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Baby 'the size of two mobile phones' miraculously survives (26 weeks, 1lb. 14 oz.)
The Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | September 15, 2007 | KAREN GRATTAGE

Posted on 09/16/2007 5:03:40 AM PDT by Stoat

Baby 'the size of two mobile phones' miraculously survives

By KAREN GRATTAGE - More by this author » Last updated at 22:47pm on 15th September 2007

  When Deborah and Russell Anderson learned they were finally expecting the baby they longed for, they decided to enjoy their last long-haul holiday for years.

But their two-week trip to South Africa became a traumatic six-month stay after Deborah gave birth to their son Henry at just 26 weeks.

The couple had hoped the £3,000 holiday in Cape Town would be a relaxing antidote to the 12 months they had spent undergoing IVF treatment.

Instead, they ran up medical bills of £70,000 and expenses of nearly £40,000 while Henry battled for life. He was the size of two mobile phones and just 1lb 14oz when he arrived in the world 14 weeks early on May 12.

Only now, after two operations and four months in intensive care, is Henry a healthy weight of 8lb 1oz and able to come home to Britain.

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Tiny: Newborn Henry lying next to Russell's mobile

The world's most premature baby, Amillia Taylor, was born in America at just 21 weeks last year. But at 26 weeks, Henry still had just a 60 per cent chance of survival.

'It's a miracle he's here,' said Deborah, 33, a complementary therapist from Cheltenham. 'All the odds were stacked against him. But seeing him so healthy and full of life makes the past six months seem worthwhile.'

The couple went on holiday in March, when Deborah was just four months pregnant. In the previous 12 months she had learned she had pelvic inflammatory disease and that IVF was her only chance of having a child. So the couple were thrilled when she became pregnant at the first try.

But as Deborah sunbathed on a beach, she started to bleed and was rushed to the Christiaan Barnard Memorial Hospital. Surgeons took emergency measures to try to stop the baby being born but after eight weeks in hospital Deborah gave birth to Henry. He was rushed into intensive care and doctors warned he might not survive.

Russell, 35, a financial adviser, said: 'They put him on a tray rather than in an incubator because he was so tiny and frail, they needed easier access. He was only two-and-a-half times as big as my mobile, very thin and his skin felt like paper. He had tiny nappies and a dummy the size of a 10p piece.

'The first week was touch and go, and after six days the doctor was concerned because of the number of times he had been resuscitated.'

Deborah said: 'He had one-on-one 24-hour care, but the number of monitors and wires coming out of Henry made us very scared. I wasn't allowed to hold him until the second week. He was so small but it was wonderful to pick him up.'

Deborah and Russell were shown how to hold Henry against their skin – a technique called 'kangaroo care' which helps premature babies bond with their parents.

Henry then faced a battle to survive, against the odds, as his lungs were still not fully matured. He also had two life-saving operations – to correct a breathing problem and a hernia – and was regularly given oxygen to help him breathe.

'We had to watch him being bagged with oxygen and brought back to life. The first few times were very distressing. Neither of us has ever cried as much as we did then,' Russell said.Deborah added: 'It was horrible to see Henry lifeless and the doctors trying desperately to revive him. We could only watch and pray. It was so hard, and we nearly lost him several times.'

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Miracle: Russelll and Deborah will fly home with Henry this week

Russell said: 'While Henry was in hospital, two other babies died. It made us realise what a miracle he is.' After Henry had been in special care for four months, doctors allowed him to return with his parents to their holiday flat. This week they are set to fly home.

Deborah said: 'Henry is wearing newborn clothes now, he's feeding normally and waking us in the night. We're looking forward to going back to the UK.'

Henry's paediatrician will travel with him in case he needs emergency help. The Andersons' insurers Cega has covered all expenses.

Deborah said: 'We have ended up spending more than six months abroad. But it has been worth it, because it gave us our miracle baby.'


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: baby; britain; england; greatbritain; miraclebaby; preemies; premature; uk; unitedkingdom
Russell said: 'While Henry was in hospital, two other babies died. It made us realise what a miracle he is.'

And it also makes one wonder how many babies were intentionally murdered during that same time, with their deaths being completely legal and referred to as 'abortions'.

With all of those opting for 'choice' and choosing murder , it's so heartwarming to see this couple choosing life, particularly under such difficult circumstances.

 

 Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

God is with us, and may He Bless this child and family.

1 posted on 09/16/2007 5:03:42 AM PDT by Stoat
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To: cpforlife.org; Coleus; cgk; narses; MHGinTN; Gabz

Good News Ping :-)


2 posted on 09/16/2007 5:06:46 AM PDT by Stoat (Rice / Coulter 2008: Smart Ladies for a Strong America)
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To: Stoat

I initally read the headline as ‘Baby, the size of two mobile homes’. Apparently the coffee is not holding up to it’s end of the bargain.


3 posted on 09/16/2007 5:08:37 AM PDT by ShadowDancer ("To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone.")
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To: ShadowDancer

It sounds as though it might be time to switch to espresso :-)


4 posted on 09/16/2007 5:12:08 AM PDT by Stoat (Rice / Coulter 2008: Smart Ladies for a Strong America)
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To: Stoat; Texas Termite; Brad's Gramma

Heck, we could have told them about all that, right?


5 posted on 09/16/2007 5:27:42 AM PDT by Maigrey ("We still get our basic rights from God and not government." - Fred D Thompson)
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To: Stoat
They're probably very fortunate they had Henry in SA, from '06...

Doctors call premature babies ‘bed blockers’

God bless wee Henry, and his mum and dad :)

6 posted on 09/16/2007 5:32:44 AM PDT by mewzilla (Property must be secured or liberty cannot exist. John Adams)
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To: Stoat
He had tiny nappies and a dummy the size of a 10p piece.

Translation please? I speak hillbilly and sometimes need help. :-)

7 posted on 09/16/2007 5:34:12 AM PDT by Melinda in TN
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To: Maigrey

Indeed we can! And I’m amazed at at the 60% survival chance. Logan was given 10% and that was “iffy”. Medicine has come soooooooo very far, in so many ways.

Prayers for this little one and his family.

Nana


8 posted on 09/16/2007 5:44:52 AM PDT by Texas Termite (We give thanks daily.)
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To: Melinda in TN
He had tiny nappies and a dummy the size of a 10p piece.

Translation please? I speak hillbilly and sometimes need help. :-)

I'm not a Brit, but I'm pretty confident that 'nappies' are diapers, but I'm having to guess that a 'dummy' in this context is a baby's teething-sucker.

Never, fear, there are many FReepers in the UK who will be along shortly and correct me if I'm wrong   :-)

9 posted on 09/16/2007 5:50:44 AM PDT by Stoat (Rice / Coulter 2008: Smart Ladies for a Strong America)
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To: Stoat; Melinda in TN
I know it's the Beeb, but it's handy :)

British American Dictionary

10 posted on 09/16/2007 5:57:15 AM PDT by mewzilla (Property must be secured or liberty cannot exist. John Adams)
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To: mewzilla
They're probably very fortunate they had Henry in SA

WOW....thanks very much for posting.  A very sad commentary on the state of healthcare there.

We can look forward to that sort of thing if HillaryCare ever gets off the ground.

11 posted on 09/16/2007 5:58:18 AM PDT by Stoat (Rice / Coulter 2008: Smart Ladies for a Strong America)
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To: Stoat

At 26 weeks, it can’t be a baby just a clump of cells...


12 posted on 09/16/2007 5:58:34 AM PDT by Always Right
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To: Stoat

Prayers up for the little one, his parents, and those who helped him through those months of care they gave him.


13 posted on 09/16/2007 6:03:14 AM PDT by mware (By all that you hold dear..on this good earth... I bid you stand! Men of the West!)
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To: Melinda in TN

nappies are diapers.


14 posted on 09/16/2007 6:04:18 AM PDT by mware (By all that you hold dear..on this good earth... I bid you stand! Men of the West!)
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To: Melinda in TN
Re the translation of 'dummy'....this one was found in 1998 and the owner still hasn't picked it up   :-)

Lost Something

 
 
item:
dummy
date found:
18/08/98
time found:
6.30pm
where found:
wilbraham road, manchester

15 posted on 09/16/2007 6:19:10 AM PDT by Stoat (Rice / Coulter 2008: Smart Ladies for a Strong America)
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To: Stoat

Your translation is essentially correct.

A nappy is a diaper, a dummy is a pacifier, or “binkie”

A Ten P piece is smaller than it used to be and is about the size of a knickel.

I know someone who had a child this premature and about the same size some 12 years ago. The kid grew up to be a normal healthy child.


16 posted on 09/16/2007 6:56:52 AM PDT by Wil H (Turning $1000 into $100,000 through cattle futures requires the "willing suspension of disbelief")
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To: Wil H; Stoat; mewzilla; mware

Thanks for the translation! It’s funny that it’s all English, but it’s not the same English. :-) Of course, down here we speak English but sometimes people still need a translator.

I’m happy the little one is doing good! Great story.


17 posted on 09/16/2007 8:01:20 AM PDT by Melinda in TN
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To: ShadowDancer

I did the same thing but I’ve not had my coffee yet.


18 posted on 09/16/2007 8:05:02 AM PDT by fella (The proper application of the truth far more important than the knowledge of it's existance."Ike")
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To: Stoat
Thanks be to God!

Most folks do not realize that the womb-bound baby builds and fills out all of his or her body. If we learn to give them what they need for nourishment and love, the preemies can make it.

BTW, it takes a special Nurse to place the IV in such a tiny baby! God bless those Nurses.

19 posted on 09/16/2007 9:38:51 AM PDT by MHGinTN (If you can read this, you've had life support. Defend life support for others in the womb.)
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To: Maigrey; Texas Termite
Heck, we could have told them about all that, right?

Oh yeah. Darn tootin' we could've!!! Prayers for this baby to grow as big & healthy and FUN as Logan!!!!

20 posted on 09/16/2007 11:04:37 AM PDT by Bradís Gramma (Mother of the Bride here, treat me with respect for once, will ya? ;))
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