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Married man considers turn as Catholic priest
Denver Post ^ | September 10, 2007 | Electa Draper

Posted on 09/10/2007 12:16:21 PM PDT by NYer

The 52-year-old husband, father and former Episcopal priest weighs it every day as he considers ordination to the Catholic priesthood after leaving a church he felt was in turmoil.

The little-known Pastoral Provision of the Catholic Church, approved by Pope John Paul II in 1980, permits former male Episcopal priests, even married men with children, to pursue two sets of vows - marriage and priesthood.

The pope granted the provision at the request of breakaway Episcopalians troubled by a 1976 decision to ordain women.

In the past 27 years, more than 80 Episcopal ministers in the United States have left their church and been ordained Catholic priests.

To any Catholic clergy who might be envious of his permission to be a married priest, Webb says don't be.

"It's a burden to carry around two vocations in life," Webb said.

Even as a married Protestant minister, Webb said one is always robbing time from one vocation for the sake of the other.

The Catholic Church terms celibacy "a gift of an undivided heart."

Yet celibacy was not mandatory for Latin Rite Catholic priests until the 12th century, and it isn't required of Eastern Rite priests if they're married before ordination.

A recent study by Catholic University in Washington estimated that making celibacy optional likely would quad ruple the number of priests.

The church says, however that the Pastoral Provision for Episcopalians is not a move in that direction.

"It is clear in everyone's mind that this is not a proving ground for optional celibacy in the Catholic Church," said the Rev. William Stetson on the Pastoral Provision website.

"In fact, the special challenges of a married clergy ... show the value of the norm of celibacy for the sake of the kingdom in the Western Church," Stetson said.

Webb said he decided to leave the Episcopal Church about three years ago after 16 years as a clergyman primarily because the church was tearing itself apart over changes in doctrine.

Over the past two decades, Webb watched members break away from Episcopal parishes to form new congregations, some becoming missions of conservative Anglican dioceses in Africa, over issues such as the blessing of gay unions and ordination of women and an openly gay bishop.

"It was an ugly fight. Relationships got fractured," Webb said. "I just came to believe that if Christ founded a church, you wouldn't be forced to leave it."

For Protestant churches, the only solution to conflict is to split apart, he says. His years in the Episcopal Church were "rich and good," but he has come to deplore schism.

"The Catholic Church has a clearer understanding of what it means to be one holy and apostolic church," he says.

Webb has done many of the things required by the Catholic Church to pursue ordination - including petitioning the church, obtaining Denver Archbishop Charles Chaput's permission, studying theology for a year and passing written and oral tests.

He has not made a final decision about entering the priesthood.

"I need to be ready spiritually," Webb says. "The care of souls is an intimidating responsibility."

Webb says he knows his wife, Cindy, "thinks it would be kind of weird to be married to a Catholic priest." Still, she makes it clear she supports him. He also thinks 17-year-old son Sterling trusts his judgment.

"When it happens, if it happens, I'll deal with it," Cindy Webb says. "God is always full of surprises. I've been a clergyman's wife in the past. What would it be like in the Catholic Church? I don't know."

She breaks into good-natured laughter. "There aren't a lot of people to ask," she says.

The Pastoral Provision does not give blanket approval to petitioners. A Catholic bishop examines each individual case.

And, these crossover priests, if widowed, may not remarry.

"There's no easy divorce from vows in the Catholic Church, whether you're married or taken a vow of chastity," Phil Webb says.

Although the Pastoral Provision is specific for former Episcopalians, the Catholic Church has permitted ordination of other former Protestant male ministers who are married. Additional seminary studies are required of them.

Beyond the marriage questions, the difference between an Episcopalian priest and a Catholic priest, so the quip goes, is about $20,000 a year.

Catholic diocesan priests generally earn smaller salaries, yet average Catholic parishes often have congregations of 1,000 while the average Episcopal parish is about 200.

Few clerical converts ordained to the Catholic priesthood work as pastors of parishes. Most work in other ministries, such as serving as hospital chaplains. None of it is lucrative work.

"It almost necessitates that you have a wife with a career," Webb says. Cindy Webb is a real estate agent. But he still worries about providing enough for his family.

Webb took a job a year ago in the Archdiocese of Denver's Marriage and Family Life office. He counsels engaged couples.

He says he'd like to keep his current position but recognizes that entering the priesthood would mean additional duties, perhaps even a new post.

Cindy Webb says if Phil chooses the priesthood, "God will work out the details."

She was raised Catholic and converted to the Episcopal Church for Phil after they married.

"I felt our family should all be together in one place," Cindy Webb says. "Phil and I have not been on the same timetable. We've had to kind of wait for each other."


TOPICS: Catholic; Mainline Protestant; Worship
KEYWORDS: celibacy; episcopal

1 posted on 09/10/2007 12:16:24 PM PDT by NYer
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To: Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...

Convert - revert - interesting.


2 posted on 09/10/2007 12:17:08 PM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer
Yet celibacy was not mandatory for Latin Rite Catholic priests until the 12th century

Commonly repeated lie.

3 posted on 09/10/2007 12:20:08 PM PDT by wideawake (Why is it that so many self-proclaimed "Constitutionalists" know so little about the Constitution?)
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To: NYer
A recent study by Catholic University in Washington estimated that making celibacy optional likely would quadruple the number of priests.

Oh, of course.

Until these prospective ordinands found out that: (1) You cannot be in debt and enter a seminary (i.e. no mortgages allowed) and (2) you get paid jack plus squat.

And no word on if the study includes the numerous Catholic priests who were laicized in the 1970s so they could get married.

They will never be allowed to work as priests again, no matter the circumstances.

4 posted on 09/10/2007 12:25:43 PM PDT by wideawake (Why is it that so many self-proclaimed "Constitutionalists" know so little about the Constitution?)
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To: NYer
*****The 52-year-old husband, father and former Episcopal priest weighs it every day as he considers ordination to the Catholic priesthood after leaving a church he felt was in turmoil.*****

Leaving a church he felt was in turmoil-——and the Roman Catholic Church in not in turmoil. Maybe, I missed something.

5 posted on 09/10/2007 12:29:00 PM PDT by GOPologist (When one lowers himself to argue with a fool, then you don't know which one is the fool.)
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To: NYer

I think this article captures very well the pain some of our Episcopal Brethren experience when feel they have been forced to set off into the deep of another Faith Tradition.


6 posted on 09/10/2007 12:41:36 PM PDT by Cheverus
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To: GOPologist
I believe the Episcopal Church embraces women priest, Gay marriage, etc.

And I believe they are very willy nilly on abortion -- no firm stance as found by the hierarchy of the Catholic Church...

7 posted on 09/10/2007 12:50:08 PM PDT by topher (Let us return to old-fashioned morality - morality that has stood the test of time...)
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To: NYer

Ya’ know...this isn’t like working for Pepsi and deciding quit and go work for Coca-Cola.......

There is a commitment of faith and belief in the traditions and beliefs of the Catholic Church. That doesn’t happen because of current job disatisfaction.....

Sigh......Whatever....


8 posted on 09/10/2007 12:50:08 PM PDT by nevergore ("It could be that the purpose of my life is simply to serve as a warning to others.")
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To: NYer
"It's a burden to carry around two vocations in life," Webb said. Even as a married Protestant minister, Webb said one is always robbing time from one vocation for the sake of the other.

If this is how he feels, perhaps he doesn't truly have two vocations.

9 posted on 09/10/2007 12:50:57 PM PDT by ichabod1 ("Self defense is not only our right, it is our duty." President Ronald Reagan)
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To: nevergore

One wonders, do they have to confess that they were never priests? That they’ve never confected the Eucharist?


10 posted on 09/10/2007 12:56:39 PM PDT by ichabod1 ("Self defense is not only our right, it is our duty." President Ronald Reagan)
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To: GOPologist
You don't KNOW from turmoil.

In comparison to ECUSA/TEC, the Catholic Church is a pleasant walk in a well-kept park.

I know. I fled across the Tiber.

11 posted on 09/10/2007 1:16:53 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: NYer; AnAmericanMother
He has not made a final decision about entering the priesthood. "I need to be ready spiritually," Webb says. "The care of souls is an intimidating responsibility."

Intimidating, perhaps ... but if it's a novel concept to the gentleman, what was he doing as an Episcopal priest?

In general, I think the Church needs to be as cautious about ordaining former Protestant clergy as about any other candidates for the priesthood ... perhaps even more so. The concept that they're merely "changing employers" is intuitively simple - but far from the sacramental reality!

12 posted on 09/10/2007 1:24:55 PM PDT by Tax-chick (I dreamed that Horatio Hornblower was a Death Eater.)
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To: Tax-chick
It COULD be that he knew all along on some level that he was playing in the local co-ed softball league, and now he's come up to the majors and is playing for keeps.

(I had more than an inkling a long time before I migrated across the Tiber.)

13 posted on 09/10/2007 1:40:31 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother

Yes, it’s possible. To me, he comes across as, “Maybe I’ll become a Catholic priest, because it’s like, my job being a priest, and I can’t be an actuary ... good thing my wife brings in the bux!”

Of course, his thought process may be totally different from the interpretation I’m drawing - that goes without saying!


14 posted on 09/10/2007 1:44:17 PM PDT by Tax-chick (I dreamed that Horatio Hornblower was a Death Eater.)
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To: AnAmericanMother

Maybe it’s because of the way this article is written, but I have real doubts about this individual’s vocation. The way he’s already complaining about trying to serve two masters... That’s one thing I like about Catholic Priests. They’re priests. That’s what they do, what they are. They aren’t family men, business men who happen to suit up in a roman collar instead of a tie with their suit before they pick up their briefcases and trundle off to work.

Another way they used to say you could tell the difference between an Episcopal minister and a Catholic Priest was how expensive their cloths looked.


15 posted on 09/10/2007 1:47:04 PM PDT by ichabod1 ("Self defense is not only our right, it is our duty." President Ronald Reagan)
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To: ichabod1
That's like somebody (wish I could remember who!) on FR who said the way to tell a Good Jesuit from The Other Kind is to look at their shoes . . . Good Jesuits have beat-up, well-worn sturdy shoes.

Most of the High Church priests I have known were unmarried and celibate anyhow.

But I don't read this quite the way you do. I think he's being quite candid about the demands of the priesthood, and it may be that his experience in the Episcopal church has brought that into focus. I can tell you that even the "low church" priests I have known have had lots of family difficulties. I don't think very many Protestant churches are candid with their ministers about the stresses and demands of the ministry and the family problems it causes.

To be charitable, he just may be bringing his prior experience to bear on the problem.

16 posted on 09/10/2007 1:53:21 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother

That’s fine. That’s why the celibacy rule makes sense. Anyway, it’s not like all priests don’t have mothers and fathers and aunts and uncles and sisters and brothers and cousins that may need their help.


17 posted on 09/10/2007 2:15:41 PM PDT by ichabod1 ("Self defense is not only our right, it is our duty." President Ronald Reagan)
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To: AnAmericanMother

I believe that in the Diocese of Portland we have two such priests. Yes, they must attend Catholic seminary and meet other requirements.


18 posted on 09/10/2007 4:25:04 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: wideawake

I would like to know what you mean by this comment. I don’t remember the date, but the Latin Church did make it mandatory.

Having two jobs isn’t easy, try three! I know many of my fellow Orthodox priest that do. Their parishes are to small to pay much, so they have another paying job as well as being a dad. At one time the man would go to seminary right after high school, marry, waited until his kids were older, then was ordained and accepted a parish. Now that more women hold jobs, that isn’t the case.

FYI: The Catholic Church did recognize Holy Orders of the ECUSP until they started ordaining women.


19 posted on 09/10/2007 4:57:07 PM PDT by frtom
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To: frtom

frtom:

I don’t think your statement is correct about the Catholic Church recognizing Anglican/Episcopalian orders. I think it was Pope Pius VIII or Pope Pius X who issued a Letter stating that Anglican orders were not valid (I think it was issued in the 1890’s).


20 posted on 09/10/2007 5:42:13 PM PDT by CTrent1564
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To: frtom

I was somewhat incorrect, it was Pope Leo XIII who issued a letter in 1986 stating that Anglican orders, from the Catholic theological position, are not valid.

Pax Domine


21 posted on 09/10/2007 5:45:09 PM PDT by CTrent1564
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To: frtom

Ok, I will get this corrrect, It was Pope Leo XIII and the letter was in fact 1896.

Sorry about my goof ups.

Pax Domine


22 posted on 09/10/2007 5:46:38 PM PDT by CTrent1564
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To: AnAmericanMother

Fleeing a church that was imploding in itself.


23 posted on 09/10/2007 6:08:28 PM PDT by Biggirl (A biggirl with a big heart for God's animal creation.)
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To: frtom; CTrent1564
FYI: The Catholic Church did recognize Holy Orders of the ECUSP until they started ordaining women.

Not quite right but not quite wrong. The Bull Apostolicae Curae indeed was issued by H.H. Leo XIII in 1896 and held that Anglican orders had been invalid since the change in the words of consecration of bishops instituted by King Edward VI (or, more properly, his radical protestant advisors, since he was 9 or so at the time and had no opinion other than what he was told.)

However, there were talks in the works in the late 60s for a concordat, along the lines of what was being discussed with the Lutherans, including (rumor had it) a revisiting of Apostolicae Curae. But the ordination of women stopped that in its tracks, and the Bishop of New Hampster killed it stone cold dead.

24 posted on 09/10/2007 6:26:43 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: Biggirl

25 posted on 09/10/2007 6:34:55 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: NYer

“A recent study by Catholic University in Washington estimated that making celibacy optional likely would quad ruple the number of priests. “

to put it bluntly, this is total BS!!!!!!!!!
the number of heretics and bad priests would quadrouple and good priests would leave.


26 posted on 09/10/2007 6:36:52 PM PDT by rogernz
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To: NYer

He just wants to get into some new habits.


27 posted on 09/10/2007 6:44:40 PM PDT by SeaHawkFan
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To: rogernz

I reckon the deciding factor would be if liberal bishops were allowed to keep doing what they are doing. If the discipline of celibacy was relaxed, it could be a good thing or a bad thing depending on what the mitred ones are allowed to get away with in their areas.

Freegards


28 posted on 09/10/2007 7:09:43 PM PDT by Ransomed (Son of Ransomed says Keep the Faith!)
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To: AnAmericanMother

Sorry, my Catholic history isn’t that good. All I remember was reading something about it.

“Every validly consecrated bishop, including heretical, schismatic, simonistic or excommunicated bishops, can validly dispense the Sacrament of Order, provided that he has the requisite intention, and follows the essential external rite (set. Certa). Cf. D 855, 860; CIC 2372.” 1952 Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma by Dr. Ludwig Ott, pp. 456.

Maybe that was what I was thinking of.


29 posted on 09/10/2007 7:13:03 PM PDT by frtom
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To: frtom
Probably so.

The difference, of course, is that the Anglican bishops during the reign of Edward VI were never properly consecrated, due to the alteration in the words. The radical protestant regents, believing in "every man his own priest," removed from the words any indication that the bishop or priest received any special powers via the Holy Spirit. Since that intention was allied to the removal of the necessary words, the effect was to invalidate the consecrations.

But that's pretty complicated and technical. I actually read Apostolicae Curae because of course I was interested in the question. That (the validity of Anglican orders) was one of the two beliefs I had to consciously give up in becoming Catholic. The other was the supremacy of the Pope. But, as my husband told our new rector, it was obvious from the way events had played out that we had been grievously in error! As he so elegantly put it, "We can deal!"

30 posted on 09/10/2007 7:22:39 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: frtom
. . . of course I meant I had to give up not believing in the supremacy of the Pope. Not a serious problem, because if there's anything the Awful Fate of the Episcopal Church demonstrates, it's the need for adult leadership and final authority!
31 posted on 09/10/2007 7:24:24 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother

I should say... my Pastor (and his twin brother) are converts. They were Anglican priests from Australia for 25 years and now they’ve been Roman Catholic for 20. They look so cute when they’re standing in the Sanctuary together. They’re turning 70 this week. Really quite a fascinating story, those two. I think they’ve both done considerable time in the chaplain corps. If I have the story right, Father Bruce was the pastor, or vicar, if that’s the right term, when the parish was started in the 1980s, left, and now has been reappointed.

Father that we had before was married, I believe. He seems like a fine man... in his sixties now, probably pushing seventy.

Did it seem odd to you when you came in that people actually called the priests Father? I mean, in the Episcopal church their title was Father, and sometimes during a service or other ecclesial event I would call them Father Henry, or Father Sam. But when I was rehearsing for my confirmation, the lady in charge started saying “Father will cross here, and when he comes up to you say such and such, it made me feel funny. At first it creeped me out, but now I like it. It feels like a healthy submission to my elder.


32 posted on 09/10/2007 7:48:05 PM PDT by ichabod1 ("Self defense is not only our right, it is our duty." President Ronald Reagan)
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To: rogernz

I assert that the number of priests would increase TENFOLD if the Church would only allow: women priests, homosexual priests, contraception, abortion, divorce and remarriage, optional Mass on Sundays, no Holy Days of Obligation, rejection of the perpetual virginity of Mary, elimination of the Papacy and what ever else you think might be most pleasing to the ‘Masses.’


33 posted on 09/11/2007 2:12:33 AM PDT by veritas2002
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To: rogernz

I assert that the number of priests would increase TENFOLD if the Church would only allow: women priests, homosexual priests, contraception, abortion, divorce and remarriage, optional Mass on Sundays, no Holy Days of Obligation, rejection of the perpetual virginity of Mary, elimination of the Papacy and what ever else you think might be most pleasing to the ‘Masses.’


34 posted on 09/11/2007 2:12:36 AM PDT by veritas2002
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To: ichabod1
The use of "Father" standing alone is, I think, a Catholic thing. It did sound different to me, but I was somewhat used to it because that was the practice in the ultramontane Anglo-Catholic parish we used to attend when we lived on the other side of town.

It honors the office, not just the man.

35 posted on 09/11/2007 3:54:15 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: veritas2002

Well, then you’d just have Episcopalians, and we already HAVE a buncha those!


36 posted on 09/11/2007 3:54:50 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: wideawake

I wonder why Catholic University even bothered with this study since the Vatican recently reaffirmed its requirement of mandatory clerical celibacy, which means that celibacy will not be made “optional” any time in the foreseeable future. The study is nothing but useless speculation and wishful thinking.


37 posted on 09/11/2007 4:46:20 AM PDT by steadfastconservative
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To: frtom
Suggest you read:


38 posted on 09/11/2007 4:54:59 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: steadfastconservative; wideawake

I guess we’ve all learned not to trust survey findings such as these without being able to review the study itself.

It seems to me that a man torn between being a Roman Catholic priest or having a wife and family would instead find a home in one of the Byzantine or Eastern Rite Catholic Churches in union with Rome where he could marry prior to ordination.


39 posted on 09/11/2007 5:08:06 AM PDT by FormerLib (Sacrificing our land and our blood cannot buy protection from jihad.-Bishop Artemije of Kosovo)
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To: AnAmericanMother
I don't think very many Protestant churches are candid with their ministers about the stresses and demands of the ministry and the family problems it causes

I seem to recall a spate of women's magazine articles -- maybe 20 or 30 years ago -- about the difficulties and stresses faced by ministers' wives -- little money, demands on their time and energy for church work and parish visitation and such, hypercritical attention to their children's behavior, etc.

40 posted on 09/11/2007 5:10:22 AM PDT by maryz
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To: maryz
But Good Housekeeping and Mother's Day had to cover it . . . because the seminaries weren't!

You have to be a pretty tough cookie to be a minister's wife. My grandfather-in-law was a Methodist minister - a good one. He was a "visiting fireman" who specialized in saving churches that were at their last gasp. He would come in, clean up the finances, hold a revival, get a bunch of new members signed up . . . and then the Conference would transfer him again! My grandmother-in-law was a tough old lady -- a bit grim, but who could blame her?

41 posted on 09/11/2007 5:59:35 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: NYer
I just hope we don't get too dependent on the ol "pastoral provision". It's the easy way out of the "priest shortage".(The "shortage" is debatable to some..I am of the position that there is perhaps a shortage of "riteous priests").

However, the greater problem I see is the "nun shortage." We need more holy women in the church. Whatever the solution will be, the succesfull effort will involve brining both the sexes back into religious life. It will be a massive re-awakening for everyone.

42 posted on 09/15/2007 9:15:29 PM PDT by right-wingin_It
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To: NYer

**Cindy Webb says if Phil chooses the priesthood, “God will work out the details.”

She was raised Catholic and converted to the Episcopal Church for Phil after they married.

“I felt our family should all be together in one place,” Cindy Webb says. “Phil and I have not been on the same timetable. We’ve had to kind of wait for each other.”**

God bless this wife and her support of her husband!


43 posted on 09/15/2007 9:21:21 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: NYer
Even as a married Protestant minister, Webb said one is always robbing time from one vocation for the sake of the other.

So just how many hours a day does a Catholic priest work on average?

44 posted on 09/15/2007 9:21:51 PM PDT by MEGoody (Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.)
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To: NYer

Definitely a convert! Just not yet a priest according to the article.

I guess the wife would be a revert, however.


45 posted on 09/15/2007 9:22:17 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: NYer
Married man considers turn as Catholic priest

Searching For Authority (A Methodist minister finds himself surprised by Truth!)
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part VI: The Biblical Reality (Al Kresta)
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part V: The Catholics and the Pope(Al Kresta)
The Hail Mary of a Protestant (A true story)
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part IV: Crucifix and Altar(Al Kresta)

Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part III: Tradition and Church (Al Kresta)
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part II: Doubts (Al Kresta)
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part I: Darkness(Al Kresta)
Conversion Story - Matt Enloe (former Baptist) [prepare to be amazed!]
THE ORTHODOX REVIVAL IN RUSSIA

Conversion Story - David Finkelstein (former Jew)
Conversion Story - John Weidner (former Evangelical)
12 Reasons I Joined the Catholic Church
Conversion Story - Tom Hunt
The Tide Is Turning Toward Catholicism: The Converts

John Calvin Made Me Catholic
Journey Home - May 21 - Neil Babcox (former Presbyterian) - A minister encounters Mary
Going Catholic - Six journeys to Rome
My (Imminent) Reception into the Roman Catholic Church
From Calvinist to Catholic

A Convert's Pilgrimage [Christopher Cuddy]
From Pastor to Parishioner: My Love for Christ Led Me Home (to the Catholic Church) [Drake McCalister]
Lutheran professor of philosophy prepares to enter Catholic Church
Patty Bonds (former Baptist and sister of Dr. James White) to appear on The Journey Home - May 7
Pastor and Flock Become Catholics

Famous Homosexual Italian Author Returned to the Church Before Dying of AIDS
Dr. Francis Beckwith Returns To Full Communion With The Church
Catholic Converts - Stephen K. Ray (former Evangelical)
Catholic Converts - Malcolm Muggeridge

Catholic Converts - Richard John Neuhaus
Catholic Converts - Avery Cardinal Dulles
Catholic Converts - Israel (Eugenio) Zolli - Chief Rabbi of Rome
Catholic Converts - Robert H. Bork , American Jurist (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Converts - Marcus Grodi

Why Converts Choose Catholicism
Journey Home - May 21 - Neil Babcox (former Presbyterian) - A minister encounters Mary

Going Catholic - Six journeys to Rome
My (Imminent) Reception into the Roman Catholic Church
From Calvinist to Catholic
A Convert's Pilgrimage [Christopher Cuddy]
From Pastor to Parishioner: My Love for Christ Led Me Home (to the Catholic Church) [Drake McCalister]
Lutheran professor of philosophy prepares to enter Catholic Church

Patty Bonds (former Baptist and sister of Dr. James White) to appear on The Journey Home - May 7
Pastor and Flock Become Catholics
The journey back - Dr. Beckwith explains his reasons for returning to the Catholic Church
Famous Homosexual Italian Author Returned to the Church Before Dying of AIDS
Dr. Francis Beckwith Returns To Full Communion With The Church

Catholic Converts - Stephen K. Ray (former Evangelical)
Catholic Converts - Malcolm Muggeridge
Catholic Converts - Richard John Neuhaus
Catholic Converts - Avery Cardinal Dulles
Catholic Converts - Israel (Eugenio) Zolli - Chief Rabbi of Rome

Catholic Converts - Robert H. Bork , American Jurist (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Converts - Marcus Grodi
Why Converts Choose Catholicism
How I led Catholics Out of the Church [Steve Wood]
The Scott Hahn Conversion Story
FORMER PENTECOSTAL RELATES MIRACLE THAT OCCURRED WITH THE PRECIOUS BLOOD

Conversion Story - Rusty Tisdale (former Pentecostal)

46 posted on 09/15/2007 9:28:21 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: MEGoody
So just how many hours a day does a Catholic priest work on average?

24.

47 posted on 09/16/2007 5:43:32 AM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer
24

Wow, I thought priest's were human beings that needed sleep, food, recreation and time with family. I wasn't aware they cut all ties with parents and siblings when they became priests. Gee, you learn all kinds of stuff on FR.

48 posted on 09/16/2007 8:43:30 AM PDT by MEGoody (Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.)
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