Keyword: archaeology

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  • Egyptian archaeologists find sandstone sphinx in temple at Aswan

    09/16/2018 4:57:15 PM PDT · by blueplum · 15 replies
    Reuters ^ | 16 Sep 2018 | Staff
    CAIRO (Reuters) - Egyptian archaeologists draining water from a temple in the southern city of Aswan have uncovered a sandstone sphinx likely dating to the Ptolemaic era, the antiquities ministry said on Sunday.
  • Kremlin archaeologists are accused of burying Stalin's atrocities

    09/13/2018 10:00:46 AM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 14 replies
    South China Morning Post ^ | Sep 13, 2018 | Agence France Presse
    In wooded northern Russia, near the Finnish border, archaeological digs by a patriotic historical group are unearthing controversy. The Russian Military History Society, which was created by the Kremlin, says it is seeking the remains of Soviet soldiers who died when the region was occupied by Nazi-aligned Finns during World War II. But human rights activists allege the organisation is trying to cover up Stalin-era repressions in the Sandarmokh forest, in Karelia. “The search for the remains of soldiers from the Second World War on the site of mass executions by the NKVD...looks like an attempt to manipulate memory," Memorial...
  • 7,200-Year-Old Traces of Cheese Have Been Discovered in Cute Animal Pots

    09/06/2018 3:14:45 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    science alert ^ | 6 SEP 2018 | MIKE MCRAE
    Residue on 7,200 year old pottery found in Croatia has pushed back the dawn of cheese making in the Mediterranean. The find resets the timeline of agriculture in the region, with fermented dairy products being made a mere five centuries after milk was first stored. But its innovation was more than just a culinary milestone for dairy connoisseurs – it could have been a life saver. … Archaeological data shows people have been growing crops and raising livestock in the region for roughly 8,000 years. Impressed Ware, named for the simple shell-like impressions used to decorate the clay. They form...
  • World’s Oldest Solid Cheese Found in 3,200-Year-Old Jar in Egypt

    08/19/2018 3:48:36 PM PDT · by ETL · 38 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Aug 16, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Ptahmes was Mayor of Memphis and high-ranking official under the Pharaohs Sethi I and Ramses II (1290-1213 BC) of the XIX dynasty. His tomb is located in the south of the Causeway of the Pharaoh Unas which yields a number of tombs dated to the New Kingdom. It was rediscovered in 2010 after a part of it was revealed in 1885 and lost under the sands at the end of the 19th century. During the 2013/2014 excavation season, Cairo University archeologists found broken jars at the site. One jar contained a solidified whitish mass, as well as canvas fabric that...
  • Oldest Cheese Ever Found in Egyptian Tomb

    08/16/2018 10:09:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | August 16, 2018 | Katherine J. Wu
    Last month, archaeologists cracked open a tomb excavated in Alexandria, Egypt, revealing three skeletons bathing in an crimson pool of sludgy sewage. In response, tens of thousands around the world immediately petitioned for the right to sip from the freshly uncorked casket of amontillado. (Spoiler: It hasn't worked out.) But fear not, coffin connoisseurs: There's a new artisanal artifact in town -- the world's oldest solid cheese, over 3,000 years in the making. The tomb of Ptahmes, mayor of Memphis, the ancient capital of Egypt during the 13th century BC, contains quite the trove of treasures. First uncovered in 1885,...
  • Looking beneath the surface: Geophysical surveys at Gobekli Tepe

    07/23/2018 12:09:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    The Tepe Telegrams ^ | 7/18/2018 | Gobekli Tepe Research Staff
    Archaeological survey methods have changed significantly over the last years. One innovation which has dramatically changed the way field archaeologists work are ground-based physical sensing techniques (for a short introduction into this technology and its application see, e.g. here [external link]). This technology provides us with images of possible archaeological features beneath the surface without even taking a shovel to hand. In 2003, a geophysical survey was undertaken at Göbekli Tepe with the help of GGH -- Solutions in Geoscience GmbH. In a first step, large parts of the tell were subjected to extensive magnetic prospection, and later selected areas...
  • Traces of war found in ancient Lydian city Sardis

    07/24/2018 9:05:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | July 13, 2018 | MANGSA - DHA
    Military equipment has been unearthed in the ancient city of Sardis in the western province of Manisa's Salihli district. Officials believe they might have been used in an ancient war between the Lydians and the Persians. The ancient city of Sardis, which was the capital of the Lydian Kingdom in the ancient ages and had been home to many civilizations from seventh B.C. to seventh A.D., is now undergoing excavation works. This year's works continue in an area called the "Palace" region... The military equipment is believed to have been used in the war that caused the end of the...
  • Thousands petition to let people DRINK liquid found inside 2,000-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus(tr)

    07/23/2018 3:18:23 PM PDT · by BBell · 87 replies
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ ^ | 7/22/18 | JESSICA GREEN
    Thousands sign petition to let people DRINK red liquid found inside 2,000-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus believing it is the elixir of life while experts say it is just sewage water Thousands sign petition to let people drink red liquid found inside sarcophagus The 2,000-year-old Egyptian coffin was found earlier this month in Alexandria Tongue-in-cheek petition created last week and now has over 11,000 signaturesA petition to let people drink from a red liquid found inside a 2,000-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus has received thousands of signatures. Speculations about the large black granite sarcophagus quickly started after its opening in the coastal city of...
  • Mysterious giant sarcophagus discovered in Egypt

    07/09/2018 8:00:28 PM PDT · by BBell · 68 replies
    http://www.foxnews.com ^ | 7/9/18 | James Rogers
    A mysterious ancient black granite sarcophagus has been discovered in Egypt. The tomb, which dates back to the Ptolemaic period between 305 B.C. and 30 B.C., was uncovered in the city of Alexandria. In a Facebook post, Dr. Mostafa Waziri, general secretary of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, announced that the 6-foot high sarcophagus, which is 8.7-feet long and 5.4-feet wide, is the largest ever found in Alexandria. The sarcophagus was found buried 16.4 feet below the surface. A layer of mortar between the lid and the body of the sarcophagus indicates that it has not been opened since it...
  • Mystery black sarcophagus opened in Egypt

    07/19/2018 7:30:12 PM PDT · by BBell · 64 replies
    Two weeks ago, archaeologists in Egypt found a massive black granite sarcophagus in Alexandria, untouched for 2,000 years - and fleet-footed rumour quickly got to work. Could it contain the remains of ancient Greek leader Alexander the Great, or (less appealingly) a deadly curse? According to experts who have now unsealed it, it's a no to both. Instead, it revealed three skeletons and red-brown sewage water, which gave off an unbearable stench.Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities had appointed a committee of archaeologists to open the relic, which was unearthed at a construction site. According to Egyptian news outlet El-Watan, they initially...
  • The EU's Magical Thinking on The Israeli-Arab Conflict: How Much Failure is Enough?

    05/18/2018 8:02:17 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 14 replies
    Frontpage Mag ^ | 05/18/2018 | Bruce Thornton
    Bruce Thornton is a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center. In Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, when the Welsh magus Glendower boasts, “I can call spirits from the vasty deep,” the sceptic Hotspur retorts, “Why, so can I, or so can any man; But will they come when you do call for them?” For seven decades the West’s foreign policy establishment has been trying to call Middle East peace from depths of endless summits and conferences and agreements with ritualistic chants of “land for peace” and “two-state solution.” But all they’ve managed to produce is war, terrorism,...
  • Archaeology and Biblical History: A Glass Head at Abel Beth Maacah Confirms Biblical Narrative

    07/02/2018 10:00:44 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 20 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 07/02/2018 | Eric Metaxas And Roberto Rivera
    I never get tired of talking about archaeology confirming biblical history. So let's talk. Second Samuel 20 tells the story of a short-lived rebellion against the rule of King David led by a Benjamite named Sheba, a kinsman of David's predecessor, Saul. It's a short, almost enigmatic, tale involving, among other things, cloistered concubines, deadly beard-pulling, and an unintentionally—or perhaps not—comical siege scene that could have come out of a Monty Python movie. Comic or not, the site of the siege was a real place that testifies to the historical nature of the biblical narrative. In II Samuel, David, fresh...
  • Aztec 'skull tower' revealed:human sacrifices had their hearts cut out heads were severed (tr)

    06/27/2018 8:00:41 PM PDT · by BBell · 44 replies
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ ^ | 6/27/18 | MARK PRIGG
    The full horror of the Aztec 'skull tower' revealed: Archaeologists say THOUSANDS of human sacrifices had their still-beating hearts cut out before their heads were severed and added to a monument the size of a basketball court Archaeologists previously found 650 skulls in Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, which became Mexico City New research shows find was just a small part of massive array of what was once thousands of skulls New details of the gory rituals have also been revealed, which include turning skulls into masks Aztec human sacrifices were far more widespread and grisly that previously thought, archaeologists have revealed....
  • The full horror of the Aztec 'skull tower' revealed: Archaeologists say THOUSANDS of [tr]

    06/28/2018 7:00:13 AM PDT · by C19fan · 41 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | June 28, 2018 | Mark Prigg
    Aztec human sacrifices were far more widespread and grisly that previously thought, archaeologists have revealed. In 2015 archaeologists from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) found a gruesome 'trophy rack' near the site of the Templo Mayor, one of the main temples in the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, which later became Mexico City. Now, they say the find was just the tip of the iceberg, and that the 'skull tower' was just a small part of a massive display of skulls known as Huey Tzompantli that was the size of a basketball court.
  • The full horror of the Aztec 'skull tower' revealed: Archaeologists say THOUSANDS

    06/27/2018 10:32:59 PM PDT · by ransomnote · 51 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | June 27, 2018 | MARK PRIGG
    Full Title: The full horror of the Aztec 'skull tower' revealed: Archaeologists say THOUSANDS of human sacrifices had their still-beating hearts cut out before their heads were severed and added to a monument the size of a basketball court Aztec human sacrifices were far more widespread and grisly that previously thought, archaeologists have revealed. In 2015 archaeologists from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) found a gruesome 'trophy rack' near the site of the Templo Mayor, one of the main temples in the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, which later became Mexico City. Now, they say the find was just...
  • The full horror of the Aztec 'skull tower' revealed

    06/27/2018 7:53:35 PM PDT · by pepsi_junkie · 44 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | June 27, 2018 | Mark Prigg
    Aztec human sacrifices were far more widespread and grisly that previously thought, archaeologists have revealed. In 2015 archaeologists from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) found a gruesome 'trophy rack' near the site of the Templo Mayor, one of the main temples in the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, which later became Mexico City. Now, they say the find was just the tip of the iceberg, and that the 'skull tower' was just a small part of a massive display of skulls known as Huey Tzompantli that was the size of a basketball court.
  • 1,500-Year-Old Love Story Between a Persian Prince and a Korean Princess that Could Rewrite History

    06/26/2018 9:10:31 AM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 47 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | May 2018 | Mark Oliver
    More than a thousand years before the first European explorer reached Korea’s shores, the Persian Empire was writing love stories about Korean princesses. Recently, historians took a second look an old Persian epic written around 500 AD and realized that, at the center of the tale, was the unusual story of a Persian prince marrying a Korean princess. It’s an incredible discovery. Up until recently, we weren’t sure that the Persians of that time even knew Korea existed. This new revelation shows Persia didn’t just make contact with Korea – these countries were intimately connected. The story is called the...
  • Students work to establish first archaeology fraternity in the country

    05/11/2018 12:42:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    The George Washington Hatchet ^ | April 30, 2018 | Lizzie Mintz
    A group of 19 students wants to establish the first archaeology fraternity in the nation. After registering as a student organization in November, Delta Iota Gamma recruited 12 members to its inaugural pledge class earlier this semester. The group plans to become a nationally recognized fraternity by the fall because members want to help students studying archaeology or classics build professional networks – a resource they said is needed on campus. Members said this semester they’ve worked to trademark the group’s letters and write governing documents. As they continue to gain recognition, they are also planning to host social events,...
  • Ships Unearthed in Virginia Offer Glimpse of Colonial Era

    05/06/2018 9:31:06 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    MSN ^ | May 6, 2018 | Emily Cochrane, The New York Times
    OLD TOWN ALEXANDRIA, Va. — Nestled in centuries of dirt and debris, several well-preserved ships and artifacts have been unearthed that offer a glimpse of life at what was once one of the busiest ports in the North American colonies. At the site for Robinson Landing, a new townhouse and condominium development along the Potomac River here, excavations have uncovered the protruding, curved wooden bones of the ships. Three ships were scuttled and buried here centuries ago as Alexandria sought to expand its land into the deeper waters of the river. “It tells us a lot about the resourcefulness of...
  • Humans were in Philippines 700,000 years ago

    05/04/2018 7:12:12 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 43 replies
    CNN ^ | May 4, 2018 | Ashley Strickland
    About 709,000 years ago, someone butchered a rhinoceros using stone tools on the Philippine island of Luzon. That may not seem remarkable -- except that humans weren't supposed to be in the Philippines so long ago. Before this discovery, the earliest indicator that early humans, or hominins, were even on those islands had been a single foot bone from 67,000 years ago, uncovered in the Callao Cave on Luzon. That's quite a time jump. Research says that the new findings push back the date for humans inhabiting the Philippines by hundreds of thousands of years. A study published Wednesday in...