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Solar system similar to ours discovered: US astronomers
Yahoo! News via Drudge ^ | June 13, 2002 | Yahoo! News staff

Posted on 06/13/2002 4:17:37 PM PDT by Exit 109

Friday June 14, 3:19 AM

Solar system similar to ours discovered: US astronomers

US astronomers announced the discovery of a solar system similar to our own, at a press conference at NASA's headquarters here.

Astronomers said they had identified an extra-solar planet orbiting this star at about the same distance Jupiter orbits the sun. They discovered a total of 15 extra-solar planets.

University of California at Berkley astronomy professor Geoffrey Marcy discovered the star, named 55 Cancri, 15 years ago, jointly with his colleague at Washington's Carnegie Institution Paul Butler.

In 1996, Marcy and Butler announced the discovery of a first planet orbiting 55 Cancri "in 14.6 days at a distance only one-tenth that from Earth to the sun."

55 Cancri is located 41 million light-years from the Earth, in the constellation of Cancer. The star, believed to be around five billion years old, is visible to the naked eye, astronomers said.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 55cancri; catastrophism; crevo; earth; geoffmarcy; goldilocks; goldilocksplanet; goldilockszone; solarsystem; xplanets
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WOW moment for astonomy fans.
1 posted on 06/13/2002 4:17:37 PM PDT by Exit 109
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To: Exit 109
Get those SETI recievers pointing that way!!
2 posted on 06/13/2002 4:24:35 PM PDT by widgysoft
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To: Exit 109
Is that where the Palestinian Bizarros have their own state?
3 posted on 06/13/2002 4:25:04 PM PDT by Argus
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To: Exit 109
Yeah, but do they have digital wristwatches? Do they know where their towels are? Are they all a bunch of froods?
4 posted on 06/13/2002 4:27:56 PM PDT by Teacher317
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To: Teacher317
I'm pretty sure Slartibartfast was responsible for this...does it have fiords?
5 posted on 06/13/2002 4:33:36 PM PDT by Focault's Pendulum
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To: all
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6 posted on 06/13/2002 4:35:10 PM PDT by WIMom
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To: Exit 109
"a first planet orbiting 55 Cancri "in 14.6 days at a distance only one-tenth that from Earth to the sun" That must be Vulcan.
7 posted on 06/13/2002 4:36:11 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: widgysoft
Get those SETI recievers pointing that way!!

And they would be easily pointed, as 55 Cancri is currently visible in binoculars low in the west after sundown.

8 posted on 06/13/2002 4:37:28 PM PDT by Joe Hadenuf
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To: Exit 109
How far is that at warp 9.4?
9 posted on 06/13/2002 4:44:08 PM PDT by det dweller too
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To: Exit 109
How far is that at warp 9.4?
10 posted on 06/13/2002 4:45:50 PM PDT by det dweller too
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To: Focault's Pendulum
Dang, only six minutes for someone to get the references and reply... sci-fi nerds rule!
11 posted on 06/13/2002 4:47:49 PM PDT by Teacher317
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To: Exit 109
55 Cancri is located 41 million light-years from the Earth, in the constellation of Cancer. The star, believed to be around five billion years old, is visible to the naked eye, astronomers said.

More like 41 L.Y. in order for it to be visible -- 41 million is farther than most of the galaxies in our local "neighborhood".

Also, for the solar system to be truly similar to our own, the scientists will have to find evidence of a planet imminently in danger of extinction from greenhouse gases due to the activities of its inhabitants ... ;^)

12 posted on 06/13/2002 5:13:43 PM PDT by mikrofon
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To: Radio_Astronomer; Physicist; Rightwhale
ping
13 posted on 06/13/2002 5:48:55 PM PDT by weikel
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To: weikel
It's close to 100 extrasolar planets now. In 10 years it will be thousands on the way to millions. None like earth.
14 posted on 06/13/2002 5:50:52 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: RightWhale
I think there are a few terran type planets out there( the big problem is that the stars are so damned far away). Also they probably have lots of diseases which we have no resistance to.
15 posted on 06/13/2002 5:55:42 PM PDT by weikel
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To: RightWhale
Do you share my view that a large % of stars have planets in orbit?
16 posted on 06/13/2002 5:56:14 PM PDT by weikel
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To: weikel
There are planets everywhere, most stars have planets and just as many more planets lurk between stars. That's what I think at this moment. There's a lot of earthsize planets of similar composition, but no earthlike planets. Planetary engineers have quite a job ahead getting the subdivisions ready.
17 posted on 06/13/2002 6:00:05 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: Exit 109
Shouldn't this be sourced as, "Agence France-Presse via Yahoo via Drudge"?
18 posted on 06/13/2002 6:01:13 PM PDT by Types_with_Fist
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To: weikel
If liberalism existed on other planets further along than ours, we would find a wasteland and no remaining life. It's main downfall would be their ability to tax money even before the idea of making it exists, a liberal dream.
19 posted on 06/13/2002 6:02:40 PM PDT by Hillarys Gate Cult
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To: RightWhale
If most stars have planets and there are around 200 billion stars( I think thats what Ive heard) in this galaxy alone the odds are there are some worlds with oxygen/nitrogen atmospheres and plantlife( at least I don't think an earthtype world is that improbable).
20 posted on 06/13/2002 6:03:33 PM PDT by weikel
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To: Types_with_Fist
Dang! Shoulda read the fine print.

