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Keyword: archaeology

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  • The tsunamis of Olympia

    07/08/2011 7:10:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Thursday, July 7, 2011 | Geographical Institute, Johannes Gutenberg University
    Olympia, the Sanctuary of Zeus and venue of the Olympic Games in Ancient Greece, was probably destroyed by tsunamis that reached far inland, and not as previously believed, by earthquakes and river flooding... Paläotsunamis that have taken place over the last 11,000 years along the coasts of the eastern Mediterranean. The Olympic-tsunami hypothesis has been put forward due to sediments found in the vicinity of Olympia, which were buried under an 8 metres thick layer of sand and other debris, and only rediscovered around 250 years ago. "The composition and thickness of the sediments we have found, do not fit...
  • Syria: Scholar Composes Music from Archaeological Ugaritic Cuneiform Tablet

    07/09/2010 9:34:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 2+ views
    Global Arab Network ^ | Thursday, July 8, 2010 | H. Sabbagh
    Musical scholar Ziad Ajjan composed eight poetry and musical pieces from the musical archaeological cuneiform tablet known as "Hymn of Supplication" H6 discovered in Ugarit in the early 20th century. Ajjan composed three musical pieces based on the musical notes in the tablet which dates back to 1400 BC, naming the pieces "Sunrise," "Sunset" and "Holiday in Ugarit." This marks the recording of the oldest music notation in the history of the world. Ajjan said he is still working on the tablet based on information he reached after extensive study and previous experiment, making use of previous research by fellow...
  • 2000 year old Roman-period carvings discovered

    11/10/2018 11:19:30 AM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 10 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 10/11/18
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=slmL71jr0hM
  • This animal on a cave wall in Borneo is the oldest known figurative painting in the world

    11/07/2018 6:51:36 PM PST · by Simon Green · 39 replies
    The Orlando Sentinel ^ | 11/07/18 | Deborah Netburn
    ” IN limestone caves hidden deep in the jungle of Borneo, archaeologists have discovered the oldest known figurative drawing created by a human artist, dating back at least 40,000 years. The ancient artwork is incomplete, but appears to depict a large mammal — probably a type of wild cow — with an oval-shaped body, thin legs and a spear sticking out of its rump. “To our knowledge, the large animal painting is the oldest figurative rock art in the world,” the researchers wrote in a study describing the find published Wednesday in Nature. The authors also note that the painting...
  • Archaeologists Find 15,500-Year-Old Spear Points in Texas

    10/28/2018 11:28:29 AM PDT · by ETL · 32 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Oct 26, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Through excavation of the Debra L. Friedkin site northwest of Austin, Texas, a team of archaeologists has identified a particular style of projectile point dated between 13,500 and 15,500 years ago — this is earlier than typical Clovis-style technologies dated to 13,000 years ago. The team found more than 100,000 artifacts, including 328 tools and 12 complete and fragmented projectile points (about 3-4 inches, or 7.6-10.2 cm, long), excavated from the Buttermilk Creek Complex horizon of the Debra L. Friedkin site.From 19 optically stimulated luminescence dates of sediments, they determined the artifacts were between 13,500- and 15,500- years-old.“There is no...
  • Excavation of King Ramses II shrine in Matariya complete

    10/27/2018 4:06:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Ahram (in English) ^ | Thursday, October 25, 2018 | Nevine El-Aref
    An archaeological mission from Egypt's Ain Shams University has completed the excavation of a shrine to King Ramses II discovered last year in Cairo's Matariya district. The head of the mission Mamdouh El-Damaty explains that the shrine was once used during festivals. The mission has also unearthed a collection of lintels, scarabs, amulets, clay pots and blocks engraved with hieroglyphic text. El-Damaty says the discovery is important because it is a unique shrine from the New Kingdom that was used for the Heb Sed festival, not only during the reign of King Ramses II but throughout the Ramesside period.
  • Discovery of Ancient Spearpoints in Texas Has Some Archaeologists Questioning the History

    10/25/2018 6:11:13 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    gizmodo.com ^ | 10/25/2018 | George Dvorsky
    FULL TITLE: Discovery of Ancient Spearpoints in Texas Has Some Archaeologists Questioning the History of Early Americas ______________________________________________________________ Archaeologists have discovered two previously unknown forms of spearpoint technology at a site in Texas. The triangular blades appear to be older than the projectile points produced by the Paleoamerican Clovis culture, an observation that’s complicating our understanding of how the Americas were colonized—and by whom. Clovis-style spear points began to appear around 13,000 to 12,700 years ago, and they were produced by Paleoamerican hunter-gatherers known as the Clovis people. Made from stones, these leaf-shaped (lanceolate) points featured a shallow concave base...
  • Viking Ship and Cemetery Found Buried in Norway

    10/15/2018 12:06:18 PM PDT · by rdl6989 · 21 replies
    Live Science ^ | October 15, 2018 | Owen Jarus
    Archaeologists using radar scans have detected a Viking ship buried beneath a cemetery in Norway. The Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) said that the archaeologists discovered the anomaly using radar scans of an area in Østfold County. The ship seems to be about 66 feet (20 meters) long and buried about 1.6 feet (50 centimeters) beneath the ground, they said in a statement.
  • 2,000-year-old inscription spells Jerusalem as Israel does today

    10/11/2018 12:25:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Art Daily ^ | Thursday, October 11, 2018 | Agence France-Presse
    Israel unveiled Tuesday a stone pillar engraved with an ancient inscription showing that the spelling of Jerusalem in its present-day Hebrew form was already in common use some 2,000 years ago. During construction work in February in Jerusalem, archaeologists unearthed the pillar with the inscription "Hananiah son of Dodalos of Jerusalem," written in Aramaic with Hebrew letters. The Hebrew spelling of the city -- pronounced Yerushalayim -- is the same today. The stone was originally part of a Jewish potter's village dating to the second century BC near Jerusalem. The site, now inside the city, became the Roman 10th Legion's...
  • Archeologists unearth 2000-year-old Hebrew 'Jerusalem' inscription

    10/12/2018 11:56:50 AM PDT · by SJackson · 8 replies
    The find is the first written evidence of the name "Jerusalem" found on a column drum dating from the Herodian period. The earliest written inscription of the word Jerusalem written in Hebrew on a 2,000 year old column drum was unveiled on Tuesday at a press conference at The Israel Museum in Jerusalem. The limestone column drum that dates back to the Second Temple period, was discovered 10 months ago on an excavation site near the International Convention Center in Jerusalem. The words: “Hanania son of Dudolos from Jerusalem” was etched on the column which was part of a building...
  • Large cross on Lesbos leveled to the ground because it could be 'offensive to Muslim migrants'

    10/11/2018 8:02:05 PM PDT · by Mr. Mojo · 46 replies
    Voice of Europe ^ | 11 October 2018
    The ancient mythical Greek island of Lesbos is today better known as anchorage ground for human traffickers and the problems and conflicts that have arisen in connection with the boat traffic. It is now reported that a large cross monument on the Greek Orthodox Christian island has been levelled to the ground. This after a group claiming to promote intercultural coexistence argued that the cross could be perceived as offensive to the predominantly Muslim boat migrants. The cross monument was built on the cliffs of Apellia, beneath the castle of Mytilene, in memory of people who have died in the...
  • Stone Engravings Of Famous Warrior Pharaoh Found In Ancient Egyptian Temple

    10/09/2018 3:49:38 AM PDT · by blam · 12 replies
    Live Science ^ | 10-3-2018 | Owen Jarus
    Part of one of the inscriptions found at Kom Ombo, a temple in southern Egypt. The image at the top of the inscription appears to show the king Seti I with the gods Horus and Sobek.A giant stone engraving that fits together like a jigsaw puzzle, found in a temple in southern Egypt, may reveal new information about a pharaoh named Seti I, who launched a series of military campaigns in North Africa and the Middle East after he became pharaoh in about 1289 or 1288 B.C., several Egyptologists told Live Science. The engraving has both drawings and hieroglyphs...
  • Egyptian archaeologists find sandstone sphinx in temple at Aswan

    09/16/2018 4:57:15 PM PDT · by blueplum · 17 replies
    Reuters ^ | 16 Sep 2018 | Staff
    CAIRO (Reuters) - Egyptian archaeologists draining water from a temple in the southern city of Aswan have uncovered a sandstone sphinx likely dating to the Ptolemaic era, the antiquities ministry said on Sunday.
  • Kremlin archaeologists are accused of burying Stalin's atrocities

    09/13/2018 10:00:46 AM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 14 replies
    South China Morning Post ^ | Sep 13, 2018 | Agence France Presse
    In wooded northern Russia, near the Finnish border, archaeological digs by a patriotic historical group are unearthing controversy. The Russian Military History Society, which was created by the Kremlin, says it is seeking the remains of Soviet soldiers who died when the region was occupied by Nazi-aligned Finns during World War II. But human rights activists allege the organisation is trying to cover up Stalin-era repressions in the Sandarmokh forest, in Karelia. “The search for the remains of soldiers from the Second World War on the site of mass executions by the NKVD...looks like an attempt to manipulate memory," Memorial...
  • 7,200-Year-Old Traces of Cheese Have Been Discovered in Cute Animal Pots

    09/06/2018 3:14:45 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    science alert ^ | 6 SEP 2018 | MIKE MCRAE
    Residue on 7,200 year old pottery found in Croatia has pushed back the dawn of cheese making in the Mediterranean. The find resets the timeline of agriculture in the region, with fermented dairy products being made a mere five centuries after milk was first stored. But its innovation was more than just a culinary milestone for dairy connoisseurs – it could have been a life saver. … Archaeological data shows people have been growing crops and raising livestock in the region for roughly 8,000 years. Impressed Ware, named for the simple shell-like impressions used to decorate the clay. They form...
  • World’s Oldest Solid Cheese Found in 3,200-Year-Old Jar in Egypt

    08/19/2018 3:48:36 PM PDT · by ETL · 38 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Aug 16, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Ptahmes was Mayor of Memphis and high-ranking official under the Pharaohs Sethi I and Ramses II (1290-1213 BC) of the XIX dynasty. His tomb is located in the south of the Causeway of the Pharaoh Unas which yields a number of tombs dated to the New Kingdom. It was rediscovered in 2010 after a part of it was revealed in 1885 and lost under the sands at the end of the 19th century. During the 2013/2014 excavation season, Cairo University archeologists found broken jars at the site. One jar contained a solidified whitish mass, as well as canvas fabric that...
  • Oldest Cheese Ever Found in Egyptian Tomb

    08/16/2018 10:09:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | August 16, 2018 | Katherine J. Wu
    Last month, archaeologists cracked open a tomb excavated in Alexandria, Egypt, revealing three skeletons bathing in an crimson pool of sludgy sewage. In response, tens of thousands around the world immediately petitioned for the right to sip from the freshly uncorked casket of amontillado. (Spoiler: It hasn't worked out.) But fear not, coffin connoisseurs: There's a new artisanal artifact in town -- the world's oldest solid cheese, over 3,000 years in the making. The tomb of Ptahmes, mayor of Memphis, the ancient capital of Egypt during the 13th century BC, contains quite the trove of treasures. First uncovered in 1885,...
  • Looking beneath the surface: Geophysical surveys at Gobekli Tepe

    07/23/2018 12:09:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    The Tepe Telegrams ^ | 7/18/2018 | Gobekli Tepe Research Staff
    Archaeological survey methods have changed significantly over the last years. One innovation which has dramatically changed the way field archaeologists work are ground-based physical sensing techniques (for a short introduction into this technology and its application see, e.g. here [external link]). This technology provides us with images of possible archaeological features beneath the surface without even taking a shovel to hand. In 2003, a geophysical survey was undertaken at Göbekli Tepe with the help of GGH -- Solutions in Geoscience GmbH. In a first step, large parts of the tell were subjected to extensive magnetic prospection, and later selected areas...
  • Traces of war found in ancient Lydian city Sardis

    07/24/2018 9:05:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | July 13, 2018 | MANGSA - DHA
    Military equipment has been unearthed in the ancient city of Sardis in the western province of Manisa's Salihli district. Officials believe they might have been used in an ancient war between the Lydians and the Persians. The ancient city of Sardis, which was the capital of the Lydian Kingdom in the ancient ages and had been home to many civilizations from seventh B.C. to seventh A.D., is now undergoing excavation works. This year's works continue in an area called the "Palace" region... The military equipment is believed to have been used in the war that caused the end of the...
  • Thousands petition to let people DRINK liquid found inside 2,000-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus(tr)

    07/23/2018 3:18:23 PM PDT · by BBell · 87 replies
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ ^ | 7/22/18 | JESSICA GREEN
    Thousands sign petition to let people DRINK red liquid found inside 2,000-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus believing it is the elixir of life while experts say it is just sewage water Thousands sign petition to let people drink red liquid found inside sarcophagus The 2,000-year-old Egyptian coffin was found earlier this month in Alexandria Tongue-in-cheek petition created last week and now has over 11,000 signaturesA petition to let people drink from a red liquid found inside a 2,000-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus has received thousands of signatures. Speculations about the large black granite sarcophagus quickly started after its opening in the coastal city of...