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Iranian Alert -- August 29, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 8.29.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 08/29/2003 12:02:32 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movment in Iran from being reported.

From jamming satellite broadcasts, to prohibiting news reporters from covering any demonstrations to shutting down all cell phones and even hiring foreign security to control the population, the regime is doing everything in its power to keep the popular movement from expressing its demand for an end of the regime.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement; studentprotest
Discover all the news since the protests began on June 10th, go to:


1 posted on 08/29/2003 12:02:32 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread

Live Thread Ping List | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”


2 posted on 08/29/2003 12:03:41 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
count me in... Iraq finished, Iran next... let's hit Sudan and Zim-Rhodesia while we're at it
3 posted on 08/29/2003 12:05:00 AM PDT by cyborg (i'm half and half... me mum is a muggle and me dad is a witch)
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To: DoctorZIn
ElBaradei: Iran Was Shopping on Nuclear Black Mkt

Reuters
Friday, August 29, 2003; 2:50 AM

VIENNA (Reuters) - The head of the United Nations nuclear watchdog said in comments aired on Friday that Iran had shopped for nuclear components on the international black market and called on Tehran to be more "proactive" and "transparent."

In an interview on the BBC television program Hardtalk, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) chief Mohamed ElBaradei also said that Iran's nuclear program had been going on far longer than the agency had realized.

Although he was not certain of the countries that made the equipment Iran had acquired on the black market, ElBaradei said he had a "pretty good idea" which ones they were.

"It could be one country, it could be more than one country," ElBaradei said. "They (Iran) told us they have got a lot of that stuff from the black market. It is through intermediaries. It is not directly from the country."

Media reports have named Pakistan, a nuclear weapons state that has refused to sign the nuclear 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), as one of countries whose nuclear technology Iran is believed to be using.

Although he stopped short of accusing Tehran of lying to the U.N. agency, ElBaradei said Iran had failed to give the IAEA a complete picture of its nuclear program, which Washington says is merely a front for a secret atomic weapons program.

"They have not really been fully transparent in telling us in advance what was going on," ElBaradei said in the interview, recorded on Thursday and aired on Friday.

Asked if he believed Iran was running a secret weapons program, ElBaradei said: "It might be, it might not be."

"I need to really get the Iranians to tell me the full, complete story," he said. "And I would like Iran to be more proactive, more transparent."

He said that it would have been much easier to verify Iran's insistence its nuclear program is peaceful if it had given the IAEA a complete picture of its atomic plans from the beginning.

"It would have been easier for us to complete our job if we knew what was going on as early as the mid 1980s," ElBaradei said. "Now we have to go... 20 years back."

He repeated his call for Iran to quickly sign a protocol giving the IAEA the right to carry out intrusive, short notice inspections across the country.

"The international community's getting very concerned, very impatient," ElBaradei said about the situation in Iran.

He also agreed that countries such as Iran, pre-war Iraq and North Korea -- what President Bush has branded the "axis of evil" -- have had a history of misleading the world about their nuclear programs.

"They have been giving the international community the runaround," he said.

The IAEA Board of Governors meets next month to discuss the agency's recent inspections in Iran. The United States is pushing the board to declare Tehran in violation of its NPT nuclear safeguards obligations and report it to the U.N. Security Council, which can impose economic sanctions.

Iran's Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi said on Thursday the Islamic Republic was ready to start talks on allowing snap U.N. inspections of its nuclear sites.

"We have written to the director-general (of the International Atomic Energy Agency) saying we are ready to start negotiations on the Additional Protocol," Kharrazi told CNN.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62712-2003Aug29.html
4 posted on 08/29/2003 12:05:17 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
ElBaradei: Iran Was Shopping on Nuclear Black Mkt

Reuters
Friday, August 29, 2003; 2:50 AM

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/972525/posts?page=4#4

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
5 posted on 08/29/2003 12:06:17 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
He also agreed that countries such as Iran, pre-war Iraq and North Korea -- what President Bush has branded the "axis of evil" -- have had a history of misleading the world about their nuclear programs. "They have been giving the international community the runaround," he said.

Iran take note..Take Bush to his word. Freedom is comming!
6 posted on 08/29/2003 12:10:10 AM PDT by Pro-Bush (Awareness is what you know before you know anything else.)
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To: DoctorZIn
Media reports have named Pakistan, a nuclear weapons state that has refused to sign the nuclear 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), as one of countries whose nuclear technology Iran is believed to be using.

Pakistan is beyond criticism in Washington, they have a reckless habit of supporting that state in all that they do. This is despite the fact that Pakistan is a centre of extremism and military adventurism, and that most of the human rights issues complained of in Iran, are about 10 thousand times worse in Pakistan.

7 posted on 08/29/2003 12:15:32 AM PDT by BlackVeil
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To: DoctorZIn
Car Bomb Attack In Iraq; outside Shiite Islam's holiest mosques in Najaf

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/972582/posts

Prime suspect: al Sadr and his controls in Teran
8 posted on 08/29/2003 5:21:17 AM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran and the AMIA Massacre

August 29, 2003
The Washington Post
Editorial/Op-Ed

Shortly after the September 11 attacks, Britain tried in earnest to woo Iran (for the past quarter-century, one of the world's leading state sponsors of terrorism) into joining an international coalition opposing al Qaeda. As he traveled to Tehran on September 24, 2001, for example, Foreign Secretary Jack Straw predicted a "new era" in relations with the Islamic regime. Now, 23 months later, the ugly reality is setting in: Iran has been harboring al Qaeda terrorists, and relations between London and Tehran have been hurtling steadily downhill in the wake of mounting evidence that Iran was behind the July 18, 1994 car-bombing of the Argentine Jewish Mutual Aid Association (AMIA) cultural center in Buenos Aires, in which 85 people died and nearly 300 more were wounded. It was perhaps the most deadly anti-Semitic incident worldwide since World War II.

Last Friday, Hadi Soleimanpour, Iran's former ambassador to Argentina, was arrested in Britain on a warrant issued by Argentina, which accuses him of conspiracy to commit murder in connection with the AMIA attack. Mr. Soleimanpour, who entered Britain on a student visa last year, was one of eight Iranians ordered arrested by an Argentinean judge, Juan Jose Galeano (a highly respected magistrate who has been vigorously pursuing the investigation for years) in connection with the massacre. Citing the seriousness of the charges and the risk of flight, a British judge ordered the former Iranian diplomat held without bail — at least until today.

Ever since the bombing nine years ago, both Washington and Jerusalem have charged that Iran was behind the AMIA attack. The charges received a strong boost last year when a deposition from Abdolghassem Mesbahi, a defector from Iranian intelligence, was leaked to the New York Times by Argentinian officials who were apparently upset with the slow pace of the AMIA bombing investigation. The allegations from Mr. Mesbahi, who defected to Germany in 1996, were explosive. He said that the Iranian government (which has loudly proclaimed its innocence) started planning the attack in 1992. Mr. Mesbahi alleged that the Iranian government paid Argentinian President Carlos Menem a million bribe to deny that Iran was involved in the crime. The money supposedly came from a million Swiss bank account fund controlled by then-Iranian President Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani. In March, Judge Galeano alleged that four top Iranian officials in Tehran (among them the former Iranian intelligence minister, Ali Fallahian) were involved in the bombing and asked Interpol to arrest them. Judge Galeano also alleged that elements of the Iranian-backed Lebanese terrorist group Hezbollah participated in the attack.

To put it mildly, Iran is not taking this very well. Tehran has severed economic and cultural ties with Argentina, and a foreign ministry spokesman condemned Mr. Soleimanpour's arrest in Britain as illegal, asserting that it had been carried out under the influence of a Zionist regime. Leaving aside the usual bluster from Tehran, the situation is a serious one. The Iranian government clearly feels it is under siege: In addition to the terrorism charges, the International Atomic Energy Agency, under intense U.S. pressure, is demanding the right to carry out more intrusive inspections of its nuclear facilities. Moreover, Iran cannot feel happy about the presence of more than 150,000 U.S. troops in next-door Iraq and Afghanistan, and the possibility that the mullahs could meet the fate of Saddam Hussein and the Taliban. The noose may have started to tighten around the neck of the dictatorship in Tehran.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=08&d=29&a=1
9 posted on 08/29/2003 7:11:47 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Iran and the AMIA Massacre

August 29, 2003
The Washington Post
Editorial/Op-Ed

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/972525/posts?page=9#9

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
10 posted on 08/29/2003 7:12:56 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: AdmSmith; seamole; nuconvert; McGavin999; DoctorZIn; Pro-Bush; BlackVeil; Eala; dixiechick2000
Iran diplomat refused bail


An Iranian ex-diplomat has again been remanded in custody in London over a terror attack which killed 85 people in Argentina.
Hade Soleimanpour, 47, is wanted by the Argentine government to face charges that he helped plan the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community centre in Buenos Aires - the country's worst ever terror attack.

He was refused bail at Bow Street Magistrates court at an extradition hearing and will appear for a further hearing on 19 September.

Bail was turned down despite an offer by his government to put up £500,000 for his surety, and a further £205,000 from family and friends.

His lawyers said the Iranian government was prepared to "stake its own credibility" on the case.

District judge Christopher Pratt said the serious nature of the charges, and the diplomatic sensitivity of the case, meant bail would be refused.


The extradition attempt has strained relations between the UK and Iran, which claims the arrest is politically motivated.

Noisy protests

About 50 protesters, mainly allied to the National Council of Resistance of Iran - which opposes the current regime - demonstrated outside the court demanding Mr Soleimanpour's extradition.

They shouted "one last terrorist out of the UK" and unfurled a banner reading "It is time to bring Mullah's regime to justice for 450 terrorist attacks", as the ex-envoy entered the court.
When his wife later left the hearing, she was also shouted at - with one protester pursuing her down the road.

Mr Soleimanpour was arrested earlier this month at the University of Durham, where he has been working as a research assistant.

The Argentine authorities believe the 47-year-old - who was Iranian ambassador to Argentina at the time of the attack - was involved in planning and commissioning the bomb.

He has strenuously denied any involvement.

Iranian president Ali Mohammed Khatami has demanded his release and an apology from the UK government.

And last week Iran's Deputy Foreign Minister Ali Ahani visited London to discuss the matter with UK Foreign Secretary Jack Straw.

The British government says it cannot intervene in what it calls a purely judicial, and not political, process.

Argentina is seeking the extradition of eight Iranian officials in total over the bombing.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3191115.stm
11 posted on 08/29/2003 7:13:12 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
EU to Press Iran on Nuclear Plans

August 29, 2003
BBC News
BBCi

The European Union is expected to put pressure on Iran to accept nuclear inspections when its foreign policy chief, Javier Solana, visits Tehran on Friday.

A spokeswoman for Mr Solana said he would underline Europe's growing concern about the nature of Iran's nuclear programme.

A leaked report earlier this week revealed the International Atomic Energy Agency's unease at finding traces of highly-enriched uranium at the Natanz nuclear facility.

Last month, the EU warned it could review its ties with Iran in September in light of the issue.

Enriching uranium is a way of purifying it so it can be used in nuclear fuel or in weapons.

Mr Solana is expected to press Tehran to quickly sign an additional protocol to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, that would allow unscheduled visits from inspectors.

Military secrets

Earlier this week, Iran said it was ready to start negotiations but wanted guarantees that inspectors would not be given total freedom of movement or violate military secrets.

Analyst Steven Everts, of the Centre for European Reform in London, told the BBC he expected Mr Solana's message to Tehran to be fairly tough.

"The EU will emphasise that Iran has to make a move, particularly on this additional protocol, which means accepting challenged, tough inspections," he said.

"There's no question of negotiating the precise context of the protocol - the protocol is a text which already exists. The question is whether Iran is willing to sign and implement it."

Tehran insists its programme is to generate electricity and is for peaceful purposes only, to satisfy its growing demand for power and prevent long-term energy shortages.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3190319.stm

12 posted on 08/29/2003 7:14:24 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Germany's Schroeder Urges Iran To Cooperate With IAEA

August 28, 2003
AFP
IranMania

BERLIN -- German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder issued an "urgent appeal" to Iran Thursday to cooperate with UN atomic energy authorities by giving a full account of its nuclear program.

"I can only give the urgent advice to be open and truthful and lay things on the table," he told the foreign press association when asked about Germany's relations with Iran in light of international concerns about its nuclear program.

"The threats that would present themselves with a continued nuclear program for military use, if there ever was one, are very, very large and very, very worrying.

"Thus, my urgent appeal (is) to cooperate fully to clear up this matter with the relevant atomic energy authority and to hide nothing, nothing at all."

Schroeder said Iran was obligated to cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and that Germany had complete faith in its director, Mohamed ElBaradei, to conduct a fair investigation.

He cited a European Union statement last month expressing its "growing concern" about the nature of Iran's nuclear program and warning that, without credible guarantees, it would review its economic ties with Tehran in September.

"We are interested in having good relations with Iran, but we also say clearly that we completely support the position that the European foreign ministers have formulated on the atomic question," Schroeder said.

Iran has come under increasing pressure, notably from Washington, to sign an additional protocol to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty allowing snap inspections of its nuclear facilities.

Concern over the issue resurfaced this week when a UN report said that inspections at Iranian facilities had turned up two different types of highly-enriched nuclear particles not needed in civilian atomic programs.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=17666&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
13 posted on 08/29/2003 7:16:34 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Put the Iraqis in Charge

August 29, 2003
The Wall Street Journal
Bernard Lewis

At first sight one would have expected that Afghanistan would be difficult, Iraq easy. In the one country, we ousted a religious regime, which had the prestige of having liberated the country from the plague of warlordism; in the other, we overthrew a universally detested Fascist-type tyranny. Afghanistan is a remote, mountainous country, with poor and difficult communications; Iraq consists largely of flat river valleys with quick and easy communication. Afghanistan has a strong tradition of regional independence and limited experience of central control; Iraq has known millennia of centralized government, run by a sophisticated and ramified bureaucracy. For these and other reasons, one might have expected that running Afghanistan would be difficult, running Iraq comparatively easy. In fact, the reverse has occurred. In Afghanistan, at first, things did indeed go badly, and there are still problems, both in the country and in the government, but they are manageable. Today with minimal help from the U.S., a central government is gradually extending its political and financial control to the rest of the country and dealing more and more effectively with the problem of the maintenance of order; in Iraq, after an easy and almost unresisted conquest, the situation seems to grow worse from day to day. While the Afghans are building a new infrastructure, Iraqis -- or others acting in their name -- are busy destroying theirs.

Why this contrast? America's enemies are the same in both places, with the same objectives. The main difference is that in Afghanistan there is an Afghan government, while in Iraq there is an American administration, and the cry of "American imperialism" is being repeated on many sides. Even the most cursory examination will reveal that this charge is ludicrously inept. America has neither the desire nor the skill nor -- perhaps most important -- the need to play an imperial role in Iraq. But the accusation -- and its resonant echoes in the Western and even in the American media -- serve a very useful purpose for those whose complaints and purposes against America are in reality quite different.

These anti-American forces fall basically into two groups. The first, and in the long run the more important, come from the camp of al Qaeda and related religious movements. For them, America is now the leader of Christendom, the ultimate enemy in the millennial struggle which they hope to bring, in their own time, to a victorious conclusion. In the writings and speeches of Osama bin Laden and of his allies and disciples, hatred of America is less significant than contempt -- the perception that America is a "paper tiger," that its people have become soft and pampered -- "hit them and they will run." This perception was bolstered by frequent references to Vietnam, Beirut and Somalia, as well as to the feeble response to subsequent terrorist attacks in the 1990s, notably on the USS Cole and on the embassies in East Africa. It was this perception which undoubtedly underlay the events of Sept. 11, clearly intended to be the opening barrage of a new war against the Americans on their home ground.

The response to this attack, and notably the operations in Afghanistan and then in Iraq, brought a rude awakening, and that is surely why there have been no subsequent attacks on U.S. soil. But the perception has not entirely disappeared, and has been revived by a number of subsequent developments and utterances. Compunction -- unwillingness to inflict as well as to suffer casualties -- is meaningless to those who have no hesitation in slaughtering hundreds, even thousands, of their own people, in order to kill a few enemies. Open debate is obviously meaningless to those whose only experience of government is ruthless autocracy. What they think they see is division and fear -- and these encourage a return to their earlier perception of American degeneracy. Such a return could have dangerous consequences, including a renewal and extension of terrorist attacks in America. By terrorist attacks, they believe, they will encourage those whose response is to say, "Let's get out of here" -- perhaps even procure the election of a new administration dedicated to this policy.

The other factor of anti-Americanism has quite a different origin, though there are areas of overlap. During the last few months the fear has often been expressed in Europe and America that democracy cannot succeed in Iraq. There is another, greater, and more urgent fear in the region -- that it will succeed in Iraq, and this could become a mortal threat to the tyrants who rule most of the Middle East. An open and democratic regime in Iraq, inevitably with a Shiite majority, could arouse new hopes among the oppressed peoples of the region, and offer a corresponding threat to their oppressors. One of these regimes, that of Iran , purports to be Islamic, and was indeed so in its origins, though it has become yet another corrupt tyranny.

