Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

A Textbook That Should Live in Infamy: The Common Core Assaults World War II
Townhall.com ^ | December 2, 2013 | Terrence Moore

Posted on 12/03/2013 10:53:51 AM PST by Kaslin

Saturday the 7th of December will mark the seventy-second anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The commemoration of that “date which will live in infamy” brings up memories of more than Pearl Harbor but of the entire American effort in World War II: of the phenomenal production of planes and tanks and munitions by American industry; of millions of young men enlisting (with thousands lying about their age to get into the service); of the men who led the war, then and now seeming larger than life—Churchill and F.D.R., Eisenhower and MacArthur, Monty and Patton; and of the battles themselves in which uncommon valor was a common virtue: Midway, D-Day, Guadalcanal, and Iwo Jima, to name only a few. Most of us today do not know those events directly but have encountered them in history books. And when we think of World War II, the people who come to mind first are our grandparents: the men and women of the Greatest Generation who are our surest link to the past.

One of the most vital questions for us—grandchildren of the Greatest Generation—is how we will preserve their memory. Ours is the much easier but still important task of making sure that subsequent generations understand the heroism and sacrifice needed to keep America—and indeed the world—safe, prosperous, and free during the grave crisis that was the Second World War. Presumably these lessons not only honor our forebears, who passed on a free and great nation to us, but they also set the example of how we must meet the challenges and crises of our own time. A glance at one of the nation’s leading high-school literature textbooks—Prentice Hall’s The American Experience, which has been aligned to the Common Core—will tell us how we are doing on that front.

The opening page of the slim chapter devoted to World War II called “War Shock” features a photograph of a woman inspecting a large stockpile of thousand-pound bomb castings. The notes in the margins of the Teacher’s Edition set the tone:

In this section, nonfiction prose and a single stark poem etch into a reader’s mind the dehumanizing horror of world war. . . .

The editors of the textbook script the question teachers are supposed to ask students in light of the photograph as well as provide the answer:

Ask: What dominant impression do you take away from this photograph?

Possible response: Students may say that the piled rows of giant munitions give a strong impression of America’s power of mass production and the bombs’ potential for mass destruction.

Translation: Americans made lots of big bombs that killed lots of people.

The principal selection of the chapter is taken from John Hersey’s Hiroshima. It is a description of ordinary men and women in Hiroshima living out their lives the day the bomb was dropped. A couple of lines reveal the spirit of the document:

The Reverend Mr. Tanimoto got up at five o’clock that morning. He was alone in the parsonage, because for some time his wife had been commuting with their year-old baby to spend nights with a friend in Ushida, a suburb to the north.

Further prompts from the margins of the Teacher’s Edition indicate how the selection is to be read and taught:

World War II has been called a popular war in which the issues that spurred the conflict were clearly defined. . . . Nevertheless, technological advances . . . [and the media] brought home the horrors of war in a new way. Although a serious antiwar movement in the United States did not become a reality until the 1960s, these works by Hersey and by Jarrell take their place in the ranks of early antiwar literature.

Have students think about and record in writing their personal feelings about war. Encourage students to list images of war that they recall vividly. [Conveniently, there is a photograph of the devastation in Hiroshima next to this prompt].

Tell students they will revisit their feelings about war after they have read these selections.

The entire section is littered with questions and prompts in this vein and plenty of photos that show the destruction of Hiroshima. In case the students would be inclined to take the American side in this conflict, the editors see to it that teachers will remind the students repeatedly that there are two sides in every war:

Think Aloud: Model the Skill
Say to students:
When I was reading the history textbook, I noticed that the writer included profiles of three war heroes, all of whom fought for the Allies. The writer did not include similar profiles for fighters on the other side. I realize that this choice reflects a political assumption: that readers want to read about only their side’s heroes.

. . . Mr. Tanimoto is on the side of “the enemy.” Explain that to vilify is to make malicious statements about someone. During wartime, it is common to vilify people on the other side, or “the enemy.”

After a dozen pages of Hersey’s Hiroshima (the same number given to Benjamin Franklin in volume one of The American Experience), students encounter the anti-war, anti-heroic poem by Randall Jarell, “The Death of the Ball Turrett Gunner.” The last line in this short poem sums up the sentiment: “When I died they washed me out of the turret with a hose.” The textbook editors zero in for the kill:

Take a position: Jarrell based his poem on observations of World War II, a war that has been called “the good war.” Is there such a thing as a “good war”? Explain.

Possible response: [In the Teacher’s Edition] Students may concede that some wars, such as World War II, are more justified than others, but may still feel that “good” is not an appropriate adjective for any war.

So, class, what are your “feelings” about war—and World War II in particular—now that you have read these two depressing selections in “early anti-war literature”?

There is more than a little sophistry taking place here: an alarming superficiality and political bias that pervades all the Common Core textbooks (as I have illustrated in my book The Story-Killers: A Common Sense Case Against the Common Core). There is no reading in this chapter ostensibly devoted to World War II that tells why America entered the war. There is no document on Pearl Harbor or the Rape of Nanking or the atrocities committed against the Jews or the bombing of Britain. The book contains no speech of Winston Churchill or F.D.R. even though the reading of high-caliber “informational texts” is the new priority set by the Common Core, and great rhetoric has always been the province of an English class. There is not a single account of a battle or of American losses or of the liberation of Europe. The editors do not balance Jarrell’s poem with the much more famous war song “Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition” that ends with the line, “And we’ll all stay free!” The rest of this chapter consists in a poster of a junk rally to gather metals for the making of munitions, a New York Times editorial, and a political cartoon penned by Dr. Seuss (who supported the war). There is not a single document or sentence in the chapter that would make a young reader consider the Axis Powers anything other than “enemies” in quotes. Essentially, all of World War II has been reduced to dropping the bomb and consequently, we are led to believe, America’s inhumanity. In short, the entire presentation of the Second World War is not an exercise in critical thinking; nor will it make students “college and career ready.” This is not teaching. It is programming, pure and simple.

“But we did drop the bomb, didn’t we?” Yes, we did. But if we are to make World War II, and Hiroshima in particular, a subject of discussion in an English literature class, then we should at least provide a few facts. The Japanese never showed any sign of surrender until after Nagasaki, the dropping of the second bomb. That meant that an invasion of Japan was the only alternative to the bomb. The Japanese were prepared to defend the mainland with 2.5 million troops and a civilian militia of millions more. American deaths would likely have been in the hundreds of thousands, and Japanese casualties, both military and civilian, could have been more than a million. Furthermore, a small detail that is left out of virtually every high-school textbook is worth considering. American planes dropped three-quarters of a million leaflets urging the people of Hiroshima to evacuate the city. That pamphlet is a document you will never see in a Common Core textbook.

Since the Prentice Hall editors are not above appealing to teenage feelings to make their point, let us give them a taste of their own medicine.

Imagine you are a ten-year-old child living in 1945. You have only distant and passing memories of your father, who enlisted in the Marine Corps as soon as the war broke out. You write him every week, and your mother writes him every day, but his letters come in spurts due to interruptions in communication. Your mother shields you from most of what goes on, but you know he barely escaped with his life at a place called Guadalcanal. Because of his experience and his unit, he will be either in the first or second assault wave on the Japanese mainland. He has an eighty percent chance of being killed. Would you want President Truman to order the dropping of the bomb to keep your father from being killed, as well as saving thousands more American servicemen and even Japanese civilians and soldiers?

This is not fiction. This was a reality faced by hundreds of thousands of American families whose husbands and fathers were deployed in the Pacific theatre. Somehow we have forgotten that reality.

It is really a very simple question. Do we want the memory of our grandparents to be left in the hands of progressive ideologues and armchair utopians who have the advantage of living in a free and prosperous country (for now) due to no expenditure of blood, toil, tears, or sweat of their own? Do we want the children just now entering school and in the years to come—who may have never met their great-grandparents—to be made ashamed of that Greatest Generation, of America, and of our resolution to remain free?


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: americanhistory; commoncore; curriculum; education; educationandschools; history; learning; schools; teaching; textbooks; worldwarll; wwii
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051 next last

1 posted on 12/03/2013 10:53:52 AM PST by Kaslin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

Common Core stinks but there was a lot of this sort of demented history in texts long before the CC standards came around.


2 posted on 12/03/2013 10:57:22 AM PST by Monterrosa-24 ((...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

Excellent piece. Thanks for the post.

My late FIL was scheduled to be on an LST in Operation Olympic after spending two days in the ocean, wounded, after his carrier was sunk off Samar in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. The hypothetical question at the article’s end certainly applied to him and my family might look markedly different today had Truman not made the correct decision to drop the atomic bomb.


3 posted on 12/03/2013 11:00:22 AM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

So students will grow up thinking Bluto was right, that the Germans bombed Pearl harbor.


4 posted on 12/03/2013 11:02:10 AM PST by AU72
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

Its hard to explain how we won the battles, but then lost the war and have since adopted almost all of the facsism we fought against.


5 posted on 12/03/2013 11:05:03 AM PST by Vince Ferrer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin
Gleichschaltung (German pronunciation: [ˈɡlaɪçʃaltʊŋ]), meaning "coordination", "making the same", "bringing into line"), is a Nazi term for the process by which the Nazi regime successively established a system of totalitarian control and coordination over all aspects of society. The historian Richard J. Evans translated the term as "forcible-coordination" in his most recent work on Nazi Germany. Among the goals of this policy were to bring about adherence to a specific doctrine and way of thinking and to control as many aspects of life as possible.

The apex of the Nazification of Germany was in the resolutions approved during the Nuremberg Rally of 1935, when the symbols of the Party and the State were fused

6 posted on 12/03/2013 11:05:17 AM PST by Lonesome in Massachussets (Doing the same thing and expecting different results is called software engineering.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin
I'd certainly have fun with this if I was a teacher.

I'd show photos, and describe the actions of the rape of Nanjing, the Bataan death march, Corregidor then I'd ask students "What should be done with a Nation that sends their soldiers to do this?

7 posted on 12/03/2013 11:08:36 AM PST by Navy Patriot (Join the Democrats, it's not Fascism when WE do it, and the Constitution and law mean what WE say.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pride in the USA; Stillwaters

Well worth the read. If I had a school-aged child today, there is nothing on earth that could compel me to send that child to public school.


8 posted on 12/03/2013 11:12:09 AM PST by lonevoice (Today I broke my personal record for most consecutive days lived)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Colonel_Flagg

My FIL still living, (90 years old) was still in Europe on VE day. His unit was already on a ship headed for Japan when the A-bombs were dropped. I can only imagine the whoop that went up when their ship turned around and started for home.


9 posted on 12/03/2013 11:12:30 AM PST by beelzepug (if any alphabets are watchin', I'll be coming home right after the meetin')
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

Good article and good post.

Leftist progressives in Common Core will do their best to further 0bama and his administrations efforts to soften our young people and our military which has quickly become little more than a social experiment.

The turkey in the WH is rewriting history as one method of accomplishing his agenda.


10 posted on 12/03/2013 11:15:56 AM PST by jazusamo ([Obama] A Truly Great Phony -- Thomas Sowell http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/3058949/posts)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Colonel_Flagg

Something so strange about FR... There is always something mentioned that I am either reading, have watched as a documentary or fiction/non-fiction movie about that subject (and this isn’t the first time I’ve mentioned this (maybe 4rth or 5th time..

Before about 6 hours ago, I had never heard of Gulf of Leyte (or Leyte Gilf)... about 6 hours ago, I had just finished watching a documentary of Battleships and Carriers, and one of the specific locations/battles, was the Battle of Leyte Gulf... gives me chills every time I see this happen o.O

Anyway, back on topic... The whole ‘education’ system (ESPECIALLY FED level) needs to be flushed and cleansed. Think it will happen within ANY of our lifetime?


11 posted on 12/03/2013 11:22:07 AM PST by Bikkuri
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

This is pure insanity


12 posted on 12/03/2013 11:25:41 AM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

If the purpose is to encourage “critical thinking”, why not have students read this book?

http://www.amazon.com/The-High-Castle-Philip-Dick/dp/0547572484


13 posted on 12/03/2013 11:25:54 AM PST by oblomov
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: beelzepug

they went home?

didn’t we land a huge occupation force after they surrendered?


14 posted on 12/03/2013 11:27:05 AM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Bikkuri
Anyway, back on topic... The whole ‘education’ system (ESPECIALLY FED level) needs to be flushed and cleansed. Think it will happen within ANY of our lifetime?

I'd just prefer 'flushed' at the Federal level, as the Federal government has no Constitutional authority to regulate the purely state and local matter of public education. As for the second part of your statement, without a rock-ribbed conservative President, sadly, no.

15 posted on 12/03/2013 11:29:39 AM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Colonel_Flagg

One of the best articles I’ve read on the decision to drop the bomb was in the Weekly Standard a good number of years ago. Titled “ Why Truman Dropped the Bomb”, it not only makes the case for dropping the bomb, it very effectively demolishes the revisionist Progressive case against dropping it.

I’m on an old smartphone, but know its out there online, if someone wouldn’t mind finding it and posting a link.


16 posted on 12/03/2013 11:29:44 AM PST by tanknetter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

I guess the next step will be to burn all the history books written before the new ones were published?? Maybe a huge rally at the mall in DC where we can throw the books into the bonfire as we march by. Where did I see something like this before? BYW, I do remember VJ day, I was awaken at 4 am by the cheering and noise making of the neighbors celebrating in the street. “The boys are coming home!” was the most common phrase used. It was a time when the “United” States was just that. Today, does anyone one really care anymore?


17 posted on 12/03/2013 11:29:56 AM PST by Bringbackthedraft (Remember Ty Woods? Glenn Doherty ? Forgot already?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: beelzepug

My grandfather, a combat engineer, was on an Okinawa bound ship as well. Made it home sometime in late September or early October.

My Mom was born the following July.

I can do the math on that. My kids have been able to do the math on that since they were very young. Using the Enola Gay as a teaching tool helped. I once offended a group of Libs who were standing in front of it whining about how “evil” it was by LOUDLY telling my daughter (then in early elementary school) that if it weren’t for that plane her grandmother, her father and therefore SHE would never have existed.


18 posted on 12/03/2013 11:38:16 AM PST by tanknetter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: GeronL
didn’t we land a huge occupation force after they surrendered?

Operation Blacklist, the occupation of Japan, peaked at 350,000 troops at the end of 1945. Leaders estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 Allied casualties if Operation Coronet (the second planned invasion of Honshu) lasted more than 90 days. So yes, most of them did go home.

Here's an interesting fact: in preparation for the anticipated invasion of Japan, 500,000 Purple Hearts were manufactured, and as of 2003 there were still 120,000 of them left after the Korean, Vietnam and all other conflicts involving American soldiers. Combat units in Iraq and Afghanistan had Purple Hearts on hand for immediate presentation to wounded soldiers in the field.

19 posted on 12/03/2013 11:38:29 AM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: tanknetter
http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/005/894mnyyl.asp#

Here you go!

20 posted on 12/03/2013 11:39:28 AM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

Thanks for posting this.

The Progressive assault on our culture is nearly complete.

They have systematically perverted the minds of our children.

And we have let them push God from our culture, instead of faithfully following the biblical injunction: “And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise.” Deuteronomy 6:6-7.


21 posted on 12/03/2013 11:41:01 AM PST by paterfamilias
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Monterrosa-24

but there was a lot of this sort of demented history in texts long before the CC standards came around.

Yes sir there was...now its being entrenched and reinforced country wide.

They don’t care about thee and me so long as our kids and grandkids are good little Nazis.


22 posted on 12/03/2013 11:48:30 AM PST by Adder (No, Mr. Franklin, we could NOT keep it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin
Say to students: When I was reading the history textbook, I noticed that the writer included profiles of three war heroes, all of whom fought for the Allies. The writer did not include similar profiles for fighters on the other side. I realize that this choice reflects a political assumption: that readers want to read about only their side’s heroes.

Yes, we need students to learn about the "hero" who ran Auschwitz and the "hero" who led the rape of Nanking, to create a moral equivalency to the people who tried to stop it from spreading.

These are the things that drove the rest of the world to war.

-PJ

23 posted on 12/03/2013 11:51:50 AM PST by Political Junkie Too (If you are the Posterity of We the People, then you are a Natural Born Citizen.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin
..my late father, stationed near Shanghai in '45, would have no doubt become part of Operation Downfall--and I might not be typing this...

All I can say is God bless the memory of Col. later Gen. Paul Tibbets

24 posted on 12/03/2013 11:53:48 AM PST by WalterSkinner ( In Memory of My Father--WWII Vet and Patriot 1926-2007)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Colonel_Flagg

Thanks!


25 posted on 12/03/2013 11:55:18 AM PST by tanknetter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin
WBill Jr will learn everything he needs to know about the war from me. And, likely, on his own, once he's old enough.

Starting with the war record of his great-grandfather, who once told me that he knew *exactly* why he was overseas after visiting a German concentration camp, and who would have looked at pap like this article with a gimlet eye.

26 posted on 12/03/2013 11:56:00 AM PST by wbill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Adder

I was in DC during the mid 90s Enola Gay exhibit controversy.

At the time I remember thinking “we’ve won this round, but they’ll be back. And 15-20 years ago there won’t be nearly as many WWII vets who can stand up and voice their outrage”

I’m distraught that I’m being proven right ...


27 posted on 12/03/2013 11:59:03 AM PST by tanknetter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Colonel_Flagg
My late FIL.....

Ditto my grandfather. He didn't see a problem with dropping the bomb. "They started it, we finished it, and I was glad not to need to go there after a year in Europe.", was his attitude, approximately.

I read a little about Operation Olympic. The spearhead - (if memory serves) the 4th and 6th Marine divisions - were written out of the plan by H+36 because it was assumed they'd cease to exist. Dropping the bomb had a terrible cost, but all other alternatives were worse.

28 posted on 12/03/2013 12:00:25 PM PST by wbill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: tanknetter

My pleasure. Great article too.


29 posted on 12/03/2013 12:09:35 PM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

I don’t know how many were stationed in Japan but most got out. All I know is a lot of war-weary vets of the European theater were ready or in the process of deploying to the Pacific and lucked out. My Dad spent almost a year back in the states before he got out. I missed being a military brat by two months.

I expect enlistees had to serve out their time while draftees duty ended with the actual war.


30 posted on 12/03/2013 12:33:17 PM PST by beelzepug (if any alphabets are watchin', I'll be coming home right after the meetin')
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: wbill

Operation Olympic had an order of battle of 14 divisions at landing. Operation Coronet had 25. By contrast, Operation Overlord in Normandy involved 12 divisions.


31 posted on 12/03/2013 12:34:37 PM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: beelzepug

I think we had nearly a million troops in Japan at the start of the occupation.


32 posted on 12/03/2013 12:53:51 PM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Monterrosa-24

“Common Core stinks but there was a lot of this sort of demented history in texts long before the CC standards came around.”

I taught Jr High history for many years. When it came time to pick a new text book, I used a quick and dirty method for thinning the herd. (This was back when there were more than two textbook publishers, so I’d have lots to choose from.) If a textbook implied through its illustrations that it was women and blacks who won WWI and WWII, or if it used more space depicting the internment of the Japanese than the entire Pacific War, the text was rejected out of hand. I don’t mind these being included, of course, but they really weren’t what the wars were about.

I once had a text that devoted more space to the role of women spies in the Civil War than it did to Lee, Grant and Shrman combined. Another neglected to mention the Wright brothers but had two entries for Emma Goldman. Finding good history texts has always been difficult, but now that there is little or no competition in the publishing industry, it is nigh on impossible.


33 posted on 12/03/2013 12:55:11 PM PST by hanamizu
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: hanamizu
“...used more space depicting the internment of the Japanese than the entire Pacific War...”

These themes are also spread in English class where activist teachers select readings that favor a Trotskyist view of history.

Just as I finished reading Alexander Solzhenitsyn's CANCER WARD, I noticed the lifeguard at the pool reading Sylvia Plath's THE BELL JAR. She was not reading it for psychology class but English. But the contrast struck me between Solzhenitsyn and Plath. One had been through World War II, the Gulag, and deprivations yet loved life and his fellow man. Plath was a spoiled brat who was known for repeated suicide attempts and she had so little to offer the reader. But over and over again our students are reading the Plaths and not the Solzhenitsyns.

34 posted on 12/03/2013 1:15:54 PM PST by Monterrosa-24 (...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: lonevoice

Surprisingly and sadly, I have found out some private ‘Christian’ schools have Common Core too.


35 posted on 12/03/2013 1:42:46 PM PST by Guenevere
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin
but may still feel that “good” is not an appropriate adjective for any war.

The American Revolutionary War to overthrow tyranny and preserve natural rights was a good war. And wars to end dictatorships that deny natural rights are good wars. Preservation of natural rights is a real good that is a requirement for life proper to a rational being.

36 posted on 12/03/2013 1:52:29 PM PST by mjp ((pro-{God, reality, reason, egoism, individualism, natural rights, limited government, capitalism}))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Colonel_Flagg
I'd just prefer 'flushed' at the Federal level....

You might have to go to the international level. This stuff stinks like KGB Active Measures stuff they spread around in the 60's, using influence agents in eastern elite academies and society, outlets like Pacifica and CBS, and the New Left and its organs. (Including Bill and Hillary's SDS and Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn's Weathermen.)

37 posted on 12/03/2013 2:03:11 PM PST by lentulusgracchus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

As I’ve stated before, eventually the only things they will teach kids about WWII are:

-Hiroshima and Dresden

-How the US was complicit in The Holocaust because they didn’t bomb the camps

-The Japanese internment camps.


38 posted on 12/03/2013 2:15:55 PM PST by dfwgator (Fire Muschamp. Go Michigan State!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Colonel_Flagg

Apologies for typos .. :/ am on heavy pain med.. hope to rid of them in a couple of days ;^) (and totally agree with your statement).


39 posted on 12/03/2013 2:17:28 PM PST by Bikkuri
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

Ten years down the road, it will be the Republicans under President Bush who started world War 2. Hitler, Japan, etal only wanted to peacefully co-exist. The rape of Nanjing, the attack on Poland, the Low Countries, the attack on Pearl, the attack on Russia, the Bataan Death March, was merely boys having fun.


40 posted on 12/03/2013 2:27:53 PM PST by sport
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Bikkuri

There is no need to apologize :) I hope you feel better very soon!


41 posted on 12/03/2013 2:31:06 PM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Monterrosa-24

bttt


42 posted on 12/03/2013 2:45:23 PM PST by Guenevere
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin; fieldmarshaldj; Clintonfatigued; NFHale; AuH2ORepublican; BillyBoy; GOPsterinMA; ...
Seriously? Nam and Iraq are one thing.

WW1 even, I don't think we needed to be involved with that one.

But these people are on the Jeanette Rankin train? Stick a flower in Hitler's rifle? Cuckoo! One wonders what they think of the Revolutionary War, perhaps peaceful protest against the Brits was the answer? A hunger strike like Gandi.

Domo arigato Mr. Roboto.

43 posted on 12/03/2013 3:32:17 PM PST by Impy (RED=COMMUNIST, NOT REPUBLICAN)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Navy Patriot
Good one. I tell my students the CNN interview with the Korean woman on the 40th anniversary of the dropping of the a-bomb.

Q: "What do you think of the Americans dropping the atomic bomb on the Japanese on this date in history?"

A: "How many did they have? They should have dropped all of them."

44 posted on 12/03/2013 3:52:37 PM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Impy

Fags. All revisionist fags.


45 posted on 12/03/2013 4:12:08 PM PST by GOPsterinMA (You're a very weird person, Yossarian.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...

Thanks Kaslin.


46 posted on 12/03/2013 5:38:43 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

I’m not an historian but I do remember that it was a strong anti-war movement that kept America out of WWI for several years and prevented America from entering WWII until Pearl Harbor.


47 posted on 12/03/2013 8:41:07 PM PST by kathsua (A woman can do anything a man can do and have babies besides;)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: wbill

Generally, after you read up on the planning invasion of Japan....you see a campaign that takes a minimum of two years and costs a minimum of 100,000 American lives. Few would guess the Japanese civilian toll....but it has to be a minimum of half-a-million dead from starvation or being used as shields for the military leadership.

An alternate war would easily be written with WW II ending sometime in 1948. There would have been no will left in the US for rebuilding Germany or Japan by that point.


48 posted on 12/03/2013 11:37:18 PM PST by pepsionice
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

This should be mandatory to watch for kids:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmUYv5-9FiI


49 posted on 12/04/2013 5:23:11 AM PST by I got the rope
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Kaslin

I see nothing at all wrong with being conflicted about Hiroshima. Any sane person would regret the necessity.

But to discuss Hiroshima without mentioning Nanking is grossly irresponsible.

We didn’t just up and decide to bomb Japan because we were evil people. We were working to bring to an end a political system that most definitely needed to be ended.


50 posted on 12/04/2013 9:42:41 AM PST by jdege
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson