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The Squares Lose: Hemp Flag to Grace Capitol Building on July 4th
The Atlantic Wire ^ | 7-2-13 | Philip Bump

Posted on 07/03/2013 7:12:27 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic

If you're near the Capitol on the Fourth, celebrating your patriotism and whatnot, or if you see images from Washington of the building during broadcasts of John P. Sousa performances, take a look at the flag on top of the dome. That flag, ladies and gentlemen, will for the first time in decades be made of hemp.

The Washington Post reports on the patriotic move. (Its headline includes the word "high," do you get it?)

Colorado hemp advocate Michael Bowman is the man responsible for getting the flag, made from Colorado-raised hemp and screen-printed with the stars and stripes, up there.

He cooked up the idea while lobbying Congress this year to include pro-hemp measures in the farm bill. That legislation failed, of course, but the seed of the hemp flag had been planted. If you're near the Capitol on the Fourth, celebrating your patriotism and whatnot, or if you see images from Washington of the building during broadcasts of John P. Sousa performances, take a look at the flag on top of the dome. That flag, ladies and gentlemen, will for the first time in decades be made of hemp.

The Washington Post reports on the patriotic move. (Its headline includes the word "high," do you get it?)

Colorado hemp advocate Michael Bowman is the man responsible for getting the flag, made from Colorado-raised hemp and screen-printed with the stars and stripes, up there.

He cooked up the idea while lobbying Congress this year to include pro-hemp measures in the farm bill. That legislation failed, of course, but the seed of the hemp flag had been planted.

(Excerpt) Read more at theatlanticwire.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; US: Colorado
KEYWORDS: decriminalization; hemp; map; marijuana; polis
I presume The Atlantic Wire is a division of The Atlantic Monthly, a magazine I refuse to have in my house. This article is similarly impudent. It winds up calling a cotton flag, flying over the Capitol, "dorky" (as compared to a screen printed hemp flag).

But, there is an interesting map at the link that shows the progression of marijuana decriminalization laws across this country in the last decade.

1 posted on 07/03/2013 7:12:28 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

In a screenshot from the farm bill debate Rep. Jared Polis holds the hemp flag. (Courtesy C-SPAN)

2 posted on 07/03/2013 7:14:12 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic
I'd probably take a sewn U.S. flag made of hemp over a sewn cotton one. I'm of the opinion that hemp cloth is a superior material.

(Screen-printed flags are for commies).

3 posted on 07/03/2013 7:15:49 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: afraidfortherepublic

So, instead of burning the flag to “protest” against the war, the hippies will be smoking it to get high. Hmmmm.


4 posted on 07/03/2013 7:16:07 AM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (Former member of the GOP useful idiot voter base.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Hemp has a long and proud record of service, especially in the Navy.


5 posted on 07/03/2013 7:17:12 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Going along the lines of how this nation was founded by geniuses but being run by idiots, banning hemp because it is a little like marijuana would be like banning water because it is a little like alcohol.


6 posted on 07/03/2013 7:17:56 AM PDT by Enterprise ("Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire)
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To: afraidfortherepublic
> ... there is an interesting map ... progression of marijuana decriminalization ...

http://cdn.theatlanticwire.com/img/upload/2013/04/08/WeedLaws.gif

7 posted on 07/03/2013 7:18:36 AM PDT by mbarker12474
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To: afraidfortherepublic

8 posted on 07/03/2013 7:19:04 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: mbarker12474

TY — you are quicker on the click than I.


9 posted on 07/03/2013 7:20:23 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: FlingWingFlyer

Any hippy ignorant enough to smoke hemp deserves the consequences. There is a huge difference between the “weed” they smoke and the “weed” that hemp fabrics, etc are made from. There is a reason why it is called “weed” and the hemp version is pretty toxic when burned. State workers I talked to years ago whose job it was to mow and burn the ditchweed all agreed that if you were too close to the burning hemp you’d at a minimum get a severe headache along with nasty nausea.

I’ve had a number of hemp wallets which are long lasting; 10 years of use for the first one I had. I got the first one two years before I retired (20 years ago) from the military and I bought that one at the BX. Went through several drug sniffing dog checks at the base gate and not one of the dogs even gave me a second look.

A durable flag for outside use would be great; what’s the problem?


10 posted on 07/03/2013 7:26:15 AM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: afraidfortherepublic
There are many Free Republic brewers and I suspect a few "growers".

Brewing is marginally legal as the government doesn't want to lose excise taxes. Why should the same not be true for growing? Because, I suspect, politicians receive money from those that benefit greatly from the illegality of drugs.

In a free nation one should be allowed to grow pretty much anything they wish as long as you are not directly harming others - but a nation with an income tax is, by definition, not free.

11 posted on 07/03/2013 7:30:40 AM PDT by Aevery_Freeman (We say "low-information" but we mean "low-intelligence")
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Why is it screen printed? Does hemp fiber not absorb dyes like cotton?..............


12 posted on 07/03/2013 7:31:32 AM PDT by Red Badger (Want to be surprised? Google your own name......Want to have fun? Google your friend's names........)
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To: 1rudeboy

Mine’s made of nylon (I think)..........


13 posted on 07/03/2013 7:32:05 AM PDT by Red Badger (Want to be surprised? Google your own name......Want to have fun? Google your friend's names........)
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To: RJS1950

A durable flag for outside use would be great; what’s the problem?

<><><><><

I’m assuming your question is rhetorical. You know (I believe) exactly what the problem is.

There are low information folks on every side of the political equation. To some, hemp = marijuana, and hemp products are the proverbial camel’s nose under the tent.


14 posted on 07/03/2013 7:32:38 AM PDT by dmz
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To: Aevery_Freeman

Thomas Jefferson grew hemp.


15 posted on 07/03/2013 7:32:39 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Incorrectly folded as well.


16 posted on 07/03/2013 7:33:17 AM PDT by Colonel_Flagg (Army dad. And damned proud of it.)
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To: Red Badger

I have no idea. To me, a printed flag is a cheap flag. Our flag should be sewn and embroidered.


17 posted on 07/03/2013 7:35:26 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: dmz

Funny that hemp supporters tend to also be marijuana supporters.


18 posted on 07/03/2013 7:35:30 AM PDT by AppyPappy (Obama: What did I not know and when did I not know it?)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

I wonder if the Betsy Ross flag was hemp?................


19 posted on 07/03/2013 7:36:08 AM PDT by Red Badger (Want to be surprised? Google your own name......Want to have fun? Google your friend's names........)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

Indeed! And doesn’t it look pathetic? It’s not red, white, & blue. It’s more powder blue, pink, and acru.


20 posted on 07/03/2013 7:37:01 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Red Badger

I doubt it. I’m sure that Betsy used the finest fabric available to her. The Colonials had wool, cotton, & silk available.


21 posted on 07/03/2013 7:39:25 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

I have absolutely no patience with people who don’t show proper respect for the flag.

It doesn’t bother me so much what the flag is made from but it does bother me that in this picture, it’s already faded before being flown. If that flag were made of a standard material, I wouldn’t fly it.


22 posted on 07/03/2013 7:45:35 AM PDT by Colonel_Flagg (Army dad. And damned proud of it.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

I doubt it was made of silk, as the cost would have been way too prohibitive. Cotton was still hand picked and ginned in The South, so it would have been fairly expensive as well. Wool, I think, is the most likely, if not hemp, mainly because most homespun cloth was wool in those days........


23 posted on 07/03/2013 7:48:49 AM PDT by Red Badger (Want to be surprised? Google your own name......Want to have fun? Google your friend's names........)
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To: AppyPappy

Funny that hemp supporters tend to also be marijuana supporters.

<><><><><

At worst what you’ve demonstrated is the old saw about broken clocks being right twice a day. At its best, you’ve demonstrated that even potheads can have sensible opinions about the nature and use of hemp products.


24 posted on 07/03/2013 7:52:36 AM PDT by dmz
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Big difference between marijuana and hemp. Growing hemp actually hurts marijuana production, because its pollen will cross with marijuana and slash the amount of THC in it. The drug is in the sap exuded by the female plants, so male plants are culled. But hemp produces so much pollen that it would drive all marijuana production indoors.

That being said, hemp is one of the most valuable crops next to corn. Its fiber can be refined into a fine silk-like cloth; it makes a superb paper, far better quality and much longer lasting than wood pulp paper because it is balanced pH. Just these two things alone could make hemp a multi-billion dollar crop in the US, creating tens of thousands of jobs.

It would also drive down the price of lumber, as more wood would be available for it instead of pulp.

Hemp also makes high quality animal fodder, which would drive down the price of meat, which is to a great extent dependent on the price of feed.

Another great thing is that hemp can grow on marginal farmland, not the prime land needed for most food crops. So it would open up vast stretches of land for profitable agriculture. It needs little irrigation, fertilizer or pesticides as well compared to other crops.

Personally, I am pretty indifferent to marijuana, but the potential for hemp agribusiness is too important to our economy to be shunned.


25 posted on 07/03/2013 7:55:49 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: dmz

Hemp products are just that, products made from a weed plant fiber. It is ridiculous to ignore a useful and profitable resource with economic uses just because some stupid people choose to use it for other things out of ignorance.

It is hardly a gateway to drugs and in fact the physiological effects of smoking real hemp would make most people very reluctant to try real “weed” for fear of experiencing the same effects.

In the late 60s I was a teenager in South Dakota and I knew some idiots who tried smoking hemp; something they quickly regretted. Real hippies used to drive across the state enroute to California and could be seen harvesting hemp growing along the old highways. There are still tons of the stuff growing wild from the crops of hemp grown during WWII for rope and canvas. The locals used to laugh at them because they knew they were literally in for a bad trip.

Hemp is not a problem to more than a few who are idiot enough to try smoking it.


26 posted on 07/03/2013 8:10:24 AM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: FlingWingFlyer

“So, instead of burning the flag to “protest” against the war, the hippies will be smoking it to get high. Hmmmm.”

You can’t get high on industrial hemp.


27 posted on 07/03/2013 8:18:59 AM PDT by dljordan (WhoVoltaire: "To find out who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize.")
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

The facts that you cite are pretty much the reason why hemp was banned in 1937. Synthetic materials, synthesized from petroleum, could be patented and controlled by certain multinational corporations which control(led) our congress. Re-legalizing and encouraging hemp production would reduce our need for petroleum. I wonder if DuPont, Weyerhaeuser, and Exxon would support such beneficial legislation?


28 posted on 07/03/2013 8:29:56 AM PDT by Unknowing (Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of their country.)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

You left out that the oil from the seeds make a high quality fuel and also can be refined into other products. As another poster said, hemp was banned due to its potential to compete with DuPont, and other oil/chemical companies.


29 posted on 07/03/2013 9:39:10 AM PDT by jdub (A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government.)
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To: Aevery_Freeman

Its a paradox here about pot.

I gave it up years ago but have little against it.....in moderation

Some here detest it.

Having just been on the PAC coast.... it looks like a lot of dope smoking freak lefties thrive

But here in the south I know scores of pot people

All righties

Regional culture

Pot is not the determinant

Where you live and skin color...religion and maybe ethnicity have more impact


30 posted on 07/03/2013 9:49:29 AM PDT by wardaddy (the next Dark Ages are coming as Western Civilization crumbles with nary a whimper)
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To: Unknowing

Probably not today. Petroleum synthetics are a tiny percentage of their market. More to the point, the paper industry, which is a substantial market component, is still very opposed to legal hemp.


31 posted on 07/03/2013 10:18:59 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: wardaddy
My point was that, when it comes to soft drugs, illegality or legality is determined more by political or financial considerations than detriment to society.

It is not my place to judge as ones use does not affect me - just their behavior.

32 posted on 07/03/2013 11:02:16 AM PDT by Aevery_Freeman (We say "low-information" but we mean "low-intelligence")
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