Some of these regimes are officially classified as our friends and allies, and dealing with them presents a number of problems. There are no such problems in dealing with Iran , an avowed enemy, and undoubtedly a major force behind the troubles in Iraq, in Palestine and elsewhere. Some have argued that the remedy is to "build bridges" to the present regime in Iran. Even if successful, the best that such a diplomacy could accomplish would be to establish the same kind of friendship with Iran as we have with Saudi Arabia -- hardly model. More realistically, such overtures could certainly achieve two immediate results -- to earn the contempt of the government and the mistrust of the people. The calculation of the present regime in Iran is well known, and dates back to the first Gulf War. If Saddam Hussein had possessed nuclear weapons, the Americans would have left him alone, and he would have kept Kuwait and probably other places too. It was then that the mullahs decided that they must have these weapons, which would enable them to enjoy the same kind of immunity as North Korea. They are working desperately to that end, and the Middle East situation will take a significant turn for the worse if they are given the time to achieve it. Opinions may differ on how to handle them, but surely the worst of all options is the line of submissiveness, which can only strengthen the perception of American weakness.

* * *

What then should we do in Iraq? Clearly the imperial role is impossible, blocked equally by moral and psychological constraints, and by international and more especially domestic political calculations. An inept, indecisive imperialism is the worst of all options, with the possible exception of subjecting Iraq to the tangled but ferocious politics of the U.N. The best course surely is the one that is working in Afghanistan -- to hand over, as soon as possible, to a genuine Iraqi government. In Iraq as in Afghanistan, a period of discreet support would be necessary, but the task would probably be easier in Iraq. Here again care must be taken. Premature democratization -- holding elections and transferring power, in a country which has had no experience of such things for decades, can only lead to disaster, as in Algeria. Democracy is the best and therefore the most difficult of all forms of government. The Iraqis certainly have the capacity to develop democratic institutions, but they must do so in their own way, at their own pace. This can only be done by an Iraqi government.

Fortunately, the nucleus of such a government is already available, in the Iraqi National Congress, headed by Ahmad Chalabi. In the northern free zone during the '90s they played a constructive role, and might at that time even have achieved the liberation of Iraq had we not failed at crucial moments to support them. Despite a continuing lack of support amounting at times to sabotage, they continue to acquit themselves well in Iraq, and there can be no reasonable doubt that of all the possible Iraqi candidates they are the best in terms alike of experience, reliability, and good will. It took years, not months, to create democracies in the former Axis countries, and this was achieved in the final analysis not by Americans but by people in those countries, with American encouragement, help and support. Ahmad Chalabi and the Iraqi National Congress deserve no less.

Mr. Lewis, professor emeritus of Near Eastern studies at Princeton, is the author, most recently, of "What Went Wrong? Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response" (Oxford, 2002).

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=08&d=29&a=5
14 posted on 08/29/2003 7:19:23 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Ayatollah Mohammad Baqer al-Hakim Killed in Car Blast

August 29, 2003
AFP
News24.com

Tehran - Iraq's best-known Shi'ite Muslim politician, Ayatollah Mohammad Baqer al-Hakim, head of the Iran-backed Supreme Assembly of the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SAIRI), was killed in Friday's car bomb attack in the central city of Najaf, the group's Tehran office told AFP.

The car bomb explosion killed at least 17 people and wounded scores more outside one of Shi'ite Islam's holiest shrines in the central Iraqi city of Najaf.

The corpses were picked off the ground outside the Tomb of Ali as blood-spattered casualties wandered around the square in panic moments after the blast in the holy city, 180km south of Baghdad.

Hakim, who spent about 20 years in exile in Iran before returning in triumph to Iraq earlier this year, "met a martyr's fate along with his bodyguards," Mohsen Hakim, political adviser to the ayatollah's brother Abdel Aziz, said.

Severals shops were gutted by the blast which struck as the faithful left after afternoon prayers on the main Muslim day of worship.

Smoke filled the area as five charred cars burned. One was thrown at least 100m.

People were buried beneath the rubble of a gate to the compound and two nearby restaurants and shops, which were flattened by the explosion.

Iraqi police supervised rescue efforts as a few US soldiers watched on.

Onlookers shouted: "Allahu Akbar" (God is Greater) every time a body was lifted from the heap of metal and brick.

Outdoor vendors and worshippers had gashes on their faces from flying glass.

An announcement over the mosque's loudspeakers urged residents to go to the local children's hospital to give blood.

The offices of firebrand anti-American cleric, Moqtada Sadr, were also damaged in the blast.

The gates of the mosque were shuttered and guarded by dozens of Iraqi police, while three fire trucks were positioned around the compound.

Police hauled away cars left in the area for fear that more bombs might be hidden.

The car exploded outside the shrine compound's southern gate where Hakim normally enters and exits on Fridays.

An angry crowd outside shouted slogans against fallen dictator Saddam Hussein and the Ba'ath party in the moments after the blast.

Hakim had denounced Saddam and the Ba'ath party during his sermon.

http://www.news24.com/News24/World/Iraq/0,,2-10-1460_1409101,00.html
15 posted on 08/29/2003 7:21:03 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Ayatollah Mohammad Baqer al-Hakim Killed in Car Blast

August 29, 2003
AFP
News24.com

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/972525/posts?page=15#15

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
16 posted on 08/29/2003 7:23:43 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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Comment #17 Removed by Moderator

Comment #18 Removed by Moderator

To: seamole
It is terrible news.
It is not too hard to figure out who is responsible for these attacks.
19 posted on 08/29/2003 9:31:22 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: AdmSmith
"Prime suspect: al Sadr and his controls in Tehran "

My first thought, too.
20 posted on 08/29/2003 11:23:51 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
Great minds thing alike. (Sometimes)
21 posted on 08/29/2003 12:00:51 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Israel FM: Iran to Reach Nuclear Point of No Return Within One Year

August 29, 2003
Haaretz and Reuters
Hamza Hendawi

Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom said Friday that Iran is likely to reach the point of no return for nuclear capability within one year and called on Russia to stop providing assistance, Israel Radio reported.

Shalom made the comments to Deputy Russian Foreign Minister Yuri Federtov who is visiting Israel.

A nuclear capable Iran will change the strategic balance in the region, he added.

In comments aired earlier Friday, the head of the United Nations nuclear watchdog said that Iran had shopped for nuclear components on the international black market and called on Tehran to be more "proactive" and "transparent."

In an interview on the BBC television program Hardtalk, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) chief Mohamed ElBaradei also said that Iran's nuclear program had been going on far longer than the agency had realized.

Although he was not certain of the countries that made the equipment Iran had acquired on the black market, ElBaradei said he had a "pretty good idea" which ones they were.

"It could be one country, it could be more than one country," ElBaradei said. "They (Iran) told us they have got a lot of that stuff from the black market. It is through intermediaries. It is not directly from the country."

Media reports have named Pakistan, a nuclear weapons state that has refused to sign the nuclear 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), as one of countries whose nuclear technology Iran is believed to be using.

Although he stopped short of accusing Tehran of lying to the UN agency, ElBaradei said Iran had failed to give the IAEA a complete picture of its nuclear programme, which Washington says is merely a front for a secret atomic weapons program.

"They have not really been fully transparent in telling us in advance what was going on," ElBaradei said in the interview, recorded on Thursday and aired on Friday.

Asked if he believed Iran was running a secret weapons program, ElBaradei said: "It might be, it might not be."

"I need to really get the Iranians to tell me the full, complete story," he said. "And I would like Iran to be more proactive, more transparent."

He said that it would have been much easier to verify Iran's insistence its nuclear programme is peaceful if it had given the IAEA a complete picture of its atomic plans from the beginning.

"It would have been easier for us to complete our job if we knew what was going on as early as the mid 1980s," ElBaradei said. "Now we have to go... 20 years back."

He repeated his call for Iran to quickly sign a protocol giving the IAEA the right to carry out intrusive, short notice inspections across the country.

"The international community's getting very concerned, very impatient," ElBaradei said about the situation in Iran.

He also agreed that countries such as Iran, pre-war Iraq and North Korea - what U.S. President George W. Bush has branded the "axis of evil" - have had a history of misleading the world about their nuclear programs.

"They have been giving the international community the runaround," he said.

The IAEA Board of Governors meets next month to discuss the agency's recent inspections in Iran. The United States is pushing the board to declare Tehran in violation of its NPT nuclear safeguards obligations and report it to the UN Security Council, which can impose economic sanctions.

Iran's Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi said on Thursday the Islamic Republic was ready to start talks on allowing snap UN inspections of its nuclear sites.

"We have written to the director-general (of the International Atomic Energy Agency) saying we are ready to start negotiations on the Additional Protocol," Kharrazi told CNN.

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=334722&contrassID=1&subContrassID=1&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y
22 posted on 08/29/2003 12:01:24 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Israel FM: Iran to Reach Nuclear Point of No Return Within One Year

August 29, 2003
Haaretz and Reuters
Hamza Hendawi

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/972525/posts?page=22#22

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
23 posted on 08/29/2003 12:02:15 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: AdmSmith
However, Daniel Pipes was interviewd on FOX, and said he doubted this was shiite caused. More likely sunni, Taliban, al-Qaeda., due to the destruction of the mosque.
24 posted on 08/29/2003 12:03:09 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Moscow Looking for Solid Evidence in Iran

St. Petersburg Times - By Simon Saradzhyan
Aug 29, 2003

MOSCOW - Russia will not suspend construction of the Bushehr nuclear power plant in Iran unless the UN International Atomic Energy Agency finds solid evidence that Iran is secretly pursuing a nuclear-weapons program, the Nuclear Power Ministry said Thursday.

"There have to be solid reasons presented before one suspends cooperation," a ministry official said in an interview, speaking on condition of anonymity.

IAEA has prepared a confidential report confirming that its inspectors had found particles of weapons-grade uranium at a nuclear facility at Natanz, the Western press reported earlier this week.

Iran's Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi on Thursday confirmed that inspectors had found traces of enriched uranium in Natanz, Reuters reported.

The leak of the report prompted Washington, which has accused Teheran of seeking nuclear weapons, to renew its call for Russia to suspend construction of the Bushehr plant.

According to the Russian official, however, the recently found particles of highly enriched uranium do not qualify as a smoking gun, given the possibility and Iran's assurances that the substance was brought in on equipment that was previously imported.

Thus, the official said, Russia does not expect the IAEA at its Sept. 8 meeting to find Iran in non-compliance with the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, which would require the nuclear watchdog to submit the issue to the UN Security Council for consideration.

He repeated the ministry's position that Russia's nuclear cooperation with Iran is "transparent" and adheres to the nonproliferation treaty and other international nuclear safeguards. He said that Russia will complete construction of the first reactor of the Bushehr plant in 2004 but may send the first batch of nuclear fuel to Iran this year.

Representatives of the Nuclear Power Ministry and their Iranian counterparts will meet in September to sign an agreement that would require Iran to ship all spent nuclear fuel from Bushehr back to Russia.

During the meeting, the Russian side will again call upon Iran to sign an additional protocol to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty that would enable the IAEA to conduct random inspections of its nuclear facilities, the official said. However, the ministry-controlled contractors will complete Bushehr's first reactor, construction of which was started but then abandoned by Germany's Siemens, even if Iran refuses, the official said. Iran has agreed to sign the protocol, but on condition it is given broad access to peaceful nuclear technologies as stipulated in the treaty.

While its contractors are busy completing the first reactor, the Nuclear Power Ministry advised Iran not to complete the second reactor. A feasibility study, which was conducted by the ministry earlier this year, shows that it would be more cost-efficient to build a new reactor from scratch, the official said.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2022.shtml

25 posted on 08/29/2003 12:06:26 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Argentines Skeptical Over Impact of Ex-Iranian Official's Arrest Over 1994 Bombing

Voice of America - By Brian Byrnes
Aug 29, 2003

BUENOS AIRES - The former Iranian ambassador to Argentina is to appear Friday in a London court in connection with the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires. The arrest has sparked an intense war of words between officials in Buenos Aires, London, and Tehran. But some people question whether the arrest will advance the nine-year investigation.

Hadi Soleimanpour, Iran's former ambassador to Argentina, was detained August 21 in northern England, where he was studying at a local university on a student visa.

His arrest was a result of a warrant issued by Argentine judge Juan Jose Galeano, who has been investigating the attack on the Argentina Israeli Mutual Association - known by its Spanish language acronym as AMIA - since it occurred in 1994.

The car bomb that exploded at the AMIA headquarters in Buenos Aires killed 85 people and injured hundreds. More than nine years later no one has been held responsible.

Laura Ginsberg's husband Jose died in the bombing, leaving her to raise their two young children alone. Since the attack, Ms. Ginsberg has fought hard to bring the perpetrators of the blast to justice. But she says that the arrest of the former Iranian ambassador is not a significant breakthrough in an investigation that has been ineffective from the start.

"This man, Soleimanpour, is in the investigation since the beginning, his name appeared in the case since the beginning of the investigation and it is hard to believe that now Galeano could gather all the information to arrest him," she said.

But apparently sufficient evidence does exist, as Judge Galeano has issued arrest warrants for a dozen Iranian officials who were in Argentina at the time of the explosion.

Police in Brussels detained Iranian diplomat Saied Baghban in connection with the AMIA case, but released him after several hours of questioning because he has diplomatic immunity.

So far, Mr. Soleimanpour is the only Iranian in police custody, but his arrest and possible extradition to Argentina has sparked a bitter debate between British, Iranian, and Argentine leaders. Iranian President Mohammad Khatami threatened "strong action" against Britain if Mr. Soleimanpour is not released.

The United States and Israel have long suspected Iran of being behind the attack, a charge that Iran has repeatedly denied.

It is the diplomatic dispute that the AMIA lawyers are paying close attention to. AMIA attorney Miguel Bronfman says Tehran could influence the British extradition case.

"Yes, we are afraid of that. In these cases, this is not just a judicial case, it is a political case. Well, Iran is a strong state in the international scene and ... well, I think that apart from the judicial steps, Great Britain will pay attention to Iran's requests," he said.

American journalist Joe Goldman agrees. He has written extensively on the AMIA case and says pressure from Iranian officials, coupled with claims that Judge Galeano has destroyed files and bribed witnesses will make the extradition of Hadi Soleimanpour and others Iranians difficult.


"I think Soleimanpour is somebody who might know something, though, about what happened, and is somebody who might prove to be a very interesting witness," said Mr. Goldman. "Unfortunately, due to the really reprehensible conduct of this judge, I think any kind of an extradition request is going to be denied."

For Laura Ginsberg this is a harsh reality that will continue to prolong her search for the truth. "This is part of a political maneuver where the need to have an international responsibility [for] the crime is the first priority here in Argentina," she said.

While leaders in Tehran, London, and Buenos Aires debate the political and legal issues in this highly sensitive case, Argentine investigators will continue to press for the arrest and extradition of Iranian officials in connection with the worst act of terrorism in the country's history.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2024.shtml

26 posted on 08/29/2003 12:07:17 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Preventing a Nuclear Iran Is a Delicate Task

Los Angeles Times - By Maggie Farley and Douglas Frantz
Aug 29, 2003

Discovery of weapons- grade material adds momentum to effort. U.S. presses the U.N. to declare that Tehran has violated a treaty.

UNITED NATIONS — Following a report by the U.N.'s nuclear agency that particles of highly enriched uranium were found in Iran, diplomats are debating how to apply enough pressure to keep the country in line with the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty without pushing so hard that Tehran rejects international oversight altogether.

"If there is a lesson learned from North Korea, it is that we have to stop these countries before they get the bomb," a United Nations official said Wednesday, as talks on denuclearizing North Korea were underway in Beijing. "But how do you stop a country from reaching that point?"

The United States is pushing for the International Atomic Energy Agency to declare Iran in noncompliance with its treaty agreements at the organization's 35-nation board meeting Sept. 8 — the first step toward possible sanctions.

The confidential U.N. report, which details new evidence of the presence of weapons-grade material at a nuclear facility in Iran and shows several reversals of position by officials there, has added momentum to the effort.

The European Union and others may now be convinced that there is a "pattern of noncompliance," a Western diplomat said. "We need to strengthen the IAEA's hand by reporting the pattern to the Security Council and pressing Iran to cooperate more fully."

Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi said Thursday that his country was ready to start talks on an additional protocol to the treaty, allowing surprise inspections of any nuclear facility.

"We do not have enriched uranium, and we do not have a program to develop nuclear weapons," he told CNN during a trip to Japan to discuss oil field development.

Although U.S. and IAEA officials welcome the step, some worry that talks could drag on at a time when experts say Iran may be one to three years away from developing a nuclear weapon.

But if Iran does not prove to be immediately accommodating, the Security Council could impose tough economic and diplomatic sanctions, ban all nuclear assistance to Iran and even call for the return of all nuclear equipment received from other countries.

Many countries are still not convinced that Iran is pursuing nuclear weapons, diplomats say. Russia, China and about 10 developing nations on the IAEA board are focusing instead on parts of the report that note Iran has been more cooperative recently.

In the meantime, an analysis of another set of nuclear samples due to be completed in October may provide definitive proof of whether Iran has enriched uranium for military purposes.

Inspectors took the samples from Kalaye Electric Co. early this month, after Iran blocked their first attempt to visit the site in March. Inspectors noted major renovations at the facility, changes that officials suspect were an attempt to sanitize it before inspections.

Positive test results would show that Iran has enriched uranium or tested nuclear materials, both of which the government denies doing.

The results will be presented at the next board meeting of the IAEA in November.

"The central issue is: Has Iran enriched uranium in Iran?" said David Albright, president of the Washington-based Institute for Science and International Security. "The IAEA needs more time to determine that, but Iran really should provide that information themselves."

For the IAEA, the most important consideration right now is to keep Iran engaged so the agency can find the answers to urgent questions.

Mohamed ElBaradei, the IAEA director-general, has said privately that his first priority was to understand what Iran had been doing in recent years with its nuclear program, according to the Western diplomat. The additional treaty protocol will deal with future inspections, making it essential now to have a clear understanding of the Iranian program, he said.

"If they made some mistakes in reporting imports but are truly not trying to produce a nuclear weapon, the IAEA is the only one who can prove them innocent," a U.N. official said.

"The important thing is to pull them back from the nuclear threshold. If there is too much pressure, too many penalties, they may decide to withdraw from the treaty, and then there is no access at all."

Indeed, the IAEA's investigation has started the slow unraveling of Iran's story about its nuclear program.

"I count six reversals of position by Iran," said the Western diplomat. "This report is not a report of cooperation, but one that demonstrates the skill of the IAEA at getting to the facts. The only time Iran changed its position was when it was confronted by irrefutable evidence."

Iran claims that the traces of highly enriched, weapons-grade uranium the inspectors found at the Natanz nuclear facility in central Iran came from contaminated components imported from another country. The IAEA has asked Tehran to identify the suppliers to check that claim, but Iran has refused.

The report also details Iran's pursuit of two other production techniques for nuclear material. Iran previously said it was not involved with heavy-water technology, which produces weapons-grade plutonium. But Iranian officials admitted that work on heavy-water technology had been underway for more than a decade.

In another reversal, Iranian authorities also acknowledged this month that scientists had used nuclear material to conduct research on uranium conversion after repeatedly telling the IAEA over the last seven months that it had never used nuclear material in research and development, the report says. The research was apparently aimed at developing uranium metal, which has not been known to be used in Iran's commercial nuclear program but is regarded as essential for building a nuclear weapon.

"Uranium metal is not something that would normally be needed for the type of reactor that Iran is building," the Western diplomat said. "It's normally associated with things that go boom."

The IAEA report does not link the new developments to any weapons effort, disappointing those pushing for an immediate halt to Iran's nuclear work. But it says investigations are still underway.

"We believe the report to be objective and contain all the facts," IAEA spokeswoman Melissa Fleming said in a phone interview from Vienna. "We are determined to have answers to the outstanding questions in the next few weeks or months."

Farley reported from the United Nations and Frantz from Istanbul, Turkey.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-iran29aug29,1,6982728.story?coll=la-headlines-world
27 posted on 08/29/2003 12:09:10 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Preventing a Nuclear Iran Is a Delicate Task

Los Angeles Times - By Maggie Farley and Douglas Frantz
Aug 29, 2003

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/972525/posts?page=27#27

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
28 posted on 08/29/2003 12:09:52 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Ayatollah Mohammed Baqer al-Hakim

Reuters - World News
Aug 29, 2003

NAJAF - Ayatollah Mohammed Baqer al-Hakim, killed by a car bomb in the Iraqi shrine city of Najaf on Friday, was the long-exiled leader of one of the main Shi'ite Muslim groups jockeying for power in postwar Iraq.


Hakim had sought to avoid confrontation with U.S.-led forces occupying Iraq since the invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein, and authorised his brother to serve on the U.S.-appointed 25-member Iraqi Governing Council set up in July.

But he said in a interview with Reuters in June that Iraq's Shi'ite majority could turn against the U.S.-led occupiers if they were not given political compensation for decades of persecution under Saddam's dictatorship.

"They gave the justification that they came in the name of liberation but now they are an occupying force. That is what is making people angry," the black-turbaned cleric said. "If the people lose their patience, there will be a social uproar."

But Hakim, 63, who headed the Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI), said there was no need at present for Iraqis to use force to end the occupation.

Tortured under the former Iraqi government, hosted and funded by Iran's clerical leaders and cautiously courted by Washington, Hakim returned to Najaf from Tehran on May 12.

Among his first acts was to pay an emotional visit to the Imam Ali shrine, a walled compound of gold dome and tilework enclosing the tomb of the Prophet Mohammad's son-in-law.

"I am not here to promote myself," he told his rapturous supporters, insisting there was unity among clerics in Najaf.

SCIRI officials said the car bomb that killed Hakim, who was among up to 20 dead, exploded as he drove away from the shrine after Friday prayers. No group has claimed responsibility.

"Ayatollah Mohammed Baqer al-Hakim became a martyr," said his nephew Mohsen Hakim, who is a SCIRI official, in Tehran.

On Sunday, the murdered man's uncle, Ayatollah Mohammed Saeed al-Hakim, was slightly wounded in a bomb attack at his office in Najaf which killed three security guards.

Some SCIRI supporters blamed that attack, which was close to the Imam Ali mosque, on followers of rival Shi'ite leader Moqtada al-Sadr. His group denied the accusation.

When Hakim returned to Najaf in May, supporters of the rival group moved through the crowd with posters of Sadr's father, Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, an Iraqi cleric assassinated in 1999.

"The ones who were abroad living in luxury cannot be real representatives," said Sheikh Adnan al-Shahmani, a spokesman for Moqtada al-Sadr. "This goes for all the opposition who lived outside."

A senior cleric like his father, Hakim was jailed and tortured in 1972. He was jailed again five years later. Five of his brothers and more than a dozen other relatives were killed during three decades of struggle against Saddam's Baath party.

Hakim eventually fled in 1980 to Iran, where Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini was setting up a Shi'ite Islamic state.

Soon after Hakim's arrival the young Islamic Republic was attacked by Iraq, sparking an eight-year war between the two oil powers. United by their Shi'ite beliefs and hatred for Saddam, Iran's new clerical leaders and Hakim formed a strong bond.

Weapons and training were provided for SCIRI's armed militia -- said to number about 10,000 -- known as the Badr Forces, which crossed from Iran and briefly occupied Basra in the Iraqi Shi'ite uprising after the 1991 Gulf War.

Hakim was believed to have been close to Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, but SCIRI was also in touch with the United States and its allies long before the war on Iraq was launched in March this year.

He distanced himself from previous vows to establish an Islamic Republic in Iraq, saying in February that he favoured an elected, broad-based government to replace Saddam.

"For more than 20 years I've been opposed to the racial, ethnic and sectarian discrimination in Iraq," he told Reuters.

The cleric was coy about what part he would like to play in postwar Iraq, saying this was up to the Iraqi people.

"I will perform whatever role they want from me," he said, his long, bearded face breaking into a mischievous smile.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2027.shtml
29 posted on 08/29/2003 12:13:26 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Diplomat Extradition Hearing Threatens Iranian Relations

Scotsman - By Vanessa Allen
Aug 29, 2003

An Iranian diplomat accused of helping to mastermind a deadly terrorist bombing was today refused bail, despite his government offering £500,000 for his surety.

The Argentinian government has asked for Hade Soleimanpour – who was Tehran’s ambassador in Buenos Aires at the time of the 1994 bombing – to be extradited from Britain to face charges.

But lawyers for the “career diplomat” said the Iranian government was prepared to “stake its own credibility” on the case, and was offering the half a million pounds as surety.

The case has threatened to sour relations between London and Tehran.

Iranian president Ali Mohammed Khatami has demanded the release of Soleimanpour – who is still employed by the Iranian ministry of foreign affairs – and an apology from the British Government.

His foreign minister and deputy foreign minister have both made personal representations to Foreign Secretary Jack Straw in the last week and Tehran has threatened to recall some of its diplomats, the extradition hearing at Bow Street Magistrates’ Court was told.

But district judge Christopher Pratt was unmoved, remanding Soleimanpour in custody until the next hearing on September 19, over fears he might abscond.

“I am very aware of the gravity of the allegations against you and the diplomatic sensitivities of the case,” he said.

“I have concluded that no amount of money proposed or conditions put forward will satisfy me.”

Argentina claims that Soleimanpour, 47, was involved in planning and commissioning the attack, and that he provided information about the preferred location and timing of the bombing.

There were 85 people killed and more than 100 injured when the blast destroyed the headquarters of the Argentine Jewish Mutual Association and the Delegation of Argentine Jewish Association in July 1994.

The seven storey building was the main community centre for Jews in Argentina, which has the largest Jewish population in Latin America.

Robert Bland, for the Argentine government, alleged that Soleimanpour “used his diplomatic position to facilitate and assist that operation”.

Mr Bland told the court: “It is clear that the Government of Iran is exceptionally upset about this and, with great respect, I would say that £500,000 – given that it is coming from the government of Iran – is not a great sum for them to lose.”

Soleimanpour’s lawyer, Alun Jones QC – who led General Pinochet’s legal team in his extradition case – said the case had caused “outrage” in Iran.

It was “very serious” for a serving member of another country’s diplomatic services to be arrested on a provisional warrant, he said, adding that Home Secretary David Blunkett should have considered the case first.

“In this very serious matter there is no evidence at all that he is a fugitive, that he will abscond, and there is no possible evidential or other basis to impugn the good faith of the government of Iran,” he said.

Stamps in Soleimanpour’s passport showed he was not in Buenos Aires at the time of the bombing, Mr Jones said, adding that he left Argentina on June 30, 1994, and returned on July 25.

The bombing was on July 18.

Mr Jones said Soleimanpour was well aware of Argentine claims that Tehran had ordered and financed the bombing, but had chosen to spend much of his time since the attack in countries from which he could be extradited.

He came to Britain in 2002 on an ordinary passport, without diplomatic status, and stayed in the country despite reports in March last year that Buenos Aires was seeking the extradition of dozens of Iranian officials in connection with the car bombing.

Mr Jones said police visits to his client’s home before his arrest last week could be interpreted as encouraging Soleimanpour to leave the country before Argentina asked for his extradition.

He added: “Mr Soleimanpour was obviously encouraged by these meetings to think he was being shown an open door by the British authorities to leave in a diplomatically sensitive case.”

An extradition warrant was issued last Thursday and Soleimanpour was arrested at his home in Durham, where he has lived for more than a year while studying environmental studies at Durham University.

He was granted a sabbatical by Iran’s diplomatic service to carry out post-graduate work at the university, where his wife works as a biologist. Their two children, aged seven and 13, attend British schools.

Mrs Soleimanpour refused to comment on the case, or to give her name.

She left the courthouse to a torrent of abuse from anti-Iranian government protesters, who called her the wife of a murderer and terrorist.

She was arm-in-arm with her friend and colleague Margaret Pullen, who gave evidence in court that the family were happy and settled in Durham.

The university worker said she was prepared to put forward her personal savings of £5,000 as additional surety for Soleimanpour’s bail.

But her offer, the Iranian government’s £500,000, another £200,000 from Soleimanpour’s parents and the promise of 40,000 US dollars from the diplomat’s Swiss bank account were not enough for Mr Pratt, who remanded him in custody until the next hearing.

The court had heard that the extradition process could take years to complete.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2033.shtml
30 posted on 08/29/2003 12:15:59 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Pakistan, Iran blast nuclear cooperation accusation

AFP - World News (via Yahoo)
Aug 29, 2003

ISLAMABAD (AFP) - Pakistan and Iran jointly rejected accusations of nuclear cooperation as malicious propaganda.

"I reject the false report that Pakistan has been helping Iran's nuclear programme," visiting Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi told a joint news conference with his Pakistani counterpart Khurshid Mahmud Kasuri that followed an hour of talks on bilateral relations and regional security issues.

Kharazi said Friday he explained in detail during his meetings with President Pervez Musharraf and Prime Minister Zafarullah Jamali that Iran's nuclear programme was completely peace-minded.

"We do not have any programme for nuclear weapons. Contrary to that, we believe that a nuclear free zone has to be established in Middle East and even in the subcontinent," Kharazi said.

Kasuri said Pakistan supported the right of Iran to develop its "peaceful nuclear programme, concomittant to its adherence of its obligation under the arms control and disarmament agreements that it is party to."

"Pakistan has never supplied in any manner whatsoever any assistance for Iran's nuclear programme," Kasuri said.

"These reports were part of a malicious smear campaign against Pakistan and Iran."

Iran has come under increasing international pressure over its nuclear programme, particularly from the United States, which suspects Tehran has a nuclear weapons agenda.

Kharazi said Tehran was cooperating fully with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the UN's nuclear watchdog, and played down UN report on the discovery of two types of highly-enriched nuclear particles at facilities in Iran.

"Our nuclear programme is totally indigenous but we have acquired some components of this facility from outside.

"Now we have learned that those components brought from outside were contaminated and this is what we have explained to IAEA and I am sure they will come to the same conclusion when they finalise their analysis."

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2028.shtml
31 posted on 08/29/2003 12:17:19 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
"Crisis of Legitimacy" Could Prompt Authoritarian Political Alternative

Eurasianet - By Afshin Molavi
Aug 29, 2003

The political gridlock caused by infighting between conservative and reformist forces in Iran has fostered what analysts in Tehran characterize as a "crisis of legitimacy." Growing popular apathy towards the political process is preparing the ground for a possible authoritarian alternative, some observers go on to warn.

Payman Morteza, a 26 year-old graphic designer, is one member of Iran’s legion of disillusioned. Morteza recalls how he was optimistic about Iran’s future after attending a 1997 campaign rally for the reform-minded cleric Mohammad Khatami, who went on to capture the presidency. "He spoke of freedom, of individual choice, of toleration," Morteza said. "It was an entirely new language for the Islamic Republic. We were so accustomed to hearing talk of revolution and sacrifice and foreign enemies."

Morteza, along with a group of friends, began campaigning for Khatami in his neighborhood. "We went into shops. We talked to people. We said: ?this man is different.’ Please vote for Khatami."

Today, six years later, Morteza ? like many Iranians ? has soured on Khatami and the reform movement, frustrated by the slow pace of change and the largely successful conservative resistance to reformist proposals. That frustration is now translating into apathy with politics.

"The reformists have been ineffective. ... I won’t bother voting in the [2004] Parliamentary elections or the [2005] Presidential elections. What’s the use? The conservatives have the real power anyway," Morteza said.

Conservatives ? who still control the key levers of power, including the instruments of coercive force ? recently mounted an aggressive assault on the tottering reform movement. They blocked reformist legislation that would liberalize Iranian elections, jailed or effectively silenced leading reformist figures, chilled pro-democracy students with violent crackdowns in recent demonstrations, and sent a clear message that they do not intend to give up power lightly. [For background see the Eurasia Insight archive].

Developments in 2003 have stirred concern among political analysts about a brewing crisis. This "crisis of legitimacy" ? the exact phrase used by several analysts in interviews with EurasiaNet -- threatens the country’s grass-roots democracy movement and could shift popular sentiment toward outside calls for regime change, or strongman alternatives, they said.

"The defeat of the reform movement has de-legitimized the government," said Morad Saghafy, editor of the prestigious Goft-o-Gu intellectual quarterly. "Before Khatami’s election, many people felt distant from the government. The reform movement brought millions of Iranians back to the regime and gave them hope that the Islamic Republic could change. The reformist failures have made many people think that the system is un-reformable. It is a double loss for the Islamic Republic."

On university campuses, in corner shops, in tree-filled parks, and wherever else Iranians gather, a blistering cynicism infects the air. "All those mullahs are the same," huffed one elderly shopkeeper in a small supermarket on Tehran’s busy Shariati Street. "They are all corrupt thieves." A shopper disagreed: "I don’t think the reformists are thieves. I think they tried, but clearly the conservatives have all the power and don’t want to give it up. So, why should we back the reformists?" Another shopper pipes in: "This system needs to be uprooted entirely. We need an entirely new regime."

Such exchanges and talk of "regime change" have become common among a people who are also frustrated by a stagnant economy, double-digit inflation, and chronic unemployment. What worries many pro-democracy analysts is that, given the despair about the lack of change, Iranians may now seek what reformists describe as unpalatable options.

"These are precisely the kind of conditions that make Iranians long for a strongman, not a democrat," explained one journalist, who asked not to be named. "That’s why there is Reza Shah nostalgia among middle-class Iranians," he said, referring to Iran’s first Pahlavi king (1925-41), who is generally remembered as an iron-fisted modernizer. Books about the former king and the Pahlavi dynasty in general sell briskly, booksellers say.

Even a few intellectuals have succumbed to the "strongman" theory. At one reception, a well-regarded historian turned to a Tehran-based political analyst and said: "Why not have a strongman? This place is such a mess that we could use a modernizing autocrat."

Ali Reza Alavitabar, a reformist publisher and academic who has been in and out of jail for his pro-democracy views, worries about such talk. "In the past six years, we have built a strong, grass-roots democracy movement," he explains. "The democratic spirit that we have instilled over the past six years have fundamentally changed the contours of the political debate, and the mindset of the average Iranian. We must continue to move forward in this direction."

Morad Saghafy agrees. "We have far more democratic-minded people in Iran today than we did six years ago and, of course, far more than we did before 1979. All of the newspapers articles, the speeches, the voting, have had an effect," he said. "This is critical because you can’t impose a democracy; you need democratic cadres."

Still, Alavitabar, Saghafy, and others admit that the conservatives have made it almost insurmountably difficult to proceed. "Politics has died," Saghafy says. "We are now simply witnessing the exertion of power."

Some Iranians have already begun looking for outside assistance. The leading pro-democracy student group, Daftar-e-Tahkim-e-Vahdat, wrote to UN Secretary General Kofi Annan, seeking UN assistance in its struggle. The letter crossed an unwritten "red line," prompting the detention at gunpoint of several leaders of the organization. (They have been freed recently, "admitting" the error if their ways). [For background see the Eurasia Insight archive].

Talk also swirls of an American "solution." Vanna Vanucci, an Italian journalist and long-time Iran observer, was stunned when she repeatedly heard from Iranians during the US war with Iraq: "When will the Americans liberate us?"

Recently, Hossein Khomeini, a mid-ranking opposition cleric and grandson of the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, spoke positively of what he called "the American liberation of Iraq" and suggested that many Iranians would welcome American involvement in "Iran’s liberation."

When pressed, many Iranians admit to fearing the prospect of a US-engineered attempt to topple Iran’s existing political order. Concerns about Washington’s intentions and abilities are only growing as they witness the US troubles in reconstructing neighboring Iraq. The US woes are documented in exhaustive detail nightly on Iran’s state-run television news.

Mehrdad Serjooie, an Iranian journalist, puts it this way: "People want more political freedoms, more social freedoms, and a better economy. They just don’t know where ? or how ? they will get these things. People are searching, wondering, and many are simply retreating, leaving their destinies to the winds of fate." The trouble is, say many analysts, the conservatives are effectively controlling the direction of those winds.

Afshin Molavi, a Washington-based journalist and frequent EurasiaNet contributor, recently returned from a three week reporting trip to Iran.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2031.shtml
32 posted on 08/29/2003 12:18:15 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Israel 'would bomb Iran nuclear plant'

Ananova - Report Section
Aug 29, 2003

Israel has made plans to bomb an Iranian nuclear power plant if it begins producing weapons grade material, it was reported today.

Military commanders have mapped out a route Israeli fighter jets would take to destroy the Bushehr reactor on the Persian Gulf, officials told the Washington Times.

Russia has been helping Iran to build its first nuclear plant for eight years in a deal worth about £500 million to Moscow.

Both countries say it is purely for civilian purposes.

But the US claims Iran could use the technology to build a nuclear bomb, and President George Bush is expected raise the issue with Russian leader Vladimir Putin at next month's Camp David summit.

Russia said this week it would stop building the plant if the UN nuclear watchdog presents "concrete evidence" that Tehran is secretly developing banned weapons.

Iran has tested 600-mile-range ballistic missiles that can reach Israel and carry nuclear, biological or chemical warheads.

In 1981, Israel bombed the Iraqi Osiraq nuclear-power plant, near Baghdad, in an operation that drew widespread international criticism.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2030.shtml

33 posted on 08/29/2003 12:19:15 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Israel 'would bomb Iran nuclear plant'

Ananova - Report Section
Aug 29, 2003

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/972525/posts?page=33#33

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
34 posted on 08/29/2003 12:20:52 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn; nuconvert; seamole; Valin; McGavin999; AdmSmith; Pro-Bush; BlackVeil; onyx; Eala; ...
29 Aug 2003 19:36:21 GMT
Iran: U.S.-led security failure behind Hakim death

(Updates with Iranian government and Supreme Leader reaction)

TEHRAN, Aug 29 (Reuters) - Iran condemned the killing on Friday of the head of a leading Iraqi Shi'ite group, which had Iranian backing, blaming his death on the failure of U.S.-led occupiers to provide security, Iranian media reported.

A senior Iranian official earlier told Reuters the killing of Mohammed Baqer Al-Hakim, who was among scores killed by a car bomb in the Iraqi city of Najaf, would only benefit those who wanted an unstable Iraq.

Hakim, head of the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI), had been exiled in Iran for more than two decades before returning to Iraq in May.

"The government of the Islamic Republic of Iran, while condemning this violent and blind act, holds occupying forces in Iraq directly responsible, which based on international principles are responsible for preserving security in Iraq," Iran's official IRNA news agency quoted a statement as saying.

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei announced three days of mourning, Iran's students' news agency ISNA reported.

"The martyrdom of (Hakim)...is a grave catastrophe for the Iraqi nation and is another document of the occupiers' crimes which have imposed insecurity and chaos on Iraq with their illegitimate presence," Khamenei was quoted as saying.

Iran was officially neutral in the U.S.-led war on Iraq, but welcomed the fall of former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, who fought an eight-year war with Iran in the 1980s.

Iran has also condemned the U.S. occupation of the country, while the United States has warned Iran not to interfere in Iraq's internal affairs.

"I believe the only people to profit from his martyrdom are those who do not want a stable and independent Iraq," Iranian Vice President Mohammad Ali Abtahi told Reuters.

SCIRI had been criticised by some groups for cooperating with the U.S. military occupation and Hakim had been viewed by Washington as a stabilising influence in post-war Iraq.

"Hakim had made a few statements saying an Iranian-style theocracy was not suitable for Iraq and put distance between himself and his Iranian backers," said one diplomat in Tehran.

But some analysts said Hakim's death would be a blow to Iran, which had nurtured him and his group since the 1980s.

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/BL2976022.htm
35 posted on 08/29/2003 2:35:23 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
Ayatollah jannati: national resources should not be spent on factional disputes

Tehran, Aug 29, IRNA -- Substitute Leader of Tehran Friday Prayers
yatollah Ahmad Jannati stressed here that the national resources
should not be spent on the tug-of-war between the political factions
in the country.
Addressing thousands of worshipers gathered at the Tehran
University campus for the weekly congregational prayers, Ayatollah
Jannati touched on the recent directives given by the Supreme Leader
of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyed Ali Khamenei on the need for
officials to try to create a tension-free society to contribute to the
national prosperity and progress.
Under the currently sensitive circumstances, Jannati said, those
getting involved in factional rows focus on the activities to preserve
the interests of the factions to which they belong and put into
oblivion the crucial issues.
He hoped that President Mohammad Khatami would do his best to
translate into action the recent recommendations given by the supreme
leader.
The problems facing the Iranian people could be solved through
having recourse to trust in the Almighty Allah, practicing religious
faith and consultations with experts and professionals and making
optimal use of the available resources, Jannati said.
Part of state budget is spent on insignificant tasks, he said
asking officials to mull over the proper spending of the resources.
Ayatollah jannati said the national capitals should come in
service of more productivity.
He said the officials have, as underlined previously by the
supreme leader, to adopt measures to administer the social justice, to
uppress the financial corruption and to remove any discriminatory
actions and behaviors.
He said administration of justice in the society would contribute
to the legitimization of the Islamic system in Iran.
As for the foreign policy issues, he referred to the arrest of the
ranian former diplomat Hadi Soleimanpour in Britain and expressed
surprise over the case.
He linked Soleimanpour`s arrest to the intense lobbying by the
Zionist regime.
It is a source of great surprise that the Zionist circle was
rocked by the blast in Argentina some 9 years ago and Iran said it
had no role in the bombings but an Iranian diplomat was arrested in
Britain due to the Zionist lobbying.
He praised the firm stand adopted by the Iranian Foreign Ministry
vis-a-vis the diplomat`s arrest and called on officials to settle
the issues with UK and Argentina once and for all.
In a telephone conversation with British Foreign Secretary Jack
Straw on August 25, Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi said Iran
government was very sensitive over the fate of Iranians living abroad
and will use all its capabilities to defend their rights.
Kharrazi referred to the recent arrest of former Iranian
ambassador to Argentina Hadi Soleimanpour by British police in London
and stressed that the event would negatively affect mutual
relations.
Kharrazi said the court ruling is political and lacks any judicial
and legal credit while asserting that Soleimanpour is innocent and
should be released as soon as possible.
Straw described as `important` Iran`s viewpoints, and stressed on
continuing of mutual talks over the issue saying London would do its
utmost to settle the challenge.
Soleimanpour, 47, was recently arrested by British Police in his
home in Durham, Northeast England over his alleged involvement in the
bombing of a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires in 1994.
He is to be held in custody until Friday August 29 when the
Magistrate Court in Bow Street in London will rule on an Argentine
extradition request.
HB/214
End
He urged the Iranians to pay
more attention to the Islamic morale.

http://www.irna.ir/#2003_08_2916_48_222

36 posted on 08/29/2003 2:40:28 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: AdmSmith; seamole; DoctorZIn; nuconvert; onyx; BlackVeil; Valin; Pro-Bush; McGavin999; Eala
Soleimanpour again refused bail in UK

London, Aug 29, IRNA - Iran`s former ambassador to Argentina, Hade
Soleimanpour, was remanded in custody for a further three weeks in
the UK Friday after being refused bail for a second time despite
being held on only a provisional arrest request on an Argentinian
extradition claim.
District Judge Christopher Pratt rejected a further application
for bail Friday because of the seriousness of the allegations made by
Argentina, related to the 1994 bombing of a Jewish centre in Buenos
Aires, the same reason given in the first application last week.
Counsel for Soleimanpour, Alan Jones, argued that there had been
no reason for his arrest by British police at his home in Durham,
north east England, on August 21, because it was only a provisional
extradition warrant.
He said that his client was "not a fugitive" and that he had
stayed on as ambassador in Buenos Aires until January 1995, when
Argentina recalled its ambassador from Tehran in 1995. Since then he
had travelled to many countries, he said.
The former ambassador on a provisional extradition request, which
does not require Home Secretary David Blunkett to sign an Authority
to Proceed with a committal hearing until Argentina presents
supporting evidence for its claim.
Jones, who acted for Britain`s Crown Prosecution Service in the
1996 extradition case against former Chilean President Augusto
Pinochet, called a witness from Durham University, where Soleimanpour
is studying a PhD, to verify his good character.
He also presented staff letters to the judge at Bow Street
Magistrates Court in central London, about his relationship with the
university.
The counsel suggested that the case was politically motivated and
referred to the Argentinian judge first accusing the Iranian
government of involvement in the bombing in an article for the New
York Times this March, when he gave the paper a 600-page dossier.
He pointed out that British police visited Soleimanpour four days
later to question him about the article. He was further questioned in
a second visit about the bombing and in a third visit, the conflict
in the Middle East was raised.
The district judge rejected an argument from Robert Bland from
Britain`s Crown Prosecution Service representing Argentina`s
application, that the former ambassador`s safety could be at risk if
he was allowed bail.
Bland ironically referred to members of the Mujahideen-e Khalq
(MKO) terrorist group demonstrating outside the court, stating that
the former ambassador`s life could be put in danger from opponents of
the Iranian government if he was released.
Soleimanpour was remanded in custody until September 19, when
Argentina has to submit its full evidence for its extradition
application to be heard.
It is at that date that the Home Secretary has to decide whether
to sign the Authority to Proceed` for a committal hearing to go
ahead. It is also eventually at the discretion of Blunkett to
ultimately decide whether an extradition takes place.

http://www.irna.ir/#2003_08_2918_19_221
37 posted on 08/29/2003 2:42:16 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot
US sponsors Anonymiser - if you live in Iran
By Kevin Poulsen, SecurityFocus
Posted: 29/08/2003 at 15:26 GMT



A pact between the U.S. government and the electronic privacy company Anonymizer, Inc. is making the Internet a safer place for controversial websites and subversive opinions -- if you're Iranian.

This month Anonymizer began providing Iranians with free access to a Web proxy service designed to circumvent their government's online censorship efforts. In May, government ministers issued a blacklist of 15,000 forbidden "immoral" websites that ISPs in the country must block -- reportedly a mix of adult sites and political news and information outlets. An estimated two million Iranians have Internet access.

Among the banned sites are the website for the U.S.-funded Voice of America broadcast service, and the site for Radio Farda, another U.S. station that beams Iranian youth a mix of pop music and westernized news. Both stations are run by the International Broadcasting Bureau (IBB), the U.S. government's overseas news and propaganda arm.

The U.S. responded to the filtering this month by paying Anonymizer (neither the IBB nor Anonymizer will disclose how much) to create and maintain a special version of the Anonymizer proxy which only accepts connections from Iran's IP address space, and features instructions in Farsi.

The deliberately generic-sounding URLs for the service are publicized over Radio Farda broadcasts and through bulk e-mails that Anonymizer sends to addresses in the country. The addresses are provided by human rights groups and other sources, says Anonymizer president Lance Cottrell.

"We're providing a system whereby the people in the countries that are suffering Internet censorship can bypass the government filtering and access all the pages that are blocked," says Cottrell.

The services' navigation boxes default to Radio Farda or Voice of America, but surfers are invited to put in any address they like, and browse free of the Iranian government's filtering.

"Dissident sites, religious sites, the L.L. Bean catalog -- we point them to the Voice of America site, but they can go anywhere," says Ken Berman, program manager for Internet anticensorship at the IBB, "They're free explore the Internet in an unfettered fashion."

Mostly unfettered. Like the Iranian filters, the U.S. service blocks porn sites -- "There's a limit to what taxpayers should pay for," says Berman. But the United States' hope is that a freer flow of online information will improve America's image in the Arab world. The service is similar to one Anonymizer provided to Chinese citizens under a previous government contract that ran-out ended earlier this year.

Cottrell and Berman agree that it's only a matter of time before the Iranonymity service winds on the official blacklist. But Berman hints that the U.S. is ready for a prolonged electronic shell game with Tehran. "In China we're continually monitoring the state of the proxy, and when we see the traffic drop off, we change the proxy's address, usually within 24 hours," says Berman. "In Iran, we're prepared to change the proxy address every day if necessary."

A bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives last month would create an Office of Global Internet Freedom that would have up to a $50 million annual budget to help citizens of foreign repressive governments skirt Internet censorship.
38 posted on 08/29/2003 7:01:51 PM PDT by yonif ("If I Forget Thee, O Jerusalem, Let My Right Hand Wither" - Psalms 137:5)
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To: F14 Pilot
"In a telephone conversation with British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw on August 25, Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi said Iran government was very sensitive over the fate of Iranians living abroad and will use all its capabilities to defend their rights.

"Very sensitive over the fate of Iranians living abroad.."
lol
"...defend their rights."
lol
Right.
39 posted on 08/29/2003 8:10:49 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
"Many countries are still not convinced that Iran is pursuing nuclear weapons, diplomats say. Russia, China and about 10 developing nations on the IAEA board are focusing instead on parts of the report that note Iran has been more cooperative recently."

Hmm. Russia, China, etc... wouldn't have anything to do with their own involvement, would it?
40 posted on 08/29/2003 8:28:51 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: yonif
Thanks for the additional info. on this.
41 posted on 08/29/2003 8:50:03 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert; DoctorZIn; onyx; AdmSmith; seamole; Valin; McGavin999; Eala; BlackVeil; Pro-Bush
EU's Solana to urge Iran to allow more nuke checks

TEHRAN, Aug. 29 — European Union foreign policy chief Javier Solana will press Iran to agree to snap inspections of its nuclear sites facilities as a key demand for closer EU trade ties, an EU official said on Friday.

http://famulus.msnbc.com/FamulusIntl/reuters08-29-125035.asp?reg=MIDEAST
42 posted on 08/29/2003 11:38:56 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: nuconvert; onyx; AdmSmith; seamole; Valin; McGavin999; Eala; BlackVeil; Pro-Bush; yonif; ...
Russia engages US in new war of words over Iran

MOSCOW (AFP)

Moscow and Washington launched a new war of words Thursday over Russia's construction of Iran's first nuclear power plant, as officials here stressed the project was irrelevant to the Islamic state's military ambitions.
"It is impossible to derive raw material for nuclear weapons from the material that we will be supplying to Iran -- even US experts agree with this," said Viktor Kozlov, who heads the AtomStroiExport company which is building the Bushehr plant.

Iran has dogged Russian-US relations for years and is likely to surface again at next month's Camp David summit between presidents George W. Bush and Vladimir Putin -- just as it did during their last meeting in Saint Petersburg on June 1.

Senior Russian officials accused Washington of actually worrying about competition in the lucrative nuclear power plant construction market rather than about Iran's potential nuclear ambitions.

"The Americans are not concerned about the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction -- they just want to limit Russia's role on the nuclear energy market," said Radzhab Safarov, a presidential adviser on Iranian affairs.

Meanwhile the atomic energy ministry said in a statement that Washington had offered no proof of how the Bushehr project could help Iran build a nuclear bomb.

"In order for Russia to tear up this agreement (with Iran), we need to be presented with firm evidence -- both logistical and political -- and none has come so far," the atomic energy ministry said.

The deal is worth some 800 million dollars (734 million euros) to Russia.

The United States on Wednesday renewed longstanding opposition to Russia's nuclear cooperation with Iran ahead of next month's meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) that will address the Iranian program.

The State Department said no nation -- including Russia -- should be assisting Iran in its nuclear efforts until Tehran agrees to allow snap inspections of its installations by the IAEA which has raised concerns about the scope of the program.

"Until Iran satisfies the IAEA's questions and fully addresses the concerns of the international community... we believe that no country should be engaging with Iran in nuclear cooperation, and that would include Russia," deputy spokesman Philip Reeker said.

Reeker's comments came one day after the top US arms negotiator left Moscow empty-handed after two days of talks on the issue.

Moscow next month is expected to sign an agreement with Tehran that would ensure that all spent nuclear fuel provided for the Bushehr reactor is returned for reprocessing to Russia.

Russia views this as a key agreement which should allay Western concerns about the possibility of Iran developing nuclear weapons from Bushehr's material.

"I find it strange that the Americans, who for years have been insisting that we sign such an agreement, today are urging us not to hurry and sign the additional protocol," Kozlov of AtomStroiExport said in a Moscow Echo radio interview.

"I do not think that Iran can ever develop a nuclear weapon... because of all of the IAEA controls and because of all the international attention given to the issue," he said.

http://www.spacewar.com/2003/030828155245.7zvaxodh.html
43 posted on 08/29/2003 11:50:40 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
"Until Iran satisfies the IAEA's questions and fully addresses the concerns of the international community... we believe that no country should be engaging with Iran in nuclear cooperation, and that would include Russia," deputy spokesman Philip Reeker said.

President Bush will back up Phillip. I am convinved we are going to take over Iran...Soon.
44 posted on 08/29/2003 11:57:19 PM PDT by Pro-Bush (Awareness is what you know before you know anything else.)
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread

Live Thread Ping List | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”


45 posted on 08/30/2003 12:07:25 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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