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An Example of Chinese Torture: Sexual Abuse
Faluninfo.net ^ | N/A | N/A

Posted on 03/03/2005 4:50:29 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster

An Example of Chinese Torture: Sexual Abuse


Sexual abuse

The inhuman and sadistic nature of the persecution is exemplified in the sexual abuse suffered by Falun Gong practitioners at the hand of Chinese authorities. The forms of sexual torture include rape, molestation, shocking genitals with electric batons, raping Falun Gong practitioners with foreign objects (including toilet brushes and batons), shoving hot peppers into vaginas, pinching genitals or nipples even to the point of tearing them off, kicking genitals, piercing nipples with hot irons, stripping practitioners naked and beating them, forcefully administering drugs that cause menstruation to cease, and more. The victims of such sexual abuse include young, unmarried women and seniors.

“There has been sexual torture, including stripping 18 women of their clothes and forcing them into the jail cells of male criminal offenders to be gang-raped. Some women have been subjected to forced, late-term abortions. Many so-called “policemen” in China have exhibited the most base and inexcusable behaviour. One said: “Don’t you say you practice tolerance? I will see if you can tolerate it when I rape you!” They have ripped off our clothes in public and shocked us with electric batons. Iron wire has been used to pierce our nipples. They have sexually violated our bodies using eggplants, toothbrushes, and plastic water bottles. In one Female Labour Camp located in Jilin Province, the police inserted hot pepper powder into women’s vaginas in order to force them to give up their belief and practice of Falun Dafa. They have forced electric stun batons into female practitioners’ vaginas to torture and shock them...”
– Excerpt from a letter from female practitioners in China


Genitals shocked with electric batons for several hours

On June 4, 2001, Ms. Li Yinping was visiting a fellow practitioner’s home in Majia Village of Shouguang City, Weifang region when police from the Shouguang Police Station arrested her and all other Falun Gong practitioners who were there. They were all detained at the Sunji Police station, although no legitimate criminal charges were brought against them.

On the afternoon of June 6, 2001, Ms. Li, along with the other detained Falun Gong practitioners, requested unconditional release. The policemen dragged Ms. Li into the hallway and beat her with a rubber baton. After drinking alcohol, five to six policemen began another round of torture. They slapped her face, twisted one of her arms behind her back, grabbed her hair and pulled her head back, hit her all over her body with rubber batons, and shocked her with electric batons. The policemen stripped Ms. Li of all of her clothing to inflict more pain by beating her unprotected skin. After beating her, the policemen chained her to an “iron chair.” After taking a break, later on in the evening, the director of the detention center, Team Leader Wang, and other guards took turns shocking her genitals with electric batons. Her whole body was shaking, and had turned dark purple and black. She suffered severe pain, and lost consciousness several times. Each time, the guards revived her by pouring cold water on her so they could shock her again. One of the officers threatened to rape and kill her. They continued to shock her with the batons even after she began spitting up blood. This torture lasted for several hours. Ms. Li was left chained to the iron chair, and she kept vomiting all night.

By early the next morning, June 7, 2001, Ms. Li had lost consciousness and her pulse was faint. She died later that day.

Stripped naked and gang-raped by male inmates

“In October 2000 prison guards in the Masanjia prison in Shenyang, Liaoning province, allegedly stripped 18 female Falun Dafa practitioners and put them into cells containing male convicted criminals. It is reported that Luo Gan, a high-ranking Communist Party official, was aware of the incident. ... It is reported that since October 1999, more than 1,500 Falun Dafa practitioners have been detained in the Masanjia labour education camp in Liaoning province. Practitioners are reportedly forced to denounce Falun Dafa. People who refuse to do so are allegedly subjected to physical abuse, shocked with electric batons, detained in solitary confinement and assigned intensive labour. The electric batons are used to shock the breasts and genitals of the female practitioners.”

– Report of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences; UN document number E/CN.4/2001/73/Add.1

Young woman suffers mental breakdown following untold torture and rape

NEW YORK (FDI) â€“ Thirty-two-year-old Ms. Zhu Xia cries, laughs, and often bangs on doors and windows madly. She soils her clothing uncontrollably, and has frequent hallucinations, tossing and turning restlessly amidst unseen enemies.

At night Zhu often throws her arms around her head defensively, screaming “Are you going to rape me?”

She has removed her blankets to sleep in the cotton fibers of her mattress and often curses “those terrible men,” muttering she “can’t take it anymore.”

This is not the young woman her family members described as “healthy and vibrant” before the police took her away because she practices Falun Gong.

Like hundreds of thousands â€“ perhaps millions â€“ of others in China, Zhu was detained by Chinese authorities and sent to brainwashing classes in order to force her to renounce Falun Gong.

She was held at the Pi County Brainwashing Center in Xinjin County, Sichuan Province.

On April 2, 2004, Pi Country authorities released Zhu. According to her family, Zhu’s mental and physical well-being had been devastated, and she had suffered a complete mental breakdown.

Zhu is no longer able to take care of herself, and is under the care of her mother.

The exact details of what Zhu went through in the Pi Country Brainwashing Center are unknown, although family members say her mental state and behavior leave little doubt she suffered untold torture and was repeatedly raped.

Thousands of eye-witnesses and victims have documented severe and systematic tortures used on Falun Gong practitioners in order to force them to renounce their beliefs. Such methods include shocks with electric batons often in sensitive areas such as the genitals, anus and mouth, violent beatings with pipes, burning with hot irons, rape and gang rape.

At the Dalian forced labor camp, numerous reports say women detainees have been hung spread-eagle from the ceiling as sticks and pepper oil are shoved into their vaginas â€“ a torture technique known as “hip-splitting.” The men are stripped naked and shocked with electric batons shortly after being doused with water to intensify the electric currents.

Men stripped naked and shocked with cattle prods; women tied spread-eagle, raped with mops and toilet brushes

Since 1999, terror and violence have permeated the Dalian Forced Labour Camp, as authorities implement orders to “transform” Falun Gong practitioners.

