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Discovering the Tree of Life
National Science Foundation Office of Legislative and Public Affairs ^ | November 18, 2002 | NSF Press Release

Posted on 11/22/2002 9:09:10 PM PST by forsnax5

NSF awards grants to discover the relationships of 1.75 million species

One of the most profound ideas to emerge in modern science is Charles Darwin's concept that all of life, from the smallest microorganism to the largest vertebrate, is connected through genetic relatedness in a vast genealogy. This "Tree of Life" summarizes all we know about biological diversity and underpins much of modern biology, yet many of its branches remain poorly known and unresolved.

To help scientists discover what Darwin described as the tree's "everbranching and beautiful ramifications," the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $17 million in "Assembling the Tree of Life" grants to researchers at more than 25 institutions. Their studies range from investigations of entire pieces of DNA to assemble the bacterial branches; to the study of the origins of land plants from algae; to understanding the most diverse group of terrestrial predators, the spiders; to the diversity of fungi and parasitic roundworms; to the relationships of birds and dinosaurs.

"Despite the enormity of the task," said Quentin Wheeler, director of NSF's division of environmental biology, which funded the awards, "now is the time to reconstruct the tree of life. The conceptual, computational and technological tools are available to rapidly resolve most, if not all, major branches of the tree of life. At the same time, progress in many research areas from genomics to evolution and development is currently encumbered by the lack of a rigorous historical framework to guide research."

Scientists estimate that the 1.75 million known species are only 10 percent of the total species on earth, and that many of those species will disappear in the decades ahead. Learning about these species and their evolutionary history is epic in its scope, spanning all the life forms of an entire planet over its several billion year history, said Wheeler.

Why is assembling the tree of life so important? The tree is a picture of historical relationships that explains all similarities and differences among plants, animals and microorganisms. Because it explains biological diversity, the Tree of Life has proven useful in many fields, such as choosing experimental systems for biological research, determining which genes are common to many kinds of organisms and which are unique, tracking the origin and spread of emerging diseases and their vectors, bio-prospecting for pharmaceutical and agrochemical products, developing data bases for genetic information, and evaluating risk factors for species conservation and ecosystem restoration.

The Assembling the Tree of Life grants provide support for large multi-investigator, multi-institutional, international teams of scientists who can combine expertise and data sources, from paleontology to morphology, developmental biology, and molecular biology, says Wheeler. The awards will also involve developing software for improved visualization and analysis of extremely large data sets, and outreach and education programs in comparative phylogenetic biology and paleontology, emphasizing new training activities, informal science education, and Internet resources and dissemination.

-NSF-

For a list of the Assembling the Tree of Life grants, see: http://www.nsf.gov/bio/pubs/awards/atol_02.htm


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: crevolist; darwin; evolution; science
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Seventeen million bucks to create a giant document for the crevo's to argue about!

A little something for a quiet weekend's musings.

1 posted on 11/22/2002 9:09:10 PM PST by forsnax5
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To: *crevo_list; VadeRetro; PatrickHenry; jennyp; balrog666; general_re; Right Wing Professor; ...
Tree Of Life ping!
2 posted on 11/22/2002 9:13:09 PM PST by forsnax5
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To: forsnax5
Checking in
3 posted on 11/22/2002 9:48:10 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: forsnax5
Geez Louise, I thought another of my novel themes had been stolen. Glad to see it's only about Darwinian puzzlements.
4 posted on 11/22/2002 9:50:19 PM PST by MHGinTN
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To: forsnax5; scripter; Heartlander; gore3000; f.Christian; Alamo-Girl; Phaedrus
The real argument is not going to be between those you suspect, rather it will be between the Darwininians and the molecular evidence. Anyway, last I heard it was not the tree of life. It was either the "bush of life" or the "cactus of life".
5 posted on 11/22/2002 9:54:17 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: AndrewC
"The 18th and 19th centuries witnessed the rise of the positive(ideological/illogical)* sciences, and with this an intensification in skepticism about God and the claims of traditional religion, especially among the educated classes. This inclination became most marked after the publication of The Origin of the Species and The Descent of Man, by the naturalist Charles Darwin. Darwin ascribed man's immediate ancestry to the anthropoids, supposedly through a process of gradual evolution. Man was no longer a creature made in the image of God, but merely a natural extension of certain lower forms of life, a refined gorilla, as it were. It was these circumstances, and this intellectual milieu, that led philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche to declare that "God is dead" and to predict the rise of new and terrible manifestations of barbarism in the century that was to come. As he put it, "For ... we shall have upheavals, a convulsion of earthquakes, a moving of mountains and valleys, the like of which has never been dreamed of ... there will be wars the like of which have never yet been seen on earth." The non-believer Nietzsche would agree wholly with the Christian believer Dostoyevsky about one thing: Without faith in God, all horrors, all of man's worst nightmares, would become possible. And so they did."

"What men... believe---really does matter."

*...my addition!

6 posted on 11/22/2002 10:02:04 PM PST by f.Christian
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To: AndrewC
LOL! If we are guessing what a "tree" drawn from genetic evidence might look like, my guess is a lawn.
7 posted on 11/22/2002 10:03:49 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: f.Christian
Nietzsche spent his final years in a lunatic asylum...the man that pronounced God dead signed his insane musings "the crucified one"
8 posted on 11/22/2002 10:08:22 PM PST by RnMomof7
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To: Alamo-Girl
If we are guessing what a "tree" drawn from genetic evidence might look like, my guess is a lawn.

From Dr. Fuz Rana: "...the hominid fossil record is not a family "tree" but a "lawn."

("Toumai Man Offers Evolutionists No Hope," Connections, 3rd & 4th Quarter 2002, Quarterly Newsletter of Reasons to Believe.)

9 posted on 11/22/2002 10:22:52 PM PST by Hebrews 11:6
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To: Alamo-Girl
mega-dittoes
10 posted on 11/22/2002 10:23:04 PM PST by LiteKeeper
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To: RnMomof7
The real "Tree of Life" is the one on which Jesus loved us.
11 posted on 11/22/2002 10:24:05 PM PST by Hebrews 11:6
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To: Hebrews 11:6
LOL! I had no idea it was already used! Thank you!!!
12 posted on 11/22/2002 10:25:16 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Alamo-Girl
What does that mean exactly?
13 posted on 11/22/2002 10:25:38 PM PST by edsheppa
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To: LiteKeeper
Thank you! Hugs!!!
14 posted on 11/22/2002 10:25:45 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Hebrews 11:6
And the real tree of life is in heaven...not here
15 posted on 11/22/2002 10:28:53 PM PST by RnMomof7
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To: edsheppa
The reason I said "lawn" is that I expect the genetic code to match around 50% of the time (or more.) Each unique creature would have differences that would look like neat, little spikes --- like blades of grass.
16 posted on 11/22/2002 10:29:02 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Alamo-Girl
So far, things look more like a tree than like a lawn. The genotypic trees look much like the phenotypic trees.

"Tree of Life" is also a representation of the Kabala. It is used in Tarot reading.
17 posted on 11/22/2002 10:40:12 PM PST by Doctor Stochastic
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To: Alamo-Girl
YEC - you are welcome
18 posted on 11/22/2002 11:04:42 PM PST by LiteKeeper
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To: forsnax5
Seventeen million bucks to create a giant document for the crevo's to argue about!

Crayola stock took a big bump!

19 posted on 11/23/2002 5:59:15 AM PST by gore3000
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To: Doctor Stochastic
So far, things look more like a tree than like a lawn. The genotypic trees look much like the phenotypic trees.

No it does not. Evolutionists claimed that mitochondrial DNA would verify the classifications that had been made by phenotype. However, this has proved false. It has given some very different results and now evolutionists have thrown out mtDNA as proving their theory:

1. Ying Cao, Axel Janke, Peter J. Waddell, Michael Westerman, Osamu Takenaka, Shigenori Murata, Norihiro Okada, Svante Pääbo, and Masami Hasegawa, “Conflict Among Individual Mitochondrial Proteins in Resolving the Phylogeny of Eutherian Orders,” Journal of Molecular Evolution 47 (1998): 307-322.
It is widely believed that molecular data confirm morphological data when the history of groups such as the mammals is being reconstructed. Many cases exist, however, where molecules (such as proteins) give “false” or erroneous phylogenies. This paper, by a team of researchers from Japan, Germany, and Australia, demonstrates that different mitochondrial proteins can give different, and contradictory, groupings. In particular, the protein NADH dehydrogenase (ND1) places primates and rodents together as closest relatives, with ferungulates (artiodactyls + cetaceans + perisodactyls + carnivores) as more distantly related to primates -- in contradiction to most other data, which places primates and ferungulates together as closest relatives. The authors conclude that this anomalous phylogenetic grouping “is not due to a stochastic error, but is due to convergent or parallel evolution” (p. 321), suggesting that molecular evidence is not free from the confounding (historically misleading) effects known to plague other types of systematic data, such as anatomical patterns.
From: Bibliography presented to Ohio BD of Ed .

20 posted on 11/23/2002 6:11:01 AM PST by gore3000
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To: Alamo-Girl
LOL! If we are guessing what a "tree" drawn from genetic evidence might look like, my guess is a lawn.

LOL
Good One!

Click the Pic

21 posted on 11/23/2002 6:23:15 AM PST by Fiddlstix
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To: Alamo-Girl
The reason I said "lawn" is that I expect the genetic code to match around 50% of the time (or more.) Each unique creature would have differences that would look like neat, little spikes --- like blades of grass.

Your expectation has already been contradicted even without completely mapping the living genome. How will you revise your thinking?

22 posted on 11/23/2002 8:21:47 AM PST by edsheppa
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To: Alamo-Girl; Hebrews 11:6
Wow! Okay now, add lawn. This is getting interesting. Maybe we are seeing evolution in action. Tree-bush-cactus-lawn-?

My guess is slime mold is next. It can morph. Makes it easy for just-so stories

23 posted on 11/23/2002 8:32:28 AM PST by AndrewC
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To: Alamo-Girl
LOL! If we are guessing what a "tree" drawn from genetic evidence might look like, my guess is a lawn.

As edsheppa and Dr. Stochastic have said, this has already been thoroughly falsified. If you only listen to the selective lawyering from your side about the places where the data conflict, you could easily miss this. (Especially on this forum.) Nevertheless the overall picture is very plain.

The Convergence of Molecular and Cladistic Trees.

Figure 4.4.1. Human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) insertions in identical chromosomal locations in various primates (Reprinted from Lebedev et al. 2000, © 2000, with permission from Elsevier Science).

24 posted on 11/23/2002 8:38:13 AM PST by VadeRetro
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To: Alamo-Girl
Someone likes DNA data now.


25 posted on 11/23/2002 8:54:30 AM PST by AndrewC
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To: VadeRetro; jennyp; Junior; longshadow; *crevo_list; RadioAstronomer; Scully; Piltdown_Woman; ...
Sorry about possibly overlapping ping lists, but this looks like a good thread.

[This ping list for the evolution side of evolution threads, and sometimes for other science topics too. If you want to be included, let me know. This is not a ping list for the creationism side of the debate. If you've been getting unwanted pings, please tell me and I'll drop you.]

26 posted on 11/23/2002 10:03:01 AM PST by PatrickHenry
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To: PatrickHenry
Scientists estimate that the 1.75 million known species are only 10 percent of the total species on earth, and that many of those species will disappear in the decades ahead. Learning about these species and their evolutionary history is epic in its scope, spanning all the life forms of an entire planet over its several billion year history, said Wheeler.

How can extinction rates be estimated by way of an estimated 10% sample of an unknown (but estimated) survey population?




27 posted on 11/23/2002 10:11:34 AM PST by Sabertooth
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To: Sabertooth
How can extinction rates be estimated by way of an estimated 10% sample of an unknown (but estimated) survey population?

Probably the environmentalists are using the same incredibly refined techniques as those used to estimate that there are 3 million homeless in the US. The numbers seem to come from the Seventh Planet.

28 posted on 11/23/2002 10:16:36 AM PST by PatrickHenry
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To: PatrickHenry
Probably the environmentalists are using the same incredibly refined techniques as those used to estimate that there are 3 million homeless in the US. The numbers seem to come from the Seventh Planet.

LOL!

29 posted on 11/23/2002 10:20:10 AM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: PatrickHenry; RadioAstronomer
Probably the environmentalists are using the same incredibly refined techniques as those used to estimate that there are 3 million homeless in the US. The numbers seem to come from the Seventh Planet.

Or perhaps the sixth, making it a stastical analysis by attenuation?




30 posted on 11/23/2002 10:28:38 AM PST by Sabertooth
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To: VadeRetro; Doctor Stochastic; edsheppa; LiteKeeper; Fiddlstix; AndrewC
Many thanks to all of you for your posts!

I had no idea using the term "lawn" would generate such a lively discussion. Jeepers!

I am aware that a device known as "the Tree of Life" is used in the Kabala (new age version) and Tarot reading. My understanding is the Kabala originally was rooted from the Torah (Spanish) and of course the Tree of Life is mentioned in Genesis and Revelation as being in the center of Eden and Paradise respectively. That's one reason why I believe Eden is in the spiritual realm - but I digress...

Several of you seem to believe my "lawn" choice has already been disputed. But I'm not convinced by your assertions. I visualized a "lawn" when I saw this article:

What it really means to be 99% chimpanzee (excerpts:)

We are accustomed to imagining scales of similarity ranging from 100% similar – that is to say, identical – to 0% similar, that is to say, totally different. This is the conceptual framework within which we interpret the 98.6% or whatever similarity of human and ape. They are really, really similar, almost identical.

But in fact, DNA similarity is not structured in quite that way. There are, as everyone knows, only 4 bases in DNA. And this places an odd statistical constraint on the comparison of sequences. No DNA similarity at all – that is to say, two random sequences that share no common ancestry – are still going to match at one out of four sites. In other words, the zero mark of a DNA comparison is not zero percent similar, but 25% similar.

Once again, the DNA comparison requires context to be meaningful. Granted that a human and ape are over 98% genetically identical, a human and any earthly DNA-based life form must be at least 25% identical. A human and a daffodil share common ancestry and their DNA is thus obliged to match more than 25% of the time. For the sake of argument let’s say 33%.

The point is that to say we are one-third daffodils because our DNA matches that of a daffodil 33% of the time, is not profound, it’s ridiculous. There is hardly any biological comparison you can make which will find us to be one-third daffodil, except perhaps the DNA.

In other words, just as Simpson argued in the 1960s, the genetic comparison is exceptional, not at all transcendent. DNA comparisons overestimate biological similarity at the low end and underestimate it at the high end – in context, humans are biologically less than 25% daffodils and more than 98% chimpanzees.

The focus on base-pair mismatch itself is misleading, for it encodes a number of archaic assumptions about genetics and evolution. In fact, it ignores what is quite possibly the most significant development in biology in the last quarter-century – namely, the complexity of genome structure.

If humans and chimpanzees are over 98% identical base-for-base, how do you make sense of the fact that chimpanzees have 10% more DNA than humans? That they have more alpha-hemoglobin genes and more Rh bloodgroup genes, and fewer Alu repeats, in their genome than humans? Or that the tips of their chromosomes contain DNA not present at the tips of human chromosomes?

Obviously there is a lot more to genomic evolution than just nucleotide substitution. But the percentage comparison renders that fact invisible, and thus obscures some of the most interesting evolutionary genetic questions.

Once you recognize that there are easily identifiable differences genetically between humans and chimpanzees – the presence of terminal heterochromatin is 100% diagnostic – you can begin to see that the pattern of relationships between the species is actually the same genetically as anatomically. Humans and chimps are simply very similar to, yet diagnosably different from, one another.


31 posted on 11/23/2002 10:30:42 AM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Alamo-Girl
So, in your opinion, no species is related to any other species, and any similarities are purely coincidental?
32 posted on 11/23/2002 10:42:45 AM PST by Junior
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To: Alamo-Girl
I visualized a "lawn" when I saw this article...

You also visualize a lawn when you see the fossil record represented as vertical parallel lines. (You have posted such pictures.) That's a question-begging reconstruction which assumes what it tries to show, that nothing is related to anything else.

The scale of similarities appears non-linear, yes, but that's because nothing is a zero. Common descent and all that. The daffodil is not totally unrelated to you. Nevertheless, nothing is as related to you as the chimp.

33 posted on 11/23/2002 10:46:50 AM PST by VadeRetro
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To: forsnax5
The Tree of Life has already been created, it's in the Animal Kingdom at Disney World. And this new one will be about as real as the current one.
34 posted on 11/23/2002 10:50:20 AM PST by Contra
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To: RnMomof7
Nietzsche: "God is dead"
God: "Nietzsche is dead"
35 posted on 11/23/2002 10:52:17 AM PST by Contra
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To: Contra
Yep
36 posted on 11/23/2002 10:58:34 AM PST by RnMomof7
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To: Junior
Thank you for your post!

So, in your opinion, no species is related to any other species, and any similarities are purely coincidental?

Just the opposite! I see 25% hard genetic similarities among every living thing, like soil. Actually, I suspect on the animal side of the lawn the similarities will be greater, more like 50% but that's just a guess. It would look like a rise in the soil.

The "grass blade" for a daffodil is on the same lawn as the chimpanzee and the human. The chimpanzee is a tad longer than the human. And there might be a blade with a fork or two where creatures have differentiated to adapt to their environment (like the finches.)

If all the sequences are maintained in drawing it, then to me, the end result will look like a "lawn."

37 posted on 11/23/2002 11:12:03 AM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Junior
Tree (connected), lawn (disconnected).

It's certainly possible to look out at the world of living things and to see only discrete, stand-alone creatures, utterly unrelated. That's exactly what we do see the very first time we open our eyes and look around. But one of the glories of the human mind is that when we look long enough and hard enough, we have the capacity to see similarities and patterns. Ultimately we learn to use the highly refined technique of inductive reasoning, which can lead us to useful theories about the world in which we live -- such as evolution. That's when the Tree of Life takes shape. And then, goodbye lawn.
Deductive and Inductive Thinking.

38 posted on 11/23/2002 11:15:07 AM PST by PatrickHenry
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To: Sabertooth
LOL
39 posted on 11/23/2002 11:16:47 AM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: VadeRetro
Thank you for your post!

I do recall that chart, it shows Time one way and morphological distance the other. The Darwin prediction looks like a tree, the fossil evidence looks like a lawn.

For lurkers, you can see the pictures here.

40 posted on 11/23/2002 11:18:02 AM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Alamo-Girl
I see 25% hard genetic similarities among every living thing, like soil.

When did we crack the soil genome?




41 posted on 11/23/2002 11:20:08 AM PST by Sabertooth
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To: Alamo-Girl
I'm sorry, but I'm just not understanding what you are getting at. Is the daffodil as closely related to humans as the chimpanzee? They are growing out of the same soil, as you put it.
42 posted on 11/23/2002 11:29:37 AM PST by Junior
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To: RnMomof7
Nietzsche spent his final years in a lunatic asylum

He had 10 bad years but recovered. He died a little young anyway. Too much cheese in the diet.

43 posted on 11/23/2002 11:39:40 AM PST by RightWhale
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To: Alamo-Girl
As to the lawn model: Is it likely that there was first a living organism and that everything living descended from it?

If conditions were just right for the formation of one living organism, couldn't billions of unrelated living organisms have started up at the same time? It is a large planet, lots of room for lots of organisms.

Then some organisms might have had offspring and some might not, and there is the lawn, with many of the individual grass plants being similar but not identical.

Eventually one family line will dominate in an area. We see this clearly in the fall when leaves change in the forest. All the leaves of one kind of tree in one area of the forest will change at the same time, yet the leaves of the same kind of tree in a different part of the forest will change at a different time. You can see this, it is clusters of autumn color separated by clusters of green. Each cluster of autumn color is of related individuals.

So the descendents of one aboriginal organism will carry on, and descendents of another aboriginal organism will disappear. Of the billions or trillions or zentillions of aboriginal unrelated organisms, only a few billion family lines survive to this day.

Can DNA be traced back to a single aboriginal strand of DNA? Consider that some DNA sequences are favored and will appear in many different, unrelated family lines out of the zentillions of aboriginal unrelated family lines.

Mere chance? No, not chance. Some DNA sequences favor survival.

44 posted on 11/23/2002 11:56:46 AM PST by RightWhale
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To: Sabertooth
When did we crack the soil genome?

LOL! It's just that I see all creatures being made up of pretty much the same stuff, genetically speaking about 25%. When I visualize that on a chart, I happen to think it'll look like soil. Just my two cents...

45 posted on 11/23/2002 12:10:54 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Junior
Is the daffodil as closely related to humans as the chimpanzee? They are growing out of the same soil, as you put it.

Yes, the daffodil and the chimpanzee are 25% the same. Likewise, the daffodil and the human are 25% the same. If that article is right, the first 25% (or more) is a given.

46 posted on 11/23/2002 12:13:33 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: RightWhale; Junior; VadeRetro
Thank you for your posts, all of you! I'm responding to RightWhale here and pinging y'all because I think it is applicable to the questions each have raised about my "lawn" remark.

As to the lawn model: Is it likely that there was first a living organism and that everything living descended from it?

My understanding is that fossils generally cannot provide tissue to map DNA information. If that is the case, and if this research project stays away from making projections based on evolution theory, what they'll end up with is a huge database with specific genetic information (which is also huge) on each and every known type of creature - plus a few that are now extinct.

Therefore, I do not see where this can project will have the database to graph a "tree" which has time vertically and morphology horizontally. It would be based on available genetic information.

But using that information, I can see them sorting, parsing and matching the database to look for genetic matches. If the resulting chart is genetic information vertically and morphology horizontally - I personally think it'll look like a "lawn."

Just my two cents...

47 posted on 11/23/2002 12:24:56 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Alamo-Girl
Ouch, a brutalized sentence. Let me reword:

Therefore, I do not see where this project will have the database to graph a "tree" which has time vertically and morphology horizontally - because the graph would be based on available genetic information as opposed to fossils.

48 posted on 11/23/2002 12:29:40 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: PatrickHenry; Alamo-Girl
But one of the glories of the human mind is that when we look long enough and hard enough, we have the capacity to see similarities and patterns.

Except when it comes to detecting design.... so say the Darwininians.

49 posted on 11/23/2002 12:53:21 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: AndrewC
Except when it comes to detecting design

Which you have yet to define precisely.

50 posted on 11/23/2002 1:33:55 PM PST by edsheppa
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