Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

How Business Travelers Contributed to USA Today's Decline (Dinosaur Media DeathWatch™)
Poynter Online ^ | September 5, 2010 | Adam Hochberg

Posted on 09/05/2010 8:07:09 AM PDT by abb

Even in an industry accustomed to bad news, the recent cutbacks at USA Today exposed a harsh reality: For many former readers, newspapers have become so passé that it's become hard even to give them away.

Last month, the Gannett-owned publication announced it was laying off about 130 people, shifting its emphasis from its iconic print edition, and devoting more resources online. USA Today has experienced a sharp circulation drop, even among people who get the paper free -- the business travelers who make up more than half of its readership.

As road warriors know, copies of USA Today have become almost as ubiquitous as Bibles and little shampoo bottles in most hotels. For years, Gannett has maintained distribution agreements with major lodging chains, which leave complimentary copies outside guestroom doors each weekday morning.

The problem is that a lot of travelers nowadays simply aren't bothering to bend down and get them.

"People will pick it up from in front of their door only because it's kind of strange just to step over it," said Steven Carvell, a Cornell University professor of Hotel Administration. "But they're not being read through."

Last year, Marriott International -- in the name of "reducing waste" -- announced it would discontinue automatic newspaper delivery in more than 2,600 hotels. Customers at about 400 full-service Marriott properties nationwide still can ask for a USA Today to be brought to their rooms. (They also can request a local newspaper or the Wall Street Journal, which is aggressively trying to skim off what's left of the hotel newspaper business.) At the limited-service hotels that make up the bulk of the Marriott portfolio, such as Courtyard and Residence Inn, free newspapers now are available only in the lobby.

By Marriott's count, the new policy reduced USA Today's paid circulation by about 50,000 copies a day, worsening a decline the publication had experienced because of the slow economy and a nationwide drop in business travel. (While the newspapers are given to guests free, USA Today can count them as paid circulation because hotels purchase them at a bulk rate and technically pass along the cost to customers as part of the room price. The fine print on hotel bills often notes that a 75 cent or dollar newspaper charge has been included in the room rate.)

A changing ritual

When Marriott announced the policy change last year, it said demand for free newspapers had declined 25 percent. "I visit more than 250 hotels a year, and more often than not, I'm stepping over unclaimed newspapers as I walk down the hallway," explained Chairman Bill Marriott, Jr., who sounds far less enthusiastic about USA Today now than he did when he personally appeared in a 1984 television ad promoting the then-new publication.

In that era when USA Today was an ambitious and brashly-colorful upstart, Marriott was the first major hotel chain to partner with Gannett and deliver the paper to guest rooms. The practice quickly spread through the travel industry and played a big role in the publication's early success, giving USA Today a strong following among upscale business people. As the newspaper forged additional bulk sales arrangements, travelers could find free copies of USA Today in airport club lounges, inside their rental cars, and in all but the most basic hotels.

"It was sort of the business travel ritual," said writer Tim Winship, a former manager of Hilton's frequent guest program who now blogs at frequentflier.com. He said the free newspapers were a popular perk with hotel customers, and he himself often pored over his USA Today for almost an hour as he ate his room-service breakfast. "It was kind of a comforting thing," Winship said.

Not surprisingly, the newspaper ritual became less prevalent as hotels began rolling out another, more modern amenity: high-speed Internet access. In-room broadband connections -- an expensive novelty just a few years ago -- have become standard at virtually all of the nation's chain hotels, and free at many of them. Winship said he now spends mornings on the road reading the news on his laptop computer.

And as for the newspaper outside his door?

"I usually just kick it inside when I go out in the morning," Winship said. "Then, when I come back, I bend over and put it in the trash can."

News 'strapped to my hip'

Surveys have found that the vast majority of business travelers carry laptops, while the use of smart phones (which don't require a hotel Internet connection) has skyrocketed among frequent hotel guests even faster than in the rest of the population. A July study by PhoCusWright, a travel industry research firm, concluded that 75 percent of regular business travelers carry devices such as BlackBerries or iPhones. A separate Pew Research Center report in July found that 38 percent of the general adult population uses mobiles devices to access the Internet.

"When you look at the demographic of business travelers, they are becoming younger," said PhoCusWright research director Carroll Rheem. "They're used to consuming their news from digital media."

A Marriott spokeswoman said she had no immediate information on how many guests pick up free newspapers in hotel lobbies or still request them to be delivered to their rooms. But it's clear that some guests remain loyal to the print editions. On flyertalk.com, a discussion forum for frequent travelers, more than a dozen regular Marriott customers responded positively when I asked, "Do you read your free newspaper"?

"I find them very nice to have and [I'm] lost without 'em," wrote IT consultant Matt Nevans, who said he saves two days' papers to read on his flights home. "It's nice to have something to do on the plane during 'no electronics' time." Another traveler expressed a similar preference for low-tech reading material in a place equally ill-suited for electronics. "I like to start the morning off reading the paper while relaxing in the Jacuzzi," he wrote.

On the other hand, several respondents said they read the complimentary Wall Street Journal when it's available, but not USA Today. And a handful said they refuse all newspapers when they check in to the hotel or ignore them if they're delivered to their room. "The best source for any news is strapped to my hip 80 percent of any waking day," said Los Angeles software engineer Kenneth Crudup.

New digital initiatives

Indeed, as Gannett puts more emphasis on its digital products, its challenge is to create a prominent online destination for all those hip-strapped devices. Deprived of the competitive advantage that comes with being the only newspaper outside a hotel guest's door, USA Today hopes to hold on to its traditional readers by producing mobile content related to travel, aviation, technology, and other subjects. To continue to reach Marriott customers, Gannett has partnered with the lodging company to promote USA Today's iPad app. It also has begun displaying USA Today content on large touch-screens in hotel lobbies.

It's uncertain whether such digital initiatives will help replace USA Today's lost circulation among business travelers. But Carroll Rheem, the travel industry researcher, said hoteliers are likely to embrace technology as a cheaper alternative to the labor intensive practice of distributing dozens of newspapers to guest rooms each morning. Rheem said it's not unimaginable that within a few years, complimentary newspapers may go the way of other once-common hotel amenities, such as free matchbooks and coin-operated vibrating beds.

"Consumers expect to consume news on the road just as they do at home," Rheem said.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: advertising; ccrm; dbm; gannett; newspapers
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-57 next last
Sunday morning good news.
1 posted on 09/05/2010 8:07:16 AM PDT by abb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: 04-Bravo; aimhigh; andyandval; Arizona Carolyn; Bahbah; bert; bilhosty; Caipirabob; carmenbmw; ...

ping


2 posted on 09/05/2010 8:07:57 AM PDT by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb

USA Today is written like a Communist propaganda cartoon. It contains little information and what it does have only the sports section is even remotely accurate or timely.


3 posted on 09/05/2010 8:10:38 AM PDT by CodeToad (Islam needs to be banned in the US and treated as a criminal enterprise.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb

I used to subscribe to several newspapers and magazines. Now, none. There’s just no point to it. I can find all the same info online - for free!


4 posted on 09/05/2010 8:12:28 AM PDT by vladimir998 (Part of the Vast Catholic Conspiracy (hat tip to Kells))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CodeToad
USA Today is written like a Communist propaganda cartoon. It contains little information and what it does have only the sports section is even remotely accurate or timely.

I liked it a lot up until a few years ago. Then, it got like the useless (actually worse that useless, damaging with their views and elitism) Cleveland Plain Dealer. That is, I could sit there for an hour reading it, and not know anything I didn't already know.

5 posted on 09/05/2010 8:13:48 AM PDT by grania
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: vladimir998

For now, I’m subscribing to Bloombery Business Week. It’s a little bit quirky and does some things in depth, which is what I like in a magazine.


6 posted on 09/05/2010 8:15:05 AM PDT by grania
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: abb

This is the original image taken by AP photographer Mikhail Metzel during a Senate hearing

____________________________________________________________________

This is the image that appeared in the 0/19/2005 USA Today

Only after being caught, did McPaper apologize:


Good riddance to bad rubbish. These people are not "journalists." They are spoiled children who deserve to be unemployed.

7 posted on 09/05/2010 8:16:33 AM PDT by SkyPilot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb

http://www.poynter.org/column.asp?id=123&aid=190028
Why USA Today’s Declines Led to Radical Restructuring

http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/456695-Kerry_On_Net_Neutrality_Debate_Take_a_Deep_Breath.php
Kerry On Net Neutrality Debate: Take a Deep Breath
Renews call for Open Internet, but advises parties to cool rhetoric

http://www.editorandpublisher.com/Headlines/sale-of-brown-publishing-newspapers-to-lenders-approved-by-bankruptcy-court-62513-.aspx
Sale of Brown Publishing Newspapers to Lenders Approved by Bankruptcy Court


8 posted on 09/05/2010 8:17:22 AM PDT by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: abb
I stay at Marriotts and Hiltons frequently. What I like to do at checkin is demand the 75 cent credit to the hotel charge because I don't want the USAToday paper. They always credit without complaining.

I've noticed more and more patrons doing the same thing. I suspect Bill Marriott has noticed the trend. It's like a tea party in the lobby only more selective.

9 posted on 09/05/2010 8:20:41 AM PDT by Zuben Elgenubi
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb

How about we get someone in Congress to propose a TAX!

A TAX on NEWSPRINT!

Whereas the production of newspapers causes trees to be cut down, hauled by polluting trucks to polluting paper mills, and hauled from paper mills to publishers and

Whereas the production of newspapers requires toxic ink and solvents and energy wasting machinery and

Whereas the distribution of newspapers requires the use of dirty internal combustion engines and

Whereas a large portion of every landfill is used for discarded newspapers,

Therefore:

Be it resolved that a Newsprint tax, of $1,000.00 per pound, be charged to EVERY newspaper with a daily subscription, within the United States!
________________________________________
We should get some Republican to propose THIS as an amendment to any “cap and trade” or “carbon tax” proposal that comes up!
Maybe we can make it like “Cap and Trade” and use the revenue generated, from this tax on dirty dinosaur newspapers, to subsidize a tax credit for home computers and digital devices?
Or, we could use the money to subsidize talk radio! Well, those guys really don’t need any help!


10 posted on 09/05/2010 8:24:12 AM PDT by Kansas58
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb

When I went to San Diego this summer, the hotel left a USA today at the door each morning; all I did was throw it away. I would have done the same had it been the local paper. I had my laptop and iphone, so why would I want to read a newspaper?


11 posted on 09/05/2010 8:25:35 AM PDT by Abin Sur
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Zuben Elgenubi; Grampa Dave

Grampa Dave has been doing this for years. He says the satisfaction from doing it is worth way more than the $0.75.


12 posted on 09/05/2010 8:26:28 AM PDT by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: abb

You can’t give away free government edjamakation now a days.
I’d live in a van down by the river before I’d live in ‘Pubic Housing’.
Government cheese anyone?
NPR has to survive by taxing people that won’t listen to it.
I don’t see why RINO’s, and non RINO’s( Democrats ) won’t taxpayer fund a ‘national newspaper’, you know, to ‘unite us’.


13 posted on 09/05/2010 8:29:01 AM PDT by Leisler ("Over time they create a legal system that plunders and a moral code that glorifies it." F. Bastiat)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb

Thank you for posting. Nothing warms my heart more than reading the continuing, slow, painful demise of the peddlers of printed Communist propaganda.


14 posted on 09/05/2010 8:31:25 AM PDT by nwrep
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb
i haven't been required to travel since 2005 and that was the only time i ever read it...

i don't miss the travel or the paper

15 posted on 09/05/2010 8:32:45 AM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb

I travel a lot and I never read them. I just toss them on the bed and leave them. I can’t remember the last time I even opened one up.


16 posted on 09/05/2010 8:34:38 AM PDT by Shire
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb

Although I am not on the road as in days of yore, I do travel and my Iphone provides a Fox News mobile ap and a Forbes mobile ap. That’s all I need. There is also Free Republic but not yet in a mobile format.

There is a USA ap but who needs or wants it with Fox and Forbes


17 posted on 09/05/2010 8:35:12 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Greetings Jacques. The revolution is coming)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb
The fine print on hotel bills often notes that a 75 cent or dollar newspaper charge has been included in the room rate.)

When I see that on my bill, I will hand the unread papers over to the front desk and tell them to remove the charge. I don't recall having it happen to me. But I don't stay in hotels that much.

18 posted on 09/05/2010 8:37:02 AM PDT by ChildOfThe60s (If you can remember the 60s, you weren't really there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: abb

“pored over his USA Today for almost an hour as he ate his room-service breakfast”

Slow reader. There’s not that much content in a USA Today paper.

15 minutes TOPS.


19 posted on 09/05/2010 8:37:29 AM PDT by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bert

I don’t know of any business traveler that doesn’t have a laptop, too. Everything at your fingertips.

Once again, proof of our theory that it never was the content, it was the distribution system that allowed the Dinosaur Media to be dominant for so long.

All gone now.


20 posted on 09/05/2010 8:37:53 AM PDT by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-57 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson