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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 08-03-14, Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCB.org/RNAB ^ | 08-03-14 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 08/02/2014 7:40:56 PM PDT by Salvation

August 3, 2014

Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

 

Reading 1 Is 55:1-3

Thus says the LORD:
All you who are thirsty,
come to the water!
You who have no money,
come, receive grain and eat;
Come, without paying and without cost,
drink wine and milk!
Why spend your money for what is not bread;
your wages for what fails to satisfy?
Heed me, and you shall eat well,
you shall delight in rich fare.
Come to me heedfully,
listen, that you may have life.
I will renew with you the everlasting covenant,
the benefits assured to David.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 145:8-9, 15-16, 17-18

R/ (cf. 16) The hand of the Lord feeds us; he answers all our needs.
The LORD is gracious and merciful,
slow to anger and of great kindness.
The LORD is good to all
and compassionate toward all his works.
R/ The hand of the Lord feeds us; he answers all our needs.
The eyes of all look hopefully to you,
and you give them their food in due season;
you open your hand
and satisfy the desire of every living thing.
R/ The hand of the Lord feeds us; he answers all our needs.
The LORD is just in all his ways
and holy in all his works.
The LORD is near to all who call upon him,
to all who call upon him in truth.
R/ The hand of the Lord feeds us; he answers all our needs.

Reading 2 Rom 8:35, 37-39

Brothers and sisters:
What will separate us from the love of Christ?
Will anguish, or distress, or persecution, or famine,
or nakedness, or peril, or the sword?
No, in all these things we conquer overwhelmingly
through him who loved us.
For I am convinced that neither death, nor life,
nor angels, nor principalities,
nor present things, nor future things,
nor powers, nor height, nor depth,
nor any other creature will be able to separate us
from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Gospel Mt 14:13-21

When Jesus heard of the death of John the Baptist,
he withdrew in a boat to a deserted place by himself.
The crowds heard of this and followed him on foot from their towns.
When he disembarked and saw the vast crowd,
his heart was moved with pity for them, and he cured their sick.
When it was evening, the disciples approached him and said,
“This is a deserted place and it is already late;
dismiss the crowds so that they can go to the villages
and buy food for themselves.”
Jesus said to them, “There is no need for them to go away;
give them some food yourselves.”
But they said to him,
“Five loaves and two fish are all we have here.”
Then he said, “Bring them here to me, ”
and he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass.
Taking the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven,
he said the blessing, broke the loaves,
and gave them to the disciples,
who in turn gave them to the crowds.
They all ate and were satisfied,
and they picked up the fragments left over—
twelve wicker baskets full.
Those who ate were about five thousand men,
not counting women and children.



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; mt14; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 08/02/2014 7:40:57 PM PDT by Salvation
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2 posted on 08/02/2014 7:42:35 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Isaiah 55:1-3

Epilogue: Invitation to partake of the banquet of the Lord’s Covenant


[1] “Ho, every one who thirsts,
come to the waters;
and he who has no money,
come, buy and eat!
Come, buy wine and milk
without money and without price.
[2] Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread,
and your labour for that which does not satisfy?
Hearken diligently to me, and eat what is good,
and delight yourselves in fatness.
[3] Incline your ear, and come to me;
hear, that your soul may live;
and I will make with you an everlasting covenant,
my steadfast, sure love for David.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

55:1-13. The invitation to the Covenant banquet acts as the epilogue to the se-
cond part of the book of Isaiah, and picks up on themes in chapter 40, which is
its prologue. The two chapters help to give literary and thematic unity to this part
of the book. The oracle in chapter 55 sums up in a way the teachings contained
in the preceding chapters — the invitation to the Covenant banquet (vv. 1-3), remi-
niscent of that celebrated by Moses at Mount Sinai (Ex 24:5, 11); the renewal
of the Covenant with David on Zion (vv. 4-5); the transcendence of God, who is
unaffected by the sins of men (vv. 8-9); the power of the word of God (vv. 10-11);
and, as a final synthesis, the promise of a new exodus, a sign of God’s ever-
lasting salvation.

These oracles are a call for conversion, a call to take advantage of the salvific
gifts so generously offered: “Come to the waters” (v. 1), “Come to me” (v. 3),
“Seek the Lord” (v. 6), “Let the wicked forsake his way” (v. 7). Originally, it was a
call to those exiled in Babylon to return to Jerusalem; but it is a call that is made
at all times, to everyone. The reference to an everlasting Covenant, in keeping
with promises made to David (cf. v. 3), can be read by Christians as an invitation
to share in the new and eternal Covenant sealed with the Blood of our Lord Jesus
Christ, a pledge of salvation for all mankind. In the Eucharist, the banquet of the
New Testament, the words of the prophet come true in the complete sense in the
words spoken by our Lord when he instituted that sacrament: “Take and eat” (cf.
v. 1) the true bread of life, the very finest food, which money cannot buy (vv. 1-3).
Therefore, the invitation extended by the prophet is a call to Christians to partake
of the Blessed Eucharist. Paul VI, urging the faithful to take part in the Sunday
celebration of the Eucharist, wrote: “How could we fail to take part in this encoun-
ter, to partake of the banquet that Christ has lovingly prepared for us? Our partici-
pation should be dignified and filled with joy. Christ, crucified and glorified, comes
among his disciples to draw them all into the power of his resurrection. It is the
pinnacle, here on earth, of the Covenant of love between God and his people: the
sign and source of Christian joy, the preparation for the eternal banquet in heaven”
(”Gaudete in Domino”, 322). Verses 1-11, like 54:5-14, are read in the liturgy of
the Easter Vigil, which celebrates Christ’s victory over sin and which invites the
faithful to partake of the banquet of the Covenant sealed by his death and resur-
rection: “On the feasts of the Lord, when the faithful receive the Body of the Son,
they proclaim to one another the Good News that the first fruits of life have been
given, as when the angel said to Mary Magdalene, ‘Christ is risen!’ Now too are
life and resurrection conferred on whoever receives Christ” (Fanqith, “Brevarium
iuxta ritum Ecclesiae Antiochenae Syrorum”, in “Catechism of the Catholic
Church”, 1391).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 08/02/2014 7:51:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Romans 8:35, 37-39

Trust in God


[35] Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress,
or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? [37] No, in all these
things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. [38] For I am sure
that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present, nor
things to come, nor powers, [39] nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all
creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

31-39. The elect will emerge unscathed and victorious from all attacks, dangers
and sufferings and will do so not through their own efforts but by virtue of the all-
powerful aid of him who has loved them from all eternity and who did not hesitate
to have his own Son die for their salvation. It is true that as long as we are on
this earth we cannot attain salvation, but we are assured that we will attain it pre-
cisely because God will not withhold all the graces we need to obtain this happy
outcome: all that is needed is that we desire to receive this divine help. Nothing
that happens to us can separate us from the Lord—not fear of death or love of life,
not the bad angels or devils, not the princes or the powers of this world, nor the
sufferings we undergo or which threaten us nor the worst that might befall us.
“Paul himself”, St John Chrysostom reminds us, “had to contend with numerous
enemies. The barbarians attacked him; his custodians laid traps for him; even
the faithful, sometimes in great numbers, rose against him; yet Paul always
came out victorious. We should not forget that the Christian who is faithful to the
laws of his God will defeat both men and Satan himself” (”Hom. on Rom”, 15).

This is the attitude which enables us to live as children of God, who fear neither
life nor death: “Our Lord wants us to be in the world and to love the world but
without being worldly. Our Lord wants us to remain in this world—which is now
so mixed up and where the clamor of lust and disobedience and purposeless
rebellion can be heard—to teach people to live with joy [...]. Don’t be afraid of the
paganized world: our Lord has in fact chosen us to be leaven, salt and light in
this world. Don’t be worried. The world won’t harm you unless you want it to. No
enemy of our soul can do anything if we don’t consent. And we won’t consent,
with the grace of God and the protection of our Mother in heaven” (S. Bernal,
“Monsignor Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer”, p. 213).

38-39. “Angels”, “principalities”: names of different angelic hierarchies (cf. Eph
1:21; 3:10); also a possible reference to fallen angels, demons (cf. 1 Cor 15:24;
Eph 6:12). “Powers” can mean the same as “angels” and “principalities”.

“Height” and “depth” may refer to cosmic forces which, in the culture of that time,
were thought to have some influence over the lives of men.

By listing these powerful superior forces (real or imaginary) St Paul is making the
point that nothing and nobody, no created thing, is stronger than God’s love for us.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 08/02/2014 7:52:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Matthew 14:13-21

First Miracle of the Loaves and Fish


[13] Now when Jesus heard this, He withdrew from there in a boat to a lonely
place apart. But when the crowds heard it, they followed Him on foot from the
towns. [14] As He went ashore He saw a great throng; and He had compassion
on them, and healed their sick. [15] When it was evening, the disciples came to
Him and said, “This is a lonely place, and the day is now over; send the crowds
away to go into the villages and buy food for themselves.” [16] Jesus said, “They
need not go away; you give them something to eat.” [17] They said to Him, “We
have only five loaves here and two fish.” [18] And He said, “Bring them here to
Me.” [19] Then He ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass; and taking the
five loaves and the two fish He looked up to heaven, and blessed, and broke and
gave the loaves to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds. [20]
And they all ate and were satisfied. And they took up twelve baskets full of the
broken pieces left over. [21] And those who ate were about five thousand men,
besides women and children.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

14-21. This episode must have occurred in the middle of springtime, because the
grass was green (Mark 6:40; John 6:10). In the Near East loaves were usually
made very thin, which meant it was easy to break them by hand and distribute
them to those at table; this was usually done by the head of the household or the
senior person at the meal. Our Lord follows this custom, and the miracle occurs
when Jesus breaks the bread. The disciples then distribute it among the crowd.
Here again we can see Jesus’ desire to have people cooperate with Him.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 08/02/2014 7:53:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading

Isaiah 55:1-3 ©

Thus says the Lord:

Oh, come to the water all you who are thirsty;

though you have no money, come!

Buy corn without money, and eat,

and, at no cost, wine and milk.

Why spend money on what is not bread,

your wages on what fails to satisfy?

Listen, listen to me, and you will have good things to eat

and rich food to enjoy.

Pay attention, come to me;

listen, and your soul will live.

With you I will make an everlasting covenant

out of the favours promised to David.


Psalm

Psalm 144:8-9,15-18 ©

You open wide your hand, O Lord; you grant our desires.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion,

  slow to anger, abounding in love.

How good is the Lord to all,

  compassionate to all his creatures.

You open wide your hand, O Lord; you grant our desires.

The eyes of all creatures look to you

  and you give them their food in due time.

You open wide your hand,

  grant the desires of all who live.

You open wide your hand, O Lord; you grant our desires.

The Lord is just in all his ways

  and loving in all his deeds.

He is close to all who call him,

  who call on him from their hearts.

You open wide your hand, O Lord; you grant our desires.


Second reading

Romans 8:35,37-39 ©

Nothing can come between us and the love of Christ, even if we are troubled or worried, or being persecuted, or lacking food or clothes, or being threatened or even attacked. These are the trials through which we triumph, by the power of him who loved us.

  For I am certain of this: neither death nor life, no angel, no prince, nothing that exists, nothing still to come, not any power, or height or depth, nor any created thing, can ever come between us and the love of God made visible in Christ Jesus our Lord.


Gospel Acclamation

cf.Lk19:38,2:14

Alleluia, alleluia!

Blessings on the King who comes,

in the name of the Lord!

Peace in heaven

and glory in the highest heavens!

Alleluia!

Or

Mt4:4

Alleluia, alleluia!

Man does not live on bread alone,

but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.

Alleluia!


Gospel

Matthew 14:13-21 ©

When Jesus received the news of John the Baptist’s death he withdrew by boat to a lonely place where they could be by themselves. But the people heard of this and, leaving the towns, went after him on foot. So as he stepped ashore he saw a large crowd; and he took pity on them and healed their sick.

  When evening came, the disciples went to him and said, ‘This is a lonely place, and the time has slipped by; so send the people away, and they can go to the villages to buy themselves some food.’ Jesus replied, ‘There is no need for them to go: give them something to eat yourselves.’ But they answered ‘All we have with us is five loaves and two fish.’ ‘Bring them here to me’ he said. He gave orders that the people were to sit down on the grass; then he took the five loaves and the two fish, raised his eyes to heaven and said the blessing. And breaking the loaves handed them to his disciples who gave them to the crowds. They all ate as much as they wanted, and they collected the scraps remaining; twelve baskets full. Those who ate numbered about five thousand men, to say nothing of women and children.


6 posted on 08/02/2014 7:58:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
7 posted on 08/02/2014 8:01:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
8 posted on 08/02/2014 8:01:56 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

9 posted on 08/02/2014 8:03:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


10 posted on 08/02/2014 8:04:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

11 posted on 08/02/2014 8:04:56 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


12 posted on 08/02/2014 8:07:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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August Devotion -- The Immaculate Heart [of Mary]

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of August is traditionally dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. The physical heart of Mary is venerated (and not adored as the Sacred Heart of Jesus is) because it is united to her person: and as the seat of her love (especially for her divine Son), virtue, and inner life. Such devotion is an incentive to a similar love and virtue.

This devotion has received new emphasis in this century from the visions given to Lucy Dos Santos, oldest of the visionaries of Fatima, in her convent in Tuy, in Spain, in 1925 and 1926. In the visions Our Lady asked for the practice of the Five First Saturdays to help make amends for the offenses given to her heart by the blasphemies and ingratitude of men. The practice parallels the devotion of the Nine First Fridays in honor of the Sacred Heart.

On October 31, 1942, Pope Pius XII made a solemn Act of Consecration of the Church and the whole world to the Immaculate Heart. Let us remember this devotion year-round, but particularly through the month of August.

INVOCATIONS

O heart most pure of the Blessed Virgin Mary, obtain for me from Jesus a pure and humble heart.

Sweet heart of Mary, be my salvation.

ACT OF CONSECRATION
Queen of the most holy Rosary, help of Christians, refuge of the human race, victorious in all the battles of God, we prostrate ourselves in supplication before thy throne, in the sure hope of obtaining mercy and of receiving grace and timely aid in our present calamities, not through any merits of our own, on which we do not rely, but only through the immense goodness of thy mother's heart. In thee and in thy Immaculate Heart, at this grave hour of human history, do we put our trust; to thee we consecrate ourselves, not only with all of Holy Church, which is the mystical body of thy Son Jesus, and which is suffering in so many of her members, being subjected to manifold tribulations and persecutions, but also with the whole world, torn by discords, agitated with hatred, the victim of its own iniquities. Be thou moved by the sight of such material and moral degradation, such sorrows, such anguish, so many tormented souls in danger of eternal loss! Do thou, O Mother of mercy, obtain for us from God a Christ-like reconciliation of the nations, as well as those graces which can convert the souls of men in an instant, those graces which prepare the way and make certain the long desired coming of peace on earth. O Queen of peace, pray for us, and grant peace unto the world in the truth, the justice, and the charity of Christ.

Above all, give us peace in our hearts, so that the kingdom of God may spread its borders in the tranquillity of order. Accord thy protection to unbelievers and to all those who lie within the shadow of death; cause the Sun of Truth to rise upon them; may they be enabled to join with us in repeating before the Savior of the world: "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men of good will."

Give peace to the nations that are separated from us by error or discord, and in a special manner to those peoples who profess a singular devotion toward thee; bring them back to Christ's one fold, under the one true Shepherd. Obtain full freedom for the holy Church of God; defend her from her enemies; check the ever-increasing torrent of immorality; arouse in the faithful a love of purity, a practical Christian life, and an apostolic zeal, so that the multitude of those who serve God may increase in merit and in number.

Finally, even as the Church and all mankind were once consecrated to the Heart of thy Son Jesus, because He was for all those who put their hope in Him an inexhaustible source of victory and salvation, so in like manner do we consecrate ourselves forever to thee also and to thy Immaculate Heart, O Mother of us and Queen of the world; may thy love and patronage hasten the day when the kingdom of God shall be victorious and all the nations, at peace with God .and with one another, shall call thee blessed and intone with thee, from the rising of the sun to its going down, the everlasting "Magnificat" of glory, of love, of gratitude to the Heart of Jesus, in which alone we can find truth, life, and peace. — Pope Pius XII

IN HONOR OF THE IMMACULATE HEART
O heart of Mary, mother of God, and our mother; heart most worthy of love, in which the adorable Trinity is ever well-pleased, worthy of the veneration and love of all the angels and of all men; heart most like to the Heart of Jesus, of which thou art the perfect image; heart, full of goodness, ever compassionate toward our miseries; deign to melt our icy hearts and grant that they may be wholly changed into the likeness of the Heart of Jesus, our divine Savior. Pour into them the love of thy virtues, enkindle in them that divine fire with which thou thyself dost ever burn. In thee let Holy Church find a safe shelter; protect her and be her dearest refuge, her tower of strength, impregnable against every assault of her enemies. Be thou the way which leads to Jesus, and the channel, through which we receive all the graces needful for our salvation. Be our refuge in time of trouble, our solace in the midst of trial, our strength against temptation, our haven in persecution, our present help in every danger, and especially) at the hour of death, when all hell shall let loose against u its legions to snatch away our souls, at that dread moment; that hour so full of fear, whereon our eternity depends. An,; then most tender virgin, make us to feel the sweetness of thy motherly heart, and the might of thine intercession with Jesus, and open to us a safe refuge in that very fountain of mercy, whence we may come to praise Him with thee in paradise, world without end. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Sacred Heart Of Jesus

Sacred Heart Of Jesus image

Immaculate Heart of Mary

Immaculate Heart of Mary image

Blessed be the Most Loving Heart and Sweet Name of Our Lord Jesus Christ and the most glorious Virgin Mary, His Mother, in eternity and forever. Amen.

....Only the Heart of Christ who knows the depths of his Father's love could reveal to us the abyss of his mercy in so simple and beautiful a way ----From the Catechism. P:1439

From the depth of my nothingness, I prostrate myself before Thee, O Most Sacred, Divine and Adorable Heart of Jesus, to pay Thee all the homage of love, praise and adoration in my power.
Amen. - -
St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

The prayer of the Church venerates and honors the Heart of Jesus just as it invokes his most holy name. It adores the incarnate Word and his Heart which, out of love for men, he allowed to be pierced by our sins. Christian prayer loves to follow the way of the cross in the Savior's steps.-- >From the Catechism. P: 2669

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) The Salutation to the Heart of Jesus and Mary

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)   An Offering of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary

 

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) Novena Prayer to Sacred Heart  of Jesus

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) Prayer to the Wounded Heart of Jesus

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Act of Consecration to the Sacred Heart

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Meditation & Novena Prayer on the Sacred Heart

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) Beads to the Sacred Heart

 

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Novena Prayer to the Immaculate Heart of Mary

 WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) A Solemn Act of Consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  The Daily Offering to the  Immaculate Heart of Mary

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Exaltation of the Immaculate  Heart of Mary

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Prayer to the Blessed Virgin

The Holy Heart of Mary Is, After the Heart of Jesus, the Most Exalted Throne of Divine Love
Let us recollect that God has given us the feast of the most pure Heart of the Blessed Virgin so that we may render on that day all the respect, honor and praise that we possibly can. To enkindle this spirit within us let us consider our motivating obligations.

The first is that we ought to love and honor whatever God loves and honors, and that by which He is loved and glorified. Now, after the adorable Heart of Jesus there has never been either in heaven or on earth, nor ever will be, a heart which has been so loved and honored by God, or which has given Him so much glory as that of Mary, the Mother of Jesus. Never has there been, nor will there ever be a more exalted throne of divine love. In that Heart divine love possesses its fullest empire, for it ever reigns without hindrance or interruption, and with it reign likewise all the laws of God, all the Gospel maxims and every Christian virtue.

This incomparable Heart of the Mother of our Redeemer is a glorious heaven, a Paradise of delights for the Most Holy Trinity. According to St. Paul, the hearts of the faithful are the dwelling place of our Lord Jesus Christ, and Jesus Christ Himself assures us that the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost take up Their abode in the hearts of those who love God. Who, therefore, can doubt that the Most Holy Trinity has always made His home and established the reign of His glory in an admirable and ineffable manner in the virginal Heart of her who is the Daughter of the Father, the Mother of the Son, the Spouse of the Holy Ghost, who herself loves God more than all other creatures together?

How much then are we not obliged to love this exalted and most lovable Heart?

St. John Eudes

Today: Immaculate Heart of Mary [DEVOTIONAL]

The Immaculate Heart of Mary [Devotional] Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Saturdays and the Immaculate Heart of Mary [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
The Brown Scapular (Catholic Caucus)
The History of Consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Homilies preached by Father Robert Altier on the Feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary
Marian Associations Unite to Celebrate Immaculate Heart
Solemnity Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart of Mary
FEAST OF THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, AUGUST 22ND
Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary

fatimamary.jpg (14780 bytes)7_sorrows.jpg (66800 bytes)ihm.jpg (15545 bytes)marylily.jpg (17424 bytes)maryjesus.jpg (16542 bytes)


13 posted on 08/02/2014 8:10:54 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
August 2014

Pope's Intentions

Universal: That refugees, forced by violence to abandon their homes, may find a generous welcome and the protection of their rights.

For Evangelization: That Christians in Oceania may joyfully announce the faith to all the people of that region.


14 posted on 08/02/2014 8:13:30 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Daily Gospel Commentary

Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Year A

Commentary of the day
Saint Athanasius (295-373), Bishop of Alexandria, Doctor of the Church
24th Festal letter for Easter

"A deserted place by himself"

Each of the saints had to flee the « broad and spacious way » (Mt 7,13) to dwell alone, apart, and there live a virtuous life: Elijah, Elisha…, Jacob… Solitude and the forsaking of life’s tumult gains a man the friendship of God. Thus Abraham, when he left the land of the Chaldeans, was called “the friend of God” (Jas 2,23). The great Moses, too, when he left the land of Egypt… spoke with God face to face, was saved from the hands of his enemies and crossed the desert. All these are an image of our departure from shadows to wonderful light and of our ascending to the city that is in heaven (Hb 11,16), the prefiguration of true happiness and everlasting joy.

Whereas we have with us the reality announced by shadows and symbols, I mean the Father’s own image, our Lord Jesus Christ (Col 2,17; 1,15). If we always receive him as our food and mark the doors of our souls with his blood, we shall be freed from Pharaoh’s labors and from his overseers (Ex 12,7; 5,6f.)… Now we have found the road to pass from earth to heaven… In former times the Lord went before the children of Israel in a pillar of fire and a cloud; but now he calls us to himself, saying: “If anyone is thirsty let him come to me and drink; from whoever believes in me will flow rivers of living water springing up to eternal life” (Jn 7,37f.).

Therefore let everyone prepare themselves with ardent desire to go to this feast : let them listen to the Savior calling since it is he who comforts us all and each one in particular. Let anyone who is hungry come to him: he is the true bread (Jn 6,32). Let anyone who is thirsty come to him: he is the fountain of living water (Jn 4,10). Let the sick person come to him: he is the Word of God who heals the sick. If anyone is bowed down by the burden of sin and repents, let him take refuge at his feet: he is rest and the harbour of salvation. Let the sinner have confidence for he has said: “Come to me, you who labor and are burdened and I will give you rest” (Mt 11,28).


15 posted on 08/02/2014 8:15:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Zenit.org

Sunday Homily: They All Ate and Were Satisfied

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle A

Rome, August 01, 2014 (Zenit.org) Fr. Jason Mitchell LC | 548 hits

 

--

Isaiah 55:1-3
Psalm 145:8-9,15-16,17-18
Romans 8:35,37-39
Matthew 14:13-21

The first reading, from the book of the prophet Isaiah, is an invitation to seek the Lord. Four words stand out: water, wine, bread, everlasting covenant. These words look back to the Old Testament and look forward to sacramental gifts of the Messiah.

During the Exodus, Moses struck the rock in the desert and provided water for the people. Jesus is the new Moses who offers living-giving water to those who believe in him. Isaiah's invitation to the thirsty to come to the water is fulfilled as an invitation to go to Christ, the source of living water, and to the waters of Baptism. Through Baptism, we are cleansed from sin and welcomed to the wedding banquet of the Messiah.

The second word is wine. The Messiah, the people of Israel knew, would bring the wine of gladness to them. In the miracle at the wedding of Cana, Jesus reveals that he is the Messiah who provides wine for the people (Isaiah 25:6). At the last supper, the wine Jesus gives is truly his own blood to drink.

The third word is bread. Those who thirst, those who hunger, are satisfied, not because they pay money and obtain food that gives earthly life; they are satisfied because they receive freely from God the food of eternal life. In the Gospel, Jesus' miracle of the five loaves and two fish looks back to the Old Testament: to Moses who gave the people manna in the desert, to Elijah who provided and flour for the widow during the famine, and to Elisha who multiplied the twenty loaves for one hundred men. Jesus surpasses all of them and promises something even greater: bread that gives eternal life.

The fourth word is "everlasting covenant". When we look back, we see the succession of covenants: the creation covenant with Adam and Eve, the covenant with Noah, the covenant with Abraham, the covenant at Sinai and at Moab, the covenant with David, and the promise of a new and ever-lasting covenant in the prophets. The new covenant of Jesus Christ brings all of these to fulfillment. The water of baptism is our way of entry into the new covenant. It is not a simple ritual washing, but rather a burial with Christ and a rising with Christ. It is a share in his passion, death and resurrection. It is birth to new life. The wine of the Eucharist is the blood of the new covenant; the bread of the Eucharist is the bread of life, the Body of Christ.

The bonds of the New Covenant are strong. Paul asks today, "what can separate us from the love of Christ?" He responds that there is nothing external that can separate us from the love of God: anguish, distress, persecution, famine, nakedness, peril or the sword. No creature, no angel, not even death, can separate us from God's love. However, the sin we commit does separate us from God. God loves us and desires our salvation; our sin, though, is a refusal of that love and that salvation. Remaining in sin is a refusal of his merciful love. We have no need to fear our God, for he is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and of great kindness. He is just and holy, near to all who call upon him in truth.


16 posted on 08/02/2014 8:17:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
The Work of God

Year A  -  18th Sunday in ordinary time

They all ate as much as they wanted

4Matthew 14:13-21

13 Now when Jesus heard this, he withdrew from there in a boat to a deserted place by himself. But when the crowds heard it, they followed him on foot from the towns.
14 When he went ashore, he saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them and cured their sick.
15 When it was evening, the disciples came to him and said, "This is a deserted place, and the hour is now late; send the crowds away so that they may go into the villages and buy food for themselves."
16 Jesus said to them, "They need not go away; you give them something to eat."
17 They replied, "We have nothing here but five loaves and two fish."
18 And he said, "Bring them here to me."
19 Then he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds.
20 And all ate and were filled; and they took up what was left over of the broken pieces, twelve baskets full.
21 And those who ate were about five thousand men, besides women and children. (NRSV)

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

God is a God full of surprises, that day a great crowd had gathered, many attracted out of curiosity, others with the spiritual need to see the new prophet perform his miracles and reveal his new ideas.

My miracles had made impact in many minds, they had realized that I had a new teaching which was accompanied by supernatural signs, some commented that I could be Elijah, others the Messiah, but people were not sure, however the spirit brought them to that place.

My apostles had no idea of how we were going to feed the multitude that was hungry after following me. I looked up to heaven, took the loaves and the fishes that they gave me, I gave thanks to my Father and asked Him for food for them, then I advised them to lie down and wait for their turn to eat, after that, they all ate and there were even twelve baskets filled with the leftovers.

People after realizing what a great miracle had occurred, wanted to make me their King by force; I had to run away from that place. I came not so much to feed the body, but the soul, this multiplication of the loaves and the fishes is a symbol of the eucharistic multiplication of the bread of life that I have come to offer, the food for the soul that God sends from Heaven in abundance.

Many were expecting a powerful king that would free them from the slavery of the Roman Empire, when they saw my prodigies they imagined many material things except that I was going to free them from the slavery of sin.

All my miracles were temporary signs that would bring a special relief from those moments or situations, but they represented healings of the soul. The change of the water into wine represented the new wine, which is living water of the Spirit, which all those who are spiritually thirsty must drink. The blind that received their sight represented those who are blind in the spirit and need to open their eyes to see my way, the lepers who were healed represented the souls wounded by sin and who need my healing, the mute who were able to speak represented those who don’t speak with God and need the spirit in order to praise God, the paralytic and the lame who were able to walk represent those who can not walk well for lack of faith and who need spiritual health. The deaf who were able to hear represented those who have not been able to understand my word, but who listen finally to my message through the action of my Spirit. Those who were dead and who were brought to life represented the transformation of the soul who is dead because of sin, but who is brought to life again after a conversion.

Now, the multiplication of the loaves and the fishes represented the multiplication of my Church, the great promised banquet, the new manna which has come down from heaven and is the new food for the people of God. This miracle was a preparation for my people, who are to feel hunger for the Bread of Life, who has come down from Heaven to give strength to the soul, this miracle was a preparation for the greatest miracle which I performed, at the Holy Supper, in which I consecrated the bread as my body, and the wine as my blood.

All miracles prior to the institution of the Holy Eucharist fulfilled their purpose, however my living bread is the continuous miracle that represents my sacrifice in Calvary, it is the food of the soul that feeds my people until the end of times.

Come, come, I invite you, eat of this food that has been sent from heaven, it does not cost you money, it fills the soul, it nourishes the spirit and purifies it of sin by giving it eternal life.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


17 posted on 08/02/2014 8:31:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

It’s easier to wear slippers than carpet the earth. A Homily for the 18th Sunday of the Year.

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

We have today the very familiar miracle of the loaves and fishes. One is tempted to say, “Oh that one…and tune out.” But, if we allow it, the gospel today contains a very personal appeal from the Lord’s lips to your (my) ears: “There is no need to dismiss the crowds, give them some food yourself.”

Immediately all the objections swim through our minds, but be still, and let us allow the Lord to instruct us and apply this Gospel in five stages.

I. THE IMAGE THAT IS EXTOLLED – The text says, When Jesus heard of the death of John the Baptist, he withdrew in a boat to a deserted place by himself.  The crowds heard of this and followed him on foot from their towns.  When he disembarked and saw the vast crowd, his heart was moved with pity for them, and he cured their sick.

The text begins with a very sad note of the death of Jesus’ cousin, John the Baptist. We should not simply dismiss the kind of human grief he must have experienced, and the text says he wants to go apart for a while, presumably to pray and grieve. It would seem, at the pinnacle of his public ministry, he could only get apart by going out on a boat, and so he does. The text is unclear how long he was out on the water, but it implies a short time.

Approaching the opposite shore Jesus sees a large crowd, and is moved with pity. He teaches them at great length and heals the sick. And here is the image that is extolled. If Jesus has allowed himself this moment of grief, he also shows that the way out of it is love and concern for others. For it is too easy for us, in our own grief, anger, sorrow, or anxiety to retreat, to hide away. As an immediate reaction this is understandable. But it is not a disposition we ought to maintain for long. For others have need, and even in our grief and our limits, we are still called to reach out. And that very reaching out, often contains our own healing too.

That we have needs, does not mean others stop having them. Jesus shows the courage and the love to still recognize the needs of others, even in his own grief. So he goes ashore and shares love with others.

II. THE ISSUE THAT IS EVADED - The text says, When it was evening, the disciples approached him and said, “This is a deserted place and it is already late; dismiss the crowds so that they can go to the villages and buy food for themselves.”

There is a human tendency, that when people are needy, we want them to go away, to disappear. Hence, the apostles, noticing the needy crowd, a crowd about to have a hunger problem, they want the crowd to go away before they become a problem.

We too, both individually and collectively, often desire the needy and poor to just disappear. If we see a beggar, we may cross the street, or refuse to look at him. If our caller ID indicates a troubled family member who may ask for money or want to talk a long time, we let the call go to voice mail. In society we tend to segregate the poor and needy. The “not in my backyard” (NIMBY) syndrome seeks to segregate the poor, the mentally handicapped and others to certain marginal sections of the city largely out of sight, and out of mind. The sick and the dying too are often relegated to nursing homes. Perhaps this is necessary for proper care, but the thought of an elderly relative living and dying in our homes is too much for many, even when it is possible. So, generally people go away to die.

Notice the threefold basis of the disciples evasion:

  1. They are DESPAIRING – for they say, this is a deserted place and it is already late.
  2. They are DISMISSIVE -  for they want Jesus to dismiss the crowd, to send them away.
  3. They are DETACHED – for instead of wanting to help, they want the crowd to go away and get food for themselves.

Yes, it is a sad human tendency to want to be rid of people who have problems. And so the disciples beg Jesus to send the increasingly troublesome crowd away. The Issue is evaded, rather than accepted as a shared problem to be solved together.

III. THE INSTRUCTION THAT ENSUESJesus said to them, “There is no need for them to go away; give them some food yourselves.”

Uh oh! This is starting to get personal. Jesus is not willing to keep this merely as a problem “they” have, he wants me to do something!

Yes, he rejects their premise by saying there is no need for them to go away. And he redirects plan by saying, give them something to eat yourselves.

Refusing to accept the presence of the poor and needy, is simply not a viable option for Jesus, or for us who would be his disciples. He wants and expects us to get started with a solution, a solution that includes both “them” and us. It looks like we are our brother’s keeper.

This is the instruction that ensues when the apostles, or when we, try to evade the issue.

IV. THE INSUFFICIENCY THAT IS EXPRESSED the text says, But they said to him, “Five loaves and two fish are all we have here.”

But we can’t possibly pull this thing off, the needs are far too great! The Lord is not interested in our excuses, he just says, “Let’s get started.”

Observe two things about the five loaves and two fishes.

  1. First, as John’s Gospel notes, (6:9), the loaves and fishes came from among the poor themselves. Hence this is not mere do-goodism. The teaching here is not to be a “limousine liberal” who rolls down the window and throws money to the poor, then goes back to his mansion. Neither is it a “we’re from the government and we’re here to help you” solution. For we should not do for others what they can reasonably do for themselves. Rather we ought to work with the poor, engaging them in what they do have, in the talents and leadership they do possess, and solve problems with them, rather than merely for them. There are loaves and fishes among even the poor, there are talents and resources to be included in the solution.
  2. Secondly, wherever the loaves and fishes come from, they are not nothing, and the Lord expects all of us to be part of the solution. Simply telling God or, (these days), the government, to go and do something, is not a full or authentic Christian response.

Hence our complaints about meager resources do not impress the Lord who says, simply, bring them to me. The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. And thus we go to the principle point.

V.  THE IMMENSITY THAT IS EXPERIENCED – the text says, Then he said, “Bring them here to me, ” and he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass.  Taking the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven, he said the blessing, broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, who in turn gave them to the crowds.  They all ate and were satisfied, and they picked up the fragments left over— twelve wicker baskets full.  Those who ate were about five thousand men, not counting women and children.

Now this story is so familiar that you and I are not shocked by the outcome. But no matter how many times we hear it, we still do not really accept it’s astonishing truth:

  1. I can do all things in God who strengthens me (Phil 4:13)
  2. All things are possible to him who believes (Mk 9:23)
  3. For man it is impossible, but not with God, for all things are possible with God (Mk 10:27)
  4. Now he who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food will also supply and increase your store of seed and will enlarge the harvest of your righteousness. (2 Cor 9:10)

Now take special note of that last quote, for this gospel is about more than caring for the poor, (and it is about that). But this Gospel is also about taking this world back for Christ.

We all know that this world is in an increasingly bad state: rampant secularism, moral relativism, and a Church with many self-inflicted wounds.  This has all led to the fact that we have a real mess on our hands. And the problems are overwhelming: sexual confusion, the culture of death, the breakdown of marriage, compulsive sin, compulsive overspending, greed, insensitivity to the poor, deep and widespread addiction to pornography, drugs, and alcohol, abortion, widespread promiscuity, adultery, corruption, cynicism, low mass attendance and on an on.

The problems seem overwhelming and our resources seem so limited to turn back the tide. What will we ever do with only five loaves and two fishes?

Jesus says, bring them to me.

Yet again, the journey of a thousand miles begins with just one step. The conversion of the whole world, begins with me. As I look the huge problems before me, I (this means you) assess my loaves and fishes:

  1. I work on my own conversion. For a holier world has to start with me. If I get holier, the world get’s holier.
  2. I look to the poor I can serve, maybe with money maybe with talents, like tutoring, counseling etc. Maybe just with the time of listening.
  3. I pick up the phone and call a family member I know is hurting.
  4. I love my spouse and children.
  5. I spend time properly raising my own children to know the Lord and seek his kingdom.
  6. I exhort the weak in my own family, and with love, rebuke sin and encourage righteousness.
  7. If I am a priest or religious, I faithfully live my vocation, and heroically call others to Christ by teaching and proclaiming the gospel without compromise.
  8. If I am a young person I seek to devoutly prepare myself for a vocation to marriage, priesthood or religious life.
  9. If I am older I seek to manifest wisdom and good example to those who are young.
  10. If I am elderly, I seek to devoutly prepare myself for death, and to give good example in this, and to witness the desire for heaven.
  11. I will pray for this world and attend mass faithfully, begging God’s mercy on this sin soaked world.

It is too easy to simply lament this world’s condition and, like the apostles, feel overwhelmed. Jesus just says, bring me what you have, and let’s get started. The conversion of the whole world will begin with me, with my meager loaves and fishes.

And Jesus will surely multiply them, he will not fail. Already there is renewal evident in the Church, through a faithful remnant willing to bring their loaves fishes, some of the things mentioned above and more besides. They are bringing them to Jesus and he is multiplying them. Renewal is happening, and signs of spring are evident in the Church.

There is an old saying that it is easier to wear slippers that to carpet the whole of the earth. Indeed it is. If it is a converted world you want start with yourself. Bring your loaves and fishes to Jesus, bring your slippers, and let’s get started.  It begins with me.

This song says,

If I can help somebody, as I pass along,
If I can cheer somebody, with a word or song,
If I can show somebody, how they’re traveling wrong,
Then my living shall not be in vain.

If I can do my duty, as a good man ought,
If I can bring back beauty, to a world up wrought,
If I can spread love’s message, as the Master taught,
Then my living shall not be in vain
.


18 posted on 08/02/2014 8:58:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Gospel Reflections

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I: Isaiah 55:1-3 II: Romans 8:35,37-39


Gospel
Matthew 14:13-21

13 Now when Jesus heard [of the death of John the Baptizer], he withdrew from there in a boat to a lonely place apart. But when the crowds heard it, they followed him on foot from the towns.
14 As he went ashore he saw a great throng; and he had compassion on them, and healed their sick.
15 When it was evening, the disciples came to him and said, "This is a lonely place, and the day is now over; send the crowds away to go into the villages and buy food for themselves."
16 Jesus said, "They need not go away; you give them something to eat."
17 They said to him, "We have only five loaves here and two fish."
18 And he said, "Bring them here to me."
19 Then he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass; and taking the five loaves and the two fish he looked up to heaven, and blessed, and broke and gave the loaves to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds.
20 And they all ate and were satisfied. And they took up twelve baskets full of the broken pieces left over.
21 And those who ate were about five thousand men, besides women and children.


Interesting Details
One Main Point

Jesus fed the people. Compare the two feasts. King Herod Antipas dined on delicacies with a chosen few in his stately palace, and beheaded John the Baptist to reward a dancer (Mt 14:3-12, the preceding passage). King Jesus used simple food to feed anyone who followed him to a deserted area, and everyone was healed and satisfied.


Reflections
  1. What am I at the feast? A sick person to be healed, a follower to be fed, a disciple working with Jesus to feed the people, a bystander, or someone else? Or, am I a prince at Herod's birthday party instead?
  2. What nourishes my life? My work, my achievement, my family, my money, grace from God, or what? Am I well-fed and satisfied, or malnourished and frustrated?
  3. What can I do to stay close to the source of my nourishment, and to help Jesus feed people around me?

19 posted on 08/02/2014 9:01:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
It is important that you choose your career with care, so that you may really follow the vocation that God has destined for you. No day should pass without some prayer to this end. Often repeat with St. Paul: "Lord, what will you have me do?"

-- Saint John Bosco

20 posted on 08/02/2014 9:09:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

21 posted on 08/02/2014 9:09:54 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


22 posted on 08/02/2014 9:12:01 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information: The Finding of the Relics of St. Stephen

Feast Day: August 3

23 posted on 08/03/2014 7:10:14 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Peter Julian Eymard


Feast Day: August 3
Born: 1811 :: Died: 1868

St. Peter Eymard was born in Grenoble in France. He worked with his father making and repairing knives until he was eighteen and spent his free time studying. Peter longed to become a priest so he taught himself Latin and received instruction in the faith from a helpful priest.

When he was twenty years old he joined the seminary of Grenoble and a few years later became a priest. He served in two parishes during the next five years and the people realized what a gift he was to them.

Father Eymard had a glowing love for the Holy Eucharist and loved to spend time daily in adoration. On the feast of Corpus Christi (the feast of the Body and Blood of Jesus) when he was carrying the Host in procession, he felt the presence of Jesus like warmth from a fireplace and it seemed to surround him with love and light.

He begged that the mercy and love of Jesus touch everyone as he had been touched and he asked Jesus to bless the people and take care of all their needs.

Years later he started a new religious order and they became known as the Priests of the Blessed Sacrament. Two years after that he began an order of sisters called the Servants of the Blessed Sacrament who devoted their lives to the perpetual (continuous) adoration of the Blessed Sacrament.

He wrote many books about the Holy Eucharist that were translated into different languages and are still available today.

For four years before he died St. Peter Eymard suffered severe pain, difficulties and critisim but he continued adoring the Holy Eucharist. His witness and sacrifice and example helped many people also become priests. He died at the age of 57 on August 1, 1868.


24 posted on 08/03/2014 7:19:43 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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CATHOLIC ALMANAC

Friday, August 3

Liturgical Color: Green

Today the Church honors Nicodemus,
the member of the Sanhedrin who was
a secret follower of Jesus. He convinced
the other members that Jesus was
entitled to a trial, and later helped St.
Joseph of Arimathea prepare Jesus
for burial.

25 posted on 08/03/2014 9:45:04 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Day 233 - Why is God more important than the family? // How is authority exercised correctly?

Why is God more important than the family?

Without relationship a person cannot live. Man's most important relationship is the one he has with God. This has priority over all human relationships, even family relationships. Children do not belong to the parents, nor do parents belong to their children. Every person belongs directly to God. Only to God is man bound absolutely and always. This is how we understand what Jesus said to those who are called: "He who loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; and he who loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me" (Mt 10:37). Therefore parents should place their children confidently into God's hands if the Lord calls them to the consecrated life in a religious order or to be a priest.


How is authority exercised correctly?

Authority is exercised properly when it is understood according to Jesus' example as service. It must never be arbitrary. Jesus showed us once and for all how authority should be exercised. He, the greatest authority, served others and took the last place. Jesus even washed the feet of his disciples (Jn 13:1-20). The authority of parents, teachers, educators, and superiors is given to them by God, not so that they can lord it over those who are entrusted to their care, but rather so that they might understand and exercise their duty of guiding and training as service. (YOUCAT questions 374-375)


Dig Deeper: CCC section (2232-2237) and other references here.


26 posted on 08/03/2014 10:12:32 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic Culture

 

Daily Readings for:August 03, 2014
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Draw near to your servants, O Lord, and answer their prayers with unceasing kindness, that, for those who glory in you as their Creator and guide, you may restore what you have created and keep safe what you have restored. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

RECIPES

o    Summer Sunday Dinner (Sample Menu)

ACTIVITIES

o    Working for Others

PRAYERS

o    Book of Blessings: Blessing Before and After Meals: Ordinary Time (1st Plan)

o    Book of Blessings: Blessing Before and After Meals: Ordinary Time (2nd Plan)

·         Ordinary Time: August 3rd

·         Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Eighth Sunday after Pentecost

But they said to him, "Five loaves and two fish are all we have here." Then he said, "Bring them here to me," and He ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven, He said the blessing, broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, who in turn gave them to the crowds. They all ate and were satisfied, and they picked up the fragments left over — twelve wicker baskets full. Those who ate were about five thousand men, not counting women and children (Matt 14:17-21).

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


 

Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Book of the Prophet Isaiah 55:1-3. The prophet, living among the Jewish exiles in Babylon, utters words of consolation for the despairing exiles. Here he tells them that Yahweh is inviting them to a banquet which he freely gives them. Yahweh alone can provide for their real needs; they are foolish to look elsewhere for consolation or help. If they cooperate he will fulfill the promise he had made to David, the promise of a future Messiah.

The second reading is from the Letter of St. Paul to the Romans 8:35, 37-39. St. Paul concludes this chapter with a hymn in praise of God's love for us: "with God on our side," he says, "who can be against us?" Then come today's verses, which are rhetorical questions, showing that there is no power in heaven or on earth that can take away or lessen God's love for us as manifested in Christ, his Incarnate Son.

The Gospel is from St. Matthew 14:13-21. This miracle was an act of kindness and loving thoughtfulness on the part of Christ. He saw the people's need - it was late for them to return to their homes and they had had nothing to eat all day - and He worked a miracle to provide for this need. The miracle also helped to convince the people of Galilee - the news spread around quickly - that He was the expected Messiah, but especially it prepared the way for the announcement of the greatest miracle of all - the miracle of the Eucharist. As St. John tells us Jesus referred to this miracle the next day in order to introduce His promise of the heavenly bread which He would give them and which was to be His own body and blood, under the form of bread and wine. The bread He miraculously multiplied that day to supply the bodily needs of the Galilean multitude was but a foreshadowing of that heavenly food which He was about to give as spiritual nourishment to the millions who would become His followers down through the centuries until the end of time.

The Galileans were grateful to Him for providing so kindly and so thoughtfully for their needs. How much more grateful should we not be for the miracle by means of which He has left us Himself to be our daily spiritual food? We are grateful, of course, to our loving Lord who not only handed up His Body to His enemies to be crucified for us, but through His divine power, arranged that His glorified body, triumphant over death, should remain with us, His Church, forever under the Eucharistic species.

Though invisible to mortal eyes, He is as truly present on our altars as He was that day in Galilee, when He miraculously fed the multitude. He is present under the form of bread and wine — so that we can partake of Him as spiritual nourishment during our earthly life. Could love go any further? He Himself said: "A man can have no greater love than to lay down his life for his friends" (Jn. 15 :13). Yes, once a man has given his life he has given his all; there is nothing more he can give. But Christ was more than man. He was God as well, and, therefore, He was able not only to lay down His human life for us, but was able and willing to remain with us after death under the Eucharistic species: to be our strength and nourishment until we join Him in the promised land of heaven.

When we compare our own unworthiness with this, almost incredible, love and thoughtfulness of Christ for us, all we can do is simply to say: "Lord, you know I am not worthy to receive you, but you say you want to come into my poor and untidy home, please make me less unworthy, forgive all my past sins and offenses, and give me the grace and strength to be better in the future."

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


27 posted on 08/03/2014 12:41:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Matthew 14:13-21

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Give them some food yourselves. (Matthew 14:16)

Tony Melendez was born without any arms. But he was also born with a gift for music, so he developed a unique way to share that gift. He played with his feet, starting with a push-button organ and moving to the guitar and harmonica. Combining his musical gifts with his faith, Melendez became involved in music ministry.

In 1987, he played before Pope John Paul II, who leaped out of his seat, embraced the young man, and said, “My wish for you is to continue giving this hope to all the people.” Melendez is still doing that through his ministry, giving concerts and motivational talks, supporting people with disabilities, and helping young-adult and missionary programs.

Tony Melendez is a perfect illustration of the principle we see at work in today’s reading. The disciples didn’t have that much going for them. Five loaves and two fish couldn’t possibly feed such a huge crowd! But they brought their meager portion to Jesus, who blessed it and gave it back to them. Notice: he didn’t distribute the meal himself. He told the disciples to do it. Not sure what to expect, they handed out the bread and fish—and the impossible became possible!

By telling the disciples to feed the crowd themselves, Jesus made it clear that the miracle would not happen without them.

What do you have to offer today? Don’t worry if it seems paltry. Offer it to the Lord anyway. Give him your work, play, or study. Give him the difficult situation that you’re dealing with. Give him your imagination or your anxieties. Ask him to bless it, transform it, and use it for his Father’s glory. Then, like Tony Melendez, work with whatever you have. As you do, you’ll find God’s power multiplying your offering, “feeding” the people around you.

“Lord, I give you my heart. Thank you for accepting me as I am. I trust that you will let none of my gifts go to waste!”

Isaiah 55:1-3; Psalm 145:8-9, 15-18; Romans 8:35, 37-39

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

(Isaiah 55:1-3; Psalm 145:8-9,15-18; Romans 8:35,37-39; Matthew 14:13-21)

1. In the first reading, we hear these words: “All you who are thirsty, come to the water! You who have no money, come receive grain and eat. Come, without paying and without cost.” What an offer! All Jesus is asking is that we “come” to Him and he will give us everything we need, and we will “delight in rich fare.” How would you describe your “thirst” for the Lord? What specific things can you do this week to increase that thirst and “come” to the Lord?

2. Again in the responsorial psalm, we read that the “hand of the Lord feeds us; he answer all our needs.” What are the needs in your life that require the Lord’s grace and power? In these areas, how do you want the Lord to touch you?

3. In the second reading, St. Paul reviews the circumstances of his life (persecution, famine, etc.) and concludes that none of it can separate him from “the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” To what extent do you believe this as well for your life? How can you use this truth to guide your prayer time and how you live out your day?

4. In the Gospel, we read that Jesus’ heart was “moved with pity,” and he feeds the large crowd earthly bread. But at every Mass, we are fed by Christ with Himself, the bread of eternal life. How hungry are you for this bread? How can you increase your hunger for Jesus, the bread of life?

5. The meditation describes the exceptional ministry of Tony Melendez, who was born without arms. The meditation also encourages us with these words to offer whatever gifts we have to the Lord: “Ask him to bless it, transform it, and use it for his Father’s glory. Then, like Tony Melendez, work with whatever you have. As you do, you’ll find God’s power multiplying your offering, ‘feeding’ the people around you.” What are some ways you can use the gifts the Lord has given you to bring glory to God?

6. Take some time now to pray and thank the Lord for his great love for you and ask him to let none of the gifts he has given you go to waste. Use the prayer at the end of the mediation as the starting point.


28 posted on 08/03/2014 12:46:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

THE HOLY EUCHARIST

(A biblical reflection on the 18th Ordinary Sunday, 3 August 2014)

Gospel Reading: Matthew 14:13-21

First Reading: Isaiah 55:1-3; Psalms: Psalm 145:8-9,15-18; Second Reading: Romans 8:35,37-39

Feeding_the_5000006

The Scripture Text
Now when Jesus heard this, He withdrew from there in a boat to a lonely place apart. But when the crowds heard it, they followed Him on foot from the towns. As He went ashore He saw a great throng; and He had compassion on them, and healed their sick. When it was evening, the disciples came to Him and said, “This is a lonely place, and the day is now over; send the crowds away to go into the villages and buy food rot themselves.” Jesus said, “They need not go away; you give them something to eat.” They said to Him, “We have only five loaves here and two fish.” And He said, “Bring them here to Me.” Then He ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass; and taking the five loaves and the two fish He looked up to heaven, and blessed, and broke and gave the loaves to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds. And they all ate and were satisfied. And they took up twelve baskets full of broken pieces left over. And those who ate were about five thousand men, besides woman and children. (Matthew 14:13-21 RSV)

MUKJIZAT PERLIPATGANDAAN ROTI OLEH YESUS- 001

As much as Jesus wanted to satisfy the physical hunger of the more than five thousand people He fed that day in Galilee, He wanted to fill their spirits even more. From the earliest centuries, the Church has seen the multiplication of bread and fish as pointing toward something even greater: the Holy Eucharist, in which Jesus feeds millions every day with His body and blood.

Imagine the grace that’s available at Mass, if only we “hearken diligently” to the Lord (Isaiah 55:2). What could be more life-changing than joining with so many of God’s people in a prayer of praise and adoration? What could be more powerful than receiving Jesus Christ Himself, letting His flesh and blood mingle with ours, letting His Holy Spirit lift our spirits up to the very throne of heaven? No wonder countless saints have sung the praises of the Holy Eucharist!

770295ee - EKARISTI

And yet, we all know how easy it can be to go to Mass without expecting to be changed. We all know how quickly the prayers and readings can take a back seat to thoughts about our day, daydreams about the future, or worries about the past. How can we reverse this tendency? By preparing!

Let us try to take a little time with the Lord before heading out the door for Mass. We ask Him to examine our hearts and show us where we might need to repent so that at the penitential rite, we will know and will experience forgiveness. Let’s set aside some time to read the Scripture passages ahead of time, so that when they are proclaimed in the liturgy we (you and I) will hear Jesus speaking to each of us personally. Let’s take a few moments to remember Christ’ body, broken for us on the cross, and thank Him for loving each of us even unto death. Whatever we do, we must realize that as we come to the Lord’s table, with humble, repentant hearts, willing to be changed by the Lord, the Holy Eucharist can become one of the most powerful experiences in our lives. May we all come to taste and see the goodness of the Lord!

Prayer: Lord Jesus, I am amazed by Your compassion. Thank You for sacrificing Your life on the altar of the cross so that I might have Your life in me. Thank You for feeding me with Your own self. By Your Holy Spirit, help me open myself up to the transforming power of Your love. Amen.

29 posted on 08/03/2014 1:02:01 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Matthew
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Matthew 14
13 Which when Jesus had heard, he retired from thence by boat, into a desert place apart, and the multitudes having heard of it, followed him on foot out of the cities. Quod cum audisset Jesus, secessit inde in navicula, in locum desertum seorsum : et cum audissent turbæ, secutæ sunt eum pedestres de civitatibus. και ακουσας ο ιησους ανεχωρησεν εκειθεν εν πλοιω εις ερημον τοπον κατ ιδιαν και ακουσαντες οι οχλοι ηκολουθησαν αυτω πεζη απο των πολεων
14 And he coming forth saw a great multitude, and had compassion on them, and healed their sick. Et exiens vidit turbam multam, et misertus est eis, et curavit languidos eorum. και εξελθων ο ιησους ειδεν πολυν οχλον και εσπλαγχνισθη επ αυτοις και εθεραπευσεν τους αρρωστους αυτων
15 And when it was evening, his disciples came to him, saying: This is a desert place, and the hour is now past: send away the multitudes, that going into the towns, they may buy themselves victuals. Vespere autem facto, accesserunt ad eum discipuli ejus, dicentes : Desertus est locus, et hora jam præteriit : dimitte turbas, ut euntes in castella, emant sibi escas. οψιας δε γενομενης προσηλθον αυτω οι μαθηται αυτου λεγοντες ερημος εστιν ο τοπος και η ωρα ηδη παρηλθεν απολυσον τους οχλους ινα απελθοντες εις τας κωμας αγορασωσιν εαυτοις βρωματα
16 But Jesus said to them, They have no need to go: give you them to eat. Jesus autem dixit eis : Non habent necesse ire : date illis vos manducare. ο δε ιησους ειπεν αυτοις ου χρειαν εχουσιν απελθειν δοτε αυτοις υμεις φαγειν
17 They answered him: We have not here, but five loaves, and two fishes. Responderunt ei : Non habemus hic nisi quinque panes et duos pisces. οι δε λεγουσιν αυτω ουκ εχομεν ωδε ει μη πεντε αρτους και δυο ιχθυας
18 He said to them: Bring them hither to me. Qui ait eis : Afferte mihi illos huc. ο δε ειπεν φερετε μοι αυτους ωδε
19 And when he had commanded the multitudes to sit down upon the grass, he took the five loaves and the two fishes, and looking up to heaven, he blessed, and brake, and gave the loaves to his disciples, and the disciples to the multitudes. Et cum jussisset turbam discumbere super fœnum, acceptis quinque panibus et duobus piscibus, aspiciens in cælum benedixit, et fregit, et dedit discipulis panes, discipuli autem turbis. και κελευσας τους οχλους ανακλιθηναι επι τους χορτους λαβων τους πεντε αρτους και τους δυο ιχθυας αναβλεψας εις τον ουρανον ευλογησεν και κλασας εδωκεν τοις μαθηταις τους αρτους οι δε μαθηται τοις οχλοις
20 And they did all eat, and were filled. And they took up what remained, twelve full baskets of fragments. Et manducaverunt omnes, et saturati sunt. Et tulerunt reliquias, duodecim cophinos fragmentorum plenos. και εφαγον παντες και εχορτασθησαν και ηραν το περισσευον των κλασματων δωδεκα κοφινους πληρεις
21 And the number of them that did eat, was five thousand men, besides women and children. Manducantium autem fuit numerus quinque millia virorum, exceptis mulieribus et parvulis. οι δε εσθιοντες ησαν ανδρες ωσει πεντακισχιλιοι χωρις γυναικων και παιδιων

30 posted on 08/03/2014 1:12:07 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
13. When Jesus heard of it, he departed thence by ship into a desert place apart: and when the people had heard thereof, they followed him on foot out of the cities.
14. And Jesus went forth, and saw a great multitude, and was moved with compassion toward them, and he healed their sick.

GLOSS; The Savior having heard the death of His Baptist, retired into the desert; as it follows, which when Jesus had heard, he departed thence by ship into a desert place.

AUG; This the Evangelist relates to have been done immediately after the passion of John, therefore after this were those things done that were spoken of above, and moved Herod to say, This is John. For we must suppose those things to been after his death which report carried to Herod, and which moved him to doubt who he could be concerning whom he heard such things; for himself had put John to death.

JEROME; He did not retire into the desert through fear of death, as some suppose, but in mercy to His enemies, that they might not add murder to murder; putting off His death till the day of His passion; on which day the lamb is to be slain as the sacrament, and the posts of them that believe to be sprinkled with the blood. Or, He retired to leave us an example to shun that rashness which leads men to surrender themselves voluntarily, because not all persevere with like constancy under torture with the which they offered themselves to it. For this reason He says in another place, When they shall persecute you in one city, flee you to another. Whence the Evangelist says not 'fled', but elegantly, departed thence, (or, 'withdrew') showing that He shunned rather than feared persecution. Or for another reason He might have withdrawn into a desert place on hearing of John's death, namely, to prove the faith of the believers.

CHRYS; Or; He did this because He desired to prolong the economy of His humanity, the time not being yet come for openly manifesting His deity; wherefore also He charged His disciples that they should tell no man that He was the Christ. But after His resurrection He would have this made manifest. Therefore although He knew of Himself what was done, yet before it was told Him He withdrew not, that He might show the verity of His incarnation in all things; for He would that this should be assured not by sight only, but by His actions. And when He withdrew, He did not go into the city, but into the desert by ship that none might follow Him. Yet do not the multitudes leave Him even for this, but still follow after Him, not deterred by what had been done concerning John; whence it follows, And when the multitudes had heard thereof, they followed him on foot out of the cities.

JEROME; They followed on foot, not riding, or in carriages, but with the toil of their own legs, to show the ardor of their mind.

CHRYS; And they immediately reap the reward of this; for it follows, And he went out and saw a great multitude, and he had compassion upon them, and healed their sick. For though great was the affection of those who had left their cities, and sought Him carefully, yet the things that were done by Him surpassed the reward of any zeal. Therefore he assigns compassion as the cause of this healing. And it is great compassion to heal all, and not to require faith.

HILARY; Mystically; The Word of God, on the close of the Law, entered the ship, that is, the Church; and departed into the desert, that is, leaving to walk with Israel, He passes into breasts void of Divine knowledge. The multitude learning this, follows the Lord out of the city into the desert, going, that is, from the Synagogue to the Church. The Lord sees them, and has compassion upon them, and heals all sickness and infirmity, that is, He cleanses their obstructed minds, and unbelieving hearts for the understanding of the new preaching.

JEROME; It is to be observed moreover, that when the Lord came into the desert, great crowds followed Him; for before He went into the wilderness of the Gentiles, He was worshipped by only one people. They leave their cities, that is, their former conversation, and various dogmas. That Jesus went out, shows that the multitudes had the will to go, but not the strength to attain, therefore the Savior departs out of His place and goes to meet them.

15. And when it was evening, his disciples came to him, saying, This is a desert place, and the time is now past; send the multitude away, that they may go into the villages, and buy themselves victuals.
16. But Jesus said to them, They need not depart; give you them to eat.
17. And they say to him, We have here but five loaves, and two fishes.
18. He said, Bring them hither to me.
19. And he commanded the multitude to sit down on the grass, and took the five loaves, and the two fishes, and looking up to heaven, he blessed, and broke, and gave the loaves to his disciples, and the disciples to the multitude.
20. And they did all eat, and were filled: and they took up of the fragments that remained twelve baskets full.
21. And they that had eaten were about five thousand men, beside women and children.

CHRYS; It is a proof of the faith of these multitudes that they endured hunger in waiting for the Lord even till evening; to which purpose it follows, And when it was evening his disciples came to him, saying, This is a desert place, and the time is now past. The Lord purposing to feed them waits to be asked, as always not stepping forward first to do miracles, but when called upon. None out of the crowd approached Him, both because they stood in great awe of Him, and because in their zeal of love they did not feel their hunger. But even the disciples do not come and say, Give them to eat, for the disciples were as yet in an imperfect condition; but they say, This is a desert place. So that what was proverbial among the Jews to express a miracle, as it is said, Can he spread a table in the wilderness? this also, He shows among his other works.

For this cause also He leads them out into the desert, that the miracle might be clear of all suspicion, and that none might suppose that any thing was supplied towards the feast from any neighboring town. But though the place be desert, yet is He there who feeds the world; and though the hour is, as they say, past, yet He who now commanded was not subjected to hours. And though the Lord had gone before His disciples in healing many sick, yet they were so imperfect that they could not judge what He would do concerning food for them, wherefore they add, Send the multitude away, that they may go into the towns, and buy themselves food. Observe the wisdom of the Master; He says not straightway to them, 'I will give them to eat'; for they would not easily have received this, but, Jesus said to them, They need not depart, Give you them to eat.

JEROME; Wherein He calls the Apostles to breaking of bread, that the greatness of the miracle might be more evident by their testimony that they had none.

AUG; It may perplex some how, if the Lord,, according to the relation of John, asked Philip whence bread was to be found for them, that can be true which Matthew here relates, that the disciples first prayed the Lord to send the multitudes away, that they might buy food from the nearest towns. Suppose then that after these words the Lord looked upon the multitude and said what John relates, but Matthew and the others have omitted. And by such cases as this none ought to be perplexed, when one of the Evangelists relates what the rest have omitted.

CHRYS; Yet not even by these words were the disciples set right, but speak yet to Him as to man; They answered to Him, We have here but five loaves and two fishes. From this we learn the philosophy of the disciples, how far they despised food; they were twelve in number, yet they had but five loaves and two fishes; for things of the body were contemned by them, they were altogether possessed by spiritual things.

But because the disciples were yet attracted to earth, the Lord begins to introduce the things that were of Himself; He said to them, Bring them here to me. Wherefore does He not create out of nothing the bread to feed the multitude with? That He might put to silence the mouth of Marcion and Manichaeus, who take away from God His creatures, and by His deeds might teach that all things, that are seen are His works and creation, and that it is He that has given us the fruits of the earth, who said in the, beginning, Let the earth bring forth the green herb; for this is no less a deed than that. For of five loaves to make many loaves, and fishes in like manner, is no less a thing than to bring fruits from the earth, reptiles and other living things from the waters; which showed Him to be Lord both of land and sea.

By the example of the disciples also we ought to be taught, that though we should have but little, we ought to give that to such as have need. For they when bid to bring their five loaves say not, Whence shall we satisfy our own hunger? but immediately obey; And He commanded the multitude to sit down on the grass, and took the five loaves and the two fishes, and looking up to heaven blessed them, and broke. Why did He look to heaven and bless? For it should be believed concerning Him that He is from the Father, and that He is equal with the Father. His equality He shows when He does all things with power. That He is from the Father He shows us by referring to Him whatsoever He does, and calling upon Him on all occasions.

To prove these two things therefore, He works His miracles at times with power, at other times with prayer. It should be considered also that in lesser things He looks to heaven, but in greater He does all with power. When He forgave sins, raised the dead, stilled the sea, opened the secrets of the heart, opened the eyes of him that was born blind, which were works only of God, He is not seen to pray; but when He multiplies the loaves, a work less than any of these, He looks up to heaven, that you may learn that even in little things He has no power but from His Father. And at the same time He teaches us not to touch our food, until we have returned thanks to Him who gives it us. For this reason also He looks up to heaven, because His disciples had examples of many other miracles, but none of this.

JEROME ; While the Lord breaks there is a sowing of food; for had the loaves been whole and not broken into fragments, and thus divided into a manifold harvest, they could not have fed so great a multitude. The multitude receives the food from the Lord through the Apostles; as it follows, And he gave the loaves to his disciples, and the disciples to the multitude.

CHRYS; In doing which He not only honored them, but would that upon this miracle they should not be unbelieving, nor forget it when it was past, seeing their own hands had borne witness to it. Therefore also He suffers the multitudes first to feel the sense of hunger, and His disciples to come to Him, and to ask Him, and He took the loaves at their hands, that they might have many testimonies of that that was done, and many things to remind them of the miracle. From this that He gave them, nothing more than bread and fish, and that He set this equally before all, He taught them moderation, frugality, and that charity by which they should have all things in common.

This He also taught them in the place, in making them sit down upon the grass; for He sought not to feed the body only, but to instruct the mind. But the bread and fish multiplied in the disciples' hands; whence it follows, And they did all eat, and were filled. But the miracle ended not here; for He caused to abound not only whole loaves, but fragments also; to show that the first loaves were not so much as what was left, and that they who were not present might learn what had been done, and that none might think that what had been done was a fantasy; And they took up fragments that were left, twelve baskets full.

JEROME; Each of the Apostles fills his basket of the fragments left by his Savior, that these fragments might witness that they were true loaves that were multiplied.

CHRYS; For this reason also He caused twelve baskets to remain over and above, that Judas might bear his basket. He took up the fragments, and gave them to the disciples and not to the multitudes, who were yet more imperfectly trained than the disciples.

JEROME; To the number of loaves, five, the number of the men that ate is apportioned, five thousand; And the number of them that had eaten was about five thousand men, besides women and children.

CHRYS; This was to the very great credit of the people, that the women and the men stood up when these remnants still remained.

HILARY; The five loaves are not multiplied into more but fragments succeed to fragments; the substance growing whether upon the tables, or in the hands that took them up, I know not.

RABAN; Then John is to describe this miracle, he first tells us that the passover is at hand; Matthew and Mark place it immediately after the execution of John. Hence we may gather, that he was beheaded when the paschal festival was near at hand, and that at the passover of the following year, the mystery of the Lord's passion was accomplished.

JEROME; But all these things are full of mysteries; the Lord does these things not in the morning, nor at noon, but in the evening, when the Sun of righteousness was set.

REMIG; By the evening the Lord's death is denoted; and after He, the true Sun, was set on the altar of the cross, He filled the hungry or by evening is denoted the last age of this world, in which the Son of God came and refreshed the multitudes of those that believed on Him.

RABAN; When the disciples ask the Lord to send away the multitudes that they might buy food in the towns, it signifies the pride of the Jews towards the multitudes of the Gentiles, whom they judged rather fit to seek for themselves food in the assemblies of the Pharisees than to use the pasture of the Divine books.

HILARY; But the Lord answered, They have no need to go, showing that those whom He heals have no need of the food of mercenary doctrine, and have no necessity to return to Judea to buy food; and He commands the Apostles that they give them food. Did He not know then that there was nothing to give them. But there was a complete series of types to be set forth; for as yet it was not given the Apostles to make and minister the heavenly bread, the food of eternal life; and their answer thus belongs to the chain of spiritual interpretation; they were as yet confined to the five loaves, that is, the five books of the Law, and the two fishes, that is, the preaching of the Prophets and of John.

RABAN; Or, by the two fishes we may understand the Prophets, and the Psalms, for the whole of the Old Testament was comprehended in these three, the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms.

HILARY; These therefore the Apostles first set forth, because they were yet in these things; and from these things the preaching of the Gospel grows to its more abundant strength and virtue. Then the people is commanded to sit down upon the grass, as no longer lying upon the ground, but resting upon the Law, each one reposing upon the fruit of his own works as upon the grass of the earth.

JEROME; Or, they are bid to lie down on the grass, and that, according to another Evangelist, by fifties and by hundreds, that after they have trampled upon their flesh, and have subjugated the pleasures of the world as dried grass under them, then by the presence of the number fifty, they ascend to the eminent perfection of a hundred. He looks up to heaven to teach us that our eyes are to be directed thither. The Law with the Prophets is broken, and in the midst of them are brought forward mysteries that whereas they partook not of it whole, when broken into pieces it may be food for the multitude of the Gentiles.

HILARY; Then the loaves are given to the Apostles' because through them the gifts of divine grace were to be rendered. And the number of them that did eat is found to be the same as that of those who should believe; for we find in the book of Acts that out of the vast number of the people of Israel, five thousand men believed.

JEROME; There partook five thousand who had reached maturity; for women and children, the weaker sex, and the tender age, were unworthy of number; thus in the book of Numbers, slaves, women, children, and an undistinguished crowd, are passed over unnumbered.

RABAN; The multitude being hungry, He creates no new viands, but having taken what the disciples had, He gave thanks. In like manner when He came in the flesh, He preached no other things than what had been foretold, but showed that the writings of the Law and the Prophets were big with mysteries. That which the multitude leave is taken up by the disciples, because the more secret mysteries which cannot be comprehended by the uninstructed, are not to be treated with neglect, but are to be diligently sought out by the twelve Apostles (who are represented by the twelve baskets) and their successors. For by baskets servile offices are performed, and God has chosen the weak things of the world to confound the strong. The five thousand for the five senses of the body are they who in a secular condition know how to use rightly things without.

Catena Aurea Matthew 14
31 posted on 08/03/2014 1:12:30 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Multiplication of the Loaves and Fishes

Early XIVth century
Church of the Holy Savior
Chora, Constantinople

32 posted on 08/03/2014 1:13:03 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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Marriage=One Man and One Woman 'Til Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for August 3, 2014:

“He withdrew in a boat to a deserted place by himself.” (Mt 14:13) It is important that we take time to pray and to be alone, even in our relationships. Discuss with your spouse different ways that you can both take time to be alone and have personal reflection time.

33 posted on 08/03/2014 1:30:20 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus Withdraws to a Deserted Place

Pastor’s Column

18th Sunday in Ordinary time

August 3, 2014

 

“When Jesus heard of the death of John the Baptist, he withdrew in a boat to a deserted place by himself.” Matthew 14:13

Who among us hasn’t wanted to get away from it all once in a while? Jesus was no different! Surrounded by people, almost all of whom wanted something from him, Jesus decided to get into a boat and take off for another part of the lake. It appears he also left the disciples behind. Jesus needed to be by himself for a time. Being alone can be a period either of loneliness, which is negative, or solitude, which is positive.

The scriptures regularly show Jesus carving out times to pray and be alone with God the Father, which was in fact essential to his ministry. Each of us, somehow, in some way, must find some quality time with God. We do this communally by attending Mass and individually in our personal prayer times. If even Jesus could not make it without down-time with God, how can I be any different? Jesus was interrupted in his solitude.

It is encouraging that even Jesus did not always succeed in his quest to be alone with God! The people have seen where Jesus’ boat was headed and followed around the shoreline on foot until they came to where Jesus was praying. Mother Theresa was once asked what she would do if a beggar came to the door and her community was at prayer before the Blessed Sacrament. Would she interrupt her prayer? She said that she would answer the door, as this would simply be the transferring of one form of Jesus’ presence, prayer, to that of Jesus present within the person whose need had presented itself at the door. Jesus’ prayer leads to action.

Jesus’ followers in this gospel are concerned because the vast crowd has arrived with little to eat. Jesus uses this “crisis” as a chance to teach the disciples something about the providence of God. He will take what little they have and multiply these few loaves and fishes to feed everyone present.

In the same way, my prayer and solitude times, if they are real encounters with God, will necessarily lead to a great commitment to being Christ to others. We may sometimes feel we do not have enough or that we are inadequate to the tasks God has given us in life, but God can multiply our small efforts to produce something truly great when we bring them to him in prayer and a lively faith. With God, all things are possible!

                                               

Father Gary


34 posted on 08/03/2014 1:51:24 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Reflections from Scott Hahn

Food in Due Season: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 08.01.14 |

Readings:
Isaiah 55:1-3
Psalm 145:8-9, 15-18
Romans 8:35,37-39
Matthew 14:13-21

In Jesus and the Church, Isaiah’s promises in today’s First Reading are fulfilled. All who are thirsty come to the living waters of baptism (see John 4:14). The hungry delight in rich fare - given bread to eat and wine to drink at the Eucharistic table.

This is the point, too, of today’s Gospel. The story of Jesus’ feeding of the 5,000 brims with allusions to the Old Testament. Jesus is portrayed as a David-like shepherd who leads His flock to lie down on green grass as He spreads the table of the Messiah’s banquet before them (see Psalm 23).

Jesus is shown as a new Moses, who likewise feeds vast crowds in a deserted place. Finally, Jesus is shown doing what the prophet Elisha did - satisfying the hunger of the crowd with a few loaves and having some left over (see 2 Kings 4:42-44).

Matthew also wants us to see the feeding of the 5,000 as a sign of the Eucharist. Notice that Jesus performs the same actions in the same sequence as at the Last Supper - He takes bread, says a blessing, breaks it, and gives it (see Matthew 26:26).

Jesus instructed His apostles to celebrate the Eucharist in memory of Him. And the ministry of the Twelve is subtly stressed in today’s account. Before He performs the miracle, Jesus instructs the Twelve to give the crowd “some food yourselves.” Indeed, the apostles themselves distribute the bread blessed by Jesus (see Matthew 15:36).

And the leftovers are enough to fill precisely 12 baskets - corresponding to each of the apostles, the pillars of the Church (see Galatians 2:9; Revelation 21:14).

In the Church, as we sing in today’s Psalm, God gives us food in due season, opens His hands and satisfies the desires of every living thing. Now, as Paul reminds us in today’s Epistle, nothing can separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus.


35 posted on 08/03/2014 2:03:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Scripture Study

Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle A

August 3, 2014

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Isaiah 55:1-3

Psalm: 145:8-9,15-18

Second Reading: Romans 8:35,37-39 

Gospel Reading: Matthew 14:13-21

 

QUESTIONS:

Closing Prayer

Catechism of the Catholic Church:  §§ 1335, 1329, 549

 

He is generous even to exhaustion; and what is most wonderful is that He gives Himself thus entirely; not once only, but every day, if we wish it. Every fresh Communion is a new gift which Jesus Christ makes of Himself.    -St. Ignatius Loyola

36 posted on 08/03/2014 2:07:56 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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18th Sunday: The hand of the Lord Feeds Us

 

 

 

"http://usccb.org/bible/readings/080314.cfm


Is 55: 1-3
Rm 8: 35, 37-39
Mt 14: 13-21

You have probably heard about the restaurant in North Carolina that offers a 15% discount on your bill if the owners notice you prayed before digging in to your meal. No one is being paid to pray and they do this apparently by random, not saying anything until the bill is given, but by simply observing their patrons.  

 

Well, that unusual offer may have been a secret until now and quietly effective.  But since hitting the national news, I bet everyone will suddenly become religious as their meal is delivered in hopes of receiving the discount! While there is nothing wrong with everyone praying before their meal, a good practice certainly, the purpose may now be defeated.  

 

However, the original intent of the restaurant owners was indeed a good one, albeit unique.  By giving the discount they are actually acknowledging a practice on which there can be no monetary price.  Prayer is free. And who doesn’t love free?    

 

We hear something similar in this Sunday’s readings, particularly from Isaiah: “All who are thirsty come to the water!  You who have no money, come, receive grain and eat; come, without paying and without cost, drink wine and milk!”  There is no discount, no bill to pay but only to accept the invitation.   

 

The sign of Jesus’ multiplication of the loaves and the fish is a fleshing out of Isaiah’s promise from God; a sign of abundance.  That God gives far more than we deserve or could ever equal is clear. We are on the receiving end of a generous God.

 

The feeding of the hungry crowds along the Sea of Galilee is mentioned more often in the Gospels than any other miracle event: seven times. This makes that event significant in the memory of the early Christians, some of who may have been in the crowd that amazing evening.

 

The rich Eucharistic theme of this story must have been evident as the early Christian assemblies gathered for the breaking of bread.  In the bread and fish they must have seen Christ feeding them through the Eucharist as they understood it to be.  It was a sign of their unity and a mark of God’s abundance that stood with them in the midst of their gatherings.

 

In the familiar story, which has encountered a variety of interpretations, it is clear that one truth stands out:  Jesus feeds a hungry crowd as God once fed the wandering people in the desert with Moses. 

Remember the hungry Hebrews in the desert with Moses?  Hungry and thirsty they cry out, “Why did you bring us here?”  Moses prays on their behalf and God gives them water from the rock and manna from heaven.  Here Jesus is about to provide another manna – more than the crowds expect

Here, Matthew makes their hunger palpable: “The disciples approached Jesus and said, ‘this is a deserted place and it is already late; dismiss the crowds so that they can go to the villages and buy food for themselves.” Jesus responds: “Give them some food yourselves.”  We know that all they offered was “five loaves and two fish.”  

 

Why would the disciples have so little for themselves?  They obviously did not plan on feeding this multitude before Jesus suggested they do so. Maybe they had been snacking all day and this is all that was left.  It’s clear that not only are they in a deserted place along with Jesus and the crowds but they also have little left to share even among themselves let alone a massive crowd.

So, in this place of nothing, abundance is provided as the “five thousand men, not counting women and children” are fed more than they can eat - hunger, desolation, and God’s provident care.  In the end, the result was the unifying of a previously disparate crowd. The Eucharistic themes are clear.

Still, God’s generosity through Jesus is not something unfortunately that we often think about.  We often feel that God thinks like we do.  That he measures out everything in order to be fair and weighs our sin against the good we do then responds accordingly through punishment or reward. If I was God, and clearly I am not, that’s probably what I would do.

 

However, as God’s invitation is offered to us we see his very nature is one to give and invite.  He does not want us to go hungry or thirsty. But our salvation depends on whether we accept or reject what he offers.

 

In the Holy Eucharist we are offered the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ who wants to feed us. And as we are fed, like the crowds, we are united as one in Christ as brothers and sisters in the Lord.

 

 

Our lives may feel like we walk in a deserted place.  Or, maybe we are simply hungry for more direction, more meaning and purpose in life. Maybe I’ve recognized that I’m so self-absorbed with my own problems or am too comfortable to really care significantly about others.  

 

Wherever I find myself, the invitation is always offered. While this isn’t free food since a price was paid for it, Jesus’ own death and resurrection, we too are called not too just grab it like ungrateful children but to receive it and change to become more like him.  The price of allowing ourselves to be transformed into the image of Christ each day is indeed priceless.  No discount needed.

 

Graciously sanctify these gifts, O Lord, we pray,

and, accepting the oblation of this spiritual sacrifice,

make of us an eternal offering to you.

Through Christ our Lord.

(Prayer over the Offerings)


37 posted on 08/03/2014 2:20:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes is a Microcosm of Salvation History

"The Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes" ("La multipliciteì de pains"; 1886-96) by James Tissot (WikiArt.org)

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, August 3, 2014 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Isa 55:1-3
• Psa 145:8-9, 15-16, 17-18
• Rom 8:35, 37-39
• Matt 14:13-21

The story of the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand is well known. It appears in all four of the Gospels and is told with an understated simplicity that speaks to the historical veracity of the event and to the supernatural power at the heart of it. There are many levels to the narrative, beginning with the literal one: Jesus, moved with great pity, miraculously fed the hungry crowds that followed him into the wilderness.

But to better appreciate this story, proclaimed into today’s Gospel, we should be mindful of what St. Matthew wrote about immediately prior: the violent and heinous murder of John the Baptist by Herod the tetrarch (Mt 14:1-12). John had been imprisoned because he publicly rebuked Herod—who considered himself a Jew—for marrying his sister-in-law Herodias (who previous husband was still alive), a violation of the Law’s teaching against incest (cf. Lev 18:16; 20:21). Herod, bound by a rash promise made at his birthday celebration, ordered the execution of John, who was beheaded in prison.

A number of contrasts emerge. The violent and egomaniac Herod is contrasted with Jesus, who is moved by pity, mercy, and love. Herod grasped after earthy power and pleasures; Jesus, on the other hand, reached out in humility to the townspeople who hungered for his words. They are the ones who, as best they could, followed the exhortation of the Lord spoken through the prophet Isaiah: “Heed me, and you shall eat well … Come to me heedfully, listen, that you might have life.”

While Herod feasted in a palace and shed innocent blood, Jesus and his followers ate simple food miraculously multiplied. And in doing so, as the Gospel of John emphasizes, Jesus taught how his innocent body and blood would be given up as true food and true drink (Jn 6:48-59).

Herod was a self-serving man driven by strong and sinful passions: lust, violence, anger. Jesus was perfectly oriented to the will of his Father, continually spending time in prayer so he could bring light and life to those dwelling in darkness and in the shadow of death. “In Herod”, writes Erasmo Leiva-Merikakis in Fire of Mercy, Heart of the World (Ignatius, 2003), “we see an instance of fear breeding a hatred that must destroy what it fears, while Jesus, free of fear, has the freedom to see misery for what it is and the power to pour himself out in response.”

The multiplication of the loaves and fishes is a microcosm of salvation history, a concrete demonstration of how the Incarnation reaches man where he lives so men can live where he cannot reach on his own.

The miracle of the feeding of the five thousand was both a reminder and a promise. It surely brought to mind how the prophet Elisha fed a hundred men with twenty loaves of barley and “had some left” (2 Kg 2:42-44), a miracle performed by “the word of the Lord”. And Jesus directly connected his ability to feed thousands with very little to the miracle of the manna (Jn 6:30-40).

But the feeding was also a miraculous foreshadowing and anticipation of the great gift of the Eucharist. In the Blessed Sacrament, the everlasting covenant anticipated by Isaiah and others comes to full fruition. In it, divine gift and abundance are perfectly realized and offered. “The miracles of the multiplication of the loaves,” states the Catechism of the Catholic Church, “when the Lord says the blessing, breaks and distributes the loaves through his disciples to feed the multitude, prefigure the superabundance of this unique bread of his Eucharist” (par 1335).

Finally, notice that Jesus first told the disciples to feed the people on their own. He wanted them to recognize their limits—not to humiliate them, but to teach them true humility. With this humility we can say, in the words of the Psalmist: “The hand of the Lord feeds us; he answers all our needs.”

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the July 31, 2011, editon of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


38 posted on 08/03/2014 2:33:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Regnum Christi

In the Presence of the Father
U. S. A. | SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
August 3, 2014. Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Matthew 14: 13-21

Now when Jesus heard this, he withdrew from there in a boat to a deserted place by himself. But when the crowds heard it, they followed him on foot from the towns. When he went ashore, he saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them and cured their sick. When it was evening, the disciples came to him and said, "This is a deserted place, and the hour is now late; send the crowds away so that they may go into the villages and buy food for themselves." Jesus said to them, "They need not go away; you give them something to eat." They replied, "We have nothing here but five loaves and two fish." And he said, "Bring them here to me." Then he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds. And all ate and were filled; and they took up what was left over of the broken pieces, twelve baskets full. And those who ate were about five thousand men, besides women and children.

Introductory Prayer: Lord Jesus, I believe you want me to have faith in you, faith that hearkens to your words without any second guessing. I hope in your words, not relying solely on my own strength or reasoning. I love you. You continue to astonish me by showing me that your ways are not my ways.

Petition: Lord Jesus, let me know you more intimately.

1. Heart-to-Heart with His Father: There is no greater joy than spending some quality time, one-on-one, with the person we love the most. We may have heard our dad say, “Let your mother and I spend some time together”, or “We are going on our second honeymoon.” It is also like the dad who treats his kids to a special dinner to celebrate something special – just father and son; father and daughter. Special things happen when we open our hearts to the one we love. Christ did this a lot. Always united to his Father, he treasured the moments of solitude he could spend speaking with him of the things they loved.

2. A Magnanimous Heart: After his love for the Father, Christ’s greatest love is us. He cannot stand to see us in need. Like any father, friend or brother, his heart melts when he sees us suffering. Christ always came back from the heart-to-heart times with his Father with a keen awareness of the needs of others and of ways to remedy any problem. It was so natural, almost effortless. Our own growth in virtue is directly related to how much time we spend in real, personal and passionate prayer with our Lord. From these heart-to-hearts, virtue grows and overtakes us in a very natural way, because our Lord’s love is contagious.

3. Nothing Is Impossible for God: God can perform miracles whenever he wants and however he wants. Nothing can hold him back. Still we often ask ourselves, “Why doesn’t Christ perform the miracle that I need in my life – my health problem, my work, my spouse, my children?” Could it be that we’re seeking something less than what He wishes to give us? God has a plan for each of our lives. It includes moments of great joys and of crosses. At times we may not understand God’s plan, but that’s when we need to pray all the more and entrust ourselves to him even more than before. It is only through humble, constant, urgent prayer that we’ll receive the answers to our heart-wrenching questions and the grace we need to carry the cross courageously and lovingly, following in the footsteps of the one who shows us the way by carrying our cross first.

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, help me to know you better as the one who loves me more than anyone else in the world. There’s so much noise and so many things and activities that compete for the time I would like to spend with you. Help me to make you the true priority in my life. I know this will bring order and peace to my life.

Resolution: I will spend five minutes before our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament today.


39 posted on 08/03/2014 2:42:36 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Free Food that Satisfies

August 3, 2014
Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading: Isaiah 55:1-3
http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/080314.cfm

In an age of obesity, free food sounds like a bad idea. We tend to take food for granted—and free food in our culture tends to be unhealthy. Besides, we can’t even get a little enthusiastic about free drinking water. Certain metaphors lose their flavor over time and Isaiah’s proclamation of a free feast with free water in this Sunday’s first reading is no different. However, that doesn’t mean that it is not worth the effort to track down its original power.

Context

This three-verse reading comes at the beginning of Isaiah 55, a chapter that caps off a much longer section often referred to as “Second Isaiah,” chapters 40–55. This long sixteen-chapter section moves the Book of Isaiah from an era of judgment and vindication to an era of hope, redemption and mercy. Chapter 55 ends this redemptive section with a poetic climax.

“Hey!”

In Hebrew, the reading begins with an interjection, hoy! Unfortunately, this word is hard to translate in a dignifiedly biblical-sounding way so many translations just leave it out. The prophet is trying to get our attention in the same way that a baseball stadium hawker will yell “Hot pretzels!” In English, we don’t use interjections much, but we could translate this word as “Ahoy!,” “Yo!” or Hey!” It launches this concluding chapter with an exhortation to listen up. To me, it sounds like a coach calling his team together to get the final pep talk before the big game starts. When God’s prophet says “Hey!” our ears should perk up.

Hunger and Thirst

For the thirsty, the prophet envisions a time of restoration, a time redemption, a time after the exile when the Jews will be brought back to the Promised Land of Israel and enjoy a special covenant relationship with God. He is not describing mere physical thirst, but the deep, generations-long, thirst for justice, for the fulfillment of God’s promises, for freedom from enemies and overlords. God’s people long for a time of restored peace and covenant love. “Every one who thirsts” (Isa 55:1 RSV) are those who “hunger and thirst for righteousness,” in Jesus’ words (Matt 5:6), both in a personal and corporate sense. While the prophecy speaks to a certain moment in the history of God’s people, it points forward to all the kinds of restoration that God can bring about and ultimately to the greatest restoration of all.

Free Food and Water

To satisfy such a deep hunger and thirst for God and his justice, Isaiah offers an ironic portrait: buy without cost! He suggests that people who have no money should “buy” grain, wine, and milk. (Some translations avoid confusion by not using a word to translate “buying,” but the Hebrew text uses it twice.) It’s a befuddling but beautiful poetic idea, to buy without cost. The only thing I can compare it to is using a coupon to obtain an item for free, but even in that case there is an exchange. The point is that in the time of God’s restoration of his people, our needs will be satisfied by God. His water and his food will reach to the deepest places of our hungry and thirsty hearts and abundantly quench our desires.

What is Bread?

The prophet warns against using one’s wages to buy “that which is not bread” or “that which does not satisfy” (Isa 55:2 RSV). Why would anyone go to the grocery store with money and come back without food? Isaiah is talking about squandering our wealth, whether it be by investing too permanently in the land of exile, Babylon, or by investing ourselves in that which takes us away from God and away from his true purposes for our lives. It is very easy for us to waste time, waste money, waste energy in all sorts of ways that don’t help anyone, even ourselves. Isaiah encourages us to invest ourselves well, to buy the bread that really does satisfy and save ourselves the trouble of investing foolishly in what cannot satisfy.

A Destiny of Delight

For those who work hard, work can become an end in itself. If we lose sight of the goal, we might lose heart or get lost in the woods. Isaiah points us back to the end goal of covenant with God: delight. Isaiah recalls the everlasting covenant with David as the destiny that will re-animate God’s people after the exile. As Christians, we too participate in the fulfillment of God’s promise of God’s promises to David. The prophet’s portrait of what fulfillment looks like demonstrates satisfying delight in wonderfully human terms. Water, grain, bread, wine, and milk all lead us back to an idyllic sounding, peaceful life. Wine and milk especially indicate an agricultural paradise with well-kept, productive vineyards, and the prosperity necessary for a successful dairy farm. He even goes beyond these simple ideas to say that we’ll “eat what is good” and, translated most literally, “let your soul delight in fatness.” Now if that doesn’t get you invigorated about enjoying the eschatological banquet, I don’t know what will!

While Isaiah’s prophecy speaks to a certain people at a certain time, it extends to us to explain how God works and to point the way to our future with him. This reading is paired with the gospel of the feeding of the five thousand. Both readings reveal that mere bread, mere human food is not enough. Our souls long with a deep thirst for something far greater, far deeper, far more satisfying than regular bread. The beginning of that fulfillment starts with the life, ministry, death and resurrection of Jesus, with the Eucharist, the Sacraments and the Church. But God’s plan of salvation is not yet finished. We look forward to the deepest quenching of our thirsty souls at the end, when the Lord comes to tell the end of his story and hand out that free food and water once and for all.


40 posted on 08/03/2014 2:53:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Scripture Speaks: Eat and Be Filled

Today, Jesus has pity on a vast, hungry crowd; the miracle He performs has profound Eucharistic meaning.

Gospel (Read Mt 14:13-21)

Our reading begins with a description of Jesus’ response to the news of the death of John the Baptist: “He withdrew in a boat to a deserted place by Himself.” Surely He had withdrawn to mourn in solitude the martyrdom of His cousin, whom He had once described as the greatest man born of woman (Mt 11:11). John died at the whim of people who refused to listen to the prophet’s call to repentance (read Mt 14:1-12). A fancy birthday party, in a palace filled with guests and fine food, ended in the death of the precursor to the Messiah. Upon hearing this, Jesus heads for a place as far from a scene like that as He can get, a “deserted place.”

It doesn’t stay deserted for long, however. The crowds who are looking for Him, who want to see and hear Him, leave their towns “on foot” and travel to find Him. He is moved by their neediness and their willingness to search Him out, even in a place where there will be nothing to eat (and perhaps where Herod’s wrath will next send its searchlight). In response, “He cured their sick.”

When evening falls and hunger sets in, the disciples decide it’s time to send the crowd home. Jesus has a different idea: “There is no need for them to go away; give them some food yourselves.” This crowd of people, hungry for Jesus, will not be turned away in hunger. The disciples try to reason with Him: “Five loaves and two fish are all we have here.” They are making calculations in their heads; this is not going to work.

Jesus tells them to bring the meager supply of food to Him, and then He orders the crowds “to sit on the grass.” Why did St. Matthew include this detail? As a Jew, writing for a largely Jewish audience, is he helping his readers to “see” an image so familiar to them from their Scriptures? “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want; He makes me lie down in green pastures…You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies…my cup overflows” (Ps 23:1-2, 5).   This “grassy” place of recline for God’s hungry people brings to life all the many places in Scripture where God provides food for His beloved covenant faithful (be sure to read Gen 1:29-30; Ex 16; 2 Kings 4:42-44). Then, just as St. Matthew helps us understand that all God’s Old Covenant promises to nourish His people are being summed up in this scene, he also helps us understand that it is a foreshadowing of the True Nourishment Jesus will provide in the Eucharist. Notice the verbs in the action recorded here: “take…bless…broke…gave.” They are exactly the same verbs that appear in St. Matthew’s account of the Last Supper (see Mt 26:26). There is no way to miss the profound significance of this miracle, the only to appear in all four Gospels. What else about this scene should we be sure not to miss?

First, Jesus gives the food to the disciples for distribution. We can see in this the future vocation of His priests, who will likewise feed God’s hungry people with the Bread of Heaven. See that “all ate and were satisfied.” Hungry no more! Finally, St. Matthew tells us there was a superabundance of food that day, enough to feed all the people to the full and more, much more, besides.

Now that St. Matthew has drawn the parallel between this scene and the Eucharist for us, we can savor all its lessons. Physical hunger, which every human being knows and understands, is a metaphor for a spiritual hunger present in every soul, too. Jesus’ gift of His Body and Blood in the Eucharist is meant to satiate that spiritual hunger. What Jesus gives us at Mass is a superabundant gift, enough to fill us, with more to spare. Only on the other side, when all is revealed, will we understand “the twelve wicker baskets full” of leftovers. Who else in the world, besides those of us at Mass receiving the sacrament, get fed by this more-than-enough outpouring of God’s love and mercy? This is a mystery that keeps life interesting.

Think again of the contrast between the rich partying in Herod’s palace that led to death, and the poor, hungry crowds who came only with their needs to Jesus, yet were happily satisfied with a banquet in “a deserted place.” Pondering that contrast prepares us for our next reading.

Possible response: Lord Jesus, what a gift it is to know that when I go to Mass, I will never be turned away in hunger. Thank You, Bread of Heaven.

First Reading (Read Isa 55:1-3)

Historically, this prophecy comes in the Book of Isaiah, when God warned His people of coming judgment on their sins, but also promised a time of restoration. These verses are a glorious prophecy of that restoration, told entirely in terms of food. God promises to feed His people in the truly nourishing food of bread and wine. This is a meal that can’t be bought with money: “Come, without paying and without cost.” Food bought for consumption and not accompanied by a hunger for God Himself (Herod’s party?) cannot possibly satisfy: “Why spend your money for what is not bread; your wages for what fails to satisfy?” The crowds seated on the grass, in a “deserted place” with Jesus, were the ones who experienced fullness: “Come to Me, heedfully; listen, that you may have life.” The Eucharistic meal, offered through the hands of priests, begins to fulfill Isaiah’s joyous invitation to eat the food only God can provide. At the same time, the Eucharistic celebration is, itself, a foreshadowing of the Bridal Feast of Heaven, when spiritual hunger and thirst end forever.

Possible response: Heavenly Father, how often I have tried to fill my hunger with that which fails to satisfy. Increase my appetite for You!

Psalm (Read Ps 145: 8-9, 15-18)

This psalm gives poetic expression to the constant theme of all salvation history: God is the Great Provider for His people. Our physical hunger is a drive given to us to teach about hunger for God, too. The psalmist describes this perfectly: “The eyes of all look hopefully to You, and You give them their food in due season; You open Your hand and satisfy the desire of every living thing.” The Gospel reading gives us a detailed scene to burn this into our memories forever. Let us sing with the psalmist: “The hand of the Lord feeds us; He answers all our needs.”

Possible response: The psalm is, itself, a response to the other lectionary readings. Read it again prayerfully as your own.

Second Reading (Read Rom 8:35, 37-39)

This epistle reading is an elaboration of our psalm response today. If we want to know how the Lord “answers all our needs,” demonstrated in our other readings by the supply of satisfying food (our most basic need), St. Paul is happy to explain. He runs through a detailed list of many things that might seem to make our neediness more powerful than God’s love for us. And it’s quite a list! Starting on earth, inside of us (anguish, distress), moving through earthly realities (famine, the sword), and then onto celestial ones (angels, principalities), St. Paul assures us that in all these tests of our faith in God’s personal care for us, we must know this one truth: “in all these things we conquer overwhelmingly through Him Who loved us.” Nothing in creation can separate us from that love—nothing but our own departure from it (remember Herod).

Possible response: Lord Jesus, how easily I let my neediness defeat me. Help me to turn it over to You for victory.


41 posted on 08/03/2014 2:55:59 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Español

All Issues > Volume 30, Issue 5

<< Sunday, August 3, 2014 >> 18th Sunday Ordinary Time
 
Isaiah 55:1-3
Romans 8:35, 37-39

View Readings
Psalm 145:8-9, 15-18
Matthew 14:13-21

Similar Reflections
 

CLOSING THE DEAL

 
"Give them something to eat yourselves." —Matthew 14:16
 

Jesus has placed His disciples in a fantastic position. On one side there is the human race, which continually grows hungry and has a daily need for food. On the other side is the Lord, Who has a continual desire to feed, nourish, and even satisfy hungry humanity (see Ps 81:11, 17; Mt 14:20). God has placed us, as His disciples, between Him and the rest of mankind, and charges us with feeding His people (Mt 14:16; Jn 21:15ff). We are God's middlemen, His ambassadors (2 Cor 5:20), charged with bringing the two parties together.

This is an ambassador's dream: one party with an unceasing demand, and the other Party with an unlimited ability and unceasing desire to supply that demand (see Lk 22:15). In the business world, candidates would compete for this kind of job opportunity and would flock en masse to interview for it, even if there were tough conditions involved. Most salespeople would eagerly tackle this challenge, aggressively and creatively finding ways to get the parties together. In the religious world, we don't seem to respond as eagerly at this prospect of being ambassadors.

Let's ask the Lord to give us His heart, a heart moved with compassion for all people (Mt 14:14). He constantly desires to fill the mouths of hungry humanity with His Word and Eucharist (Ps 81:11), whether or not they appreciate Him. He will give us His heart for His people in such a way that we will find rest (Mt 11:29) rather than distress (Nm 11:15) in feeding them. "Go out now and take your place" (Acts 5:20) as God's ambassadors.

 
Prayer: Sacred Heart of Jesus, make my heart like unto Thine. Give me Your desire to feed Your loved ones (Jn 21:15).
Promise: "All those present ate their fill." —Mt 14:20
Praise: Praise the risen Jesus, Who is the Word-Made-Flesh, now and forever! (Jn 1:14)

42 posted on 08/03/2014 2:59:54 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

To My Unborn Child

To my unborn child,
what I wish to give you in times to come,
happiness, and wisdom,
a life filled with fun,
to explore all adventures of your curious mind,
to become knowledgeable of what you'll find,
as I await your arrival and the presence of newborn cries,
I picture how you'll look when I open up my eyes.
I feel your movements every time I wake each day,
letting mommy know that you're okay,
obstacles I hope you'll overcome,
education I know you'll get done,
I stay up late reading to you,
talking to my stomach,
a feeling I never knew,
hungry all the time
'No doubt you're a son of mine',
You make me feel happy even when I'm sad,
because the formation of another life makes me glad.
Proud of you I am,
I already know how you'll be,
a smart 'lil' man for mommy to see,
no worries from me a mom to be,
to a special baby boy I can't wait to see.


43 posted on 08/03/2014 3:14:36 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Part 3: Life in Christ (1691 - 2557)

Section 2: The Ten Commandments (2052 - 2557)

Chapter 2: You Shall Love Your Neighbor as Yourself (2196 - 2557)

Article 4: The Fourth Commandment (2197 - 2257)

Jesus said to his disciples: "Love one another even as I have loved you."1

Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long in the land which the Lord your God gives you.4

He was obedient to them.5

The Lord Jesus himself recalled the force of this "commandment of God."6 The Apostle teaches: "Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right. 'Honor your father and mother,' (This is the first commandment with a promise.) 'that it may be well with you and that you may live long on the earth."'7

IV. THE FAMILY AND THE KINGDOM

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Family ties are important but not absolute. Just as the child grows to maturity and human and spiritual autonomy, so his unique vocation which comes from God asserts itself more clearly and forcefully. Parents should respect this call and encourage their children to follow it. They must be convinced that the first vocation of the Christian is to follow Jesus: "He who loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; and he who loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me."39

1.

Jn 13:34.

4.

Ex 20:12; Deut 5:16.

5.

Lk 2:51.

6.

Mk 7:8-13.

7.

Eph 6:1-3; cf. Deut 5:16.

39.

Mt 10:37; cf. 16:25.

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2233

Becoming a disciple of Jesus means accepting the invitation to belong to God's family, to live in conformity with His way of life: "For whoever does the will of my Father in heaven is my brother, and sister, and mother."40

Parents should welcome and respect with joy and thanksgiving the Lord's call to one of their children to follow him in virginity for the sake of the Kingdom in the consecrated life or in priestly ministry.

40.

Mt 12:49.

V. THE AUTHORITIES IN CIVIL SOCIETY

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God's fourth commandment also enjoins us to honor all who for our good have received authority in society from God. It clarifies the duties of those who exercise authority as well as those who benefit from it.

Duties of civil authorities

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Those who exercise authority should do so as a service. "Whoever would be great among you must be your servant."41 The exercise of authority is measured morally in terms of its divine origin, its reasonable nature and its specific object. No one can command or establish what is contrary to the dignity of persons and the natural law.

41.

Mt 20:26.

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The exercise of authority is meant to give outward expression to a just hierarchy of values in order to facilitate the exercise of freedom and responsibility by all. Those in authority should practice distributive justice wisely, taking account of the needs and contribution of each, with a view to harmony and peace. They should take care that the regulations and measures they adopt are not a source of temptation by setting personal interest against that of the community.42

42.

Cf. CA 25.

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Political authorities are obliged to respect the fundamental rights of the human person. They will dispense justice humanely by respecting the rights of everyone, especially of families and the disadvantaged.

The political rights attached to citizenship can and should be granted according to the requirements of the common good. They cannot be suspended by public authorities without legitimate and proportionate reasons. Political rights are meant to be exercised for the common good of the nation and the human community.


44 posted on 08/04/2014 4:21:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

http://resources.sainteds.com/showmedia.asp?media=../sermons/homily/2014-08-03-Homily%20Fr%20Gary.mp3&ExtraInfo=0&BaseDir=../sermons/homily


45 posted on 08/10/2014 1:35:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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