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New Device Offers A Peek At Our Deeply Buried Past
The Miami Herald of Miami, Florida ^ | June 22, 2003 | Martin Merzer

Posted on 06/27/2003 11:25:09 PM PDT by goody2shooz

Mark Grasmueck can see underground and, without hardly anyone noticing, he has been peeking below downtown Miami.

Grasmueck, a University of Miami geophysicist, is quietly working with archaeologists on the planned One Miami development in the heart of Miami just north of the Dupont Plaza hotel -- a site that almost certainly harbors ancient treasure.

What he sees as far as 20 feet under the asphalt -- and how he sees it -- could revolutionize archaeology, help experts assure the purity of our drinking water and reveal new details of South Florida's 120,000-year-old limestone foundation.

''The deeper you go, the more back in time you go,'' said Grasmueck, a slim, bespectacled assistant professor who was born and educated in Switzerland.

So you can see underground? ''Yes,'' he said.

You are Superman? ``Well, not exactly.''

Grasmueck, 36, has developed a device that he slowly and methodically pulls backward like a reverse lawn mower, each time targeting a four-inch strip of ground.

A particularly sophisticated form of ground-penetrating radar, the device visually slices the earth into fine layers. When reassembled, the exquisitely thin images create a movie that takes the viewer on an underground tour.

He tested his ground-breaking technology two years ago near Coconut Grove, creating a one-minute subterranean view of Ingraham Terrace Park.

FINE-TUNING

Now, he and noted archaeologist Robert Carr are fine-tuning the device in downtown Miami, hoping it will help them find ancient pottery, primitive tools and other artifacts below the six acres of parking lots north of the Dupont Plaza.

A 24-second movie produced by Grasmueck already has identified promising archaeological targets there, perhaps evidence left by the now extinct Tequesta Indians who carved the Miami Circle on the other side of the Miami River.

The film shows a possible pattern of post holes and even possible burial sites, though other explanations -- including natural solution holes -- are possible. More precise analysis of the images is under way, and Carr is preparing to ''ground-truth'' the findings by digging up areas pinpointed by the film.

''I was stunned when I saw this,'' Carr said. ``He produces what appears to be an X-ray movie of what's below the ground. It's like the greatest science fiction film you ever saw. Nothing like this has ever been done in the history of archaeology.''

Now destined to become the site of luxury condominiums, stores and offices, the land once was covered by the main Tequesta village. Also here over past centuries were a Tequesta burial mound, early Spanish forts, the 19th century Fort Dallas and the Royal Palm Hotel.

Under one corner of the site, Carr and his team already have found pottery shards, musket balls and discarded animal bones and shells.

''We haven't found anything highly unusual yet, but we know we're on the right track,'' he said.

That exploration was conducted the way archaeology always has been conducted: by guessing and digging. But the need to perform labor-intensive, large-scale excavations might be eliminated -- if Grasmueck's technology works.

On May 25, he and a team of four scientists methodically pulled his device through 200 passes -- called transects -- over a 66-foot-by-76-foot grid in a parking lot between Southeast Second and Third streets and Second and Third avenues. It took them all day.

Basically, the machine and its antennae transmit electromagnetic pulses that can penetrate the ground. Return echoes, collected by a receiver, appear slightly different at each survey location, depending on the precise nature of the material they intercept.

When assembled by a sophisticated computer program and analyzed by Grasmueck and his team, the data can point archaeologists to the most promising areas for limited excavation.

The computer ''stacks'' the images in a cube, then slices the cube horizontally, providing the viewer with the illusion of embarking on an underground trip.

As the voyage unfolds, anomalies -- small circles that might be post holes, oblong shapes that could be graves, and other irregularities -- come into view.

''What gives us echoes are changes in soil type and moisture content, and rocks and pipes and artifacts,'' Grasmueck said. ``Everything that is different from the surrounding material gives a return, an echo.''

Some antennae can send waves as deep as 100 feet under Florida, but at a cost in clarity. Such penetrations might soon be used to track salt-water intrusion into South Florida's water table and to help reconstruct the formation of the region's foundations.

For the One Miami site, Grasmueck chose antennae that balanced depth with clarity, providing what laymen might consider a somewhat muddy image but one that he and other experts consider remarkably clear.

''Here you see the asphalt,'' Grasmueck said, looking at the film in his office at UM's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science on Virginia Key, ``and then they put in a bit of crushed rock and the soil and the midden deposits that Bob Carr is after and then the Miami oolite limestone.''

TREASURE CHEST

Midden is the black, earth-like substance formed by the debris of ancient cultures. It is the treasure chest of local archaeologists.

Carr and Grasmueck have formed a symbiotic professional relationship. Carr, who helped discover the Miami Circle and often conducts urban archaeology as bulldozers lurk close, needs tools that will make his work more efficient. Grasmueck must rely on Carr to help him test or ''ground-truth'' his device by seeing what is really under the site.

In about a month, Carr plans to use photos and maps developed by Grasmueck as an underground guide to the One Miami site.

Said Carr: ``This is very exciting. We're developing the language of how to interpret this kind of data. Nothing like this has ever been done in archaeology.''

Grasmueck, asked whether he plans to be on site when Carr tests the new system, said: ``Yes, of course. I'm very curious to see what comes out of that ground.''


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: archaeology; economic; geophysics; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; miami; miamiriver; radar; tequesta; tequestatribe
I thought this was pertinent in light of the problems we're having finding WMD in Iraq, particularly if it is buried versus sent to Syria or Libya.
1 posted on 06/27/2003 11:25:09 PM PDT by goody2shooz
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To: goody2shooz
Very useful technology - thanks for posting this.
2 posted on 06/27/2003 11:39:34 PM PDT by 11B3 (We live in "interesting times". Indeed.)
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To: goody2shooz
Trying to figure out what's new about his device. Ground penetrating radar has been around for years. Must be the software?
3 posted on 06/27/2003 11:51:57 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: goody2shooz
"I thought this was pertinent in light of the problems we're having finding WMD in Iraq, particularly if it is buried versus sent to Syria or Libya.

. . .a humbling investigation. . .and a good point for discovery of WMD. . .wonder if they have even considered this. . .

4 posted on 06/28/2003 12:17:13 AM PDT by cricket
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To: goody2shooz
"Midden is the black, earth-like substance formed by the debris of ancient cultures"

Etymology: Middle English midding, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse myki dung & Old Norse dyngja manure pile -- more at DUNG
Date: 14th century

Yep, archaeologist are just dumpster divers at heart.
5 posted on 06/28/2003 12:40:18 AM PDT by NotQuiteCricket (flexstand.com)
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To: LibWhacker
"Must be the software?"

I suspect it is a combination of increased resolution and the software. Sounds like the equivalent of MRI for archaeologists.

If the prototype is THIS good, think what it'll be like after a few years of development.

6 posted on 06/28/2003 3:45:11 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel)
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To: NotQuiteCricket
"Yep, archaeologist are just dumpster divers at heart."

From Amazon.com:

Rubbish!: The Archaeology of Garbage by William Rathje, Cullen Murphy (Contributor), William Ratheje"

"One of the central tenets of the University of Arizona's Garbage Project is that "what people have owned--and thrown away--can speak more eloquently, informatively, and truthfully about the lives they lead than they themselves ever may." Project garbologists have alchemized more than 250,000 pounds of refuse--from landfills and from trash cans in selected neighborhoods--into a treasure trove for experts in marketing and consumer research, census studies and environmentalism. Garbologists have determined that people waste three times more beef when the meat is in short supply than when it is plentiful; that many women use birth-control pills incorrectly; and that lower-income families consistently buy small-size, brand-name products rather than cheaper generic ones. Erudite and witty cultural tour guides, Rathje, an archeologist and anthropologist who directs the Project, and Atlantic managing editor Murphy claim that our garbage problems are solvable; that, with proper safeguards, incineration may be a viable option in some communities; and that paper--not disposable diapers or fast-food packaging--is a chief culprit in overloading landfills. Illustrated. First serial to Smithsonian; BOMC and QPB alternates; author tour."

7 posted on 06/28/2003 3:49:52 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel)
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To: goody2shooz
Whatever happened to the HAARP project which was capable of looking very deep into the earth? I think they used atmospheric heating to create a lens on the order of 30 miles wide they could bounce radar off to look down anywhere they wished.
8 posted on 06/28/2003 4:38:00 AM PDT by ALS (http://designeduniverse.com Debunking Darwin since the beginning of time... :)
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To: blam
fyi
9 posted on 06/28/2003 5:15:50 PM PDT by John Beresford Tipton
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To: NotQuiteCricket
"Yep, archaeologist are just dumpster divers at heart."

Be nice.

10 posted on 06/28/2003 6:34:36 PM PDT by blam
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To: goody2shooz
''I was stunned when I saw this,'' Carr said. ``He produces what appears to be an X-ray movie of what's below the ground. It's like the greatest science fiction film you ever saw. Nothing like this has ever been done in the history of archaeology.''

Well now, perhaps we'll finally be able to find out if any hidden chambers or treasures still exist below the great pyramids and the Sphinx ;-)

11 posted on 06/28/2003 6:48:12 PM PDT by varon
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To: goody2shooz
Also here over past centuries were a Tequesta burial mound, early Spanish forts, the 19th century Fort Dallas and the Royal Palm Hotel.

Ahhh, yes. The Royal Palm Hotel of the early-20th century era.
12 posted on 06/28/2003 6:50:52 PM PDT by July 4th
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To: blam
I was just going to ping you. I want one of these, how about you? Arrowhead hunting would be a lead-pipe cinch.
13 posted on 06/28/2003 6:55:03 PM PDT by Ditter
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To: NotQuiteCricket
About ten years ago, they shut down Boston's "Big Dig" because
they came across the subterranean end of a long forgotten
outhouse.

The shutdown cost some like $1.3M or 3.1M for the day so the
dumpster divers could go wild, and maybe even bring up some
long dormant virus or bacteria.

14 posted on 06/28/2003 7:06:12 PM PDT by Calvin Locke
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To: Ditter
"Arrowhead hunting would be a lead-pipe cinch."

Perhaps.

The anthropologist in me wants to know the origin and meaning of 'a lead pipe cinch?'

15 posted on 06/28/2003 9:11:01 PM PDT by blam
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To: LibWhacker
Good point. Might indeed be the software.
16 posted on 06/28/2003 11:16:49 PM PDT by goody2shooz
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To: ALS
Um, I believe there were some unforeseen side affects on the Whale and Dolphin populations. The Navy dropped it like a hot potato.
17 posted on 06/28/2003 11:18:51 PM PDT by goody2shooz
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To: goody2shooz
You could be thinking of something else.

HAARP

18 posted on 06/29/2003 8:47:48 AM PDT by ALS (http://designeduniverse.com Debunking Darwin since the beginning of time... :)
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To: Ditter
Lead Pipe Cinch

Today we present yet another chapter in our search for the origins of the phrase "lead pipe cinch," meaning a task or accomplishment that is so easy as to be a certainty. Previous theories put forward have included using a lead pipe as a threat to ensure cooperation, as well as the use of a lead pipe as a means of "deflating" a horse which has puffed up its belly to avoid being "cinched" and saddled. Now J.R. Latimer, a reader in Mexico, and Dennis Engbring, from Green Bay, WI, have both e-mailed to me a very convincing "plumbing- based" explanation for the term. Mr. Latimer goes further and deflates the "horse" theory. Mr. Latimer writes:

"I lived for many years in Africa where often one found an older, low-tech form of plumbing. Lead piping was/is used to make critical junctures, and it is "cinched" to the pieces it connects, i.e., the faucet/tap and the incoming pipe. This makes for a very sure, no- leak joint, and to my understanding, the technique has been used since Roman times. Thus the expression "lead pipe cinch" meaning a sure thing or absolutely.

"As for using a pipe to cinch up a saddle, it seems unlikely. I spent some time in a combat active cavalry unit and the standard method to deflate a horse was to kick it in the belly and when it exhaled you pulled the cinch tight. It sounds cruel, but it almost seemed a game for the horse -- anyway, most of the horses don't do this. Growing up in Texas I don't recall ever seeing a pipe laying around a corral and NEVER have I heard of a cowboy or horse soldier carrying one. I suspect the twisting pipe method would get an admiring glance from an inquisitor, but would receive guffaws or worse from other riders. Also, the twisting cinch would pinch the horse, possibly injuring it a place that also gets rubbed. Not good."

19 posted on 06/29/2003 9:51:22 AM PDT by blam
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To: blam
LOL Is this quest for the origins of "lead pipe cinch" a new one, or did I get you going? I have always thought it was the first one. Meaning, "do it my way or I'll bash you with this lead pipe". Who would not comply to this?
20 posted on 06/29/2003 4:06:23 PM PDT by Ditter
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To: blam
a very sure, no-leak joint

My guess:
Lead, or plumbum from which the word for plumbing, is very malleable, which means joints between lead pipe sections or lead pipes and fixtures can be hammered or compressed until they seal reasonably well. Lead corrodes and leaches, however, so lead plumbing will need repair eventually as joints reopen. It was as good a joint as could be had until copper, solder, and teflon tape for threaded joints in brass or iron pieces or welding of steel pipes.

21 posted on 06/29/2003 4:19:12 PM PDT by RightWhale (gazing at shadows)
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To: goody2shooz
Like a CAT scan. Imagine what will be found when the entire surface of the planet is scanned 20 feet deep.
22 posted on 06/29/2003 4:20:54 PM PDT by RightWhale (gazing at shadows)
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To: goody2shooz
I could use this guy in my backyard. A couple of years ago, a bolt from my lawn mower fell off (one of the ones that holds the handle together) and it's been missing ever since. Really annoys the heck out of me. For now, I have a regular bolt with a nut holding the handle in place but I cannot put the plastic wing nut on it because it doesn't thread right. I think it's a different size. So now I must suffer with the nut and bolt (requiring tools to get it apart) until either I find the bolt or I get a new lawn mower.
23 posted on 06/29/2003 4:23:08 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (Back in boot camp! 256 (-44))
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To: blam
I believe it comes from the use of a solder-type material (lead/tin alloy) that, when slipped over a wire rope and then pulled back over a loop made in the rope and crimped forms a "cinch."

Tip: look at your keychain, there's a good chance it resembles this.

24 posted on 06/29/2003 5:14:36 PM PDT by Old Professer
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To: Ditter; RightWhale
"Is this quest for the origins of "lead pipe cinch" a new one, or did I get you going? "

You got me started. I suspected it had something to do with plumbing. When I was a kid, my dad would use flax and melted lead to seal cast iron drain pipes. I liked playing with the melted lead.

25 posted on 06/29/2003 5:17:54 PM PDT by blam
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To: SamAdams76
E-mail me your address and I will send you a replacement screw with the wingnut, gratis (used, of course).

My e-mail addy is in my profile.

26 posted on 06/29/2003 5:19:30 PM PDT by Old Professer
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To: blam
I believe the rope-like material was called oakum.
27 posted on 06/29/2003 5:21:44 PM PDT by Old Professer
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To: Old Professer
Wow, that's very kind of you. I will send you my address. But I don't need the wingnut, I still have that. What I need is just the bolt.

28 posted on 06/29/2003 5:23:44 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (Back in boot camp! 256 (-44))
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To: varon
They probably already know...
29 posted on 06/29/2003 5:30:01 PM PDT by plusone
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To: July 4th
LOL!! Your comment brings to mind an Eddie Izzard bit:

"Yes, and, um, I grew up in Europe, where the history comes from. ... You tell your history, “Damn, man! 30 years old, let’s smash her to the floor and put a car park here!” I have seen it in stories. I saw, you know, something in…a program on something in Miami. And they were saying, “We’ve redecorated this building to how it looked over fifty years ago!” And people were going, “No, surely not, no. No one was alive then.”
30 posted on 06/29/2003 5:30:56 PM PDT by stands2reason
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To: Ditter; RightWhale
I'm re-reading James Burke's book, The Day The Universe Changed. I'm amazed at the number of things we still say and do that go back a thousand years or more.

For example: Our 'reading of the will' has it's origins in the king's court where no-one knew how to read and all written documents were read out loud in the court. The king employed a reader and a writer and (According to Burke) the reader could not write and the writer could not read. All reading in those days were read out loud and when a monk was seen reading something without moving his lips, people were astonished.

My grandad used to sit on his porch in the swing and read his bible out loud...even when no-one was present.

31 posted on 06/29/2003 5:36:19 PM PDT by blam
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To: Old Professer
"I believe the rope-like material was called oakum."

LOL, I'm sure you're correct, dad called it flax. (It was rope like)

32 posted on 06/29/2003 5:39:51 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
Years ago my husband found something explaining old nursery rhymes. The only one I can remember now was "Ring around the rosey pocketful of poseys, we all fall down". It came from the middle ages in Europe & it refers to dying of the plague.
33 posted on 06/29/2003 5:43:32 PM PDT by Ditter
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To: Ditter
"Years ago my husband found something explaining old nursery rhymes. The only one I can remember now was "Ring around the rosey pocketful of poseys, we all fall down". "

"Ring around the Rosy, pocket full of posies, upstairs, downstairs, we all fall down." I tracked this down also. I knew it was related to the plague but could not figure out the 'upstairs-downstairs' part.
"Upstairs - Downstairs" relates to economics...the more affluent lived upstairs (out of the muck/garbage/refuge, stench on the street) and the poor lived downstairs. That statement implied that the plague affected everyone equally...the rich and the poor.

34 posted on 06/29/2003 5:52:42 PM PDT by blam
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To: ALS
Whatever happened to the HAARP project which was capable of looking very deep into the earth? I think they used atmospheric heating to create a lens on the order of 30 miles wide they could bounce radar off to look down anywhere they wished.

Well, that's one of the tin-foil hat stories about HAARP. The most persistent is that it's actually a weather control program, based on Nikolai Tesla's work. The site linked elsewhere as a reply to you maintains that HAARP is a research project on the ionosphere. I also heard that it was actually part of the ELF (extreme low frequency) system for broadcasting messages to submerged subs.

NASA flew a penetrating radar system on the shuttle some years ago that was able to detect long buried canals, roads and even villages. According to Tom Clancy (as well as other sources) this mission wasn't about archaeology, it was meant to demonstrate our capability to pick out hidden hardened sites, therefore making Soviet attempts to build hidden missle silos moot and thus encouraging them to negotiate at the START talks. They have continued to fly the radar, as well as one adapted to an airplane (see http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/02/980216073822.htm for an article about archaelogical discoveries at Angkor Wat).

I still have this funny feeling that we know where the WMD are buried and we're holding off for our own reasons. Part of it may be giving the dims and the European appeasers enough rope to hang themselves. We may also be watching the sites to see who goes there. I can only hope.

35 posted on 06/29/2003 6:37:49 PM PDT by Phsstpok
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To: Phsstpok
The link I provided is Alaska University. I don't know how you connect your tin-foilness to me via that link, but atmospheric heating has been around for quite ahwile now. At least as far back as 1958, and it wasn't from tin-foilers. It's from the scientific community.
Atmospheric heating using RF is a fact. It was a fact before it became a "conspiracy".

Do a search on "ionospheric heaters".
36 posted on 06/29/2003 8:30:28 PM PDT by ALS (http://designeduniverse.com Debunking Darwin since the beginning of time... :)
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To: RightWhale
RATS!! Better go dig up Jimmy Hoffa and plant him deeper. Can't afford to have him found yet..
37 posted on 06/29/2003 9:05:00 PM PDT by UpToHere
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To: ALS
It was a fact before it became a "conspiracy".

Agreed. The tin foil comment is about how persistent the extreme versions of the related rumors, particularly the Tesla/"weather control as a weapon" version. Doesn't mean the tin-foiler's can't take it, run with it and make all related "knowledge" subject to review.

38 posted on 06/30/2003 4:14:28 AM PDT by Phsstpok
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To: Phsstpok
"Part of it may be giving the dims and the European appeasers enough rope to hang themselves. "

By George, I think you've got it!
39 posted on 06/30/2003 4:20:00 AM PDT by Rebelbase (........The bartender yells, "hey get out of here, we don't serve breakfast!")
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To: Phsstpok
They may have a point though. There was a treaty drawn up between us and Russia that included the use of atmospheric heating as a weapon for weather control. It was in the 70's under Nixon. I'll have to look it back up again. Haven't perused it in years. I think the treaty was mainly about space weaponery.
40 posted on 06/30/2003 4:28:12 AM PDT by ALS (http://designeduniverse.com Debunking Darwin since the beginning of time... :)
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To: ALS
There was a treaty drawn up between us and Russia

Actually, that would be a treaty between the US and the USSR, which no longer exists. That would make the treaty moot, as far as we're concerned (if we chose to look at things that way).

41 posted on 07/01/2003 10:30:46 AM PDT by Phsstpok
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To: goody2shooz; *Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Just adding this to the GGG homepage, not sending a general distribution.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.

42 posted on 07/21/2004 7:15:29 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv; blam

I searched and searched at Google, but could find no update on this story. It seems like there would be SOME-thing. I've been interested in that area ever since they found the Miami Circle, but the news is scant.

Any ideas on what key words I can use? I used the archaeologist's name and the name Miami One project. I did a regular search and a search in the news. I don't know what else to search under.

Thanks.


43 posted on 07/27/2004 10:08:44 AM PDT by JudyB1938 (I am not paranoid. I have "rational fear".)
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To: goody2shooz; JudyB1938

An MRI for ground scanning. It will be helpful.


44 posted on 07/27/2004 10:53:36 AM PDT by blam
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To: JudyB1938
Google
(for "Mark Grasmueck").

45 posted on 07/27/2004 12:16:20 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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46 posted on 04/27/2006 10:04:25 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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47 posted on 05/06/2006 8:50:04 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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