Guess that means no frog legs for me.

21 posted on 06/13/2002 6:04:02 PM PDT by Exit 109
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To: Exit 109
Don't we hear about one of these extra-solar solar systems being discovered every other month or so?
22 posted on 06/13/2002 6:05:09 PM PDT by JoeSchem
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To: Exit 109
Guess that means no frog legs for me.

Nawwww. I'm sure Drudge would gladly give you some...:-)

23 posted on 06/13/2002 6:07:53 PM PDT by Types_with_Fist
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To: Hillarys Gate Cult
I would hope when civilization reaches a certain level of development liberals( modern not classical) would have been genetically engineered out of existence. Communism( well unless the race has a hive mind like the borg) is already empirically proven as a failed economic system.
24 posted on 06/13/2002 6:09:40 PM PDT by weikel
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To: colorado tanker
"a first planet orbiting 55 Cancri "in 14.6 days at a distance only one-tenth that from Earth to the sun" That must be Vulcan.

In Star Trek lore, Mr. Spock's home planet of Vulcan orbited Epsilon Eridani. Back about two years ago, astronomers reported discovering a planet orbiting that star, also.

25 posted on 06/13/2002 6:09:53 PM PDT by JoeSchem
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To: Exit 109
It doesn't sound all that similar to our solar system. Yes, it's a got a big Jupiter sized planet at about the right distance, but it's also got a really big planet in close to the start too. We've only got a few rocks until you get out to Jupiter. 'Course one of those rocks is a pretty pleasant place.
26 posted on 06/13/2002 6:10:20 PM PDT by El Gato
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To: JoeSchem
From a viewpoint of ETI, all these discoveries are not suitable for life. This particular planet is not anywhere near the "goldilocks zone" i.e. not too hot, not too cold. Geez, this Jupiter size planet is one tenth the distance to their sun as compared to our planet. I am certain that the temperature on this planet would melt lead. With a planet this size the gravity would be incredible. The atmosphere would be enormously heavy and poisonous.

By the way most of the planets that have been discovered so far have highly elliptical orbits. Therefore, long periods of time at extreme cold and shorter periods of time at metal melting temperatures.

Godspeed, The Dilg

27 posted on 06/13/2002 6:34:07 PM PDT by thedilg
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To: thedilg
Only the first ones we have found. Think of the possibilities out there. :-)
28 posted on 06/13/2002 6:44:02 PM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: JoeSchem
"In Star Trek lore, Mr. Spock's home planet of Vulcan orbited Epsilon Eridani. Back about two years ago, astronomers reported discovering a planet orbiting that star, also." Well, if we could just figure out how to simulate a warp drive signature, maybe they'd come visit us!
29 posted on 06/13/2002 6:45:48 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: det dweller too
How far is that at warp 9.4?

If you go by the charts made by some of the "official" Star Trek manuals that estimate how fast a given warp-factor is, it would take about 50 to 100 years to travel 41 million light years at 9.4. Now at 41 light years, it would only take about a day or so.

30 posted on 06/13/2002 6:53:07 PM PDT by Orangedog
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To: Hillarys Gate Cult
I wonder if a species much more advanced than us would want to take issue with our planet and the pollution that we have been beaming out into space for decades...specifically this would be the 20 years of CNN and 50+ years of broadcast television. Let's just hope that they would have a sense of humor and would love to see countless reruns of 'Baywatch.'
31 posted on 06/13/2002 6:59:50 PM PDT by Orangedog
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To: mikrofon
.......OR, the Scientists will have to find a Planet with a Population in "Imminent Danger" of "Self-Immolation," due to the "ravings" of a "Quasi-Religious Group of 'Self-Appointed Prophets of Doom'" who have Parlayed a Dubious collection of "Junk Science" into a "Political Force," & are attempting to create a "Political Power Base" for their own Personal Profit!!

The "Global warming Schtick" has FAR MORE credibility in "Cut-Throat Politics" than it has in Serious Scientific Discussion!!

BEWARE!!--"Global Warming" MAY WELL BE a "House of Cards!!"

Doc

32 posted on 06/13/2002 7:13:36 PM PDT by Doc On The Bay
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To: Orangedog
Um not quite. The interstellar scintillation will "strip" off the modulation and leave only the narrowband carrier without any information. This is why most SETI searches look for that narrowband carrier.
33 posted on 06/13/2002 7:19:49 PM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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34 posted on 06/13/2002 7:20:27 PM PDT by Mo1
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To: Orangedog
It's even faster via power ring!
35 posted on 06/13/2002 7:21:48 PM PDT by GreenLanternCorps
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Comment #36 Removed by Moderator

To: RadioAstronomer
That's what I get for trying to be sarcastic on a propeller-head thread :) I fugured I'd be mocked and teased, but graded?! Guess that's what makes FR so blasted interesting!
37 posted on 06/13/2002 7:55:22 PM PDT by Orangedog
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To: weikel
There is a book titled "Rare Earth" written in the popular style by a couple of actual scientists that points out just how unlikely the combination really is that made earth the great place it is. It's a quick and easy read but has a lot of material, a good overview of the situation as it was known a couple of years ago.
38 posted on 06/13/2002 10:51:02 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: marcleblanc
Why?

A lot of variables and they all have to be just right. We could probably learn how to terraform planets that are close to what we need, but finding another earth among mere billions of galaxies and billions of stars each is an astronomically small probability, one in a quadrillion and that is us.

At the same time, every rocky planet, even those that don't have stars and exist in the near zero temperatures and total darkness between stars probably have some kind of low life forms such as bacteria that need only some heat and some rocks to chew. Most such planets would have some internal heat unless they are really, really old. Even earth has that down in the rock, vast quantities of bacterial life, even more biomass than what is on the surface, bacteria that never saw the light of day.

39 posted on 06/13/2002 11:08:26 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: Orangedog
I fugured I'd be mocked and teased, but graded?!

Oh my. If I came across that way, you have my deepest apologies. I was just trying to impart information. I never in my wildest dreams tried to or even though I was being condescending. :-(

40 posted on 06/14/2002 12:51:18 AM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: Exit 109
This appears to be the 55 Cancri page...


41 posted on 06/14/2002 1:05:09 AM PDT by Redcloak
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To: Exit 109
I understand that astronomers predict the existence of planets around other stars through mathematics and astro-physics. To my knowledge, there is no instrument than can resolve the image of planets around other stars. I hope they can do this in my lifetime. I live in the big city and sometimes I miss the night sky. The moon, a couple of planets, and the brightest stars are all you get.
42 posted on 06/14/2002 1:31:25 AM PDT by Spandau
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To: RadioAstronomer
No offense taken. Sarcasm never comes across in print as it is meant to. I must learn to use it sparingly.
43 posted on 06/14/2002 5:58:52 AM PDT by Orangedog
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To: Exit 109
What a massive waste of time and money.
44 posted on 06/14/2002 8:35:03 AM PDT by That Subliminal Kid
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To: RightWhale
Planetary engineers have quite a job ahead getting the subdivisions ready.

Especially if they have to neutron bomb the place first, as a form of "fumigation".

45 posted on 06/14/2002 8:52:19 AM PDT by adx
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To: That Subliminal Kid
What a massive waste of time and money.

And what would you rather see that money going to? The returns we get from pure scientific research far exceed the initial monetary input. Without pure research and the resultant engineering, we would still be swinging from trees.

46 posted on 06/14/2002 9:09:36 AM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: Orangedog
Thank you for not being angry. :-)
47 posted on 06/14/2002 9:10:10 AM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: det dweller too
How far is that at warp 9.4?

It's the same distance as at any other speed.

48 posted on 06/14/2002 9:12:16 AM PDT by ShadowAce
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To: ShadowAce
It's the same distance as at any other speed.

ROFL! I din't catch that. :-)

49 posted on 06/14/2002 9:46:15 AM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: Spandau
there is no instrument than can resolve the image of planets around other stars

I think it has been done, although the 'planet' would have to be a supermassive one, and probably on the borderline between gas giant and brown dwarf. Wasn't there an image published a few months ago? Just a dot of light, certainly no surface detail. It will be another 10 years before NASA has the instrument in space able to optically resolve extrasolar planetary detail.

50 posted on 06/14/2002 9:57:29 AM PDT by RightWhale
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