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Catholic Converts - Robert H. Bork , American Jurist (Catholic Caucus)
LRC ^ | February 19, 2007

Posted on 02/19/2007 6:27:20 PM PST by NYer

Robert H. Bork (1927-    ): American jurist, Yale law professor, U.S. Solicitor General (1973-77), judge for federal Circuit Court of Appeals for D.C. (1982-88), Supreme Court nominee, resident scholar at American Enterprise Institute; converted in 2003 from Protestant background


Robert Bork, the Culture War, and the Catholic Church

Judge Robert Bork, a conservative legal and judicial champion well-known to American readers, was received into the Catholic Church on July 21, 2003, at age 76. Most readers will remember Judge Bork because of his nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. An outspoken conservative, Bork was attacked by liberal politicians for his opposition to unbridled "civil liberties"—most notably his opposition to Roe v. Wade—and after acrimonious confirmation hearings he was voted down by the Senate. Judge Bork went on to become a senior fellow with the American Enterprise Institute, where he researches constitutional law, antitrust law and cultural issues.

Bork's conversion did not come about suddenly. After the death of his first wife in 1980, Bork married Mary Ellen, who had taught religion for fifteen years as a nun of the Sacred Heart and remained actively Catholic even after her departure from that order. He credited her with introducing him to the Faith, but the journey would take many years. A defining moment—for both Bork and American society—came in 1996, when he published his book, Slouching Towards Gomorrah. The impact of this work cannot be overstated. Coming in the midst of Newt Gingrich's neoconservative "revolution," which was driven less by concern for cultural issues than by resentment with President Bill Clinton and burgeoning interest in classical liberal notions of economics and politics, Bork's book alerted both religious and secular conservatives to the dangerous slide toward decadence in western society.

Instigated by liberal elites who manipulated—and were manipulated by—the so-called "youth movement" of the 1960s, this cultural decadence has become evident in ways that are now all too familiar. Bork spells them out, describing the deterioration of art and music; the popularization of pornography; the collapse of the family and consequent social disintegration; the radicalization of academia, law, and politics; legislation for divorce on demand, abortion, assisted suicide, and euthanasia; racial politics; and the decline of religion under multiple assaults from feminism and political correctness. The revolution has been both deliberate and successful, and has transformed our society into something no one could have imagined fifty years earlier.

Yet Slouching Towards Gomorrah is not just a tale of gloom and doom. Deep as the moral rot has penetrated into the vitals of society, Bork sees a faint hope for an eventual cure—in religion. "We may be witnessing a religious revival, another awakening," he writes. Evangelical Protestants and orthodox Jews are gaining strength as never before, and struggling to hold the ramparts against the decadent tide. All of their efforts are destined for naught, however, unless they are joined by one institution, the most important of all: the Catholic Church. It is "a crucial question for the culture whether the Roman Church can be restored to its former strength and orthodoxy," Bork observes.

Because it is America's largest denomination, and the only one with strong central authority, the Catholic Church can be a major opponent of the nihilism of modern liberal culture. Pope John Paul II has been attempting to lead an intellectual and spiritual reinvigoration, but there is resistance within the Church. Modern liberal culture has made inroads with some of the hierarchy as well as the laity. It remains to be seen whether intellectual orthodoxy can stand firm against the currents of radical individualism and radical egalitarianism. For the moment, the outcome is in doubt.

Like many thinkers, Bork had pondered the problems of politics, economics, and society only to find himself one day—seemingly accidentally—in accord with the age-old teachings of the Catholic Church. Some who make this discovery flee into denial; others, more honest and intelligent, investigate the Faith further. And Bork is nothing if not honest. As he told Catholic journalist Tim Drake, after he wrote Slouching Towards Gomorrah he was approached by a priest who told him that his "views on matters seemed to be very close to those of the Catholic views, which was true." Another priest, Fr. C. John McCloskey who had aided the conversion of columnist Robert Novak and a U.S. Senator from Kansas, then engaged Bork in informal instruction, supplying him with books like The Belief of Catholics by Monsignor Ronald A. Knox.

Whether the Faith remained intact was another question. Implicit in his book, although he does not address it directly, is the disappearance of the Church's moral authority as it succumbed to internal disarray in the wake of Vatican II. The absence of an orthodox Catholic voice in society was of vital importance in allowing the cultural collapse of the 1960s. Bork nevertheless found that the fundamental elements of the Faith remained intact. "The Church is the Church that Christ established," he discovered, "and while it's always in trouble, despite its modern troubles it has stayed more orthodox than almost any church I know of. The mainline Protestant churches are having much more difficulty."

Thanks in part to Knox, Bork likewise found the theological arguments for belief compelling. "I found the evidence of the existence of God highly persuasive," he recalled, "as well as the arguments from design both at the macro level of the universe and the micro level of the cell. I found the evidence of design overwhelming, and also the number of witnesses to the Resurrection compelling. The Resurrection is established as a solid historical fact. Plus, there was the fact that the Church is the Church that Christ established, and while it's always in trouble, despite its modern troubles it has stayed more orthodox than almost any church I know of." Mary Ellen aided the process with her own prayers and persuasion. Bork was still religiously undecided in 1999; when he signed on to teach a course in the Moral Foundations of the Law at the conservative Catholic Ave Maria School of Law, founded in 1999 by Tom Monaghan (the actively pro-life founder of Domino's Pizza). But four years later, all the pieces had come together, and he entered the Catholic Church.

Bork's conversion of course has not weakened his commitment to the culture war, and particularly to its newest front: "gay marriage." His help is sorely needed. Many libertarians, Republicans, and self-described "conservatives" tremble at the notion that government should intervene to protect this fundamental social institution. "Enough already!" cries commentator Jonah Goldberg of the National Review Online in response to the gay marriage debate, "many of us just don't want to hear about it anymore ... there are more important things in the world." Larry Elder, another conservative commentator, approvingly cites Vice President Dick Cheney's remark that "I think different states are likely to come to different conclusions and that's appropriate[;] I don't think there should necessarily be a federal policy in this area," and suggests that government should get out of the marriage business altogether and let people do as they please—including, presumably, if they have an inclination for polygamy or incest. "Our society will endure," Elder smugly reassures us. Even columnist Charles Krauthammer, a friend of Bork's who has taken a staunchly conservative line on many social issues, writes: "for me the sanctity of the Constitution trumps everything, even marriage. Moreover, I would be loath to see some future democratic consensus in favor of gay marriage blocked by such an amendment." For similar reasons, many Republican politicians are now working to kill the proposed Constitutional amendment banning gay marriage. Catholics are likewise divided, with the spiritual heirs of Vatican II's "renewal" conniving in support of the homosexual lobby, and the majority of even those who call themselves orthodox regarding the issue with boredom and apathy.

The willful blindness of such a view seems obvious; yet Bork is one of the few still willing to cry, "It's the culture, stupid!" At a recent meeting of the Catholic Lawyers Guild in Boston, Bork joined with Archbishop Sean O'Malley in urging Catholic jurists to fight the lemmings' march toward gay marriage. "If they don't," Bork quipped after the meeting, "I didn't speak very clearly." In his recent book, Coercing Virtue: the Worldwide Rule of Judges, he deals with the issue further by showing how legislation for gay marriage, civil unions and the like has come about as a result of the efforts of activist, leftist courts. "The cultural war," he says, "is an international phenomenon and the courts have the power of judicial review to strike down statues or accept them. They have taken one side in the culture war — the side of the intellectual elite, or a term I like, the Olympians. They are those people who think they have a superior attitude in life and that those of us lower down the courts should be coerced into accepting their views."

Bork's embracement of the Catholic Faith provides ample cause for celebration, both for the sake of his soul and for those who have fallen victim to the unrelenting campaign against Christian values in modern society. Now more than ever, the Church is in need of leaders who can draw orthodox believers from of their bunkers and bring them out—figuratively and literally—into the streets to do battle for the Faith. Let us hope that the conversion of this sage will not be the last.

***

Edward G. Lengel holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia, where he is an Associate Professor on the staff of the Papers of George Washington documentary editing project. He has written several articles for Catholic periodicals, and also is the author of three books, including an upcoming military biography of George Washington to be published by Random House.


TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; Religion & Culture; Theology
KEYWORDS: bork; catholic; conservative; convert; homosexual; justice; republican
SOURCES:

Bork, Robert H. Slouching Towards Gomorrah: Modern Liberalism and American Decline. New York: Regan Books, 1996.

"Judge Bork Converts to the Catholic Faith," National Catholic Register, 20-26 July, 2003.

"Gay Marriage Debate: Enough Already," Jonah Goldberg, Tribune Media Services, 20 February 2004.

"The State Should Get Out of the Marriage Business," Larry Elder, Creators Syndicate, 26 February 2004.

"Debating Marriage," Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, 27 February 2004

"Bishop to Lawyers: Stop Gay Marriage" Boston Herald, 12 January 2004.

1 posted on 02/19/2007 6:27:23 PM PST by NYer
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To: NYer

How did I miss him swimming the Tiber?

Then again, my first daughter was born in 2003, the next several months were quite the fog.


2 posted on 02/19/2007 6:32:47 PM PST by mockingbyrd (peace begins in the womb)
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To: Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...


3 posted on 02/19/2007 6:33:17 PM PST by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...


4 posted on 02/19/2007 6:34:31 PM PST by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer

This country is a lesser country because Bork was not on the Supreme Court.


5 posted on 02/19/2007 6:36:17 PM PST by fkabuckeyesrule
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To: mockingbyrd
*How did I miss him swimming the Tiber? *

Just wait ... there are plenty more 'surprises' to come :-)

Congratulations on the birth of your first (and may I presume your second) daughter.

6 posted on 02/19/2007 6:36:42 PM PST by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer

Why thank you...twice. The first one was born a week into the Iraq War, the second the day after Pope Benedict was elected.

So before the third one, God willing, makes an appearence, I'll give everyone a heads up. Something big will undoubtedly be about to go down.


7 posted on 02/19/2007 6:42:36 PM PST by mockingbyrd (peace begins in the womb)
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To: NYer

it's a shame that Robert Bork isn't on the Supreme Court, but it's a crying shame that Fr. C. John McCloskey isn't a bishop or Cardinal by now.


8 posted on 02/19/2007 6:42:42 PM PST by Nihil Obstat
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To: Nihil Obstat; mockingbyrd; Kolokotronis; Convert from ECUSA; sandyeggo; Salvation
it's a shame that Robert Bork isn't on the Supreme Court, but it's a crying shame that Fr. C. John McCloskey isn't a bishop or Cardinal by now.

Lent is the season for conversion of heart. That is why these conversion stories are being posted and will continue to be posted throughout this great season. It is a time for purification and reconciliation.

In his homily this evening (it's Ash Monday in the Eastern Catholic and Orthodox Churches), Father spoke about fasting. He commented that the admonition not to eat meat dates back to the early centuries when meat was a luxury enjoyed by the wealthiest individuals. Giving up meat, for them, was indeed a sacrifice. He carried the thought through to contemporary times, noting that we often begin Lent with the best of intentions but sometimes fail along the way. Essentially, he said, we make promises to our Lord that we fail to keep.

Father focused us on the sacrifice of 'giving to others'. When we relinquish those items to which we are most attached, (fill in the blank), we should take the money normally spent on them and give this to the needy. It is especially important to look on those in need and see Christ. He expounded at great length about the sense of community - be it at home, the parish, or the worldwide level.

This is the time to focus your prayers and energies on praying for those in need but be willing to accept God's plan for them. Why not make that your lenten offering.

9 posted on 02/19/2007 6:58:15 PM PST by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer

I love Bork - one of the greatest minds alive.


10 posted on 02/19/2007 7:05:47 PM PST by Victoria Delsoul (If you think the world's dangerous, and you need a tough guy... that's me [Rudy] --Newt Gingrich)
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To: NYer; ELS; kstewskis; onyx; Salvation
Excellent article. Thanks for posting. To each, ephiphany when the time is right. Father McCloskey must be so impressive .. he's the catalyst for the conversion to Catholicism of Novak, Brownback, Lawrence Kudlow, Bork and former abortionist, Bernard Nathanson, and I think all originally Jewish. God love him for his faith and generously given gifts.

Here's an article about him:

Father John, DC evangelist

WASHINGTON -- In a matter of days, Father C. John McCloskey III will quietly perform rites in which two more converts enter the Roman Catholic Church.

This latest ceremony at Catholic Information Center will not draw the attention of the Washington Post. But that happened last year when Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas entered the fold. Some of McCloskey's earlier converts also caused chatter inside the Beltway -- columnist Robert Novak, economist Lawrence Kudlow and former abortion activist Bernard Nathanson.

"All I am doing is what Catholic priests must do," said McCloskey. "I'm sharing the Gospel of Christ, offering people spiritual direction and, when they are ready, bringing them into the church. ... It's a matter of always proposing, never imposing, never coercing and merely proclaiming that we have something to offer to all Christians and to all people.

"Call it evangelism. Call it evangelization. It's just what we're supposed to do."

But words like "conversion" and "evangelism" draw attention when a priest's pulpit is located on K Street, only two blocks from the White House. The flock that flows into the center's 100-seat chapel for daily Mass includes scores of lobbyists, politicians, journalists, activists and executives.

So it's no surprise that McCloskey's views have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, USA Today and elsewhere. His feisty defense of Catholic orthodoxy has landed him on broadcasts with Tim Russert, Bill O'Reilly, Paula Zahn, Greta Van Susteren and others.

This is a classic case of location, location, location.

McCloskey feels right at home. The 49-year-old priest is a native of the nation's capital, has an Ivy League education and worked for Merrill Lynch and Citibank on Wall Street before seeking the priesthood through the often-controversial Opus Dei movement. He arrived at the Washington center in 1998.

In addition to winning prominent converts, McCloskey has bluntly criticized the American Catholic establishment's powerful progressive wing, tossing out quotations like this zinger: "A liberal Catholic is oxymoronic. The definition of a person who disagrees with what the Catholic church is teaching is called a Protestant."

Many disagree. Slate.com commentator Chris Suellentrop bluntly said that while the urbane priest's style appeals to many Washingtonians, ultimately he is offering "an anti-intellectual approach. All members of the church take a leap of faith, but McCloskey wants them to do it with their eyes closed and their hands over their ears."

It is also crucial that McCloskey openly embraces evangelism and the conversion of adults from Judaism, Islam and other world religions. For many modern Catholics this implies coercion, manipulation, mind control and, thus, a kind of "proselytism" that preys on the weak. In recent discussions of overseas missionary work many Catholics have suggested that they no longer see the need to share the faith with others and invite them to become Christians.

The bottom line: Protestants do evangelism. Protestants try to convert others. In the wake of Vatican II, Catholics have outgrown this kind of work.

"That's pure trash. That's a false ecumenism," said McCloskey. "That's simply not Catholic teaching. The Catholic church makes exclusive truth claims about itself and cannot deny them. It doesn't deny that there are other forms of religion. It doesn't deny that these other forms of religion have some elements of truth in them. ...

"But we are proclaiming Jesus Christ and where we believe he can be most fully found and that's the Catholic church. We cannot deny that." This issue will become even more controversial as America grows more diverse.

Meanwhile, the number of nominally Christian adults who have not been baptized is rising. The children and grandchildren of what McCloskey calls the "bourgeoisie Catholics" are poised to leave the church. Soon, their fading ethnic ties will not be enough. Their love of old schools and sanctuaries will not be enough.

"This country is turning into Europe," he said. "People have gotten to the point where they are saying, 'Why bother even being baptized? We don't believe any of this stuff anymore.' I am encountering more people that I need to baptize, because their parent's didn't bother to do that, even though they were nominal Christians.

"In Europe that is normal and this is what is headed our way."

~~~~~~~~~~~

After the death of Pope John Paul II

11 posted on 02/19/2007 7:07:16 PM PST by STARWISE (They (Rats) think of this WOT as Bush's war, not America's war-RichardMiniter, respected OBL author)
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To: fkabuckeyesrule

I moved more and more steadily to rock solid conservatism during my early twenties, and after marriage. But it was working in New York City and being called to Jury Duty in Newark, NJ that gave me an opportunity to solidify my position. I had the time to listen en route to duty to the Bork hearings. Listening for great lengths at a time, I became quite piqued at the beligerant rants and musing of the likes of Ted Kennedy during examination of Bork.

How do we get a hold of the tapes of those hearings and make them public. They would continue to win converts. V's wife.


12 posted on 02/19/2007 7:24:22 PM PST by ventana
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To: mockingbyrd; NYer

Actually, I didn't realize that he wasn't a Catholic. I saw him once at a dinner given by a Catholic group, about 10 years ago in New York City. I sat at a table with his wife.

Somebody later told me that he had been left very embittered by that horrible confirmation episode, which I can certainly understand. I'm really happy to hear that he has become a Catholic (like Justice Thomas!) and I hope he has been able to achieve peace and the understanding that he was right and he was being persecuted, essentially. And then that he has been able to unite his sufferings with those of Our Savior.


13 posted on 02/19/2007 7:49:23 PM PST by livius
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To: NYer
Let me keep this simple:

Bork is da BOMB!

14 posted on 02/19/2007 8:09:34 PM PST by Mad Dawg ("global warming -- it's just the tip of the iceberg!")
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To: 2ndMostConservativeBrdMember; afraidfortherepublic; Alas; al_c; american colleen; annalex; ...

robert novak and dick morris too.


15 posted on 02/19/2007 8:26:35 PM PST by Coleus (Roe v. Wade and Endangered Species Act both passed in 1973, Murder Babies/save trees, birds, insects)
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To: NYer
At a recent meeting of the Catholic Lawyers Guild in Boston, Bork joined with Archbishop Sean O'Malley in urging Catholic jurists to fight the lemmings' march toward gay marriage.

I am waiting for one state legislature or one Governor in America with the stones to stand up to the black-robed oligarchs who believe "Judicial Review" actually means "Judicial Fiat" and tell them to take a flying leap.
16 posted on 02/19/2007 8:33:41 PM PST by Quick or Dead
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To: NYer
Not to mention being a Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute (where I worked in the fall) and a professor at Ave Maria School of Law (where I recently applied).
17 posted on 02/19/2007 8:51:20 PM PST by Eisenhower (Adoro te devote, latens Deitas, quae sub his figuris vere latitas...)
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To: mockingbyrd

Definitely a convert. There are others.........


18 posted on 02/19/2007 10:03:57 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: NYer

Another wonderful and inspiring article. Thanks, NYer.


19 posted on 02/20/2007 7:05:24 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: STARWISE

Very interesting. Thanks!


20 posted on 02/20/2007 7:05:51 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: ventana
****How do we get a hold of the tapes of those hearings and make them public.****

Last year when they had the Supreme Courts hearings for Alito and Roberts C-SPAN3 replayed all of the supreme court hearings since cspan started including the Bork hearings.

21 posted on 02/20/2007 7:17:54 PM PST by fkabuckeyesrule
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To: NYer

Thomas, Scalia, and Bork...The real Dream Team.


22 posted on 02/27/2007 7:56:18 PM PST by raybyrd24
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