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Keyword: alexanderthegreat

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  • Trump Is Cutting Old Gordian Knots

    04/04/2018 9:15:52 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 27 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | April 5, 2018 | Victor Davis Hanson
    <p>The proverbial knot of Gordium was impossible to untie. Anyone clever enough to untie it would supposedly become the king of Asia. Many princes tried; all failed.</p> <p>When Alexander the Great arrived, he was challenged to unravel the impossible knot. Instead, he pulled out his sword and cut through it. Problem solved.</p>
  • Macedonia Ready to Give up Claims on Alexander the Great

    12/28/2017 11:23:14 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 17 replies
    ABC News ^ | Dec 23, 2017, | KONSTANTIN TESTORIDES
    Macedonia's left-wing prime minister said he is ready to renounce his country's claim to be the sole heirs of the legacy of Alexander the Great to help solve a 26-year-old dispute with neighboring Greece over the country's name. "I give up (the claim) of Macedonia being the sole heir to Alexander. The history belongs not only to us, but also to Greece and many other countries," Zoran Zaev, in power since the spring, said in an interview to TV station Telma late Friday. Since its independence from Yugoslavia in 1991, Macedonia has claimed at least part of the heritage of...
  • The Lowly King of Israel...Zechariah pt 13

    Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: he is just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass. And I will cut off the chariot from Ephraim, and the horse from Jerusalem, and the battle bow shall be cut off: and he shall speak peace unto the heathen: and his dominion shall be from sea even to sea, and from the river even to the ends of the earth. As for thee also, by the blood of thy covenant I...
  • Gentile Powers Will Be Overthrown...Zechariah pt 12

    02/22/2017 4:12:56 PM PST · by pastorbillrandles
    02-18-17 | Bill Randles
    The burden of the word of the Lord in the land of Hadrach, and Damascus shall be the rest thereof: when the eyes of man, as of all the tribes of Israel, shall be toward the Lord. And Hamath also shall border thereby; Tyrus, and Zidon, though it be very wise. And Tyrus did build herself a strong hold, and heaped up silver as the dust, and fine gold as the mire of the streets. Behold, the Lord will cast her out, and he will smite her power in the sea; and she shall be devoured with fire. Ashkelon shall...
  • Did Muhammad Ever Really Live?

    09/19/2008 5:25:25 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 31 replies · 978+ views
    A number of Islamic associations have put a quick end to their collaboration with a professor -- and trainer of people who are supposed to teach Islam in German high schools -- who has expressed his doubt that Muhammad ever lived. Islam scholar Michael Marx spoke with SPIEGEL ONLINE about what lies behind the debate and the historical person of the Prophet.
  • Archaeologists discover layers of Indo-Greek city in Swat

    06/26/2016 6:51:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Dawn News ^ | Sunday, June 26, 2016 | Fazal Khaliq
    Archaeologists excavate Indo-Greek and Saka-Parthian structures at Bazira, Swat. -- Dawn photo Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Terracotta baroque female figurine, circa 3rd-2nd BC. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat
  • Border Fence - India's border fence at night

    10/05/2015 9:31:37 AM PDT · by Republic_Venom · 25 replies
    NDTV ^ | Oct 05, 2015 | Subuhi Parvez
    NASA posted a photo of the border between India and Pakistan as seen from outer space on Facebook on Sunday. The photo was taken by an astronaut on the International Space Station and shows the familiar outline of the north-western segment of India picked out in glowing lights. The astronaut who took the photo was "looking north across Pakistan's Indus River valley." The thread of orange that separates the two countries is lit by security lights that glow orange. The brightest spot visible is Karachi which faces the Arabian Sea. The Indus Valley is also dotted with lights. This is...
  • Inscription Spurs Debate Over Mysterious Greek Tomb [Amphipolis]

    03/05/2016 2:34:16 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Discovery News ^ | March 2, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    An incomplete inscription might reopen the debate about the identity of the owner of a tomb from the Alexander the Great era, according to new research into blocks from the circular retaining wall of the mysterious mound. The tomb was unsealed in northern Greece 18 months ago. Dated to between 325 B.C. -- two years before Alexander the Great's death -- and 300 B.C., the tomb is located in Amphipolis, east of Thessaloniki, and is billed as the largest of its kind in the Greek world, measuring more than 1,600 feet in circumference. According to study author Andrew Chugg, a...
  • Cleopatra Not First Female Pharoah of Her Line: Queen Arsinoe II, an Olympian medalist...