Mr. Chu Hui was tortured with beatings and cattle prod shocks from 9 p.m. to 8 a.m. the next morning. The torturers used the cattle prods all over his body, including inserting them into his anus. Mr. Chu passed out several times during the torture.

Mr. Liu Yonglai was stripped of his clothes, gagged with a cloth, and thrown to the ground while officers shocked him with 4-5 cattle prods. They doused him with water to intensify the electric currents, and especially targeted sensitive areas of the body, such as the genitalia, neck, mouth, etc.. The smell of burning flesh filled the room and both sides of Mr. Liu’s mouth sustained tear wounds.

Women have also suffered savage forms of sexual assault as labour camp authorities sought to “re-educate” them.

60-year-old Ms. Fu Shuying was tied up spread-eagle, while a torturer violently inserted a long rod into her vagina, causing severe inflammations and infections.

27-year-old Ms. Chen Hui and 30-year-old Ms. Sun Yan were also tied up in a spread-eagle position as torturers repeatedly thrust long rods into their vaginas, causing bleeding.

Three other women had chili pepper sauce shoved into their vaginas, causing extreme pain, while in three other cases toilet and shoe brushes were used, causing severe vaginal bleeding.

According to witnesses, the torturers frequently tell the practitioners “we represent the government in transforming you” or “it means nothing if you die here.”

Hundreds of reports from Falun Gong practitioners in China quote police and labour camp officials as saying they are under orders that “no method is too extreme” to force Falun Gong practitioners to renounce their beliefs, and those who are killed amidst the torture “should be reported as suicides.”

Prison guard rapes 28-year-old university student

On the evening of May 13, 2003, Ms. Wei Xingyan, a graduate student from Chongqing University, was caught possessing balloons and banners printed with messages about Falun Gong. She was arrested and placed in the Baihelin detention center without trial. A male police officer ordered two inmates to strip her naked, then forced her to the floor and raped her. Since news of her story was exposed outside of China, her school and the local authorities have attempted to erase her identity, denying that she exists. Her current whereabouts are unknown.

Authorities order criminal inmates to strip, beat, and sexually abuse Ms. Liu Runling

“Liu Runling, aged 38, resident of Hebei Province, was reportedly arrested on 28 September 2001 and detained at the No. 1 Detention Centre, where she remains. In January 2002, guards allegedly ordered several inmates to torture Ms. Liu because she refused to renounce Falun Gong. According to reports, they took her to a bathroom, where she was stripped naked and beaten. They reportedly inserted hair and used tissues into her vagina, and pierced her with needles for 40 minutes. It is reported that this left her covered with wounds and needle holes, and both her breasts allegedly turned black.”

– Report of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences; UN document number E/CN.4/2003/75/Add.2

Yan Juying

“On 6 October 2000, Falun Gong practitioner Yan Juying from Yanjiao, Sanhe city, Hebei province, went to Tiananmen Square to appeal on behalf of Falun Gong. She was arrested and sent back to Yanjiao police station. It is reported that before she got out of the car, the police captain, Yang Xizhong, started to kick her, beat her, pull her hair, slap her face and kick her private parts. Then he lifted her up and violently threw her to the ground. He allegedly beat her on the buttocks several hundred times with a wooden rod, whipped her numerous times, subjected her to electric shocks all over her body, used a slipper to slap her face, put an electric baton in her mouth, spat on her face and stomped on her heels. He allegedly threatened to splash her body with boiling water. When Yan Juying refused an order to take off her clothes, Yang Xizhong allegedly threatened to find some workers to rape her. He then sexually molested her. After some time Yang Xizhong recorded the interrogation and beat Yan Juying again. That night, Yan Juying was sent to the town government hall to attend the ‘transformation class.’”

– Report of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences; UN document number E/CN.4/2001/73/Add.1

A female practitioner raped by a police officer on the street

On the evening of May 14, 2001, a female Falun Gong practitioner from Beijing was beaten and raped on the street by a patrolling plainclothes police officer. The above photo was taken nine days later after the incident.

“Finally, I was beaten to the ground and was not able to get up. Two of my front teeth were knocked out; several places on my head were hurt; my body was swollen and turned purple; my bones felt like they were falling apart. He then hit my right ear and temple hard with a stick and I lost consciousness. At this moment he pulled me under a bridge, tore my pants apart, and raped me. After that, he inserted a plastic baton forcefully into my vagina, and rode on my body. When I regained my strength and was able to shout, I shouted with all the strength I had: ‘Help! Catch this hooligan!’ The man seemed to have no fear. Finally, he got on his bicycle and rode away in a hurry, leaving me behind.”


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: china; clintonlovers; commieparadise; commierapists; dnccontributors; falungong; falungongrapers; friendsofclinton; humanright; torture

1 posted on 03/03/2005 4:50:29 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Well, at least they did not put panties on their heads.


2 posted on 03/03/2005 4:52:46 AM PST by Diogenesis (Si vis pacem, para bellum)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Bill Clinton will probably print this out and read it late at night when he's alone.


3 posted on 03/03/2005 4:57:29 AM PST by theDentist (The Dems are putting all their eggs in one basket-case: Howard "Belltower" Dean.)
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To: TigerLikesRooster
Sounds like an average Thursday in San Fransisco.
4 posted on 03/03/2005 4:59:08 AM PST by CzarNicky (The problem with bad ideas is that they seemed like good ideas at the time.)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Powder..Patch..Ball FIRE!

What persecution. Where is the MSM in showing these pictures and stories?


The Chinese government must be very afraid of their movement.


5 posted on 03/03/2005 5:09:57 AM PST by BallandPowder
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To: TigerLikesRooster
No this is sick and horrible.

Where is Amnesty International?

Oh that's right, they are only interested in criticizing the United States

Where is the UN?

Oh that's right, Kofi and company are too busy counting their food for oil money.

6 posted on 03/03/2005 5:16:40 AM PST by Obadiah
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To: BallandPowder
Re #5

They are afraid of it more than U.S.

7 posted on 03/03/2005 5:16:58 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster
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To: TigerLikesRooster
This was very hard to read. Where is the outrage from all those Human Rights organizations like the one suing Secretary Rumsfeld for "alleged" abuses - the ones he had nothing to do with. Where is the United Nations and the ACLU on this truly criminal abuse of innocent people engaged in a philosophical practice. Why is China not removed from MFN list?

Send this article to any Human Rights organization you can find and suggest they do something serious about this abuse in China rather than punch at shadows and the other inane complaints just for politics.

8 posted on 03/03/2005 5:24:35 AM PST by yoe
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To: Obadiah

Only the evil USA is capable of these atrocities, so the "human rights" organizations only protest our actions.

God help us all.


9 posted on 03/03/2005 5:28:01 AM PST by TNCMAXQ
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To: TigerLikesRooster
Yo, Hold on and slow down a second guys. The comments I read before this post indicate a wholesale acceptance and lapping up of this stuff. Look at that first "picture" the drawing at the top of the article. Doesn't that stike you as the sort of quality image from the "Police Gazette" of the 1950's?

I don't believe any of this for a minute. And even if there is a grain of truth buried in here somewhere, the wanton evil and bloodlust it describes is in no way characteristic of any Chinese I have ever met (and I know a lot of them).

The picture of the young lady with the massive bruises could have been caused by anything (like a motorcycle accident for example).

I'm not saying that the Chinese are angels, they are clearly not. But this is propagandist bull$hit and I'm surprised that the usually critical thinkers at FR aren't using their well honed thinking skills to analyze this.

10 posted on 03/03/2005 5:41:51 AM PST by lafroste (gravity is not a force. See my profile to read my novel absolutely free (I know, beyond shameless))
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To: TigerLikesRooster
Sarcasm on/
That's it lets outsource the prisoners at Gitmo to these folks!
/Sarcasm off

Seriously sick individuals. I know it's a power thing but I just never have been able to understand how a man can get off by raping a woman. Especially these sickos that rape 70 and 80 year old grandma or kids. These people need to be Dawrined out of the gene pool!
11 posted on 03/03/2005 5:44:36 AM PST by Syntyr
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To: TigerLikesRooster

At least they have favored nation status...


12 posted on 03/03/2005 6:00:19 AM PST by stuartcr
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To: lafroste

I believe it, on an incident specific level. China is a huge country, with a population that large there will be bad apples.

Presenting only the bad apples is obviously propogandist bull and not reflective of the big picture, but that doesn't mean it didn't happen.

If you go looking for it hard enough, you can find wanton evil and bloodlust in police officers right here. Look up Abner Louima or Lester Siler. Behavior like that isn't characteristic of any American I've ever met, but it happens.


13 posted on 03/03/2005 6:06:53 AM PST by CGTRWK
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To: lafroste
Look at that first "picture"......from a Chinese comic book or one of their cheap hand outs?

I went to the ( Falun Dafa page) and they seem to concur with this report. I would really like to know if indeed there is truth to this – as written, it is beyond awful.

14 posted on 03/03/2005 6:09:37 AM PST by yoe
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To: lafroste
Re #10

There were many nice Russians in Soviet Union. That does not imply that no brutalities committed in Lubyanka or no gulag exist.

Falun Gong is feared by Chinese regime because it perceives the sect can endanger the regime's hold on power.

China has its totalitarian apparatus of oppression. It will not hesitate to use the apparatus to subversive individuals.

If you base your opinion of Chinese regime on Chinese you meet in America, you are truly naive.

15 posted on 03/03/2005 6:20:34 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster
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To: CGTRWK
I agree that on an individual level, one can find all manner of horrors in any large country (see Jeffry Dahmer). But this article implies that these practises are institutionalized standard operating procedures intended to terrorize the populace in to sheep like compliance with dictatorial rule. That is what I do not believe. The Chinese system can be harsh, and it can be corrupt, but in my experience, it is also attempts to be fair (after its own form), and it attempts to govern with the rule of law. It has a long way to go, but sanctioned behaviour like this, if it exists at all, exists in defiance of the actual will of the political leaders.

China is emerging, it is a fascinating thing to see. I was talking with a young lady from Guangzhou just a few weeks ago who was complaining that she wasn't "free" because she had to go to work every day. That's not much of a complaint.

16 posted on 03/03/2005 6:25:46 AM PST by lafroste (gravity is not a force. See my profile to read my novel absolutely free (I know, beyond shameless))
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To: CGTRWK
Re #13

I do not think it is the problem of isolated police brutalities. Chinese regime is particularly brutal on this sect. In Chinese history, pseudo-religious sects are usually the ones which brought down dynasties. It is about regime survival.

Besides, don't you remember what Chinese regime did to demonstrators in Tienanmen Square, in 1989? They ran over people using tanks. Didn't you see the crushed remains of a demonstrator? That was the first time I saw a human meat pie.

17 posted on 03/03/2005 6:26:22 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster
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To: TigerLikesRooster

I base my assessment of the Chinese based on my travels in China. Most Chinese I know are in China, not the US.


18 posted on 03/03/2005 6:27:06 AM PST by lafroste (gravity is not a force. See my profile to read my novel absolutely free (I know, beyond shameless))
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To: lafroste
Re #18

Yeah, I doubt Chinese in China will tell you something like this casually. People do not complain about the state in front of foreigners. If you are a common thief, you may not get this kind of treatment. However, this is the anti-state crime.

19 posted on 03/03/2005 6:30:41 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster
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To: lafroste

I think it is somewhat extreme but I believe it is an accurate portrayal of the Chinese leaders/police, I believe you mislead yourself to believe otherwise. After Tienanmen Square how could we believe otherwise?


20 posted on 03/03/2005 6:50:34 AM PST by ThisLittleLightofMine
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To: lafroste

I would also like to point out that I don't think everything is rosy in China by a long shot. But gratuitous articles like this do not accurately portray China and lead to misunderstandings, baseless hatred and more violence. The sheer speed of change in China is breathtaking and that inevitably engenders fear in the weak minded, on both sides of the Pacific.


21 posted on 03/03/2005 6:58:25 AM PST by lafroste (gravity is not a force. See my profile to read my novel absolutely free (I know, beyond shameless))
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Maybe Michael Moore will film a documentary expose'.


22 posted on 03/03/2005 7:01:45 AM PST by evets (God bless President Bush and VP Cheney)
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To: TigerLikesRooster
People do not complain about the state in front of foreigners.

So seem determined to prove that my opinions are invalid based on a host of reasons. First, you assumed that the Chinese I knew are in the US. When that didn't work, you assumed that everyone I met in China would lie to me because I'm a foreigner. Well, most of the people I know in China are either family or friends of family and they complain about the state alot.

The fact remains that the picture this article attempts to paint of China is innacurate and misleading.

23 posted on 03/03/2005 7:03:05 AM PST by lafroste (gravity is not a force. See my profile to read my novel absolutely free (I know, beyond shameless))
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To: evets
Maybe Michael Moore will film a documentary expose'.

Yep, that's what we need: objective and meticulous journalism. If ole' moore would investigate, I'm sure we'd have the unvarnished truth for sure.

< /sarcasm>

24 posted on 03/03/2005 7:06:26 AM PST by lafroste (gravity is not a force. See my profile to read my novel absolutely free (I know, beyond shameless))
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To: lafroste
...this is propagandist bull$hit

Police officers in NYC have performed some of this exact perverted brutality on prisoners. Here in the good ol' US of A. You really think that police in a huge, communist country aren't capable of the same things? If so, your naiveté is astonishing.

25 posted on 03/03/2005 7:14:26 AM PST by TChris (Most people's capability for inference is severely overestimated)
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To: lafroste
Re #23

You seem to think that Chinese people you meet are nice thus other Chinese would not do the kind of torture in a institutionalized way. Next time, why don't you bring up to them this subject about being arrested with being a Falun Gong? What do they know about it?

Considering what they did in Tienanmen Square, I do not see this as a strech. If they sealed TAM square from outsiders and went ahead to crush demonstrators, you may say today that the survivors of account is also misleading and inaccurate.

26 posted on 03/03/2005 7:34:54 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster
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To: lafroste

TigerLikesRooster is not the only person or group who has remarked on institutionalized brutality in China. For instance, our State Department regularly reports the same, as does Amnesty International.

Here are some longish excerpts:

Torture, administrative detention and unfair trials

Torture and ill-treatment remained widespread in many state institutions. Common methods included kicking, beating, electric shocks, suspension by the arms, shackling in painful positions, and sleep and food deprivation. Women in detention were vulnerable to rape and sexual abuse.

“Custody and repatriation”, a system of administrative detention which had allowed for the arbitrary detention and abuse of millions of migrant workers, vagrants, homeless children and others in urban areas, was formally abolished when new rules for dealing with vagrancy came into effect in August. Its abolition was prompted by a public outcry about the brutal murder of migrant worker Sun Zhigang in March while he was being held unlawfully in a “custody and repatriation” centre in Guangzhou city.

However, another system, “re-education through labour”, continued to allow for the detention of hundreds of thousands of people for up to three years without charge or trial. In September the Ministry of Public Security announced new regulations aimed at preventing the police from using torture in administrative cases, but it remained unclear how well they would be enforced in practice.

People accused of both political and criminal offences continued to be denied due process. Detainees’ access to lawyers and family members continued to be severely restricted. Political trials fell far short of international fair trial standards. Those charged with offences related to “state secrets” or “terrorism” had their legal rights restricted and were tried in camera.
  • In February US-based dissident Wang Bingzhang became the first democracy activist known to have been convicted of “terrorist” offences. He was sentenced to life imprisonment in connection with various charges, including passing military secrets to Taiwan and leading a “terrorist” group. There were serious violations of Chinese and international law during his trial and pre-trial detention. In May the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention ruled that his arrest and detention were arbitrary and called on the authorities to remedy the situation.
Source: Amnesty International

c. Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

The law prohibits torture; however, police and other elements of the security apparatus employ torture and degrading treatment in dealing with some detainees and prisoners. Human rights monitors reported a number of unconfirmed but credible cases of torture. The Prison Law prohibits prison guards extorting confessions by torture, insulting prisoners' dignity, and beating or encouraging others to beat prisoners. Senior officials acknowledge that torture and coerced confessions are chronic problems, but have not taken sufficient measures to end these practices. Former detainees and the press reported credibly that officials used electric shocks, prolonged periods of solitary confinement, incommunicado detention, beatings, shackles, and other forms of abuse. According to credible reports, Huang Qi was bound hand and foot and beaten by police in Chengdu while they tried to force him to confess to subversion. He lost several teeth and remains in poor health. Huang was the operator of an Internet site that posted information about missing persons, including students who disappeared in June 1989 in Tiananmen Square. There were numerous credible reports of abuse of FLG practitioners by the police and other security personnel, including police involvement in beatings, detention under extremely harsh conditions, and torture. Persons detained pending trial were particularly at risk during pretrial detention due to systemic weaknesses in the legal system or lack of implementation of the revised Criminal Procedure Law. Reports of torture increase during periodic "strike hard" campaigns in which police are encouraged to achieve quick results against crime, and such reports increased during the current "strike-hard" campaign, which began in April.

During the year, deaths in custody due to police use of torture to coerce confessions from criminal suspects continued to be a problem. According to press reports a 38-year-old handicapped factory worker from Shuangcheng, in the northeastern province of Heilongjiang, was dragged from his home and died in custody after being beaten by police. His family allegedly was not allowed to view the body or have an autopsy performed. The location of his remains is unknown (see Section 1.a.).

In June the influential magazine Outlook Weekly reported that police and investigators still routinely used torture to extract confessions. To curb the practice, the magazine called for the right to remain silent; the right for suspects to give direct testimony in their own trials; and the right for a defense attorney to be present during police questioning. In September 2000, the National People's Congress (NPC) carried out an independent study of the use of torture in Tianjin, Inner Mongolia, Heilongjiang, Zhejiang, Hebei, and Shaanxi between 1997 and 1999. The group discovered 221 cases of confessions coerced by torture, which had resulted in the deaths of 21 criminal suspects. Commenting on the study group's findings in December 2000, Hou Zongbin, chairman of the NPC's Judicial Affairs Committee, stated that while the 1997 Criminal Procedure Law had brought reforms to the criminal justice system, torture remained a systemic problem. During the year, officials in Liaoning Province began a pilot program instituting the right to remain silent in criminal trials as a way to combat torture.

There were many reports of persons, especially FLG adherents, sentenced to mental hospitals for expressing either their political or religious beliefs.

There were reports during the year that police sometimes used excessive force to break up demonstrations. Police also beat persons being arrested and persons in detention. Eyewitnesses have reported frequent abuse of FLG protesters as they were being detained.

Conditions in penal institutions for both political prisoners and common criminals generally are harsh and frequently degrading. Forced labor is common. Conditions in administrative detention facilities (including reeducation-through-labor camps and custody and repatriation centers) are similar to those in prisons. Prisoners and detainees often are kept in overcrowded conditions with poor sanitation, and their food often is inadequate and of poor quality. Many detainees reportedly rely on supplemental food and medicines provided by relatives; however, some prominent dissidents reportedly are not allowed to receive supplemental food or medicine from relatives. According to released political prisoners, it is standard practice for political prisoners to be segregated from each other and placed with common criminals. There are credible reports that common criminals have beaten political prisoners at the instigation of guards. Guards in custody and repatriation centers reportedly rely on "cell bosses" to maintain order; these individuals frequently beat other detainees and sometimes steal their possessions. The treatment of some prominent political prisoners, whose cases regularly are raised with authorities, sometimes improves. The 1994 Prison Law was designed, in part, to improve treatment of detainees and increase respect for their legal rights. The Government's stated goal is to convert one-half of the nation's prisons and reeducation-through-labor camps into "modernized, civilized" facilities by the year 2010. According to credible sources, persons held in these "model" prisons receive better treatment than those held in other prison facilities.

Adequate, timely medical care for prisoners continues to be a serious problem, despite official assurances that prisoners have the right to prompt medical treatment if they become ill. Credible reports indicate that as part of the "strike hard" campaign, jails have tightened access to medical parole. For example, reports indicate that 57 inmates died at Liaoning's Province's Tieling prison during the year compared to ten deaths in 2000. Seventy inmates had been released from Tieling on medical grounds in 2000, but only two were released during the year. Nutritional and health conditions can be grim. At year's end, political prisoners who reportedly had difficulties in obtaining medical treatment, despite repeated appeals on their behalf by their families and the international community, included: Xu Wenli, Gao Hongmin, Qin Yongmin, Wang Youcai, Chen Lantao, Chen Meng, Fang Jue, Hu Shigen, Kang Yuchun, Liu Jingsheng, Rebiya Kadeer, Jigme Sangpo, Ngawang Sangdrol, Wang Guoqi, and Zhang Shanguang. Ngawang Choephel was incarcerated in a facility near Chengdu in Sichuan Province throughout the year. According to government officials, he suffered from a variety of ailments, including digestive, urinary, kidney, and liver problems. Zhang Shanguang, who is serving a 10-year sentence for disclosing news of labor demonstrations to Radio Free Asia, is suffering from serious tuberculosis. Fang Jue suffers from leg and back problems; Xu Wenli has suffered from hepatitis. Hua Di, a Stanford researcher, was sentenced to 10 years in prison on charges of revealing secrets of the country's missile program. He is suffering from cancer and was denied release on medical parole in April. Prison officials in Xinjiang have not allowed family members of businesswoman and prominent Uighur activist Rebiya Kadeer to bring her medicine for heart disease since her arrest in August 1999. She is said to be in poor health, suffering from painful feet, blurred vision, and impaired hearing. There also are allegations that she has been abused physically. Officials reportedly have denied repeated requests for her to be hospitalized.

Forced labor in prisons and reeducation-through-labor camps is common. At one camp in the western part of the country, inmates are forced to work up to 16 hours per day breaking rocks or making bricks, according to credible reports. There were several deaths from overwork, poor medical care, and beatings by guards in 2000.

The Government does not permit independent monitoring of prisons or reeducation-through-labor camps, and prisoners remain largely inaccessible to international human rights organizations. However, foreign delegations have been allowed to visit "model" prisons. The Government continued its unofficial dialog on human rights and prisoner issues with a foreign-based human rights group. During the year, officials accepted lists from this group of several hundred names of political detainees, and provided detailed information on more than 50 cases, including several who were released prior to the completion of their sentences. The group's executive director visited the Tianjin Prison, a model facility, and Beijing Number Two Prison, a maximum security prison that holds most persons convicted of political offenses in Beijing. Talks with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) on an agreement for ICRC access to prisons remained stalled.

d. Arbitrary Arrest, Detention, or Exile

Arbitrary arrest and detention remain serious problems. The law permits the authorities in some circumstances to detain persons without arresting or charging them, and persons may be sentenced administratively to up to 3 years in reeducation-through-labor camps and other similar facilities without a trial. Because the Government tightly controls information, it is impossible to determine accurately the total number of persons subjected to new or continued arbitrary arrest or detention. Official government statistics report that in 1997 there were 230,000 persons in reeducation-through-labor camps. According to a March article by the official news agency, there are 300 reeducation-through-labor camps that have held over 3.5 million prisoners since 1957. It has been estimated that as many as 1.7 million persons per year were detained in a form of administrative detention known as custody and repatriation before 1996; the number of persons subject to this form of detention reportedly has grown since that time. According to reliable reports, the Government confined some FLG adherents, and some political, religious, and labor activists and dissidents to psychiatric hospitals; and has forced some to take drugs or submit to electric shock treatments. Another labor dissident, Wang Miaogen from Shanghai, who disappeared in 1999, is believed to be held in a psychiatric hospital. Although the crime of being a "counterrevolutionary" was removed from the criminal code in 1997, Western NGO's estimate as many as 1,300 persons remain in prison for the crime, and another 600 are serving sentences under the State Security Law, which covers the same crimes as the repealed section on "counterrevolution."

Amendments to the Criminal Procedure Law abolished an often-criticized form of pretrial detention known as "shelter and investigation" that allowed police to detain suspects for extended periods without charge. Nonetheless, in some cases, police still unilaterally can detain a person for up to 37 days before releasing him or formally placing him under arrest. Once a suspect is arrested, the revised law allows police and prosecutors to detain him for months before trial while a case is being "further investigated." Few suspects are released on bail pending trial. Under the Criminal Procedure Law, detained criminal suspects, defendants, their legal representatives, and close relatives are entitled to apply for a guarantor to enable the suspect or defendant to await trial out of custody. In practice, officials usually do not agree. The Criminal Procedure Law also stipulates that authorities must notify a detainee's family or work unit of his detention within 24 hours. However, in practice, timely notification remains a serious problem, especially in sensitive political cases. Under a sweeping exception, officials need not provide notification if it would "hinder the investigation" of a case. Police continue to hold individuals without granting access to family or a lawyer, and trials continue to be conducted in secret.

A major flaw of the Criminal Procedure Law is that it does not address the reeducation-through-labor system. Defendants legally are entitled to challenge reeducation-through-labor sentences under the Administrative Litigation Law. Persons can gain a reduction in, or suspension of, their sentences after appeal; appeals usually are not successful, however, because of problems such as short appeal times and inadequate legal counsel, which weaken the effectiveness of the law in preventing or reversing arbitrary decisions. There have been cases of individuals successfully appealing their reeducation sentences through the courts, though the exact number of such cases is unknown.

The Criminal Procedure Law also does not address custody and repatriation, which allows the authorities to detain persons administratively without trial to "protect urban social order." Persons who may be detained under this provision include the homeless, the unemployed, petty criminals, and those without permission to live or work in urban areas; such persons may be returned to the locality in which they are registered. If the location to which they are to be repatriated cannot be determined, or if they cannot be repatriated for financial reasons, such persons may be sent to "resettlement farms." Those unable to work may be sent to "welfare centers." Until they are repatriated, those detained may be held in custody and repatriation centers, and may be required to pay for the cost of their detention and repatriation by working while in detention. Relatives and friends of detainees in these centers reportedly often are able to secure a detainee's release through the payment of a fee. Provincial regulations on custody and repatriation in some cases have expanded the categories of persons who may be detained. In Beijing, for example, those who may be detained specifically include the mentally ill and mentally disabled, and "those who should be taken into custody according to Government regulations." Many other persons are detained in similar forms of administrative detention, known as custody and education (for prostitutes and their clients) and custody and training (for minors who have committed crimes). Persons reportedly may be detained for long periods under these provisions, particularly if they cannot afford to pay for their release.

According to researchers, the country has 20 "ankang" institutions, directly administered by the Ministry of Public Security, in which dissidents and activists are housed with mentally ill patients. The regulations for committing a person into an ankang facility are not clear. Credible reports indicate a number of political or trade union dissidents, "underground" religious believers, and FLG adherents are incarcerated in such facilities. Wang Wanxing, who protested in Tiananmen Square in 1992, continued to be held in a psychiatric hospital on the outskirts of Beijing (see Section 1.c.). In late 2000, labor activist Cao Maobing was detained and admitted against his will to a psychiatric hospital in Yanchong, Jiangsu province, where he reportedly also was forced to take medication against his will (see Section 6.a.). However, Cao was released in July. According to reliable reports, the Government confined hundreds of FLG adherents to psychiatric hospitals.

The campaign against the China Democracy Party, a would-be opposition party that began in 1998, continued during the year. Scores of CDP leaders, activists, and members have been arrested, detained, or confined as a result of this campaign. Since December 1998, at least 30 core leaders of the CDP have been given severe punishments on subversion charges. In what some experts have described as an attempt by authorities to tarnish the public image of the democracy movement, officials have accused a number of democracy activists of soliciting prostitutes, distributing pornographic videos, petty theft, or other crimes unrelated to their political activities. In March the vice-chairman of the CDP's Hubei province branch, Lu Xiaolan, was detained as he tried to organize a CDP meeting in Wuhan. In late December 2000, Shanghai-based Cai Guihua and Fu Shenping chose to go into exile after being harassed by the police. The two each had served more than 1 year in prison for supporting the CDP in Shanghai. In December 2000, CDP activists Wang Zechen and Wang Wenjiang reportedly were sentenced in Anshan to 6 years and 4 years in prison, respectively, on charges of subverting state power. The two were arrested in June 1999.

The authorities also used laws on subversion, endangering state security, and common crimes to arrest and imprison a wide range of political dissidents, activists, and others. After being released from prison in June, 2000, Li Wangyang was rearrested on subversion charges in May, and sentenced to 10 years in prison in September for "incitement to subvert state power" after demanding the authorities pay for back, heart, and lung ailments he contracted while in prison. Li had served 11 years in prison for his role in presiding over the Shaoyang Workers Autonomous Federation, a Tiananmen-era free trade union. Six other persons were detained in the incident, including Li's sister, who was sentenced to 3 years in a labor camp for helping Li publicize his demands. In September 2000, a court in Hebei sentenced the cofounder of the environmental NGO China Development Union, Qi Yanchen, to 4 years in prison for subversion for writing that the Government would have to introduce political reform in order to avoid widespread unrest. The article at issue appeared in the prodemocracy e-mail newsletter VIP Preference (see Sections 1.f. and 2.a.).

Police sometimes detained relatives of dissidents (see Section 1.f.).

Persons critical of official corruption or malfeasance also frequently were threatened, detained, or imprisoned.

In January, Supreme People's Court President Xiao Yang stated that political dissent and outlawed religions would be among the top targets of a stepped-up crackdown by authorities during the year. In April the Government began a national "strike-hard" campaign against "violent and organized" crime. However according to press reports, the campaign also has targeted some dissidents, separatists, and underground church members. Local police reportedly were ordered to increase the number of arrests and judges were instructed to accelerate legal processing and sentencing. The campaign has been characterized by large-scale sentencing rallies and parades of condemned prisoners through the streets of major cities, followed by public executions. For example, in April local newspapers in Sichuan province reported that over 3000 criminals were sentenced publicly in 123 rallies held across the province. Of those more than 900 were "severely punished," a category that includes the death sentence and lengthy prison terms (see Section 1.d.). By the third quarter of the year, press stories indicated that over 2,000 persons had been executed as part of the campaign. The Government regarded the number of death sentences it carried out as a state secret.

Minority activists continued to be targets of the police. As part of the nationwide "strike hard" campaign, "splittists" or separatists, have been singled out. Xinjiang official Abulahat Abkurixit told the Xinjiang Legal newspaper in April that authorities in Xinjiang would use the "strike hard" campaign to strike at Muslim separatists and illegal religious activities. As part of the campaign, local courts in Xinjiang have meted out death sentences or long prison terms to a number of persons accused of separatist activity. In early 2000 a court sentenced Uighur businesswoman Rebiya Kadeer to 8 years in prison for passing "state intelligence" information to foreigners. The "state intelligence" she was accused of attempting to pass consisted of newspaper articles published in the official press and a list of individuals whose cases had been handled by judicial organs. Police arrested Kadeer, her son, and her secretary while they were on their way to meet a visiting foreign delegation in August 1999.

Journalists also were detained or threatened during the year, often for reporting on subjects that met with the Government's or the local authorities' disapproval (see Section 2.a.). In July 2000 Zhuhai police arrested five journalists, including two from Hong Kong and two from Macau, who were attempting to report on peasant protests against a land redevelopment scheme; local police arrested Ma Xiaoming, a Shaanxi television station reporter who had reported on a case involving 12,000 peasants who brought a lawsuit against their township government.

Local authorities used the Government's anticult campaign to detain and arrest large numbers of religious practitioners. For example, in December 2000, four members of the Zhong Gong qigong group were charged by Nanjing authorities with "inciting subversion of the state's political power" and sentenced to between 2 and 41/2 years in prison.

The State Compensation Law provides a legal basis for citizens to recover damages for illegal detentions. Although many citizens remain unaware of this law, there is evidence that it is having a growing, if still limited, impact. Throughout the year, the official press published numerous articles to raise public awareness of recent laws meant to enhance the protection of citizens' rights, including the Criminal Procedure Law, the State Compensation Law, the Administrative Procedure Law, and others. Many citizens have used the State Compensation Law during the year to sue for damages.

There were no reports that the Government exiled citizens. The Government continued to refuse reentry to citizens who were dissidents and activists. The Government's refusal to permit some former reeducation-through-labor camp inmates to return to their homes constitutes a form of internal exile.

Source: U.S. State Department

27 posted on 03/03/2005 7:38:27 AM PST by snowsislander
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To: TigerLikesRooster

I personally believe the gist of this story to be true.


28 posted on 03/03/2005 7:47:30 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: TChris
You really think that police in a huge, communist country aren't capable of the same things? If so, your naiveté is astonishing.

What is really astonishing is that my words are willfully misinterpreted then that mis-interpretation is cited to belittle my opinions.

One more time, then I'm done with this thread:

1) The Chinese can be very brutal.

2) The brutality described in this article is exadgurated(sp?) and intends to imply that the actions described are standard, normal and expected practices. That is a lie.

3) The rate of change in China is running at an extraordinary pace at the moment, and that change is towrds an open and freer society. I never said they were where they need to be yet.

4) Tienemen Square was brutal repression, and also damn near started a civil war. That type of oppression was learned to be something whose time has past.

5) Of course the Chinese police are capable of this level of abuse, but, just as here in the US, it is not the norm, and is not official government policy.

6) This article is propaganda. This judgement is not intended to address any article except the one posted.

I would appreciate it if these gratuitous charges of "naivete" would cease.

29 posted on 03/03/2005 7:50:29 AM PST by lafroste (gravity is not a force. See my profile to read my novel absolutely free (I know, beyond shameless))
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To: TigerLikesRooster
Re #26

Correction:

You seem to think that Chinese people you meet are nice thus other Chinese would not do the kind of torture in a institutionalized way. Next time, why don't you bring up to them this subject aboutof getting arrested withfor being a Falun Gong? And what do they know about it? Considering what they did in Tienanmen Square, I do not see this as a strech. If they sealed TAM square from outsiders and went ahead to crush demonstrators, you may say today that the survivors' of account is also misleading and inaccurate.

30 posted on 03/03/2005 7:52:06 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster
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To: lafroste
Re #29

As I said above, next time, why don't you ask your folks in China about getting arrested for being a Falun Gong? And what do they know about it?

31 posted on 03/03/2005 8:11:45 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster
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To: lafroste

....'What is really astonishing is that my words are willfully misinterpreted then that mis-interpretation is cited to belittle my opinions'.....

This shouldn't come as a surprise, it's standard procedure for a lot of freepers!!


32 posted on 03/03/2005 9:14:19 AM PST by stuartcr
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Comment #33 Removed by Moderator

To: lafroste

Well the CHINESE PEOPLE are the victems of atrocities by their GOVERNMENT.


34 posted on 03/06/2005 7:31:38 AM PST by Paul_Denton (The UN is UN-American! Get the UN out of the US and US out of the UN! http://asiasec.blogspot.com/)
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To: lafroste
The Chinese system can be harsh, and it can be corrupt, but in my experience, it is also attempts to be fair (after its own form), and it attempts to govern with the rule of law. It has a long way to go, but sanctioned behaviour like this, if it exists at all, exists in defiance of the actual will of the political leaders.

Yeah and Tiananmen Square was not ordered by the Chinese Government? Cmon! Only one man in that government supported freedom and he was placed under house arrested and died under "mysterious" circumstances.

35 posted on 03/06/2005 7:34:49 AM PST by Paul_Denton (The UN is UN-American! Get the UN out of the US and US out of the UN! http://asiasec.blogspot.com/)
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To: lafroste
I would also like to point out that I don't think everything is rosy in China by a long shot. But gratuitous articles like this do not accurately portray China and lead to misunderstandings, baseless hatred and more violence. The sheer speed of change in China is breathtaking and that inevitably engenders fear in the weak minded, on both sides of the Pacific.

A war with China could just as easily happen now as it can in ten years. China's government is an enemy to both the US and Taiwan AND its own people!

36 posted on 03/06/2005 7:37:40 AM PST by Paul_Denton (The UN is UN-American! Get the UN out of the US and US out of the UN! http://asiasec.blogspot.com/)
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To: lafroste

I'm also skeptical of anything coming from the Falun Gong. I hope these claims are investigated and I hope China keeps moving toward becoming a more humane nation. But I place these Falun people in the cultist category.


37 posted on 03/06/2005 7:38:01 AM PST by zook
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To: TigerLikesRooster

I have a very close friend who back in the 1980s spent quite a bit of time in Chinese prisons for "crimes against the state." She experienced nothing like this.


38 posted on 03/06/2005 7:39:58 AM PST by zook
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To: lafroste

Because you have no evidence to back up your claims, your words have about the same amount of weight as a tinfoil hat conspiracy theorist. Communism rules through fear pain and torture. When will you realize that?


39 posted on 03/06/2005 7:41:43 AM PST by Paul_Denton (The UN is UN-American! Get the UN out of the US and US out of the UN! http://asiasec.blogspot.com/)
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To: zook

China has not moved anywhere toward being humane. They have been shutting down internet cafes to keep its population brainashed and in the dark! They still harvest organs of the dead, they still opress the Tibetins and are still modernizing their military to strike at Taiwan some day.


40 posted on 03/06/2005 7:45:17 AM PST by Paul_Denton (The UN is UN-American! Get the UN out of the US and US out of the UN! http://asiasec.blogspot.com/)
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To: Paul_Denton

I've been there, I know many people there and I know many people from there who now live here. It's no paradise, to be sure. But China has made huge strides over the past 20 years in terms of becoming more free and humane.


41 posted on 03/06/2005 7:49:28 AM PST by zook
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To: lafroste
the wanton evil and bloodlust it describes is in no way characteristic of any Chinese I have ever met (and I know a lot of them).

Chinese are no different from any other race. They are capable of the most inhuman behavior imaginable, as are people of all races. If you have a strong stomach, try reading about the methods of torture commonly used throughout civilized and cultured Europe up until the last century or two. While it may be true that certain cultures are likely to produce more sadistic individual members than others, I don't believe that any one race or culture has a corner on man's inhumanity to man. That practice has been universal since before recorded history.

Regarding your statement about torturing prisoners not being characteristic of Chinese who you know, consider this;

I remember reading a book written by one of the American Flying Tiger pilots of WWII. He gave an account of witnessing the execution by torture of two Chinese workers who were caught stealing food from the American compound. The local Chinese authorities carried out the sentence by hanging the naked men from a tree branch by their wrists and taking turns flogging them with leather bullwhips until they died. The process required several hours of flogging to kill the men, and before they died their skin and flesh was hanging in shreds from their bodies.

According to the author that kind of death sentence was the normal practice in China of that era. If that kind of "justice" was meted out under a supposedly benign pro-American government, I have no doubt that a Communist government would use even more inhuman methods in it's treatment of criminals and dissidents. IOW, I don't find anything questionable in the article's description of Red China's "justice" system.

42 posted on 03/06/2005 8:19:00 AM PST by epow
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To: lafroste
I would appreciate it if these gratuitous charges of "naivete" would cease.

In those charges offend you, I recommend that in the future you refrain from making naive statements in your posts. after having read more of your posts since posting my initial comments I see that I may have misinterpreted your original post. But I think you must admit that your first post is quite susceptible to such misinterpretation.

43 posted on 03/06/2005 8:28:43 AM PST by epow
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To: epow
I remember reading a book written by one of the American Flying Tiger pilots of WWII. He gave an account of witnessing the execution by torture of two Chinese workers who were caught stealing food from the American compound.

Eighteenth century Chinese novels (written under pen names because being an author was considered "low class") provide a fascinating insight into Chinese thinking. In those stories, punishment of the perpetrator was every bit as much of the story as the exemplary detective work used to catch them. One example is "the Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee" where Dee was sort of a Chinese Sherlock Holmes. According to the law at the time (mideavil China, where the story was set, say ~1,200 AD, not the 1900's when the story was written), a suspect could not be convicted and punished unless he confessed to the crime. In "Judge Dee" they did indeed utilize all manor of hideous torture to illicit that confession. Of course, once the perp confessed (for some reason Judge Dee was never wrong) then the story spoke in great detail about his manner of execution. However, the interrogation was usually much worse than the final sentence.

My original point about the article I posted those comments too was that that specific article was propaganda aimed at inciting racial hatred of the Chinese, and I object to that.

44 posted on 03/06/2005 5:13:53 PM PST by lafroste (gravity is not a force. See my profile to read my novel absolutely free (I know, beyond shameless))
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