http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/rr40.html

At the end of his two terms in office, Ronald Reagan viewed with satisfaction the achievements of his innovative program known as the Reagan Revolution, which aimed to reinvigorate the American people and reduce their reliance upon Government. He felt he had fulfilled his campaign pledge of 1980 to restore "the great, confident roar of American progress and growth and optimism."

On February 6, 1911, Ronald Wilson Reagan was born to Nelle and John Reagan in Tampico, Illinois. He attended high school in nearby Dixon and then worked his way through Eureka College. There, he studied economics and sociology, played on the football team, and acted in school plays. Upon graduation, he became a radio sports announcer. A screen test in 1937 won him a contract in Hollywood. During the next two decades he appeared in 53 films.

From his first marriage to actress Jane Wyman, he had two children, Maureen and Michael. Maureen passed away in 2001. In 1952 he married Nancy Davis, who was also an actress, and they had two children, Patricia Ann and Ronald Prescott.

As president of the Screen Actors Guild, Reagan became embroiled in disputes over the issue of Communism in the film industry; his political views shifted from liberal to conservative. He toured the country as a television host, becoming a spokesman for conservatism. In 1966 he was elected Governor of California by a margin of a million votes; he was re-elected in 1970.

Ronald Reagan won the Republican Presidential nomination in 1980 and chose as his running mate former Texas Congressman and United Nations Ambassador George Bush. Voters troubled by inflation and by the year-long confinement of Americans in Iran swept the Republican ticket into office. Reagan won 489 electoral votes to 49 for President Jimmy Carter.

On January 20, 1981, Reagan took office. Only 69 days later he was shot by a would-be assassin, but quickly recovered and returned to duty. His grace and wit during the dangerous incident caused his popularity to soar.

Dealing skillfully with Congress, Reagan obtained legislation to stimulate economic growth, curb inflation, increase employment, and strengthen national defense. He embarked upon a course of cutting taxes and Government expenditures, refusing to deviate from it when the strengthening of defense forces led to a large deficit.

A renewal of national self-confidence by 1984 helped Reagan and Bush win a second term with an unprecedented number of electoral votes. Their victory turned away Democratic challengers Walter F. Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro.

In 1986 Reagan obtained an overhaul of the income tax code, which eliminated many deductions and exempted millions of people with low incomes. At the end of his administration, the Nation was enjoying its longest recorded period of peacetime prosperity without recession or depression.

In foreign policy, Reagan sought to achieve "peace through strength." During his two terms he increased defense spending 35 percent, but sought to improve relations with the Soviet Union. In dramatic meetings with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, he negotiated a treaty that would eliminate intermediate-range nuclear missiles. Reagan declared war against international terrorism, sending American bombers against Libya after evidence came out that Libya was involved in an attack on American soldiers in a West Berlin nightclub.

By ordering naval escorts in the Persian Gulf, he maintained the free flow of oil during the Iran-Iraq war. In keeping with the Reagan Doctrine, he gave support to anti-Communist insurgencies in Central America, Asia, and Africa.

Overall, the Reagan years saw a restoration of prosperity, and the goal of peace through strength seemed to be within grasp.


43 posted on 06/10/2004 3:54:08 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Delta 21

October 27, 1964

A Time for Choosing

They say the world has become too complex for simple answers. They are wrong. There are no easy answers, but there are simple answers. We must have the courage to do what we know is morally right. Winston Churchill said that "the destiny of man is not measured by material computation. When great forces are on the move in the world, we learn we are spirits -- not animals." And he said, "There is something going on in time and space, and beyond time and space, which, whether we like it or not, spells duty."

October 27, 1964

A Time for Choosing

We need true tax reform that will at least make a start toward restoring for our children the American Dream that wealth is denied to no one, that each individual has the right to fly as high as his strength and ability will take him. . . . But we cannot have such reform while our tax policy is engineered by people who view the tax as a means of achieving changes in our social structure.

October 27, 1964

A Time for Choosing

You and I are told we must choose between a left or right, but I suggest there is no such thing as a left or right. There is only an up or down. Up to man's age-old dream -- the maximum of individual freedom consistent with order -- or down to the ant heap of totalitarianism. Regardless of their sincerity, their humanitarian motives, those who would sacrifice freedom for security have embarked on this downward path. Plutarch warned, "The real destroyer of the liberties of the people is he who spreads among them bounties, donations and benefits."
October 27, 1964

A Time for Choosing

You and I have a rendezvous with destiny. We will preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on earth, or we will sentence them to take the first step into a thousand years of darkness. If we fail, at least let our children and our children's children say of us we justified our brief moment here. We did all that could be done.

October 27, 1964

A Time for Choosing

It's time we asked ourselves if we still know the freedoms intended for us by the Founding Fathers. James Madison said, "We base all our experiments on the capacity of mankind for self-government." This idea that government was beholden to the people, that it had no other source of power, is still the newest, most unique idea in all the long history of man's relation to man. This is the issue of this election: Whether we believe in our capacity for self-government or whether we abandon the American Revolution and confess that a little intellectual elite in a far-distant capital can plan our lives for us better than we can plan them ourselves.

October 27, 1964

A Time for Choosing

Are you willing to spend time studying the issues, making yourself aware, and then conveying that information to family and friends? Will you resist the temptation to get a government handout for your community? Realize that the doctor's fight against socialized medicine is your fight. We can't socialize the doctors without socializing the patients. Recognize that government invasion of public power is eventually an assault upon your own business. If some among you fear taking a stand because you are afraid of reprisals from customers, clients, or even government, recognize that you are just feeding the crocodile hoping he'll eat you last.

January 7, 1970

Los Angeles Times

Welfare's purpose should be to eliminate, as far as possible, the need for its own existence.

11/13/79

Official Announcement for Presidency

Someone once said that the difference between an American and any other kind of person is that an American lives in anticipation of the future because he know it will be a great place. Other people fear the future as just a repetition of past failures. There's a lot of truth in that. If there is one thing we are sure of it is that history need not be relived; that nothing is impossible, and that man is capable of improving his circumstances beyond what we are told is fact.

11/13/79

Official Announcement for Presidency

That is why I am seeking the presidency. I cannot and will not stand by and see this great country destroy itself. Our leaders attempt to blame their failures on circumstances beyond their control, on false estimates by unknown, unidentifiable experts who rewrite modern history in an attempt to convince us our high standard of living, the result of thrift and hard work, is somehow selfish extravagance which we must renounce as we join in sharing scarcity. I don't agree that our nation must resign itself to inevitable decline, yielding it proud position to other hands. I am totally unwilling to see this country fail in its obligation to itself and to the other free peoples of the world.

11/13/79

Official Announcement for Presidency

The key to restoring the health of the economy lies in cutting taxes. At the same time, we need to get the waste out of federal spending.

11/13/79

Official Announcement for Presidency

In short, a punitive tax system must be replaced by one that restores incentive for the worker and for industry; a system that rewards initiative and effort and encourages thrift.

11/13/79

Official Announcement for Presidency

The 1970's have taught us the foolhardiness of not having a long-range diplomatic strategy of our own. The world has become a place where, in order to survive, our country needs more than just allies -- it needs real friends. Yet, in recent times we often seem not to have recognized who our friends are. This must change. It is now time to take stock of our own house and to resupply its strength.

11/13/79

Official Announcement for Presidency

A troubled and afflicted mankind looks to us, pleading for us to keep our rendezvous with destiny; that we will uphold the principles of self-reliance, self-discipline, morality, and, above all, responsible liberty for every individual that we will become that shining city on a hill.

10/28/80

Ronald Reagan / Jimmy Carter Debate

Next Tuesday is election day. Next Tuesday all of you will go to the polls; you'll stand there in the polling place and make a decision. I think when you make that decision it might be well if you would ask yourself, are you better off than you were 4 years ago? Is it easier for you to go and buy things in the stores than it was 4 years ago? Is there more or less unemployment in the country than there was 4 years ago? Is America as respected throughout the world as it was? Do you feel that our security is as safe, that we're as strong as we were 4 years ago?

January 20, 1981

First Inaugural Address

It is not my intention to do away with government. It is rather to make it work -- work with us, not over us; stand by our side, not ride on our back. Government can and must provide opportunity, not smother it; foster productivity, not stifle it.

01/20/81

First Inaugural Address

So, with all the creative energy at our command, let us begin an era of national renewal. Let us renew our determination, our courage, and our strength. And let us renew our faith and our hope.

We have every right to dream heroic dreams. Those who say that we're in a time when there are no heroes, they just don't know where to look.