    12/12/2010 8:29:43 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, December 2, 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Cleopatra may not have been ancient Egypt's only female pharaoh of the Ptolemaic dynasty -- Queen Arsinoë II, a woman who competed in and won Olympic events, came first, some 200 years earlier, according to a new study into a unique Egyptian crown. After analyzing details and symbols of the crown worn by Arsinoë and reinterpreting Egyptian reliefs, Swedish researchers... suggest that Queen Arsinoë II (316-270 B.C.) was the first female pharaoh belonging to Ptolemy's family -- the dynasty that ruled Egypt for some 300 years until the Roman conquest of 30 B.C. While researchers largely agree on Arsinoë's prominence...
  • Rag And Bone Cup Dates To 300BC

    05/27/2008 3:21:27 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 144+ views
    Rag and bone cup dates to 300BC Last Updated: 9:40PM BST 27/05/2008 The grandson of a rag and bone man who acquired a small metal cup is in line for a windfall after discovering it is a pure gold vessel dating back to the third or fourth century BC. A rag and bone man gave his grandson the pure gold vessel, which is from the third or fourth century BC The piece could be worth hundreds of thousands of pounds. The 5˝ in cup, believed to be from the Achaemenid empire, has two female faces looking in opposite directions, their...
  • BOMBSHELL: Amazing Biblical Archeological Discovery In Jerusalem...

    11/10/2015 8:09:42 AM PST · by amorphous · 66 replies
    Shoebat.com ^ | 9 Nov 2015 | Walid Shoebat
    The discovery of the Acra last week is "a dream come true" for archaeologists, who have been speculating on the citadel's location for 100 years, the IAA said. The discovery of Acra comes at a delicate time, for it reveals the story of the Maccabees, Antiochus and the coming Antichrist. All this is understood once we connect the dots and see the parallels between the Grecian Empire at the time of the Maccabees harassing God's people and the Antichrist who is also from the same empire (Asia Minor) harassing God's people today.
  • Fortress of Antiochus Epiphanes Uncovered in Jerusalem

    11/04/2015 8:29:09 AM PST · by dutchdingo · 5 replies
    thetrumpet.com ^ | November 3, 2015 | Brent Nagtegaal
    On Monday afternoon, the Israeli Antiquities Authority (IAA) sent a newsbrief to reporters in Jerusalem, calling for a press conference the following day to announce the “solution to one of the greatest questions in the history of Jerusalem.” Tuesday’s announcement did not disappoint: On site, in Jerusalem’s City of David, archaeologist Doron Ben-Ami announced that the famed Akra (citadel) of Antiochus Epiphanes had been discovered. Up until that announcement, little had been found testifying to the massive Hellenistic intrusion into the city early in the second century B.C. Yet here, at the northwestern portion of the City of David, a...
  • Archaeological find in Jerusalem's City of David may answer ancient mystery [2 Thess 2]

    11/03/2015 7:50:50 AM PST · by Jan_Sobieski · 13 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 11/03/2015 | DANIEL K. EISENBUD
    A recent discovery by the Israel Antiquities Authority in Jerusalem’s City of David may reveal the answer to one of archaeology's most enduring mysteries: the location of the Greek Acra citadel. The exact location of the famous stronghold built by Antiochus IV, to control Jerusalem and monitor activity on the Temple Mount, has long been unknown due to the paucity of architectural remains that can be traced to the Greek presence in Jerusalem. Over the past 100 years of archaeological research in Jerusalem, numerous theories have been put forth identifying the location of the Acra, which was eventually overtaken by...
  • Floods Swept Ancient Nile Cities Away, Experts Says

