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Lion Sculpture Gets Record price
BBC ^ | 12-6-2007

Posted on 12/06/2007 8:28:59 AM PST by blam

Lion sculpture gets record price

The Guennol Lioness was discovered at a site near Baghdad

A tiny limestone figure of a lion from ancient Mesopotamia has sold at auction for $57m (£28m), almost double the previous record price for a sculpture. The 8.3cm (3.25in) tall Guennol Lioness is thought to have been carved 5,000 years ago in what is now Iraq and Iran.

The lion, whose new owner has not been identified, had been on loan to the Brooklyn Museum of Art for 59 years.

The previous record for a sculpture was set last month when Pablo Picasso's Tete de Femme was sold for $29m.

A 2,000-year-old Roman bronze sold for $28m in June, the previous record price for an antiquity sold at auction.

'Storied figure'

The ancient carving, which was found at a site near Baghdad, was acquired in 1948 by Alastair and Edith Martin and formed part of their Guennol Collection.

The proceeds of the sale will benefit a charitable trust formed by the Martin Family.

Before the auction in New York on Wednesday, the head of Sotheby's antiquities department, Richard Keresey, described the figure as a "brilliant combination of animal form and human pose".

"The successful bidder.. will have the distinction of owning one of the oldest, rarest and most beautiful works of art from the ancient world," he added.

The buyer, who wished to remain anonymous, entered the bidding at $27m, already $9m more than what the sculpture had been expected to fetch.

Mesopotamia, which was located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, has been called the "cradle of civilisation" because agriculture, animal herding and domestication developed there earlier than anywhere else, almost 8,000 years ago.

By 3000 BC, the Mesopotamians had already invented the wheel, developed writing, and created the world's first cities and monumental architecture.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: art; godsgravesglyphs; lion; mesopotamia; museum; price; relics; sculpture

1 posted on 12/06/2007 8:29:00 AM PST by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

GGG Ping.


2 posted on 12/06/2007 8:29:21 AM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 49th; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks Blam.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

· Google · Archaeologica · ArchaeoBlog · Archaeology magazine · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Mirabilis · Texas AM Anthropology News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo ·
· History or Science & Nature Podcasts · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


3 posted on 12/06/2007 8:47:35 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, December 5, 2007 _________________https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

BUMP!


4 posted on 12/06/2007 9:15:26 AM PST by Publius6961 (MSM: Israelis are killed by rockets; Lebanese are killed by Israelis.)
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To: blam

Does anyone remember the old movie serial about the Lion men? They wore neat lion headdesses and lion claws attached to their hands. As I recall, either Jungle Jim or Tarzan had a hell of a time with them.

I think the remaining members of that cult bought it.

Or was that the leopard men? I forget. Nevermind.


5 posted on 12/06/2007 11:46:22 AM PST by wildbill
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To: blam; SunkenCiv
By 3000 BC, the Mesopotamians had already invented the wheel, developed writing, and created the world's first cities and monumental architecture...

LAMENTATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF UR

(Great) fires he lit that heralded the storm. The people mourn. And lit on either flank of furious winds the searing heat of the desert. Like flaming heat of noon this fire scorched.

The storm ordered by Enlil in hate, the storm which wears away the country, covered Ur like a cloth, veiled it like a linen sheet.

On that day did the storm leave the city; that city was a ruin. O father Nanna, that town was left a ruin. The people mourn. On that day did the storm leave the country. The people mourn. Its people('s corpses), not potsherds, littered the approaches. The walls were gaping; the high gates, the roads, were piled with dead. In the wide streets, where feasting crowds (once) gathered, jumbled they lay. In all the streets and roadways bodies lay. In open fields that used to fill with dancers, the people lay in heaps.

The country's blood now filled its holes, like metal in a mold; bodies dissolved -- like butter left in the sun...

FROM CLAY TABLETS OF THE OLDEN DAYS

6 posted on 12/06/2007 3:11:24 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM!)
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To: Fred Nerks
"The country's blood now filled its holes, like metal in a mold; bodies dissolved -- like butter left in the sun... "

Maybe this storm.

7 posted on 12/06/2007 3:17:20 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam

http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/SitesFromSatellites/sites.php?name=uruk-ur&view=c

Ur and Uruk locations Google.


8 posted on 12/06/2007 4:28:07 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM!)
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To: Fred Nerks
Neat images, thanks.

See my post #29 on this thread.

9 posted on 12/06/2007 4:41:31 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam
GEODYNAMICS

Reconstruction of the palaeoshorelines and palaeobathymetry for the Persian Gulf at 12,000 years ago. The lower part of the Gulf is first flooded at about 13,000 years BP but large freshwater lakes could have developed in several locations within the valley floor. Large shallow depressions also occur on the southern margin of the present Gulf.

10 posted on 12/06/2007 6:15:13 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM!)
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To: Fred Nerks
Check out this map. The Persian Gulf was dry during the Ice Age.
11 posted on 12/06/2007 6:30:41 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam
mind you...nothing seems to explain how all that diluvial material ended up almost covering the ziggaraut...

How it was found...and Woolleys team at work.

12 posted on 12/06/2007 6:36:56 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM!)
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To: Fred Nerks

At the end of the Ice Age, there was an ‘over-shoot’ and the world’s oceans were once (not for very long) deeper than they are now. The Russians building the foundation for the Aswan High Dam encountered this silt layer...I think it’s the same one that Wooley encountered.


13 posted on 12/06/2007 6:53:30 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam
CLAY TABLETS FOUND

Look, he's standing in it!

I can't believe that map!

14 posted on 12/06/2007 6:54:11 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM!)
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To: blam
At the end of the Ice Age, there was an ‘over-shoot’ and the world’s oceans were once (not for very long) deeper than they are now.

where did the water go? (Let me guess - into the porous cavities in the crust of the earth?)

I live in an area that is extinct shield volcano. All around me I can see evidence of an ancient shoreline...about 300 feet HIGH!

but I STILL want to know - where did all the water go? And how did it carry those stones on top of the ziggaraut?

There is a theory that masses of water rushed down from the Zagros Mountains and all the soil carried by the rushing water filled the valley depression between the two rivers.

15 posted on 12/06/2007 7:04:59 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM!)
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To: Fred Nerks
"I can't believe that map!"

That's with the world's oceans reduced by about 320 feet. Some say the level was reduced by as much as 500 feet...most accept 400 feet.

16 posted on 12/06/2007 7:09:47 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: Fred Nerks
"And how did it carry those stones on top of the ziggaraut? "

I don't know anything about the ziggaraut or that situation. The water I'm talking about went back into ice. It's with us today.

17 posted on 12/06/2007 7:14:25 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam
The Russians building the foundation for the Aswan High Dam encountered this silt layer...I think it’s the same one that Wooley encountered.
Just some quibbles, the Russians found that the Nile used to run in a very deep, narrow gorge, but that was a few million years back, while the Med was still disconnected from the Atlantic. The Woolley layer is generally held to have been a spray of sediment, similar to a delta, from a single, short-lived event (and that was in historical times). ;')
18 posted on 12/06/2007 10:31:40 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, December 5, 2007 _________________https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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“a few million years back” s/b “a few million years old”


19 posted on 12/06/2007 10:36:22 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, December 5, 2007 _________________https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Fred Nerks

From a gradualist perspective, the continents rose (and the sea basins deepened) due to isostatic rebound after the glaciers melted. So the “overshoot” would be from the glaciers having melted, and the continents not having yet rebounded. That’s a possibility (we all know how highly I regard gradualism). See also:

In the shadow of the Moon
New Scientist | 30 January 1999 | editors
Posted on 08/31/2004 11:42:25 AM EDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1203912/posts


20 posted on 12/06/2007 10:40:15 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, December 5, 2007 _________________https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: blam

...and it depended on the latitude as well.


21 posted on 12/06/2007 10:40:49 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, December 5, 2007 _________________https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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