01/20/81

First Inaugural Address

I'm told that tens of thousands of prayer meetings are being held on this day, and for that I'm deeply grateful. We are a nation under God, and I believe God intended for us to be free. It would be fitting and good, I think, if on each Inaugural Day in future years it should be declared a day of prayer.

01/20/81

First Inaugural Address

It is time to reawaken this industrial giant, to get government back within its means, and to lighten our punitive tax burden. And these will be our first priorities, and on these principles there will be no compromise.

March 30, 1981

To surgeons as he entered the operating room

I hope you're all Republicans.

May 17, 1981

Notre Dame Univ

The years ahead will be great ones for our country, for the cause of freedom and the spread of civilization. The West will not contain Communism, it will transcend Communism. We will not bother to denounce it, we'll dismiss it as a sad, bizarre chapter in human history whose last pages are even now being written.

07/27/81

Address to the Nation

This is not the time for political fun and games. This is the time for a new beginning. I ask you now to put aside any feelings of frustration or helplessness about our political institutions and join me in this dramatic but responsible plan to reduce the enormous burden of Federal taxation on you and your family.

September 29, 1981

We who live in free market societies believe that growth, prosperity and ultimately human fulfillment, are created from the bottom up, not the government down. Only when the human spirit is allowed to invent and create, only when individuals are given a personal stake in deciding economic policies and benefitting from their success -- only then can societies remain economically alive, dynamic, progressive, and free. Trust the people. This is the one irrefutable lesson of the entire postwar period contradicting the notion that rigid government controls are essential to economic development.

October 30, 1981

Government has an important role in helping develop a country's economic foundation. But the critical test is whether government is genuinely working to liberate individuals by creating incentives to work, save, invest, and succeed.

11/06/81

American Irish Historical Society

I've been asked at times, "What's it like to see yourself in the old movies, the reruns on TV?" It's like looking at a son you never knew you had.

11/30/81

Ohio State Republican Fundraising

These are exciting times. The Columbia has been orbiting the Earth, Senator Glenn is in orbit around New Hampshire -- and the Federal budget is off somewhere in the wild blue yonder.

Attacks on Lybia against International Terrorism 1981/88

Today we have done what we had to do. Quaddafi counted on America to be passive, he counted wrong.

01/14/82

New York City Partnership

The Bible talks of faith, hope, and charity, and the greatest of these is charity. The real meaning of the parable of the Good Samaritan has always been not so much the benefit that was done to the pilgrim who had been beaten, but the good that accrued to the Samaritan for going to his aid, who crossed to the other side of the road where the beaten pilgrim lay, bound up his wounds, and carried him to the nearest town. He didn't hurry on by and then when he got to town tell a caseworker that there was someone out there back a ways that needed help.

January 14, 1982

New York City Partnership Association

Government is the people's business and every man, woman and child becomes a shareholder with the first penny of tax paid.

02/09/82

Indiana State Legislature

They try to keep track of them, but Federal grants are like rabbits -- they multiply like crazy, and when they're out you can't catch them.

03/16/82

Oklahoma State Legislature

One of your native sons, Will Rogers, had a lot to say about taxes. If he were alive today, one wonders what he would think considering that he said that taxes were too high back in the 1930s. He said, "Lord, the money we do spend on government." And Will said, "It's not one bit better than the government we got for one-third the money twenty years ago.

Well, this is once we can really say, "You can say that again."

March 28, 1982

National Association of Realtors

We don't have a trillion-dollar debt because we haven't taxed enough; we have a trillion-dollar debt because we spend too much.

04/26/82

Chamber of Commerce of the U.S

Now, I've already lived about 20 years longer than my life expectancy at the time I was born. That's a source of annoyance to a great many people.

05/25/82

California Republican Party Dinner

Many of us in this room have been toiling together in the political vineyards for more than 20 years. We've shared victories and defeats, good times and bad. I made it 20 years and not more than that, because any more than that I wasn't a Republican.

June 1982

In an ironic sense, Karl Marx was right. We are witnessing today a great revolutionary crisis -- a crisis where the demands of the economic order are colliding directly with those of the political order. But the crisis is happening not in the free, non-Marxist West, but in the home of Marxism-Leninism, the Soviet Union....

06/17/82

To Employees at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations

So, just remember that sometime when the going is very rough and you're particularly frustrated and before you push the typewriter off the desk -- just stick with the rest, because we're going to get the job done, thanks to you.

08/11/82

Republican Fundraising for a U.S. Senator

As I've said before, no matter how tough my job gets, sometimes I wake up at night in a cold sweat thinking how much worse it could be if we didn't have a Republican majority in the Senate. As I said to a little group just a short time ago, imagine having two Tip O'Neills.

02/23/83

Presidential Medal of Freedom

Billy Graham is an American who lives first, and always, for his fellow citizens. In honoring him, we give thanks for God's greatest spiritual gifts: faith, hope and love.

And, Billy, I'm going to have to tell them something that you told me, because with all of this, too, there is a practical side of life. Reverend Graham was in the Soviet Union, and invited by a bureaucrat of that governmental structure to lunch, and found himself faced with a lunch, as he described it, that was more magnificent and more of a gourmet type of thing than he had ever seen, caviar that wouldn't stop and every other thing that you could eat. And he couldn't resist saying to his host, "But how can you live this way, do this, when there are so many people out there in your country that don't have enough to eat, that are hungry?" And the man said, "I worked hard for this." And, God bless him, Billy Graham said, "That's what the capitalists say."

March 8, 1983

National Association of Evangelicals

Let us beware that while they [Soviet rulers] preach the supremacy of the state, declare its omnipotence over individual man, and predict its eventual domination over all the peoples of the earth, they are the focus of evil in the modern world.... I urge you to beware the temptation ... to ignore the facts of history and the aggressive impulses of any evil empire, to simply call the arms race a giant misunderstanding and thereby remove yourself from the struggle between right and wrong, good and evil.

March 23, 1983

Address to the Nation

I call upon the scientific community in our country, those who gave us nuclear weapons, to turn their great talents now to the cause of mankind and world peace, to give us the means of rendering those nuclear weapons impotent and obsolete.

04/27/83

Crime Fighter Award Winners

You know, someone once said that a hero isn't braver than anyone else. He's just brave 5 minutes longer.

06/01/83

White House Reception

More and more people are realizing that Marxist socialism can provide rhetoric, but it doesn't put food on the table. One of the heads of state in the recent summit was speaking about someone of that philosophy in his own country and said, "They talk left but live right."

08/23/83

American Legion 65th Annual Convention

You know, Mark Twain once remarked that he spent $25 to research his family tree, and then he had to spend $50 to cover it up. Well, America is more fortunate. We can be proud of our heritage, and we need never hide from our roots. The world we live in is not an easy one, but we've inheritied a noble mission.

September 20, 1983

University of South Carolina

There are no such things as limits to growth, because there are no limits on the human capacity for intelligence, imagination and wonder

January 16, 1984

Address to the Nation

History teaches that wars begin when governments believe the price of aggression is cheap.

01/27/84

Newsweek Interview

Mr. President, you're not shy about mentioning your longevity, and you kid about your age. But do you think that your age is a potential political problem in the campaign?

The President

No. I think somebody tried to make it one 4 years ago, and it didn't work. And I've never heard it mentioned, or I don't -- most of the time now they don't even ask about it in the polls. And I've tried to start a rumor that I'm really not that old, that they mixed up the babies in the hospital

05/09/84

Small Business Person of the Year Awards

You know, not too long ago, I was asked to explain the difference between a small businessman and a big businessman. And my answer was that a big businessman is what a small businessman would be if only the government would get out of the way and leave him alone.

June 6, 1984

Normandy, France

We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free.

June 6, 1984.

Normandy, France

The men of Normandy had faith that what they were doing was right, faith that they fought for all humanity, faith that a just God would grant them mercy on this beachhead or the next. It was the deep knowledge -- and pray God we have not lost it -- that there is a profound moral difference between the use of force for liberation and the use of force for conquest.

August 23, 1984

RNC Speech

The poet called Miss Liberty's torch, "the lamp beside the golden door." Well, that was the entrance to America, and it still is. And now you really know why we're here tonight.

The glistening hope of that lamp is still ours. Every promise every opportunity is still golden in this land. And through that golden door our children can walk into tomorrow with the knowledge that no one can be denied the promise that is America.

Her heart is full; her torch is still golden, her future bright. She has arms big enough to comfort and strong enough to support, for the strength in her arms is the strength of her people. She will carry on in the eighties unafraid, unashamed, and unsurpassed.

In this springtime of hope, some lights seem eternal; America's is.

January 28, 1986

Challenger Disaster

We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them -- this morning, as they prepared for their journey, and waved good-bye, and "slipped the surly bonds of earth" to "touch the face of God."

December 10, 1986

Human Rights Day

The other day, someone told me the difference between a democracy and a people's democracy. It's the same difference between a jacket and a straitjacket.

1987

Berlin Wall

Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!

September 25, 1987

Arlington, Virginia

How do you tell a Communist? Well, it's someone who reads Marx and Lenin. And how do you tell an anti-Communist? It's someone who understands Marx and Lenin.

May 31, 1988

Moscow State University

Freedom is the right to question and change the established way of doing things. It is the continuous revolution of the marketplace. It is the understanding that allows to recognize shortcomings and seek solutions.

1992

Republican National Convention

When you see all that rhetorical smoke billowing up from the Democrats, well ladies and gentleman, I'd follow the example of their nominee; don't inhale.

1992

Republican National Convention

This fellow they've nominated claims he's the new Thomas Jefferson. Well let me tell you something; I knew Thomas Jefferson. He was a friend of mine and Governor... You're no Thomas Jefferson!

1994

Republican National Convention

After watching the State of the Union address the other night, I'm reminded of the old adage that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Only in this case, it's not flattery, but grand larceny: the intellectual theft of ideas that you and I recognize as our own. Speech delivery counts for little on the world stage unless you have convictions, and, yes, the vision to see beyond the front row seats.

1994

Republican National Convention

Although the political landscape has changed, the bold ideas of the 1980's are alive and well. Republican candidates swept every major election across the country last year... and as a result, it seems that our opponents have finally realized how unpopular liberalism really is. So now they're trying to dress their liberal agenda in a conservative overcoat.

1994

Republican National Convention

However, our task is far from over. Our friends in the other party will never forgive us for our success, and are doing everything in their power to rewrite history. Listening to the liberals, you'd think that the 1980's were the worst period since the Great Depression, filled with suffering and despair. I don't know about you, but I'm getting awfully tired of the whining voices from the White House these days. They're claiming there was a decade of greed and neglect, but you and I know better than that. We were there.

1994

Republican National Convention

It was leadership here at home that gave us strong American influence abroad, and the collapse of imperial Communism. Great nations have responsibilities to lead, and we should always be cautious of those who would lower our profile, because they might just wind up lowering our flag


44 posted on 06/10/2004 3:56:19 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

President Reagan's Farewell Speech


The President spoke at 9:02 P.M. from the Oval Office at the White House. The address was broadcast live on nationwide radio and television.

This is the 34th time I'll speak to you from the Oval Office and the last. We've been together 8 years now, and soon it'll be time for me to go. But before I do, I wanted to share some thoughts, some of which I've been saving for a long time.

It's been the honor of my life to be your President. So many of you have written the past few weeks to say thanks, but I could say as much to you. Nancy and I are grateful for the opportunity you gave us to serve.

One of the things about the Presidency is that you're always somewhat apart. You spent a lot of time going by too fast in a car someone else is driving, and seeing the people through tinted glass—the parents holding up a child, and the wave you saw too late and couldn't return. And so many times I wanted to stop and reach out from behind the glass, and connect. Well, maybe I can do a little of that tonight.

People ask how I feel about leaving. And the fact is, `parting is such sweet sorrow.' The sweet part is California and the ranch and freedom. The sorrow—the goodbyes, of course, and leaving this beautiful place.

You know, down the hall and up the stairs from this office is the part of the White House where the President and his family live. There are a few favorite windows I have up there that I like to stand and look out of early in the morning. The view is over the grounds here to the Washington Monument, and then the Mall and the Jefferson Memorial. But on mornings when the humidity is low, you can see past the Jefferson to the river, the Potomac, and the Virginia shore. Someone said that's the view Lincoln had when he saw the smoke rising from the Battle of Bull Run. I see more prosaic things: the grass on the banks, the morning traffic as people make their way to work, now and then a sailboat on the river.

I've been thinking a bit at that window. I've been reflecting on what the past 8 years have meant and mean. And the image that comes to mind like a refrain is a nautical one—a small story about a big ship, and a refugee, and a sailor. It was back in the early eighties, at the height of the boat people. And the sailor was hard at work on the carrier Midway, which was patrolling the South China Sea. The sailor, like most American servicemen, was young, smart, and fiercely observant. The crew spied on the horizon a leaky little boat. And crammed inside were refugees from Indochina hoping to get to America. The Midway sent a small launch to bring them to the ship and safety. As the refugees made their way through the choppy seas, one spied the sailor on deck, and stood up, and called out to him. He yelled, `Hello, American sailor. Hello, freedom man.'

A small moment with a big meaning, a moment the sailor, who wrote it in a letter, couldn't get out of his mind. And, when I saw it, neither could I. Because that's what it was to be an American in the 1980's. We stood, again, for freedom. I know we always have, but in the past few years the world again—and in a way, we ourselves—rediscovered it.

It's been quite a journey this decade, and we held together through some stormy seas. And at the end, together, we are reaching our destination.

The fact is, from Grenada to the Washington and Moscow summits, from the recession of '81 to '82, to the expansion that began in late '82 and continues to this day, we've made a difference. The way I see it, there were two great triumphs, two things that I'm proudest of. One is the economic recovery, in which the people of America created—and filled—19 million new jobs. The other is the recovery of our morale. America is respected again in the world and looked to for leadership.

Something that happened to me a few years ago reflects some of this. It was back in 1981, and I was attending my first big economic summit, which was held that year in Canada. The meeting place rotates among the member countries. The opening meeting was a formal dinner of the heads of goverment of the seven industrialized nations. Now, I sat there like the new kid in school and listened, and it was all Francois this and Helmut that. They dropped titles and spoke to one another on a first-name basis. Well, at one point I sort of leaned in and said, 'My name's Ron.' Well, in that same year, we began the actions we felt would ignite an economic comeback—cut taxes and regulation, started to cut spending. And soon the recovery began.

Two years later, another economic summit with pretty much the same cast. At the big opening meeting we all got together, and all of a sudden, just for a moment, I saw that everyone was just sitting there looking at me. And then one of them broke the silence. 'Tell us about the American miracle,' he said.

Well, back in 1980, when I was running for President, it was all so different. Some pundits said our programs would result in catastrophe. Our views on foreign affairs would cause war. Our plans for the economy would cause inflation to soar and bring about economic collapse. I even remember one highly respected economist saying, back in 1982, that `The engines of economic growth have shut down here, and they're likely to stay that way for years to come.' Well, he and the other opinion leaders were wrong. The fact is what they call `radical' was really `right.' What they called `dangerous' was just `desperately needed.'

And in all of that time I won a nickname, `The Great Communicator.' But I never though it was my style or the words I used that made a difference: it was the content. I wasn't a great communicator, but I communicated great things, and they didn't spring full bloom from my brow, they came from the heart of a great nation—from our experience, our wisdom, and our belief in the principles that have guided us for two centuries. They called it the Reagan revolution. Well, I'll accept that, but for me it always seemed more like the great rediscovery, a rediscovery of our values and our common sense.

Common sense told us that when you put a big tax on something, the people will produce less of it. So, we cut the people's tax rates, and the people produced more than ever before. The economy bloomed like a plant that had been cut back and could now grow quicker and stronger. Our economic program brought about the longest peacetime expansion in our history: real family income up, the poverty rate down, entrepreneurship booming, and an explosion in research and new technology. We're exporting more than ever because American industry because more competitive and at the same time, we summoned the national will to knock down protectionist walls abroad instead of erecting them at home.

Common sense also told us that to preserve the peace, we'd have to become strong again after years of weakness and confusion. So, we rebuilt our defenses, and this New Year we toasted the new peacefulness around the globe. Not only have the superpowers actually begun to reduce their stockpiles of nuclear weapons—and hope for even more progress is bright—but the regional conflicts that rack the globe are also beginning to cease. The Persian Gulf is no longer a war zone. The Soviets are leaving Afghanistan. The Vietnamese are preparing to pull out of Cambodia, and an American-mediated accord will soon send 50,000 Cuban troops home from Angola.

The lesson of all this was, of course, that because we're a great nation, our challenges seem complex. It will always be this way. But as long as we remember our first principles and believe in ourselves, the future will always be ours. And something else we learned: Once you begin a great movement, there's no telling where it will end. We meant to change a nation, and instead, we changed a world.

