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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 10-11-06
USCCB.org/New American Bible ^ | 10-11-06 | New American Bible

Posted on 10/11/2006 9:18:27 AM PDT by Salvation

October 11, 2006

Wednesday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time

Psalm: Wednesday 41

Reading 1
Gal 2:1-2, 7-14

Brothers and sisters:
After fourteen years I again went up to Jerusalem with Barnabas,
taking Titus along also.
I went up in accord with a revelation,
and I presented to them the Gospel that I preach to the Gentiles–
but privately to those of repute–
so that I might not be running, or have run, in vain.
On the contrary,
when they saw that I had been entrusted with the Gospel to the uncircumcised,
just as Peter to the circumcised,
for the one who worked in Peter for an apostolate to the circumcised
worked also in me for the Gentiles,
and when they recognized the grace bestowed upon me,
James and Cephas and John,
who were reputed to be pillars,
gave me and Barnabas their right hands in partnership,
that we should go to the Gentiles
and they to the circumcised.
Only, we were to be mindful of the poor,
which is the very thing I was eager to do.

And when Cephas came to Antioch,
I opposed him to his face because he clearly was wrong.
For, until some people came from James,
he used to eat with the Gentiles;
but when they came, he began to draw back and separated himself,
because he was afraid of the circumcised.
And the rest of the Jews acted hypocritically along with him,
with the result that even Barnabas
was carried away by their hypocrisy.
But when I saw that they were not on the right road
in line with the truth of the Gospel,
I said to Cephas in front of all,
“If you, though a Jew,
are living like a Gentile and not like a Jew,
how can you compel the Gentiles to live like Jews?”

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 117:1bc, 2

R. Go out to all the world, and tell the Good News.
Praise the LORD, all you nations,
glorify him, all you peoples!
R. Go out to all the world, and tell the Good News.
For steadfast is his kindness toward us,
and the fidelity of the LORD endures forever.
R. Go out to all the world, and tell the Good News.

Gospel
Lk 11:1-4

Jesus was praying in a certain place, and when he had finished,
one of his disciples said to him,
“Lord, teach us to pray just as John taught his disciples.”
He said to them, “When you pray, say:

Father, hallowed be your name,
your Kingdom come.
Give us each day our daily bread
and forgive us our sins
for we ourselves forgive everyone in debt to us,
and do not subject us to the final test.”




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For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 10/11/2006 9:18:29 AM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Lady In Blue; NYer; american colleen; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ...
Alleluia Ping!

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2 posted on 10/11/2006 9:20:19 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
The “Our Father” of “La Civiltà Cattolica” - (comparison to Muslim version)

Our Father

HOLDING HANDS AT THE OUR FATHER?

Our Father - In Heaven (Dr. Scott Hahn)

The 'Our Father': Appropriate gestures for prayer

Our Father ... in Heaven

Praying: The Lord's Prayer [Read Only]

3 posted on 10/11/2006 9:22:28 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
From Catholic Culture

And other sources!

Prayer Categories:

October Devotion: The Holy Rosary

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. Pope Leo XIII personally started the practice of devoting October to the Rosary devotion. In a letter of September 1, 1883, mindful of the Rosary's power to strengthen faith and foster a life of virtue, he outlined the triumphs of the Rosary in past times and admonished the faithful to dedicate the month of October to the Blessed Virgin through the daily recitation of her Rosary in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament, in order to obtain through her intercession the grace that God would console and defend His Church in her sufferings.

We highly recommend that you read Pope John Paul II's Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae, or "On the Most Holy Rosary." It explains even further this wonderful devotion, and introduces the optional mysteries of light, or Luminous mysteries.

INVOCATION
Queen of the most holy Rosary, pray for us.

TO THE QUEEN OF THE HOLY ROSARY
Queen of the most holy Rosary, in these times of such brazen impiety, manifest thy power with the signs of thine ancient victories, and from thy throne, whence thou dost dispense pardon and graces, mercifully regard the Church of thy Son, His Vicar on earth, and every order of clergy and laity, who are sore oppressed in the mighty conflict. Do thou, who art the powerful vanquisher of all heresies, hasten the hour of mercy, even though the hour of God's justice is every day provoked by the countless sins of men. For me who am the least of men, kneeling before thee in supplication, do thou obtain the grace I need to live righteously upon earth and to reign among the just in heaven, the while in company with all faithful Christians throughout the world, I salute thee and acclaim thee as Queen of the most holy Rosary:

Queen of the most holy Rosary, pray for us.

TO OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY
O Virgin Mary, grant that the recitation of thy Rosary may be for me each day, in the midst of my manifold duties, a bond of unity in my actions, a tribute of filial piety, a sweet refreshment, an encouragement to walk joyfully along the path of duty. Grant, above all, O Virgin Mary, that the study of thy fifteen mysteries may form in my soul, little by little, a luminous atmosphere, pure, strengthening, and fragrant, which may penetrate my understanding, my will, my heart, my memory, my imagination, my whole being. So shall I acquire the habit of praying while I work, without the aid of formal prayers, by interior acts of admiration and of supplication, or by aspirations of love. I ask this of thee, O Queen of the holy Rosary, through Saint Dominic, thy son of predilection, the renowned preacher of thy mysteries, and the faithful imitator of thy virtues. Amen.

FOR THE CRUSADE OF THE FAMILY ROSARY
The Family Rosary Crusade, organized and directed by Father Patrick Peyton, C.S.C., sought to revive the practice of families reciting the Rosary daily within their homes. The Crusade has the encouragement and support of Pope Pius XII and it is succeeding admirably in realizing the desire of the Pope that no family would allow a day to pass without the recitation of the Rosary. This prayer was composed by Cardinal Spellman when the Crusade visited his Archdiocese.

O Queen of the most holy Rosary: with hearts full of confidence we earnestly beseech you to bless the Crusade of the Family Rosary. From you came the grace to begin it. >From you must come the grace to win souls to it. We beg you to bless this Crusade so that from every home the incense of this prayer will daily rise before you, O admirable Mother.

O Queen of Homes: by the power of the Rosary we beseech you to embrace all the members of our family in the love of your Immaculate Heart. May you abide with us and we with you, praying to you while you pray for us. May you preside in our homes as once you did at Nazareth with Jesus and Joseph, filling them with the holiness of your presence and inspiration.

O Queen of Peace: it is you who have placed the Rosary in our hands. It is you who bid us to recite it daily. By the power of the Family Rosary we beseech you to obtain peace for uspeace within our hearts, our homes, our country and throughout the world. Through the daily recitation of the Family Rosary we beg you to keep sin from our souls, enmities from our hearts and war from our shores. By the graces received from the devotion of the Family Rosary we pray to be made helpful to one another in following the paths of virtue so that we may be found worthy to be called children of your family, children of your home. Amen.

Cardinal Spellman

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

 

Pray the Rosary

Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. >From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

The Rosary and Orthodoxy

Father Benedict Groeschel on the Rosary

THE HOLY ROSARY

Catholic Caucus: The Holy Rosary

The Power of the Rosary - A Weapon Against Terrorism

Rosary May Contribute to Unity Says Protestant Theologian

Papal Address on the Rosary as a Weapon of Peace

Very simple guide to praying/learning the Rosary

October: Month of the Holy Rosary

Tips on Praying a Family Rosary

SRI LANKA CATHOLICS START ROSARY CHAIN FOR PEACE

Rosary Aids Spiritual Growth, Says Pope

Pray the Rosary

Rosary to Mark St. Martha's Feast

4 posted on 10/11/2006 9:33:13 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: Galatians 2:1-2, 7-14

Visit to Jerusalem



[1] Then after fourteen years I went up again to Jerusalem with Barnabas,
taking Titus along with me. [2] I went up by revelation; and I laid before
them (but privately before those who were of repute) the gospel which I
preach among the Gentiles, lest somehow I should be running or had run
in vain. [7] But on the contrary, when they saw that I had been entrusted
with the gospel to the uncircumcised, just as Peter had been entrusted
with the gospel to the circumcised [8] (for he who worked through Peter
for the mission to the circumcised worked through me also for the Gen-
tiles), [9] and when they perceived the grace that was given to me,
James and Cephas and John, who were reputed to be pillars, gave to
me and Barnabas the right hand of fellowship, that we should go to the
Gentiles and they to the circumcised; [10] only they would have us re-
member the poor, which very thing I was eager to do.

Peter and Paul at Antioch


[11] But when Cephas came to Antioch I opposed him to his face, be-
cause he stood condemned. [12] For before certain men came from
James, he ate with the Gentiles; but when they came he drew back
and separated himself, fearing the circumcision party. [13] And with
him the rest of the Jews acted insincerely, so that even Barnabas was
carried away by their insincerity. [14] But when I saw that they were not
straightforward about the truth of the gospel, I said to Cephas before
them all, "If you, though a Jew, live like a Gentile and not like a Jew,
how can you compel the Gentiles to live like Jews?"



Commentary:

1-10. St Paul had ended his first apostolic journey by returning to
Antioch in Syria, from where he had set out. We know that the Christian
community in that city, which was an important crossroads of race and
culture, had developed as a providential result of the dispersal of Jerusa-
lem Christians following on Stephen's martyrdom (cf. Acts 11:19- 26).
Some of these refugees had brought the new faith to Antioch but had
confined themselves to preaching and converting Jews. Later, through
the activity of other Christians, Jews of the Diaspora, that is, domiciled
outside Palestine, and pagans also began to adopt the new religion.
Barnabas had been commissioned by the Jerusalem church to organize
the young Christian community in Antioch (cf. Acts 11:19-24). He later
chose Paul, who had been living quietly in Tarsus, to act as his assis-
tant (cf. Acts 11:25-26).

The disciples in Antioch, where the name "Christians" was first used to
descrie them, belonged to the whole gamut of social and ethnic back-
grounds, as we can see from the short list of "prophets and teachers"
of the church at Antioch (cf. Acts 13:1-3): some were of African origin,
like Symeon "who was called Niger"; others came from he western
Mediterranean, like Lucius of Cyrene; Manaen was from the household
of Herod the tetrarch; and there were Jews from communities outside
Palestine--for example, Barnabas and Saul themselves.

Among these different types, we find some Christians of Jewish back-
ground who felt that pagan converts to Christianity should observe the
prescriptions of the Mosaic Law (including the detailed precepts which
Jewish tradition kept adding to that Law); these guardians of the gate
of entry into the chosen people were requiring that pagan converts be
circumcised, as all Jews were.

When these "Judaizers" from Jerusalem (cf. Acts 15:1) asserted that
circumcision was necessary for salvation, they were raising an issue
which went much deeper than simply conforming to the Law of Moses:
was the Redemption wrought by Christ enough, of itself, for attaining
salvation, or was it still necessary for people to become part of the
people of Israel, conforming to all its ritual requirements?

Clearly, this question was a source of considerable division. Acts 15:2
refers to its causing "no small dissension". The present passage of
Galatians shows that Paul, receiving a revelation from God, decided to
grasp the nettle by stating unequivocally that Christ's redemption--on
its own, and alone--brings salvation. In other words, circumcision was
not necessary, nor did the elaborate ritual regulations of Judaism
apply to Christians. In Jerusalem Paul expounded "the Gospel" he had
been proclaiming to the Gentiles. He was accompanied by Barnabas,
and by a young disciple, Titus, the son of pagan parents, quite possi-
bly baptized by Paul himself (cf. Tit 1:4, where he calls him his "true
child"), who would later became one of his most faithful co-workers.

1. Between his conversion and the date of his letter, St Paul had visited
Jerusalem three times (cf. Acts 9:26; 11:29-30; 15:1-6). Of these three
journeys he here mentions only two, omitting the time he and Barnabas
went there (cf. Acts 11:29-30), because that visit was not particularly
significant.

The Judaizers' demands were inadmissible and clearly dangerous. That
was why Paul and Barnabas had opposed them openly at Antioch, and
in fact it was their failure to achieve unity and peace on this point that
had led them to go up to the Holy City to obtain a decision from the
Apostles themselves and the priests living in Jerusalem.

10. The Acts of the Apostles show us how concerned the early Church
was about looking after the material needs of its members. We can see
this, for example, when it tells us about "serving tables", which refers to
the work of giving help to the needy: this began to take up more and
more time, with the result that the seven deacons were appointed to
allow the Apostles to concentrate on their own specific work--prayer
and the ministry of the word or preaching (cf. Acts 6:1-6).

St Paul was faithful to this charge about not forgetting the poor, as we
can see from many references in his letters to collections for the poor
(cf. 1 Cor 16:1-3; 2 Cor 8:1-l5; 9:l5; etc.). Indeed, one of the reasons
for his last visit to Jerusalem was to hand over the monies collected in
the Christian communities of Greece and Asia Minor.

11-14. In his dealing with Jews, St Paul sometimes gave way in secon-
dary matters, provided that this did not take from the essence of the
Gospel: he had Timothy, whose mother was Jewish, circumcised "be-
cause of the Jews that were in those places" (Acts 16:3), and he him-
self kept to Jewish practices in order to allay suspicion and jealousy
(cf. Acts 21:22-26). Similarly, he recommends patience and certain
understanding towards those "weak" in the faith, that is, Christians of
Jewish origin who held on to some Jewish observances connected with
fast days, clean and unclean food and abstinence from the flesh of ani-
mals sacrificed to idols (cf. Rom 14:2-6; 1 Cor 10:23- 30). But on the
key issue of Christians' freedom from the Mosaic Law, the Apostle was
always firm and unambiguous, relying on the decisions of the Council
of Jerusalem.

Paul's correction of Peter did not go against the latter's authority. On
the contrary, if it had been just anyone, the Teacher of the Gentiles
might have let the matter pass; but because it was Cephas, that is,
the "rock" of the Church, he had to take action in order to avoid the
impression being given that Christians of Gentile origin were obliged
to adopt a Jewish lifestyle.

Far from undermining the holiness and unity of the Church, this epi-
sode demonstrated the great spiritual solidarity among the Apostles,
St Paul's regard for the visible head of the Church, and Peter's humility
in correcting his behavior. St Augustine comments: "He who was re-
buked was worthier of admiration and more difficult to imitate than he
who made the rebuke [...]. This episode serves as a fine example of
humility, the greatest of Christian teachings, because it is through hu-
mility that charity is maintained" ("Exp. in Gal.", 15).

12. When he speaks of these Judaizers as coming "from James", this
does not mean that they had been sent by that Apostle. It is, rather, a
reference to their coming from Jerusalem, where, after the persecution
organized by Herod Agrippa and the forced flight of St Peter (cf. Acts
12-17), St James the Less remained as bishop. But what is probable is
that these Christians, who had not given up the Mosaic Law and Jewish
observances, made use of that Apostle's name: as "the brother of the
Lord", he enjoyed universal veneration and respect.



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries".
Biblical text from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate.
Commentaries by members of the Faculty of Theology, University
of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin,
Ireland.
Reprinted with permission from from Four Courts Press and Scepter
Publishers, the U.S. publishers.


5 posted on 10/11/2006 9:46:56 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: Luke 11:1-4

The Our Father



[1] He (Jesus) was praying in a certain place, and when He ceased,
one of His disciples said to Him, "Lord, teach us to pray, as John
taught His disciples." [2] And He said to them, "When you pray, say:
`Our Father, hallowed be Thy name. Thy Kingdom come. [3] Give us
each day our daily bread; [4] and forgive us our sins, for we ourselves
forgive every one who is indebted to us; and lead us not into temptation.'"



Commentary:

1-4. St. Luke gives us a shorter form of the Lord's Prayer, or Our Fa-
ther, than St. Matthew (6:9-13). In Matthew there are seven petitions,
in Luke only four. Moreover, St. Matthew's version is given in the
context of the Sermon on the Mount and specifically as part of Jesus'
teaching on how to pray; St. Luke's is set in one of those occasions
just after our Lord has been at prayer--two different contexts. There is
nothing surprising about our Lord teaching the same thing on different
occasions, not always using exactly the same words, not always at
the same length, but always stressing the same basic points. Natu-
rally, the Church uses the longer form of the Lord's Prayer, that of St.
Matthew.

"When the disciples asked the Lord Jesus, `Teach us to pray', He
replied by saying the words of the `Our Father', thereby giving a
concrete model which is also a universal model. In fact, everything
that can and must be said to the Father is contained in those seven
requests which we all know by heart. There is such simplicity in them
that even a child can learn them, but at the same time such depth that
a whole life can be spent meditating on their meaning. Isn't that so?
Does not each of those petitions deal with something essential to our
life, directing it totally towards God the Father? Doesn't this prayer
speak to us about `our daily bread', `forgiveness of our sins, since we
forgive others' and about protecting us from `temptation' and `delivering
us from evil?'" ([Pope] John Paul II, "General Audience", 14 March
1979).

The first thing our Lord teaches us to ask for is the glorification of God
and the coming of His Kingdom. That is what is really important--the
Kingdom of God and His justice (cf. Matthew 6:33). Our Lord also
wants us to pray confident that our Father will look after our material
needs, for "your Heavenly Father knows that you need them all"
(Matthew 6:32). However, the Our Father makes us aspire especially
to possess the goods of the Holy Spirit, and invites us to seek forgive-
ness (and to forgive others) and to avoid the danger of sinning. Finally
the Our Father emphasizes the importance of vocal prayer. "`Domine,
doce nos orare. Lord teach us to pray!' And our Lord replied: `When
you pray say: "Pater noster, qui es in coelis"... Our Father, who art in
Heaven...'. What importance we must attach to vocal prayer!" ([St] J.
Escriva, "The Way", 84).

1. Jesus often went away to pray (cf. Luke 6:12; 22:39ff). This practice
of the Master causes His disciples to want to learn how to pray. Jesus
teaches them to do what He Himself does. Thus, when our Lord prays,
He begins with the Word "Father!": "Father, into Thy handsI commit My
spirit" (Luke 23:46); see also Matthew 11:25; 26:42, 53; Luke 23:34;
John 11:41; etc.). His prayer on the Cross, "My God, My God,..."
(Matthew 27:46), is not really an exception to this rule, because there
He is quoting Psalm 22, the desperate prayer of the persecuted just
man.

Therefore, we can say that the first characteristic prayer should have
is the simplicity of a son speaking to his Father. "You write: `To pray
is to talk with God. But about what?' About what? About Him, about
yourself: joys, sorrows, successes, failures, noble ambitions, daily
worries, weaknesses! And acts of thanksgiving and petition: and love
and reparation. In a word: to get to know Him and to get to know your-
self: `to get acquainted!'" ([St] J. Escriva, "The Way", 91).

2. "Hallowed be Thy name": in this first petition of the Our Father "we
pray that God may be known, loved, honored and served by everyone
and by ourselves in particular." This means that we want "unbelievers
to come to a knowledge of the true God, heretics to recognize their
errors, schismatics to return to the unity of the Church, sinners to be
converted and the righteous to persevere in doing good." By this first
petition, our Lord is teaching us that `we must desire God's glory more
than our own interest and advantage." This hallowing of God's name is
attained "by prayer and good example and by directing all our thoughts,
affections and actions towards Him" ("St. Pius X Catechism", 290-293).

"Thy Kingdom come": "By the Kingdom of God we understand a triple
spiritual kingdom--the Kingdom of God in us, which is grace; the King-
dom of God on earth, which is the Catholic Church; and the Kingdom
of God in Heaven, which is eternal bliss [...]. As regards grace, we
pray that God reign in us with His sanctifying grace, by which He is
pleased to dwell in us as a king in his throne-room, and that He keeps
us united to Him by the virtues of faith, hope and charity, by which He
reigns in our intellect, in our heart and in our will [...]. As regards the
Church, we pray that it extend and spread all over the world for the sal-
vation of men [...]. As regards Heaven, we pray that one day we be
admitted to that eternal bliss for which we have been created, where
we will be totally happy" ("ibid.", 294-297).

3. The Tradition of the Church usually interprets the "bread" as not only
material bread, since "man does not live by bread alone, but by every
word that proceeds from the mouth of God" (Matthew 4:4; Deuteronomy
8:3). Here Jesus wants us to ask God for "what we need each day for
soul and body [...]. For our soul we ask God to sustain our spiritual life,
that is, we beg Him to give us His grace, of which we are continually in
need [...]. The life of our soul is sustained mainly by the divine word
and by the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar [...]. For our bodies we pray
for what is needed to maintain us" ("St. Pius X Catechism", 302-305).

Christian doctrine stresses two ideas in this petition of the Our Father:
the first is trust in Divine Providence, which frees us from excessive
desire to accumulate possessions to insure us against the future (cf.
Luke 12:16-21); the other idea is that we should take a brotherly in-
terest in other people's needs, thereby moderating our selfish tenden-
cies.

4. "So rigorously does God exact from us forgetfulness of injuries and
mutual affection and love, that He rejects and despises the gifts and
sacrifices of those who are not reconciled to one another" ("St. Pius
V Catechism", IV, 14, 16).

"This sisters, is something which we should consider carefully; it is
such a serious and important matter that God should pardon us our
sins, which have merited eternal fire, that we must pardon all trifling
things which have been done to us. As I have so few, Lord, even of
these trifling things, to offer Thee, Thy pardoning of me must be a
free gift: there is abundant scope here for Thy mercy. Blessed be
Thou, who endurest one that is so poor" (St. Teresa of Avila, "Wa
of Perfection", Chapter 36).

"And lead us not into temptation": it is not a sin to "feel" temptation
but to "consent" to temptation. It is also a sin to put oneself\ volun-
tarily into a situation which can easily lead one to sin. God allows
us to be tempted, in order to test our fidelity, to exercise us in virtue
and to increase our merits with the help of grace. In this petition we
ask the Lord to give us His grace not to be overcome when put to the
test, or to free us from temptation if we cannot cope with it.



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries".
Biblical text from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate.
Commentaries by members of the Faculty of Theology, University
of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin,
Ireland.
Reprinted with permission from from Four Courts Press and Scepter
Publishers, the U.S. publishers.


6 posted on 10/11/2006 9:49:03 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Mass Readings

First reading Galatians 2:1 - 14 ©
It was not till fourteen years had passed that I went up to Jerusalem again. I went with Barnabas and took Titus with me. I went there as the result of a revelation, and privately I laid before the leading men the Good News as I proclaim it among the pagans; I did so for fear the course I was adopting or had already adopted would not be allowed. On the contrary, they recognised that I had been commissioned to preach the Good News to the uncircumcised just as Peter had been commissioned to preach it to the circumcised. The same person whose action had made Peter the apostle of the circumcised had given me a similar mission to the pagans. So, James, Cephas and John, these leaders, these pillars, shook hands with Barnabas and me as a sign of partnership: we were to go to the pagans and they to the circumcised. The only thing they insisted on was that we should remember to help the poor, as indeed I was anxious to do.
When Cephas came to Antioch, however, I opposed him to his face, since he was manifestly in the wrong. His custom had been to eat with the pagans, but after certain friends of James arrived he stopped doing this and kept away from them altogether for fear of the group that insisted on circumcision. The other Jews joined him in this pretence, and even Barnabas felt himself obliged to copy their behaviour.
When I saw they were not respecting the true meaning of the Good News, I said to Cephas in front of everyone, ‘In spite of being a Jew, you live like the pagans and not like the Jews, so you have no right to make the pagans copy Jewish ways’.
Psalm or canticle Psalm 116 (117)
Praise of the merciful Lord
Praise the Lord, all nations; all peoples, praise him.
For his mercy is strong over us and his faithfulness is for ever.
Gospel Luke 11:1 - 4 ©
Once Jesus was in a certain place praying, and when he had finished one of his disciples said, ‘Lord, teach us to pray, just as John taught his disciples’. He said to them, ‘Say this when you pray:
“Father, may your name be held holy,
your kingdom come;
give us each day our daily bread,
and forgive us our sins,
for we ourselves forgive each one who is in debt to us.
And do not put us to the test.”’

7 posted on 10/11/2006 9:54:21 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Office of Readings -- Awakerning Prayer

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 88 (89)
The Lord's kindness to the house of David
I will sing for ever of the kindnesses of the Lord:
 to generation upon generation
 my mouth will proclaim your faithfulness.
For you have said
 “My kindness shall be established for ever”;
 your faithfulness will be established in the heavens.

“I have made a covenant with my chosen one.
 I have sworn to David my servant:
To all eternity I will set your descendants firm;
 I shall build your house to last for all generations”.

The heavens will proclaim your wonders, O Lord,
 the assembly of your holy ones will proclaim your faithfulness.
For who in the sky can be compared to the Lord?
 Who could resemble the Lord among all the sons of God?
God is to be feared in the council of his holy ones,
 great and terrible above all who surround him.

Lord God of hosts, who is like you?
 Yours is the power, and faithfulness surrounds you.
You subdue the pride of the sea:
 when its waves rise high, you calm them.
You have trampled Rahab underfoot, like a wounded man;
 through the strength of your arm you have scattered your enemies.

Yours are the heavens and yours is the earth,
 you set firm the globe and all it contains.
You made the north and the south,
 Tabor and Hermon will rejoice in your name.
Your arm it is that has the power,
 your hand is strong, your right hand held high.
Your throne is founded on justice and right,
 kindness and faithfulness are your attendants.

Happy the people that knows the cry of praise!
 They will walk in the light of your presence, Lord,
 and rejoice in your name all the day –
for you are the splendour of their strength,
 and by your good will our standard is held high.
For our shields belong to the Lord,
 and our king to the Holy One of Israel.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 88 (89)
In a vision you spoke to your holy ones.
 You said, “I have given strength to a warrior,
 I have raised a chosen one from the people.
I have found David my servant,
 I have anointed him with my holy oil.
For my hand will always give him support,
 my right arm will give him strength.

The enemy shall make no headway against him,
 the son of iniquity shall have no power over him.
I will crush his foes in his sight
 and strike down those who hate him.
My faithfulness and kindness shall be with him
 and his strength will be triumphant through my name.
I shall extend his power over the sea,
 and his right hand over the rivers.

He will call upon me: ‘you are my father,
 my God and my safe refuge’.
And I shall make him my first-born,
 supreme over all the kings of the earth.
My kindness to him will continue for ever,
 my covenant with him will remain firm.
For all ages I shall establish his descendants,
 and for all the days of heaven his throne will stand”.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 88 (89)
“But if his children abandon my law
 and walk no more in the paths of my decrees;
if they profane my judgements
 and do not keep to my commandments,
I will punish their transgressions with a rod,
 I will punish their wickedness with a beating.

Even so, I will not turn my kindness away from him,
 nor will I be untrue to my word.
I will not profane my covenant,
 I will not go against the word I have spoken.
I have sworn in my sanctuary, once and for all:
 I will not lie to David.
His seed shall remain for ever,
 his throne firm as the sun in my sight,
just as the moon, stays firm for ever,
 a faithful witness in the sky”.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Reading 1 Timothy 4:1 - 5:2 ©
The Spirit has explicitly said that during the last times there will be some who will desert the faith and choose to listen to deceitful spirits and doctrines that come from the devils; and the cause of this is the lies told by hypocrites whose consciences are branded as though with a red-hot iron: they will say marriage is forbidden, and lay down rules about abstaining from foods which God created to be accepted with thanksgiving by all who believe and who know the truth. Everything God has created is good, and no food is to be rejected, provided grace is said for it: the word of God and the prayer make it holy. If you put all this to the brothers, you will be a good servant of Christ Jesus and show that you have really digested the teaching of the faith and the good doctrine which you have always followed. Have nothing to do with godless myths and old wives’ tales. Train yourself spiritually. ‘Physical exercises are useful enough, but the usefulness of spirituality is unlimited, since it holds out the reward of life here and now and of the future life as well’; that is a saying that you can rely on and nobody should doubt it. I mean that the point of all our toiling and battling is that we have put our trust in the living God and he is the saviour of the whole human race but particularly of all believers. This is what you are to enforce in your teaching.
Do not let people disregard you because you are young, but be an example to the believers in the way you speak and behave, and in your love, your faith and your purity. Make use of the time until I arrive by reading to the people, preaching and teaching. You have in you a spiritual gift which was given to you when the prophets spoke and the body of elders laid their hands on you; do not let it lie unused. Think hard about all this, and put it into practice, and everyone will be able to see how you are advancing. Take great care about what you do and what you teach; always do this, and in this way you will save both yourself and those who listen to you.
Do not speak harshly to a man older than yourself, but advise him as you would your own father; treat the younger men as brothers and older women as you would your mother. Always treat young women with propriety, as if they were sisters.

Reading St Ignatius of Antioch's letter to the Trallians
Faith is the body of the Lord and love is his blood
Take on meekness. Be renewed in faith, which is the flesh of the Lord, and in love, which is the blood of Jesus Christ. Let none of you have a grudge against his neighbour. Give no occasion to the heathen: do not let the congregation of God be blasphemed because of the behaviour of a few foolish persons. For Woe to him who makes anyone blaspheme my name without a cause.
Be deaf therefore when anyone preaches to you without mentioning Jesus Christ, who was of the family of David, who was truly born of Mary, who truly ate and drank, was truly persecuted under Pontius Pilate, was truly crucified and died in the sight of those in heaven and on earth and under the earth; who was also truly raised from the dead, when his Father raised him up — just as his Father will raise us up, believers in Christ Jesus without whom we have no true life.
Flee from these preachers, these wicked offshoots that bear deadly fruit, one taste of which is fatal. These have not been planted by the Father; if they had been, they would grow as branches of the Cross and their fruit would be incorruptible. Through the Cross he calls you, who are parts of his own body, to himself. A head cannot come into being alone, without the rest of the body; for God promises unity, as he himself is unity.
I greet you from Smyrna together with the Churches of God that are present with me, men who in all things have given me solace in the flesh and in the spirit. I carry my chains for the sake of Jesus Christ, praying that I may attain to God; and these chains appeal to you to continue in your present harmony and in prayer with one another. For it is right that each of you, and especially the presbyters, should give the bishop peace of mind, to the honour of the Father, of Jesus Christ, and of the Apostles. I appeal to you to listen to me in love, so that this letter can never be used in evidence against you. And pray for me also, for I have need of your love in the mercy of God, that I may be granted the lot which I am set to obtain, and not be rejected.
The love of the Smyrnaeans and Ephesians greets you: remember in your prayers the Church in Syria, of which I am the most undeserving member. Farewell in Jesus Christ. Submit yourselves to the bishop as you would to God’s commandments, submit to the clergy likewise. Let each of you individually love one another with an undivided heart. My spirit is consecrated to you not only now, but also when I reach the presence of God. I am still in peril, but the Father can be trusted in Jesus Christ to fulfil both your prayers and mine. May you be found blameless in Christ.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

8 posted on 10/11/2006 9:59:36 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
Feria
First Reading:
Psalm:
Gospel:
Galatians 2:1-2, 7-14
Psalm 117:1-2
Luke 11:1-4

The most powerful weapon to conquer the Devil is humility. For as he does not know at all how to employ it, neither does he know how to defend himself from it.

-- St Vincent de Paul


9 posted on 10/11/2006 10:03:36 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Collect:
Lord, our help and guide, make your love the foundation of our lives. May our love for you express itself in our eagerness to do good for others. Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Recipes:

October 11, 2006 Month Year Season

RM - Blessed John XXIII, pope

Old Calendar: Motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Today is the feast of Blessed John XXIII, pope from 1958-1963, best known for convening the Second Vatican Council. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II on September 3, 2000. His feast is assigned to the day on which the first session of Vatican II opened in 1962. His feast is not on the General Roman Calendar, but can be celebrated locally.

Before the reform of the General Roman Calendar today was the feast of the Motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The theological controversies regarding the divinity of Christ which disturbed the Church during the fourth and fifth centuries led to a denial of the divine maternity of Mary. The heretics refused to honor Mary as Mother of God. The Council of Ephesus in 431 declared that the Blessed Virgin "brought forth according to the flesh the Word of God made flesh" and that in consequence she is the Mother of God. Thus she is rightly given the title of divine maternity. In 1931, on the fifteenth centenary of this great Council, Pius XI instituted today's feast. By this act the pope wished to emphasize not only Mary's divine maternity, but also her motherhood of all the members of Christ's Mystical Body.


Blessed Pope John XXIII

Blessed Pope John XXIII was born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli at Sotto il Monte, Italy, in the Diocese of Bergamo on 25 November 1881. He was the fourth in a family of 14. The family worked as sharecroppers. It was a patriarchal family in the sense that the families of two brothers lived together, headed by his great-uncle Zaverio, who had never married and whose wisdom guided the work and other business of the family. Zaverio was Angelo's godfather, and to him he always attributed his first and most fundamental religious education. The religious atmosphere of his family and the fervent life of the parish, under the guidance of Fr. Francesco Rebuzzini, provided him with training in the Christian life.

He entered the Bergamo seminary in 1892. Here he began the practice of making spiritual notes, which he continued in one form or another until his death, and which have been gathered together in the Journal of a Soul. Here he also began the deeply cherished practice of regular spiritual direction. In 1896 he was admitted to the Secular Franciscan Order by the spiritual director of the Bergamo seminary, Fr. Luigi Isacchi; he made a profession of its Rule of life on 23 May 1897.

From 1901 to 1905 he was a student at the Pontifical Roman Seminary. On 10 August 1904 he was ordained a priest in the church of Santa Maria in Monte Santo in Rome's Piazza del Popolo. In 1905 he was appointed secretary to the new Bishop of Bergamo, Giacomo Maria Radini Tedeschi.

When Italy went to war in 1915 he was drafted as a sergeant in the medical corps and became a chaplain to wounded soldiers. When the war ended, he opened a "Student House" for the spiritual needs of young people.

In 1919 he was made spiritual director of the seminary, but in 1921 he was called to the service of the Holy See. Benedict XV brought him to Rome to be the Italian president of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith. In 1925 Pius XI named him Apostolic Visitator in Bulgaria, raising him to the episcopate with the titular Diocese of Areopolis. For his episcopal motto he chose Oboedientia et Pax, which became his guiding motto for the rest of his life.

On 19 March 1925 he was ordained Bishop and left for Bulgaria. He was granted the title Apostolic Delegate and remained in Bulgaria until 1935, visiting Catholic communities and establishing relationships of respect and esteem with the other Christian communities.

In 1935 he was named Apostolic Delegate in Turkey and Greece. His ministry among the Catholics was intense, and his respectful approach and dialogue with the worlds of Orthodoxy and Islam became a feature of his tenure. In December 1944 Pius XII appointed him Nuncio in France.

At the death of Pius XII he was elected Pope on 28 October 1958, taking the name John XXIII. His pontificate, which lasted less than five years, presented him to the entire world as an authentic image of the Good Shepherd. Meek and gentle, enterprising and courageous, simple and active, he carried out the Christian duties of the corporal and spiritual works of mercy: visiting the imprisoned and the sick, welcoming those of every nation and faith, bestowing on all his exquisite fatherly care. His social magisterium in the Encyclicals Pacem in terris and Mater et Magistra was deeply appreciated.

He convoked the Roman Synod, established the Commission for the Revision of the Code of Canon Law and summoned the Second Vatican Council. The faithful saw in him a reflection of the goodness of God and called him "the good Pope." He was sustained by a profound spirit of prayer. He launched an extensive renewal of the Church, while radiating the peace of one who always trusted in the Lord. Pope John XXIII died on the evening of 3 June 1963, in a spirit of profound trust in Jesus and of longing for his embrace.

Taken from L'Osservatore Romano, September 6, 2000. (For complete text, see the Catholic Culture Library.

Things to Do:


Motherhood of Mary
In the year 1931 a jubilee marking the fifteenth centenary of the Council of Ephesus was celebrated to the great joy of the whole Catholic world. The fathers at that Council, under the guidance of Pope Celestine, formally condemned the errors of Nestorius and declared as Catholic faith the doctrine that the Blessed Virgin Mary, who gave birth to Jesus, was truly the Mother of God. Prompted by holy zeal, Pope Pius XI determined that the memory of so important an event should continue alive in the Church. Accordingly he ordered the renovation of Rome's famous memorial to the Council of Ephesus, namely, the triumphal arch and transept in the Basilica of St. Mary Major on the Esquiline. His predecessor Pope St. Sixtus III (432-440) had embellished that arch with a beautiful mosaic, but time had done it damage.

In an encyclical Pius XI, moreover, underscored the principal teachings of the General Council at Ephesus, developing in detail and with loving affection the singular privilege of divine Motherhood granted to the Blessed Virgin Mary. He believed that so sublime a mystery should ever become more firmly anchored in the hearts of the faithful. At the same time the Pope singled out Mary, the Mother of God and the one blessed among women together with the holy Family of Nazareth as the foremost model for the dignity and sanctity of chaste married life and for the religious education of youth.

Excerpted from The Church's Year of Grace, Pius Parsch.

Things to do:

  • Learn more about the Council of Ephesus and Nestorius;

  • Find out the meaning of the word Theotokos;

  • Pray and meditate upon the beautiful hymn to Mary, the Akathist Hymn, sung by the Eastern Church.

10 posted on 10/11/2006 10:06:40 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

 

A Pinch of This … A Dash of That
October 11, 2006


Jesus teaches us the different forms of prayer: adoration, petition, intercession, thanksgiving and praise.

Wednesday of the Twenty-Seventh Week in Ordinary Time
Father Barry O´Toole, LC

Luke 11: 1-4
Jesus was praying in a certain place, and when he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, "Lord, teach us to pray just as John taught his disciples." He said to them, "When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name, your Kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread and forgive us our sins for we ourselves forgive everyone in debt to us, and do not subject us to the final test."

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I know you have something important to teach me today. I want to be with you these brief minutes. Thank you for this private audience with you. I am here to please and console you, not to feel good about myself.

Petition: Send forth you loving spirit, Lord, and renew my life of prayer.

1. When I Need It the Most.  The desire to pray is itself a gift from God. We can see the disciples’ interest provoked by the good example Christ gives them. My experience has taught me that when I least want to pray is probably when I need it the most. If I am putting off my spiritual exercises, my monthly retreat or my daily prayer time, this should be a warning light. My love for God is becoming a little tepid.

2. Always an Excuse.  After overcoming my laziness and all of the obstacles to beginning my prayer, the real battle begins. There are always so many distractions: the phone, the itch to attend to so many other little things…. We always have an excuse for distraction. Jesus didn’t. His prayer was so intense that he was oblivious to the things going on around him. It wasn’t until after his prayer that the disciples were able to submit their petition. For an apostle, prayer is a must and therefore must be “protected” from willful distractions.

3. A Hearty Meal.  Before sitting down to eat, I go to the refrigerator and gather what I both like and know will nourish me. I then proceed to prepare myself a meal. In the same way, I should be concerned about the content of my prayer. This will be my spiritual nourishment for the day. Jesus teaches us the different forms of prayer: adoration, petition, intercession, thanksgiving and praise (Cf. Catechism of Catholic Church, nos. 2623-2649). Just as a balanced diet contains a little of all the nutrition groups, so also a healthy prayer life should contain a balance of all of these elements.

Dialogue with Christ: Lord, I thank you for the brief lessons you have given me today. Teach me to pray. Refresh my prayer life. Send your life-giving Spirit to renew my mind, heart and will. Help me to schedule my time of prayer so that I can offer you not the crumbs or leftover instants of my busy schedule, but rather the juicy, meaty moments of my day. You deserve the best of the day.

Resolution:  I will read a few of the paragraphs of the Catechism of the Catholic Church -- even online if necessary -- in order to refresh my method of prayer.


11 posted on 10/11/2006 10:09:10 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Lauds -- Morning Prayer

Morning Prayer (Lauds)

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 85 (86)
A poor man's prayer in time of trouble
Turn your ear to me, Lord, and hear me,
 for I am poor and destitute.
Keep my life safe, for I am faithful;
 O God, save your servant, who trusts in you.

Take pity upon me, O Lord,
 for I call to you all the day long.
Make your servant’s heart glad,
 for to you, O Lord, I have raised it.
For you, Lord, are gentle and mild:
 you are kind to all those who call on you.

Let your ears hear my prayer, O Lord!
 Turn to the voice of my pleading!
In my time of trouble I call on you,
 for you, O Lord, will hear me.

No other god is like you, O Lord,
 and nothing compares with your works.
All people – all nations you made –
 will come and worship before you;
 they will give glory to your name.
For you are great, you work wonders:
 you alone are God.

O Lord, teach me your paths,
 and I will come to your truth.
Make my heart simple and guileless,
 so that it honours your name.
I will proclaim you, Lord my God,
 and give you praise with all my heart.
I will give glory to your name for ever,
 for your great kindness is upon me:
 you have rescued me from the deepest depths.

O God, the proud rise against me,
 in the meetings of the powerful they seek my life:
 they do not keep you in their sight.
And you, Lord, are a God of compassion,
 full of mercies, patient and true.
Look upon me, have mercy upon me,
 give your strength and protection to your servant
 your servant, the child of your handmaid.

Give me a sign of your goodness,
 let my enemies see it and be confounded;
because you, O Lord, have helped me and given me comfort.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle Isaiah 33
The Lord will give just judgement
Hear what I have done, you who are far off,
 and you who are near, learn of my strength.
In Sion, the sinners are afraid;
 the hypocrites tremble.
Which of you could live with a devouring fire?
Which of you will abide in everlasting burning?

He who walks in justice, he who speaks fairly –
he who rejects the spoils of robbery –
he who throws back a bribe –
he who blocks his ears against murderous counsels –
he who shuts his eyes against evil sights –
this is he who will dwell on high, secure in a fortress of rocks.
Bread is given to him; his supply of water is secure.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 97 (98)
The Lord has brought salvation
Sing a new song to the Lord,
 for he has worked wonders.

His right hand, his holy arm,
 have brought him victory.
The Lord has shown his saving power,
 and before all nations he has shown his justice.
He has remembered to show his kindness
 and his faithfulness to the house of Israel.
The farthest ends of the earth
 have seen the saving power of our God.

Rejoice in God, all the earth.
 Break forth in triumph and song!
Sing to the Lord on the lyre,
 with the lyre and with music.
With trumpets and the sound of the horn,
 sound jubilation to the Lord, our king.

Let the sea resound in its fulness,
 all the earth and all its inhabitants.
The rivers will clap their hands,
 and the mountains will exult at the presence of the Lord,
 for he comes to judge the earth.
He will judge all the world in justice,
 and the peoples with fairness.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Benedictus
The Messiah and his forerunner
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, for he has come to his people and brought about their redemption.
He has raised up the sign of salvation in the house of his servant David,
as he promised through the mouth of the holy ones, his prophets through the ages:
to rescue us from our enemies and all who hate us, to take pity on our fathers,
to remember his holy covenant and the oath he swore to Abraham our father,
that he would give himself to us, that we could serve him without fear – freed from the hands of our enemies –
in uprightness and holiness before him, for all of our days.

And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Most High: for you will go before the face of the Lord to prepare his path,
to let his people know their salvation, so that their sins may be forgiven.
Through the bottomless mercy of our God, one born on high will visit us
to give light to those who walk in darkness, who live in the shadow of death;
to lead our feet in the path of peace.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Some short prayers may follow here, to offer up the day's work to God.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

12 posted on 10/11/2006 10:10:48 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Homily of the Day


Homily of the Day

Title:   Willingness to Change: True Sign of Greatness!
Author:   Monsignor Dennis Clark, Ph.D.
Date:   Wednesday, October 11, 2006
 


Gal 2:1-2,7-14 / Luke 11:1-4

St. Peter is one of the most fascinating figures in the New Testament. He generally seems bigger than life, walking on water, slicing off the high priest's servant's ear, boldly proclaiming that he’d never deny Jesus. And, of course, his mistakes were usually bigger than life too.

Today’s epistle finds him wavering back and forth, trying to keep the peace between the Jewish Christians and the Gentile converts. At issue was the matter of forcing Gentiles to observe all the Jewish dietary laws. Initially, Peter’s generous spirit told him that was foolish, and he, a Jew, ate regularly with the Gentiles. But then he got cold feet and, to buy peace, distanced himself from the Gentiles.

At that point, St. Paul intervened, telling Peter plainly that he was wrong and that Jesus would have been astonished at his conduct, which made no sense in terms of the larger gospel values that Jesus had taught. Peter knew the truth when he heard it, and though it was embarrassing, he reversed himself and followed Paul’s advice.

It’s interesting to speculate what percentage of us would have the same willingness and ability both to listen and to change course in broad daylight with all the world watching. Maybe that’s a habit we could learn to cherish and practice. The people around us might well be astonished, and they’d certainly be grateful.

 


13 posted on 10/11/2006 10:14:58 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Lk 11:1-13
# Douay-Rheims Vulgate
1 And it came to pass that as he was in a certain place praying, when he ceased, one of his disciples said to him: Lord, teach us to pray, as John also taught his disciples. et factum est cum esset in loco quodam orans ut cessavit dixit unus ex discipulis eius ad eum Domine doce nos orare sicut et Iohannes docuit discipulos suos
2 And he said to them: When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. et ait illis cum oratis dicite Pater sanctificetur nomen tuum adveniat regnum tuum
3 Give us this day our daily bread. panem nostrum cotidianum da nobis cotidie
4 And forgive us our sins, for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation. et dimitte nobis peccata nostra siquidem et ipsi dimittimus omni debenti nobis et ne nos inducas in temptationem

14 posted on 10/11/2006 8:32:11 PM PDT by annalex
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To: annalex


Christ Praying in the Garden

Marco Basaiti

1516
Oil on panel, 371 x 224 cm
Gallerie dell'Accademia, Venice

15 posted on 10/11/2006 8:33:47 PM PDT by annalex
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To: Salvation

Faith-sharing bump.


16 posted on 10/11/2006 9:16:06 PM PDT by Ciexyz (Satisfied owner of a 2007 Toyota Corolla.)
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To: Salvation

Good teachings bump.


17 posted on 10/11/2006 9:36:15 PM PDT by Ciexyz (Satisfied owner of a 2007 Toyota Corolla.)
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To: Ciexyz; All

Please pray for my friend, Sandra, who dad died yesterday.


18 posted on 10/11/2006 10:56:59 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Vespers -- Evening Prayer

Vespers (Evening Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 125 (126)
Gladness and hope in the Lord
When the Lord gave Sion back her captives, we became like dreamers.
Our mouths were filled with gladness and our voices cried in exultation.
Among the Gentiles they were saying,
 “By his deeds the Lord has shown himself great”.
The Lord’s deeds showed forth his greatness,
 and filled us with rejoicing.

Give us back our captives, O Lord,
 as you renew the dry streams in the desolate South.
Those who sow in tears will rejoice at the harvest.

They wept as they went, went with seed for the sowing;
but with joy they will come, come bearing the sheaves.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 126 (127)
Without the Lord, we labour in vain
If the Lord does not build the house,
 its builders labour in vain.
If the Lord does not watch over a city,
 its workmen guard it in vain.

It is vain for you to rise before the dawn
 and go late to your rest,
 eating the bread of toil –
 to those he loves, the Lord gives sleep.

The Lord bestows sons as an heirloom,
 the fruit of the womb as a reward.
Like arrows in the hand of a warrior –
 so are the sons of one’s youth.
Happy the man who fills his quiver thus:
 when he disputes with his enemies at the gate,
 he will not be the loser.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle Colossians 1
Christ, firstborn of all creatures and firstborn from the dead
Let us give thanks to God the Father, who has made us worthy to share in the light that is the saints’ inheritance.
He has rescued us from the power of the shadows and brought us to the kingdom of his beloved Son,
in whom we have redemption and the forgiveness of sins.

He is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation,
for in him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible,
thrones and dominations, principalities and powers.

All things were created through him and for him: he is before all things, and in him all things hold together.

And he is the head of the body, the Church. He is the beginning, the first-born from the dead, and so he is pre-eminent above all.
For it was the Father’s will that the fullness of God should dwell in him, and that through him all things should be reconciled to himself.
Through the blood of the Cross he brought peace to all things, both on Earth and in the heavens.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Magnificat
My soul rejoices in the Lord
My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
 and my spirit rejoices in God, my salvation.
For he has shown me such favour –
 me, his lowly handmaiden.
Now all generations will call me blessed,
 because the mighty one has done great things for me.
His name is holy,
 his mercy lasts for generation after generation
 for those who revere him.

He has put forth his strength:
 he has scattered the proud and conceited,
 torn princes from their thrones;
 but lifted up the lowly.
He has filled the hungry with good things;
 the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel,
 he has remembered his mercy as he promised to our fathers,
 to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Some short prayers may follow here, to offer up the day's work to God.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

19 posted on 10/11/2006 11:00:45 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
The Word Among Us


Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Meditation
Galatians 2:1-2,7-14



Disagreements. Strained relationships. Polarized “camps.” We may think these are mainly characteristic of the church in our day. However, when we look at the life of the apostle Paul, we quickly discover that he was almost always involved in disputes and controversies. He was frequently at odds with some of the very churches that he had founded. He had strong disagreements and even arguments with other apostles, such as Peter and Barnabas.

Yet at the same time, Paul was one of the greatest missionaries and builders of churches in the history of Christianity! Despite serious problems in Paul’s relationships with others, God still used him to spread the gospel.

How are we to understand these seeming contradictions? One thing is to note that Paul did not give up when he experienced difficulties in relationships. He knew that developing loving relationships is a very important part of God’s plan for his church, and Paul kept striving toward that goal. Paul also knew that people could get into arguments because they misunderstood aspects of the gospel message and may need to be taught—or retaught—the truth. Finally, Paul understood that we all take our human weaknesses and sins with us into the church, and that God has called us, despite this reality, to help spread the gospel message.

Paul’s example should encourage us today. More than likely, we have disagreements with other people in our church. We may not understand or agree with every single thing the church teaches. We may even fail in some of our relationships. Yet no matter what our situation is, God can still use us to spread the gospel and to build up his church. Like Paul, we should never give up in our desire to bring people to God and closer to each other. Don’t let difficulties or disagreements paralyze you! Instead, accept the reality of who people are—including yourself—and continue to advance God’s kingdom. Just as he did for Paul, God will help all of us despite our weaknesses.

“Lord, your people are still separated from each other. By your Spirit, make me an instrument of unity, peace, and reconciliation. Teach me to base all of my thoughts and actions on the love of Christ and my call to preach the gospel.”

Psalm 117:1-2; Luke 11:1-4


20 posted on 10/11/2006 11:04:16 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 

<< Wednesday, October 11, 2006 >>
 
Galatians 2:1-2, 7-14 Psalm 117 Luke 11:1-4
View Readings  
 
WEAK PRAYER
 
"Lord, teach us to pray." —Luke 11:1
 

One of the most important things Jesus wants to teach us about prayer is that we are often weak in prayer. "The Spirit too helps us in our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought; but the Spirit Himself makes intercession for us with groanings that cannot be expressed in speech" (Rm 8:26). We must know our weaknesses in prayer, when we're only giving God lip-service (Mt 15:8), when our hearts are far from the Lord.

When we recognize our weakness, we can get help by repenting of our sins, turning to the Spirit, and asking others to intercede for us. The Lord does not expect us to be self-sufficient in prayer. He accepts us in our weakness, but we don't accept ourselves. We should be honest with God and admit we're not praying as we ought. We should humbly ask others to intercede for us because we aren't praying for ourselves rightly (Jas 4:3).

Sometimes we should stop praying, leave our gift at the altar, and be reconciled (Mt 5:24). Honesty is the best policy in prayer. When we admit we need help, that's when we get help. When we admit our weakness, prayer power reaches perfection (2 Cor 12:9).

 
Prayer: "Out of the depths I cry to You, O Lord; Lord, hear my voice!" (Ps 130:1)
Promise: "Give us each day our daily bread." —Lk 11:3
Praise: Marcia, a busy, active homeschooling mom of eight, awakens at 5:30 AM daily to have quiet time to sit at the feet of Jesus and listen to Him.
 

21 posted on 10/11/2006 11:06:50 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Compline -- Night Prayer

Compline (Night Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


This is an excellent moment for an examination of conscience. In a communal celebration of Compline, one of the penitential acts given in the Missal may be recited.

A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.


Psalm 30 (31)
Trustful prayer in time of adversity
O God, protect me; be my refuge. Alleluia.
In you, Lord, I put my trust: may I never be put to shame.
 In your justice, set me free,
Turn your ear to me,
 make haste to rescue me.
Be my rampart, my fortification;
 keep me safe.

For you are my strength and my refuge:
 you will lead me out to the pastures,
 for your own name’s sake.
You will lead me out of the trap that they laid for me –
 for you are my strength.

Into your hands I commend my spirit:
 you have redeemed me, Lord God of truth.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
O God, protect me; be my refuge. Alleluia.

Psalm 129 (130)
Out of the depths
Out of the depths I have cried to you, Lord. Alleluia.
Out of the depths I have cried to you, Lord: Lord, hear my voice.
Let your ears listen out for the voice of my pleading.

If you took notice of our transgressions, Lord – Lord, who would be left?
But with you is forgiveness, and for this we revere you.
I rely on you, Lord, my spirit relies on your promise;
my soul hopes in the Lord, more than the watchman for daybreak.

More than the watchman for daybreak, let Israel hope in the Lord:
for with the Lord there is kindness and abundant redemption.
He himself will redeem Israel from all its transgressions.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Out of the depths I have cried to you, Lord. Alleluia.

Reading Ephesians 4:26-27
Be angry if you must, but do not sin: do not let your anger outlast the sunset: do not give the Devil his chance.

Short Responsory ?
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
You have redeemed us, Lord, God of faithfulness.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

Canticle Nunc Dimittis
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace. Alleluia.
Now, Master, you let your servant go in peace.
 You have fulfilled your promise.
My own eyes have seen your salvation,
 which you have prepared in the sight of all peoples.
A light to bring the Gentiles from darkness;
 the glory of your people Israel.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace. Alleluia.

Prayer
Let us pray.
Lord Jesus Christ, you lay a gentle yoke upon those who follow you. Meek and humble, you give them a light burden to carry. Receive the work and the prayers we have offered to you today; and give us rest, to make us more eager to serve you, who live and reign for ever and ever, Amen.

May the almighty Lord grant us a quiet night and a perfect end.
A M E N
An antiphon to Our Lady should be recited here.

22 posted on 10/11/2006 11:08:19 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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