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FAS (Fed Am Scientist) Report: Iraqi Precursor Chemicals Stored Separately for Weapon-side Mixing
FAS.org ^ | Federation of American Scientists

Posted on 06/04/2003 6:47:53 AM PDT by HatSteel

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Chemical Weapons Programs

Iraq started research into the production of chemical weapons agents in the 1970s and started batch production of agents in the early 1980s. At that stage, production was heavily reliant on the import of precursor chemicals from foreign suppliers.

In 1982, early in the Iran-Iraq War, the Iraqis used riot control agents to repel Iranian attacks. They progressed to the use of CW agents in mid-1983 with mustard, and in March 1984 with tabun (the first use ever of a nerve agent in war). The Iraqis continued to use chemical weapons until the end of hostilities in August 1988; in addition they introduced the nerve agents sarin and GF late in the war.

In March 1986 UN Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar formally accused Iraq of using chemical weapons against Iran. Citing the report of four chemical warfare experts whom the UN had sent to Iran in February and March 1986, the secretary general called on Baghdad to end its violation of the 1925 Geneva Protocol on the use of chemical weapons. The UN report concluded that "Iraqi forces have used chemical warfare against Iranian forces"; the weapons used included both mustard gas and nerve gas. The report further stated that "the use of chemical weapons appear[ed] to be more extensive [in 1981] than in 1984." Iraq attempted to deny using chemicals, but the evidence, in the form of many badly burned casualties flown to European hospitals for treatment, was overwhelming. By July 1986 it was estimated that Iraqi chemical warfare was responsible for about 10,000 casualties.

Although the Iraqis initially used chemical weapons to prevent defeat and to reduce battlefield losses, they later integrated CW attacks into combined-armed operations designed to regain lost territory and to gain the offensive. Iraq's use of CW in the war with Iran can be divided into three distinct phases:

  1. 1983 to 1986--used in a defensive role; typically to deflect Iranian human-wave assaults. In 1984 Iraq became the first nation to use a nerve agent on the battlefield when it deployed Tabun-filled aerial bombs during the Iran-Iraq war. Some 5,500 Iranians were killed by the nerve agent between March 1984 and March 1985. Tabun kills within minutes. Some 16,000 Iranians were reported killed by the toxic blister agent mustard gas between August 1983 and February 1986.
  2. 1986 to early 1988--iraq adapts use against Iran to disrupt Iranian offensive preparations.
  3. early 1988 to conclusion of the war-- Iraq integrated large nerve agent strikes into its overall offensive during the spring and summer of 1988 leading to the ceasefire.

Iran used chemical weapons late in the war, but never as extensively or successfully as Iraq. The success of Iraqi offensive operations in the southern sector in mid-1988 ultimately caused the Iranians to cease hostilities. The use of chemical weapons contributed to the success of these operations.

The first chemical attacks by Saddam Hussein against civilian populations included attacks launched by Iraqi aircraft against 20 small villages in 1987.

Saddam Hussein's forces reportedly killed hundreds of Iraqi Kurds with chemical agents in the Kurdish town of Halabja in March 1988. The poison gas attack on Halabja was the largest-scale chemical weapons (CW) attack against a civilian population in modern times. Halabja had a population of about 80,000 people who was predominantly Kurdish and had sympathised with Iran during the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s. Troops from the Kurdish Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) entered Halabja on 15th March 1988, accompanied by Iranian revolutionary guards. The Iraqi CW attack began early in the evening of March 16th, when a group of eight aircraft began dropping chemical bombs; the chemical bombardment continued all night. The Halabja attack involved multiple chemical agents -- including mustard gas, and the nerve agents SARIN, TABUN and VX. Some sources report that cyanide was also used.

Mustard Blister Agent

In 1981, Iraq started producing the blister agent mustard (HD). Iraq's earlier declarations of 3,080 tons produced have been reduced in the 1995 disclosure to 2,850 tons. The quality of the mustard agent was good (not less than 80 per cent pure) and was such that the agent could be stored for long periods, either in bulk or in weaponized form. Even years after its production, the mustard agent analysed by the Commission was found to be in good and usable condition.

CS Tear Gas

Research into the production of CS was initiated at the Salman Pak site in the late 1970s and early 1980s for the purposes of riot control. It was conducted under the auspices of the Committee for National Security, not the Armed Forces. A few tons were produced at this site. In the early 1980s, military scale production of CS was started at the Muthanna site. The UN Special Commission has been unable to establish how much CS was produced in total. It is known that RPG-7 rocket- propelled grenades, 250- and 500-gauge bombs and 82mm and 120mm mortar shells were filled with CS, but again the quantity of munitions so filled cannot be established. Consequently, the Commission is unable to establish any kind of material balance for Iraq's CS-related activities.

Nerve Gas

Production of the nerve gases tabun (GA) and sarin (GB) started in 1984 and the method of production changed over time in order to resolve stabilization problems. Iraq's latest declarations have reduced the stated amount of tabun produced from 250 tons to 210 tons and of sarin produced from 812 tons to 790 tons.

The tabun produced was poor, being of a maximum purity of 60 per cent. As a result, the agent did not store well and could only be stored for a limited period. Furthermore, Iraq experienced problems in the production of tabun owing to salt blockages forming in pipes during synthesis. Because of these problems, Iraq refocused its nerve agent research, development and production efforts on sarin (GB/GF).

The sarin produced was also of poor quality (maximum purity of 60 per cent when solvent is taken into account) and so too could only be stored for short periods. In order to overcome this problem, Iraq resorted to a binary approach to weaponization: the precursor chemicals for sarin (DF 2/ and the alcohols cyclohexanol and isopropanol) were stored separately for mixing in the munitions immediately prior to use to produce a mixture of two G-series nerve agents, GB and GF. Given that the locally manufactured DF had a purity of more than 95 per cent and the alcohols were imported and of 100 per cent purity, this process could be expected to yield relatively pure sarin.

Over the period from June 1992 to June 1994, the Commission's Chemical Destruction Group destroyed 30 tons of tabun, 70 tons of sarin and 600 tons of mustard agent, stored in bulk and in munitions.

VX Nerve Agent

Iraq also had a research and development programme for the production of a further nerve agent, VX. According to Iraq's 1995 account, VX was the focus of its research efforts in the period after September 1987. Iraq has stated that between late 1987 and early 1988, a total of 250 tons of phosphorous pentasulphide and 200 tons of di-isopropylamine were imported, these being two key precursors required for the production of VX. For the other precursors required, Iraq claims to have used only approximately 1 ton of methyl phosphonyl chloride (MPC) from a total of 660 tons produced indigenously. The remaining MPC is claimed to have been used to produce DF, then used in GB/GF production. The fourth precursor required for VX, ethylene oxide, was generally available, being a multi- purpose chemical.

Iraq stated in 1995 that it produced a total of only 10 tons of choline from the di-isopropylamine and ethylene oxide and approximately 3 tons of methyl thiophosphonyl dichloride from the phosphorous pentasulphide and methyl phosphonyl chloride. From this, Iraq states that it produced experimental quantities of VX (recently increased to 260 kg from 160 kg). Iraq has recently admitted that three 250-gauge aerial bombs had been filled with VX for experimental purposes.

Iraq claimed that further attempts to produce VX were unsuccessful and the programme was finally abandoned in September 1988. According to Iraq's account, the remaining choline from the 10 tons was burned in early 1988 and the remaining 247 tons of phosphorous pentasulphide was discarded in 1991 by scattering it over an area of land and putting it in pits. Iraq also claimed that 213 tons of di-isopropylamine was destroyed by bombing during the Gulf war. However, while the Commission has found traces of these chemicals at the sites at which Iraq states their destruction occurred, it has not been able to verify the quantities destroyed. Thus, precursors for the production of at least 200 to 250 tons of VX could not be definitively accounted for.

The Commission has supervised the destruction, or verified Iraq's unilateral destruction, of 125 250-gauge bombs and several thousands 120mm mortar shells. In its new declaration, Iraq declared an additional 350 500-gauge and 100 250-gauge aerial bombs filled with CS in 1987.

"Agent-15"

The British government has asserted that Iraq developed large stocks of an incapacitant gas dubbed "Agent- 15". It is apparently a glycollate similar in effect to the agent BZ, an incapacitant once produced by the United States. If this is correct, exposure to about 100 milligrams in aerosolized form would be sufficient to incapacitate. Symptoms, which begin within 30 minutes of exposure and may last several days, include dizziness, vomiting, confusion, stupor, hallucinations, and irrational behavior. The US Army considered BZ to be too unpredictable in its effectiveness to be useful on the battlefield, and all US stocks were destroyed.

Precursor chemical production

In the early stages of its chemical weapons programme, Iraq imported all its precursor chemicals. Over time, however, Iraq sought to obtain the capability to produce indigenously all the precursors required for the production of the agents noted above. Iraq acknowledges that it had or was on the brink of having the capability to produce in quantity the precursors for tabun (GA): D4 and phosphorous oxychloride (POCl3), the sarin/cyclosarin (GB/GF) precursors: methylphosphonyl difluoride (DF), methyl phosphonyl dichloride (MPC), dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP), trimethylphosphite (TMP), hydrogen fluoride (HF), phosphorous trichloride (PCl3) and thionyl chloride (SOCl2). Phosphorous trichloride and thionylchoride are also the main precursors for the production of mustard (HD).

Iraq also had the capability to produce, at least at laboratory scale, sodium sulphide (Na2S) and thiodiglycol (both for sulphur mustard agent production), methyl benzilate (for BZ production), triethanol amine (for nitrogen-mustard agent production) and potassium bifluoride and ammonium bifluoride (for GB/GF production). In addition, Iraq had the capability to produce the VX precursors choline, methyl thiophosphonyl dichloride (MPS) at the least at pilot-plant scale.

Munitions

Iraq has declared that it weaponized for chemical weapons purposes the following munitions: RPG-7 rocket-propelled grenades and 82mm and 120mm mortar shells exclusively for CS; 130mm and 155mm artillery shells for mustard agent; 250- and 500-gauge aerial bombs for mustard, tabun, sarin and CS; 122mm rockets, R-400 and DB-2 aerial bombs for sarin and mixtures of GB/GF; and Al Hussein missile warheads for sarin. Of these, Iraq acquired the capability to produce all of the aerial bomb types listed and the Al Hussein missile warheads and chemical containers for 122mm rockets. It was reliant on imports of the other empty munitions but had the capability to empty conventional artillery shells and aerial bombs for subsequent refill with chemical-weapons agent.

Current Capabilities

Iraq has rebuilt key chemical weapons facilities since 1991. While they are subject to United Nations scrutiny, some could be converted from industrial and commercial use fairly quickly, allowing Iraq to restart limited production of chemical weapons agents. Iraq currently has 41 sites with equipment that could be converted to produce chemical weapons agents and their precursors and four facilities that produced chemical munitions until 1991 and could do so again. At least 30 facilities have infrastructure that could be reconfigured for weapons production. Iraq also has the experience and know-how in large-scale production of chemical weapons agents and sufficient qualified personnel with practical experience in research and development on, and the industrial production of, CW agents. It is also thought that Iraq retains a broad array of chemical-weapons-related items such as precursor chemicals, production equipment, filled munitions, and program documentation, as well as requisite technical expertise. UNSCOM estimated that, under current circumstances, Iraq would be able to organize the production of chemical agents through reconfiguration or relocation of available dual-use material within several days or weeks.

Sources and Resources



FAS | Nuke | Guide | Iraq | CW |||| Index | Search | Join FAS



TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: chemicals; iraq; precursor; warlist; weaponside; wmd
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The sarin produced was also of poor quality (maximum purity of 60 per cent when solvent is taken into account) and so too could only be stored for short periods. In order to overcome this problem, Iraq resorted to a binary approach to weaponization: the precursor chemicals for sarin (DF 2/ and the alcohols cyclohexanol and isopropanol) were stored separately for mixing in the munitions immediately prior to use to produce a mixture of two G-series nerve agents, GB and GF. Given that the locally manufactured DF had a purity of more than 95 per cent and the alcohols were imported and of 100 per cent purity, this process could be expected to yield relatively pure sarin.
1 posted on 06/04/2003 6:47:54 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: HatSteel
There is no doubt regarding the Iraqi use of wmd's prior to Gulf War I, nor is there any doubt that Iraqi wmd's were found/admitted in the Unscom period.

Weapon-side mixing, missile-side mixing, just-in-time productions --- whatever you choose to call it --- would be an excellent strategy for Hussein who never wanted to get caught with provable chemical weapons.

That is why we should look for the PRECURSOR chemicals and NOT JUST for the pure CHEMICAL WEAPON.

That is why we should begin to educate the American public on this issue.

Incidentally, that is why there also are MOBILE anthrax labs. They never had stocks. Instead, the point was just-in-time, missile-side production of their deadly agent.

2 posted on 06/04/2003 6:52:36 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; FairOpinion; knighthawk; Howlin; BOBTHENAILER; Grampa Dave
The regular media and the Bush-haters will probably ignore this--as they have the roving chem labs, the mustard and sarin in the Tigris River, and other WMD finds (that they keep insisting were never found).

3 posted on 06/04/2003 6:55:41 AM PDT by MizSterious (Support whirled peas!)
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To: HatSteel
In the same way that DESKSIDE PUBLISHING made the home computer such a revolutionary tool, so has WEAPONSIDE MIXING made chemical/biological weaponry the easiest WMD to deny the existence of by a guilty country. Missile-side mixing. Just-in-time production
4 posted on 06/04/2003 6:56:47 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: MizSterious
Why don't you post what links you have or can remember/research? I've always found the threads which compile links to be really useful.
5 posted on 06/04/2003 7:01:27 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: HatSteel
"WEAPONSIDE MIXING made chemical/biological weaponry the easiest WMD to deny the existence of by a guilty country. Missile-side mixing. Just-in-time production."

Yeah, especially when the precursors are so benign. Isopropanol = rubbing alcohol. I have WMD in my bathroom cabinet!
6 posted on 06/04/2003 7:03:21 AM PDT by RightOnTheLeftCoast
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To: VaBthang4; 68-69TonkinGulfYatchClub; Blueflag; Travis McGee; aristeides; mhking; Jeff Head
ping
7 posted on 06/04/2003 7:03:33 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: HatSteel

Thanks for finding this and posting it.
8 posted on 06/04/2003 7:05:51 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: RightOnTheLeftCoast
Of course you realize that other chemicals are used in addition to the alcohols. The question is this: what ingredients are necessary? What is the mixing process? How long does it take?

The other serious precursor chemicals are plausibly denied as insecticide or drug production.

9 posted on 06/04/2003 7:06:44 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: MizSterious; Ernest_at_the_Beach; BOBTHENAILER
A few weeks ago, I posted reply to one of our threads that it was very obvious that the Iraqis with their mobile chem 101 labs had a matrix/template of how to make WMDs on demand.

The mobile lab would drive up to a hidden missile or artillery site, the precursors from pesticides to herbicides would be in barrels by the missile/artillery.

The Iraqi Chem 101 grads would make the bad stuff. It would be transfered to the missiles/shells.

Then, the Mobile Chem 101 Lab would drive away to the next site.
10 posted on 06/04/2003 7:10:57 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave
No problem. If the process required, say, 10 chemicals that are otherwise not violations; how long would it take the US military (if they had such a program) to bring 10 chemicals from separate sites to various specific sites that also had delivery systems for wmds?

If you have 100 delivery sites, you'd need 1000 vehicles, a coordination plan, and a recipe for mixing on site, and perhaps, machinery/technology for mixing on site.

11 posted on 06/04/2003 7:12:15 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: HatSteel
More than likely the products needed would be at the site or close by in the basement of a hospital. One truck could get the material from there to the site if needed.

First, they would get the barrels there. Then the mobile chem 101 lab would show up. The stuff would be processed and transferred. The mobile chem lab would probably leave and the trained post chem lab guys would load the stuff into the containers of the missiles/shells.

Massive amounts of the finalized product would not be necessary. A couple of barrels of final product would be enough for that site.

Remember all of those WMD suits that were found all over Iraq in the early part of the war. This is why they were stored all over.
12 posted on 06/04/2003 7:25:05 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave
However they organized it, it really wouldn't be that hard to do. It also makes perfect sense in terms of avoiding detection. It is a program that turns the legal into the illegal in a matter of hours. It's the perfect get-around.
13 posted on 06/04/2003 7:27:48 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: HatSteel
You nailed it with this last reply of yours: However they organized it, it really wouldn't be that hard to do. It also makes perfect sense in terms of avoiding detection. It is a program that turns the legal into the illegal in a matter of hours. It's the perfect get-around.
14 posted on 06/04/2003 7:30:58 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: HatSteel
Well sure. My point is that, as far as the NY Times is concerned, the most we'll find will be a barrel of "rubbing alcohol" and a barrel of "insecticide" and maybe some "baby milk".
15 posted on 06/04/2003 7:46:50 AM PDT by RightOnTheLeftCoast
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To: Grampa Dave
"The Iraqi Chem 101 grads would make the bad stuff. It would be transfered to the missiles/shells."

Unless I'm mistaken, I think we found "mixing" equipment at a site along with missiles. The missiles used liquid propellants - UDMH and nitrogen tetroxide.....which are NOT mixed prior to fueling the missile therefore the mixing equipment had another purpose.

16 posted on 06/04/2003 7:51:50 AM PDT by Ben Hecks
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To: RightOnTheLeftCoast
Excellent points. I just missed them the first time around. :>) (My wife says you gotta hit me in the head before I "get it.")
17 posted on 06/04/2003 7:53:30 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: Ben Hecks
I remember that, too. You don't recall the links for that, do you?
18 posted on 06/04/2003 7:54:24 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: Ben Hecks
I think that you are correct.

SOS Powell spent a lot of time at the UN documenting and showing pictures of the suspected Mobile Labs during his UN session.

At that time, I thought, "Why is he spending so much time on this!"

Now we know.
19 posted on 06/04/2003 7:54:52 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave
We also have found several suspicious missiles / munitions with plugs in the end for instilling substances. Some of them with up to three plugs, Russian made. Might fit with the one-stop mobile lab approach.

Prairie
20 posted on 06/04/2003 8:14:45 AM PDT by prairiebreeze (We will not deny, ignore or pass our problems along to other Presidents. ---GWBush)
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To: HatSteel
Nice find. The comments and theories make sense. Now just need some of the captives to listen to some more Barney and Metallica and they can explain it....
21 posted on 06/04/2003 8:16:19 AM PDT by eureka! (Rats and Presstitutes lie--they have to in order to survive.....)
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To: eureka!; Grampa Dave; prairiebreeze
check this out. Just posted. Belgium Finds Nerve Gas Ingredient in Letters
22 posted on 06/04/2003 8:21:12 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: prairiebreeze
Thanksf for reminding us of these findings.

The mobile chem lab guys could pump the newly created bad stuff into those containers after the plugs were removed and replace the plugs.

Or they could pump the new bad stuff into some other containers and have them available for a fast transfer into the containers of the missiles or shells.
23 posted on 06/04/2003 8:22:01 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: HatSteel
Just saw that. We will see more in the future. BTW, welcome aboard to FR. This is a special place....
24 posted on 06/04/2003 8:23:57 AM PDT by eureka! (Rats and Presstitutes lie--they have to in order to survive.....)
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To: MizSterious; Ernest_at_the_Beach; FairOpinion; knighthawk; Howlin; BOBTHENAILER; Grampa Dave; ...
and other WMD finds (that they keep insisting were never found).

Paging all those who feel we were LIED to by the evil Bush Administration.

25 posted on 06/04/2003 8:27:18 AM PDT by BOBTHENAILER (One by one, we're ridding the world of vermin. RATs are next!!)
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To: HatSteel; MissMillie
In order to overcome this problem, Iraq resorted to a binary approach to weaponization: the precursor chemicals for sarin (DF 2/ and the alcohols cyclohexanol and isopropanol) were stored separately for mixing in the munitions immediately prior to use to produce a mixture of two G-series nerve agents, GB and GF. Given that the locally manufactured DF had a purity of more than 95 per cent and the alcohols were imported and of 100 per cent purity, this process could be expected to yield relatively pure sarin.

Nice post hatsteel. Miss Millie, this might interest you.

26 posted on 06/04/2003 8:29:41 AM PDT by BOBTHENAILER (One by one, we're ridding the world of vermin. RATs are next!!)
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To: HatSteel
I don't have a link to a FR thread but this might help:

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/world/Primetime/iraq_barrels030426.html
27 posted on 06/04/2003 8:31:47 AM PDT by Ben Hecks
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To: HatSteel
Thanks, that is an interesting link and ties in with your thread here.

Welcome to FR! I don't remember seeing any posts or replies from you. This is an excellent thread/find.
28 posted on 06/04/2003 8:36:21 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: HatSteel
FAS (Fed Am Scientist) Report: Iraqi Precursor Chemicals Stored Separately for Weapon-side Mixing

D'OH !

i hope this report can be translated using very tiny words for the benefit of the Hollyweird crowd, the media midgets, Democrats, Progressives, Peace Activists and other assorted fruits and nuts.

One can only hope.
But they still won't get it.

29 posted on 06/04/2003 8:45:53 AM PDT by Publius6961 (Californians are as dumm as a sack of rocks)
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To: HatSteel; BOBTHENAILER; hchutch; Dog; Dog Gone; Ernest_at_the_Beach
Here is another new thread that ties right in with this thread.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/922763/posts

Banned missile programme found in Iraq
The Associated Press ^ | 6/4/03


Posted on 06/03/2003 10:51 PM PDT by LdSentinal


LONDON (AFP) - US and British experts have discovered that Iraq was developing a banned missile, capable of reaching Israel and other parts of the Middle East, the Times reported, quoting "senior government sources".

The right-of-centre newspaper said it understood British Prime Minister Tony Blair , who has called for patience in the search for Iraq's alleged weapons of mass destruction, has been told that rocket motors for the missiles have been found.

Sources told the paper that in the past few weeks weapons experts discovered that the Abu Ghraib military base near Baghdad was developing a weapon with a range of about 960 kilometres (600 miles).

Under limits set by the UN Security Council, Iraq was allowed to missiles with a range of up to 150 kilometres only, The Times said.


30 posted on 06/04/2003 9:10:43 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Ben Hecks
Thanks, it does help. I've added it to my links list.
31 posted on 06/04/2003 9:13:08 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: BOBTHENAILER
Paging all those who feel we were LIED to by the evil Bush Administration.

Since you included me I must assume you feel I fall into the above group. WRONG! Just because I happen to disagree with Rummy on one area does not mean I disagree in all areas. You are reading way more into comments than are there.

32 posted on 06/04/2003 9:14:52 AM PDT by SLB
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To: Ben Hecks
Posted here:

Suspicious Iraqi Drums - UPDATE

33 posted on 06/04/2003 9:15:21 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Where is Saddam? and his Weapons of Mass Destruction?)
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To: Grampa Dave
Weapon-Side Mixing (WSM) of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) = Bush Doctrine Preemption(BPJ)

WSM of WMD = BPJ

34 posted on 06/04/2003 9:26:24 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: HatSteel; Grampa Dave; BOBTHENAILER; MizSterious
Diging around for some articles:

2 trailers deemed biological arms labs

35 posted on 06/04/2003 9:37:31 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Where is Saddam? and his Weapons of Mass Destruction?)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Another one:

IRAQ: U.S. Analysts Link Iraq Labs to Germ Arms

This from the New York times.

36 posted on 06/04/2003 9:41:37 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Where is Saddam? and his Weapons of Mass Destruction?)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Ernest, these are excellent. Thanks.
37 posted on 06/04/2003 9:45:28 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Earlier find:

Suspected bioweapons labs found

38 posted on 06/04/2003 9:49:28 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Where is Saddam? and his Weapons of Mass Destruction?)
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To: HatSteel
I think we already found the precursor chemicals when they discovered those barrels of "pesticide."

Because yeah, Iraqi military bases really need huge drums of pesticide, just in case. You know, attack by 50 foot locusts and such.
39 posted on 06/04/2003 9:50:54 AM PDT by Skywalk
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To: backhoe; HatSteel
BH do you have any indexing of the mobile chem labs in Iraq re articles before, during and after the war?
40 posted on 06/04/2003 9:52:08 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave
This ties directly to Pres. Bush saying yesterday (day before?) that WMDs HAD BEEN FOUND. He then cited the "mobile weapons labs."

It makes perfect sense given weapon-side mixing of chem and bio.

It would be like the cops looking for amphetamines and ignoring the discovery of a production lab with all the precursor chemicals --- just because at that point in time there weren't any fully prepared amphetamines on site!

But cops are FAR smarter than democRATs.

41 posted on 06/04/2003 10:08:57 AM PDT by HatSteel
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To: HatSteel
What you posted will become obvious to those with a brain.

The professional hate GW crews on the left and right will never see it.
42 posted on 06/04/2003 10:09:35 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Skywalk
Some farmer/rancher noted on a circulating email that I got during the war re the barrels of pesticides, herbicides and pure alcohol listed as found: That you could treat all of California's farms and ranchs for a few years. I wished that I had kept that email.
43 posted on 06/04/2003 10:12:26 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; HatSteel
Here are some more:

WARNING: Gathering WMD storm a crock. See what Clinton told nation in 1998...

THE ROAD ENDS FOR WMD ON WHEELS

Coalition forces enter possible WMD site

Initial tests suggest WMD "cocktail" found in Iraq (**Of special note--post #58, by Archy)

U.S. finds new evidence of Iraqi WMD (NBC training school, antidotes)

Chem-weapons lab believed discovered

BRITS' CHILLING CHEM-NUKE FIND

CAPTURED FOES FOUND WITH CHEM-WAR GEAR

EUPHRATES 'POISONED'

MSNBC - Cyanide & Mustard Agents Found in Euphrates River

Is the Activity at Al Qaim Related to Nuclear Efforts?

U.S. probing nuclear facility (Al Tuwaitha Follow Up)

Team Inspects suspected plutonium site (update by the journalist who broke original story, NEW info)

Underground Nuclear Facility Found in Iraq

Marines hold Iraqi nuclear site built by French

U.S. Marines Guard Secret Iraqi City with Very Hot Nuclear Radiation Levels

These are some I found, but it should also be mentioned that a search on "chem" "nuclear" "nuke" and "WMD" will turn up many more. Also "plutonium."

44 posted on 06/04/2003 10:13:25 AM PDT by MizSterious (Support whirled peas!)
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To: HatSteel
This is an excellent analogy:

It would be like the cops looking for amphetamines and ignoring the discovery of a production lab with all the precursor chemicals --- just because at that point in time there weren't any fully prepared amphetamines on site!

45 posted on 06/04/2003 10:13:37 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: archy
Archy, meant to ping you to #44, since I mentioned one of your posts from another thread!
46 posted on 06/04/2003 10:15:37 AM PDT by MizSterious (Support whirled peas!)
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To: Grampa Dave
Freeper "Archy" had noted that back in early April--great post by him on the thread mentioned above.
47 posted on 06/04/2003 10:17:20 AM PDT by MizSterious (Support whirled peas!)
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To: Grampa Dave; sharktrager; backhoe
OK , got this (see post #2)

IRAQ: Irrigation problems could affect grain crop in southern Iraq: FAO

And this:

IRAQ: It’s Springtime in Baghdad

And see post #8 by sharktrager !!!!!!!

48 posted on 06/04/2003 10:21:26 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Where is Saddam? and his Weapons of Mass Destruction?)
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To: HatSteel; MizSterious; Skywalk
See above Links at pst #48!
49 posted on 06/04/2003 10:24:12 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Where is Saddam? and his Weapons of Mass Destruction?)
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To: BOBTHENAILER
Got more!
50 posted on 06/04/2003 10:25:13 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Where is Saddam? and his Weapons of Mass Destruction?)
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