    10/18/2001 1:46:50 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,309+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 10-17-2001 | Hillary Mayall
    Floods Swept Ancient Nile Cities Away, Expert Says By Hillary Mayell for National Geographic News October 17, 2001 Two cities that lay at the edge of the Mediterranean more than 1,200 years ago, Herakleion and Eastern Canopus, disappeared suddenly, swallowed by the sea. Now, an international team of scientists may have figured out the mystery of why it happened. The researchers have concluded that the two cities collapsed when the land they were built on suddenly liquefied. The cities of Herakleion and Eastern Canopus lay at the edge of the Mediterranean more than 1,200 years ago, but disappeared suddenly when ...
  • Huqoq 2015: New Mosaics Unearthed at Huqoq Synagogue

    08/08/2015 8:15:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | July 30, 2015 | Robin Ngo
    Over the last several seasons of excavation in a fifth-century C.E. synagogue in the Lower Galilee, archaeologists have uncovered stunning mosaics depicting two scenes from the Samson cycle, human and animal figures, a Hebrew dedicatory inscription and a meeting between what may be Alexander the Great and a Jewish high priest. Led by Jodi Magness, the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the excavation at the ancient Jewish village in Huqoq, Israel, has continued to yield exciting finds that fascinate scholars and laypersons alike. During the 2015 field...
  • Mosaic in Israel Shows Biblical Samson

    07/05/2012 4:40:04 AM PDT · by marshmallow · 8 replies
    CNN ^ | 7/4/12 | Joe Sterling
    (CNN) -- Archaeologists are reveling in the discovery of an ancient synagogue in northern Israel, a "monumental" structure with a mosaic floor depicting the biblical figure of Samson and a Hebrew inscription. The synagogue -- dating to the fourth and fifth centuries in both the Talmudic and late Roman periods -- is in Huqoq, an ancient Jewish village in the country's Galilee region, the Israeli Antiquities Authority said. Jodi Magness, a professor of early Judaism in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said the building was found in a recent excavation. She...
  • Alexander the not so Great: History through Persian eyes

    07/25/2012 9:39:37 AM PDT · by Renfield · 31 replies
    BBC ^ | 7-14-2012 | Ali Ansari
    Alexander the Great is portrayed as a legendary conqueror and military leader in Greek-influenced Western history books but his legacy looks very different from a Persian perspective. Any visitor to the spectacular ruins of Persepolis - the site of the ceremonial capital of the ancient Persian Achaemenid empire, will be told three facts: it was built by Darius the Great, embellished by his son Xerxes, and destroyed by that man, Alexander. ~~~snip~~~ He razed Persepolis to the ground following a night of drunken excess at the goading of a Greek courtesan, ostensibly in revenge for the burning of the Acropolis...
  • Alexander the Great's "Crown," Shield Discovered?

    04/25/2008 7:11:55 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 225+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 4-23-2008 | Sara Goudarzi
    Alexander the Great's "Crown," Shield Discovered?Sara Goudarzi for National Geographic NewsApril 23, 2008 An ancient Greek tomb thought to have held the body of Alexander the Great's father is actually that of Alexander's half brother, researchers say. This may mean that some of the artifacts found in the tomb—including a helmet, shield, and silver "crown"—originally belonged to Alexander the Great himself. Alexander's half brother is thought to have claimed these royal trappings after Alexander's death. The tomb was one of three royal Macedonian burials excavated in 1977 by archaeologists working in the northern Greek village of Vergina (see map of...
  • Alexander the Great-Era Treasure Found in Israeli Cave

    03/10/2015 6:20:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Mar 9, 2015 07:00 PM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    A rare cache of jewelry and silver coins, minted during the reign of Alexander the Great, has been discovered in a stalactite filled cave in northern Israel, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced on Monday. The 2,300-year-old treasure was found by three members of the Israeli Caving Club who wriggled through a narrow passage at the entrance of the stalactite cave and wandered inside for several hours. Stashed inside a niche, one of the spelunkers, Hen Zakai, spotted two ancient silver coins. On one side of the coins was an image of Alexander the Great, while the other side portrayed...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...