Countries across the globe are turning to free markets and free speech and turning away from the ideologies of the past. For them, the great rediscovery of the 1980's has been that, lo and behold, the moral way of government is the practical way of government: Democracy, the profoundly good, is also the profoundly productive.

When you've got to the point when you can celebrate the anniversaries of your 39th birthday you can sit back sometimes, review your life, and see it flowing before you. For me there was a fork in the river, and it was right in the middle of my life. I never meant to go into politics. It wasn't my intention when I was young. But I was raised to believe you had to pay your way for the blessings bestowed on you. I was happy with my career in the entertainment world, but I ultimately went into politics because I wanted to protect something precious.

Ours was the first revolution in the history of mankind that truly reversed the course of government, and with three little words: `We the People.' `We the People' tell the government what to do; it doesn't tell us. `We the People' are the driver; the government is the car. And we decide where it should go, and by what route, and how fast. Almost all the world's constitutions are documents in which governments tell the people what their privileges are. Our Constitution is a document in which `We the People' tell the government what it is allowed to do. `We the People' are free. This belief has been the underlying basis for everything I've tried to do these past 8 years.

But back in the 1960's, when I began, it seemed to me that we'd begun reversing the order of things—that through more and more rules and regulations and confiscatory taxes, the government was taking more of our money, more of our options, and more of our freedom. I went into politics in part to put up my hand and say, `Stop.' I was a citizen politician, and it seemed the right thing for a citizen to do.

I think we have stopped a lot of what needed stopping. And I hope we have once again reminded people that man is not free unless government is limited. There's a clear cause and effect here that is as neat and predictable as a law of physics: As government expands, liberty contracts.

Nothing is less free than pure communism—and yet we have, the past few years, forged a satisfying new closeness with the Soviet Union. I've been asked if this isn't a gamble, and my answer is no because we're basing our actions not on words but deeds. The detente of the 1970's was based not on actions but promises. They'd promise to treat their own people and the people of the world better. But the gulag was still the gulag, and the state was still expansionist, and they still waged proxy wars in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Well, this time, so far, it's different. President Gorbachev has brought about some internal democratic reforms and begun the withdrawal from Afghanistan. He has also freed prisoners whose names I've given him every time we've met.

But life has a way of reminding you of big things through small incidents. Once, during the heady days of the Moscow summit, Nancy and I decided to break off from the entourage one afternoon to visit the shops on Arbat Street—that's a little street just off Moscow's main shopping area. Even though our visit was a surprise, every Russian there immediately recognized us and called out our names and reached for our hands. We were just about swept away by the warmth. You could almost feel the possibilities in all that joy. But within seconds, a KGB detail pushed their way toward us and began pushing and shoving the people in the crowd. It was an interesting moment. It reminded me that while the man on the street in the Soviet Union yearns for peace, the government is Communist. And those who run it are Communists, and that means we and they view such issues as freedom and human rights very differently.

We must keep up our guard, but we must also continue to work together to lessen and eliminate tension and mistrust. My view is that President Gorbachev is different from previous Soviet leaders. I think he knows some of the things wrong with his society and is trying to fix them. We wish him well. And we'll continue to work to make sure that the Soviet Union that eventually emerges from this process is a less threatening one. What it all boils down to is this: I want the new closeness to continue. And it will, as long as we make it clear that we will continue to act in a certain way as long as they continue to act in a helpful manner. If and when they don't, at first pull your punches. If they persist, pull the plug. It's still trust by verify. It's still play, but cut the cards. It's still watch closely. And don't be afraid to see what you see.

I've been asked if I have any regrets. Well, I do.The deficit is one. I've been talking a great deal about that lately, but tonight isn't for arguments, and I'm going to hold my tongue. But an observation: I've had my share of victories in the Congress, but what few people noticed is that I never won anything you didn't win for me. They never saw my troops, they never saw Reagan's regiments, the American people. You won every battle with every call you made and letter you wrote demanding action. Well, action is still needed. If we're to finish the job. Reagan's regiments will have to become the Bush brigades. Soon he'll be the chief, and he'll need you every bit as much as I did.

Finally, there is a great tradition of warnings in Presidential farewells, and I've got one that's been on my mind for some time. But oddly enough it starts with one of the things I'm proudest of in the past 8 years: the resurgence of national pride that I called the new patriotism. This national feeling is good, but it won't count for much, and it won't last unless it's grounded in thoughtfulness and knowledge.

An informed patriotism is what we want. And are we doing a good enough job teaching our children what America is and what she represents in the long history of the world? Those of us who are over 35 or so years of age grew up in a different America. We were taught, very directly, what it means to be an American. And we absorbed, almost in the air, a love of country and an appreciation of its institutions. If you didn't get these things from your family you got them from the neighborhood, from the father down the street who fought in Korea or the family who lost someone at Anzio. Or you could get a sense of patriotism from school. And if all else failed you could get a sense of patriotism from the popular culture. The movies celebrated democratic values and implicitly reinforced the idea that America was special. TV was like that, too, through the mid-sixties.

But now, we're about to enter the nineties, and some things have changed. Younger parents aren't sure that an unambivalent appreciation of America is the right thing to teach modern children. And as for those who create the popular culture, well-grounded patriotism is no longer the style. Our spirit is back, but we haven't reinstitutionalized it. We've got to do a better job of getting across that America is freedom—freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of enterprise. And freedom is special and rare. It's fragile; it needs production [protection].

So, we've got to teach history based not on what's in fashion but what's important—why the Pilgrims came here, who Jimmy Doolittle was, and what those 30 seconds over Tokyo meant. You know, 4 years ago on the 40th anniversary of D-day, I read a letter from a young woman writing to her late father, who'd fought on Omaha Beach. Her name was Lisa Zanatta Henn, and she said, `we will always remember, we will never forget what the boys of Normandy did.' Well, let's help her keep her word. If we forget what we did, we won't know who we are. I'm warning of an eradication of the American memory that could result, ultimately, in an erosion of the American spirit. Let's start with some basics: more attention to American history and a greater emphasis on civic ritual.

And let me offer lesson number one about America: All great change in America begins at the dinner table. So, tomorrow night in the kitchen I hope the talking begins. And children, if your parents haven't been teaching you what it means to be an American, let 'em know and nail 'em on it. That would be a very American thing to do.

And that's about all I have to say tonight, except for one thing. The past few days when I've been at that window upstairs, I've thought a bit of the `shining city upon a hill.' The phrase comes from John Winthrop, who wrote it to describe the America he imagined. What he imagined was important because he was an early Pilgrim, an early freedom man. He journeyed here on what today we'd call a little wooden boat; and like the other Pilgrims, he was looking for a home that would be free. I've spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don't know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it. But in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still.

And how stands the city on this winter night? More prosperous, more secure, and happier than it was 8 years ago. But more than that: After 200 years, two centuries, she still stands strong and true on the granite ridge, and her glow has held steady no matter what storm. And she's still a beacon, still a magnet for all who must have freedom, for all the pilgrims from all the lost places who are hurtling through the darkness, toward home.

We've done our part. And as I walk off into the city streets, a final word to the men and women of the Reagan revolution, the men and women across America who for 8 years did the work that brought America back. My friends: We did it. We weren't just marking time. We made a difference. We made the city stronger, we made the city freer, and we left her in good hands. All in all, not bad, not bad at all.

And so, goodbye, God bless you, and God bless the United States of America.


45 posted on 06/10/2004 4:01:50 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
What an awesome man, an awesome President. God Bless Ronald Reagan, protect him and keep him safe. Godspeed to a wonderful person who personified the American Dream. We will miss you. All my love to you and your family. It's so little, but you know, it means so much to him.
46 posted on 06/10/2004 4:08:42 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: Delta 21
We don't have a trillion-dollar debt because we haven't taxed enough; we have a trillion-dollar debt because we spend too much.

Ronald Reagan -Address to National Association of Realtors, March 28, 1982
47 posted on 06/10/2004 4:11:11 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance

I still get goosebumps when I hear him say Tear down this wall!!!!! I will never cast a vote as important as I did back then for his first term!!!


48 posted on 06/10/2004 4:28:36 PM PDT by GregB (God Bless and protect my nephew Heath with the 1st Armored Division in Baghdad.......)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djreece

marking


49 posted on 06/10/2004 4:28:53 PM PDT by djreece
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: Indy Pendance
Pres. Reagan bids farewell to the national news media.


50 posted on 06/10/2004 5:19:54 PM PDT by My2Cents (Godspeed, President Reagan....And thank you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-55 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson